Campaign Medal Groups


 

General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine with six Regimental Sporting Medallions (Two Silver) for Tug of War (1931), Football (1931-32 and 1933-34)), Water Polo (1935), Long Jump (Hong Kong 1934) and Fencing to Private Charles Osborne Blyth, Lincolnshire Regiment born in Tynemouth, Northumberland in 1908. Serving with the 4th Battalion in North West Europe as a Sergeant he was wounded in action between 26th July and 1st August 1944 at Tessel-Bretheville during a German counter attack. He died in Durham in 1978.

General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine

4798760 Pte G O Blythe Linc R

Six Regimental Sporting Medals (Two Silver)

Football, Tug of War, Fencing, Water Polo and Long Jump

With copy War Office casualty reporting list entry.

Charles Osborne Blythe was born in Tynemouth, Northumberland 6th August 1908, he served with the 2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment in Palestine and with the 4th Battalion in North West Europe, wounded in action between 26th July 1944 and 1st August 1944 in Normandy during the German counter attack at Tessel-Bretheville. He died in Durham in 1978.

GVF & better £165 SOLD


 

1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type Petty Officer Telegrapher Reginald Victor Dicks, Royal Navy a former Labourer born in Havant, Hampshire in 1908. Entering the Royal Navy at Ganges as Boy 2nd Class 6th September 1924, he was rated Boy Telegraphist 8th January 1926. Joining HMS Achilles 27th January 1939, he served aboard this ship at the battle of the River Plate 13th December 1939. Awarded the LSGC Medal aboard Achilles in September 1941, he was discharged in New Zealand in 1946 and died there in 1977.

1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

J.111530 R V Dicks A/PO TEL HMS Achilles

Mounted as originally worn.

With copy service record.

Reginald Victor Dicks born Havant, Hampshire 27th September 1908, a Boy Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at Ganges as Boy 2nd Class 6th September 1924, rated Boy Telegraphist at Centurion 8th January 1926, Ordinary Telegraphist aboard HMS Barham 27th September 1926, Telegraphist aboard HMS Warspite 1st January 1928. Advanced to acting Leading Telegraphist aboard HMS Antelope 29th June 1934, Leading Telegraphist aboard HMS Royal Sovereign 29th June 1935. Joining HMS Achilles 27th January 1939 until 5th November 1941, taking part in the Battle of the River Plate.

In the early morning of 13 December 1939, a force consisting of Achilles, Ajax and Exeter detected smoke on the horizon, which was confirmed at 0616 to be a Pocket Battleship thought to be the German Battleship Admiral Scheer, but turned out to be Admiral Graf Spee. A fierce battle ensued, at a range of approximately 20 kilometres (11 nmi). Achilles suffered some damage. In the exchange of fire, four crew were killed, her Captain W E Parry, was wounded; 36 of Graf Spee’s crew were killed.

The range reduced to about 4 nautical miles (7.4 km) at around 07:15 and Graf Spee broke off the engagement around 07:45 to head for the neutral harbour of Montevideo which she entered at 22:00 that night, having been pursued by Achilles and Ajax all day. Graf Spee was forced by international law to leave within 72 hours. Faced with what he believed to be overwhelming odds, the captain of Graf Spee, Hans Langsdorff, scuttled his ship rather than risk the lives of his crew. An ensign flag flown by HMS Achilles during the Battle of the River Plate was donated to Christ Church Cathedral in the Falkland Islands and is still on display hanging on the south wall of the Cathedral at Port Stanley.

Advanced to Petty Officer Telegraphist at Philomel (Auckland, New Zealand) 6th November 1941, he re-joined HMS Achilles 3rd December 1941 and Philomel 9th October 1942 to Cook 13th March 1943 (Wellington, New Zealand). Discharged 22nd October 1946 in New Zealand. LSGC awarded 17th September 1941, he died in New Zealand in 1977.

GVF & better £950 Reserved


 

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Malay Peninsula, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 to Chief Radio Supervisor B A Rose, Royal Navy, awarded the LSGC Medal whilst serving at the Royal Navy Warfare School, HMS Dryad at Fort Southwick, Portsmouth.

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Malay Peninsula

050403 B A Rose A/LRO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2

CRS B A Rose D136717C HMS Dryad

Mounted as originally worn.

A/LRO is Acting Leading Radio Operator, CRS is Chief Radio Supervisor.

Rose left the Royal Navy and re-enlisted hence change in service number, HMS Dryad was the Royal Navy Warfare School at Fort Southwick, Portsmouth, in 2004 the School moved to HMS Collingwood.

First time on the market, toned.

NEF £195 Available


 

1939/45 War Medal, General Service  Medal GVI clasp Malaya to Lieutenant Michael Ian Ogilvy – Stuart, Gordon Highlanders. Born in 1926, the son of a Squadron Leader, Royal Air Force he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant from the Eaton Hall Officer Cadet School, Cheshire in July 1951. Serving in Singapore and Malaya with the 1st Battalion 1951 to 1954, he married the daughter of an Army Major in Tampin, Malaya in November 1953. Resigning his commission in July 1956, he died in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire in 2011.

1939/45 War Medal privately engraved naming

M I Ogilvy-Stuart

General Service Medal GVI clasp Malaya

2/Lt M I Ogilvy-Stuart Gordons

Mounted as originally worn with corresponding miniatures mounted as originally worn.

With research extracted from the London Gazette and on line sources.

Michael Ian Ogilvy-Stuart was born 26th March 1926, a Cadet at the Eaton Hall Officer Cadet School, Cheshire (22546802), he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Gordon Highlanders 7th July 1951 with seniority 28th June 1948 (London Gazette 23rd October 1951 page 5489). Joining the 1st Battalion, promoted Lieutenant 7th July 1951 with seniority 28th June 1950 (London Gazette 9th November 1951 page 5835), he served with them in Singapore and Malaya 1951 to March 1954 when the Battalion left to return to the UK. He married at St Barbara’s Church, Tampin, Malaya on 21st November 1953 Anne Norah, the daughter of Major and Mrs C Booth of Aldershot. Resigning his commission 31st July 1956 (London Gazette 27th July 1956 page 4409). He died in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire 12th June 2011 aged 85 years. The Times newspaper dated 22nd June 2011 has his obituary.

Scarce post war Gordon Highlanders officer’s GSM

GVF & better £245 Available


 

1939/45 Defence and War Medals, Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Radfan, Queen Elizabeth 2 Coronation Medal 1953 to Group Captain John Denham, Royal Air Force. Born in Wolverhampton in 1910, he graduated BA (Cambridge) in 1930 and MRCS, LRCP in London (Westminster Hospital) in 1936. Commissioned Flying Officer Medical Branch in January 1937, he rose steadily through the ranks and was promoted to Group Captain in October 1957, awarded a Diploma of Psychological Medicine and Diploma in Public Health. Promoted to Group Captain in October 1957, he retired in August 1966 and died in Watford, Hertfordshire in 1993.

1939/45 Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Radfan

Gp Capt J D Tonkinson RAF

Coronation Medal 1953

Unnamed as issued

Court mounted for display.

With research extracted from the RAF List and other on line sources.

John Denham Tonkinson was born in Wolverhampton 4th June 1910, the son of William Albert Tonkinson a Post Office Sorting Clerk and Telegraphist and his wife Edith Alice, the family residing at 33 Clark Road, Wolverhampton. Graduating BA at Cambridge University in 1930, he went on to qualify as a Doctor of Medicine MRCS and LRCP at The Westminster Hospital, London. First commissioned Flying Officer RAF Medical Branch 3rd January 1937 and appointed School of Naval Co-operation No 17 Training Group, RAF Station Ford, Arundel, Sussex from 29th March 1938. Promoted Flight Lieutenant 3rd January 1938, Temporary Squadron Leader 1st December 1941, Substantive Squadron Leader 28th February 1945, Wing Commander 1st July 1948, Group Captain 1st October 1957. Appointed RAF College Cranwell, Flying Training Command 22nd February 1965, he retired 20th August 1966 (London Gazette 16th September 1966 page 44116). Dr Tonkinson died in Watford on 4th September 1993.

GVF & better £325 SOLD


 

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Northern Ireland, South Atlantic Medal with Rosette to Lance Corporal E J Joseph, Welsh Guards. Enlisting in 1968, the 1st Battalion completed 4 tours of Northern Ireland before being deployed to the Falklands war. On 7th June 1982 whilst the Battalion was aboard the RFA Sir Galahad, the ship was attacked by Argentine Aircraft whilst a sitting stationary target in Bluff Cove. Hit several times, the ship caught fire and was eventually abandoned and scuttled. Thirty two Welsh Guardsmen lost their lives, with scores wounded and burnt. 

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp Northern Ireland

24076158 Gdsm E J Joseph WG

South Atlantic Medal with Rosette

24076158 LCpl E J Joseph WG

Court mounted for display.

Service number indicates 1968 enlistment.

The 1st Battalion Welsh Guards served in Northern Ireland from 23rd March 1971 to 28th July 1971 based at Carnmoney, 17th June 1972 to 25th October 1972 based in Belfast City Centre, 14th November 1973 to 7th March 1974 based at Bessbrook and again from 25th October 1979 to 28th February 1980 based at Bessbrook.

In 1982, the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards (CO Lieutenant-Colonel John Rickett) formed part of th Infantry Brigade of the British Task Force sent to liberate the Falkland Islands from Argentinian occupation during the. On 7th June they were on board the ill-fated RFA Sir Galahad, which was accompanied by RFA Sir Tristram, waiting to be landed at Bluff Cove, though they were delayed from doing so. However, attack was imminent after the landing craft were spotted by Argentinian observers. At 0200, five Dagger and five A-4 Skyhawk  aircraft were seen over the Falklands. Shortly afterwards, the Daggers were the first to attack. Only a short time later, the Skyhawks reached Fitzroy, with three aircraft hitting Sir Galahad with horrific consequences. Sir Tristram was also hit, the explosion killed two crewmen, both ships were ablaze. The attack on Sir Galahad culminated in high casualties, 48 dead, 32 of them Welsh Guards, 11 other Army personnel and 5 crewmen from Sir Galahad. There were many wounded, many suffering from horrendous burns caused by fire. The burnt-out Sir Galahad was later scuttled at sea and is now a war grave.

Very neat hardly noticeable to the naked eye official corrections to naming of South Atlantic Medal.

GVF & better £895 Reserved


 

Gulf War Medal 1991 no clasp, Campaign Service Medal clasp N Iraq & S Turkey to Signalman R S Hansford, Royal Signals, the clasp fairly scarce to the Army awarded for “Operation Haven” following the 1991 Gulf War, the majority of British Forces employed consisted of 3 Commando Brigade, Royal Marines.

Gulf War Medal 1991 no clasp

24803393 Sig R S Hansford R Signals

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasp N Iraq & S Turkey

24803393 Sig R S Hansford R Signals

The pair court mounted as worn, with named card box of issue for the CSM and clasp.

Provenance : Dix Noonan Webb Auction Lot 1215 7th December 2005

The British initiative “Operation Haven” was made at a time when the US was fundamentally uninterested in any further taking of action in the Gulf. The British Prime Minister’s lobbying of European colleagues achieved NATO support, leveraging the necessary American air support. Then as Saddam Hussein’s retribution activities escalated, US ground and logistic support was also achieved. This was a distinctly British operation though, with a proposed force of 6,000 personnel, spearheaded by 3 Commando Brigade, Royal Marines, with elements from the Army, RAF and other coalition members. It was deemed dramatically successful, even though it appeared to be risky given the climate of those times. Operation Haven literally “invaded” Iraq. The Coalition’s main task was to enter Northern Iraq, clear the designated area of the Iraqi threat and establish a safe environment for the Kurd refugees to return to their homes. The mission was both a military one and humanitarian; once security had been established, with the US providing air support and specialist elements with other Coalition members, supply and rebuilding of infrastructure was then initiated. The ground mission within Iraq took 58 days to complete. Operation Provide Comfort/Haven officially ended shortly after and the enforcement of the ‘No Fly Zone’ continued to ensure security in the region.

NEF £650 Available


 

Campaign Service Medal clasps Gulf, Northern Ireland, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 to Petty Officer Marine Engineering Mechanic Kevin Roy Tutt, Royal Navy born in Salisbury, Wiltshire in 1955.

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasps GULF, Northern Ireland

POMEM)M) K R Tutt D128234P RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2

POMEM(M) K R Tutt D1282334P RN

The pair court mounted as worn.

Both Medals impressed naming, clasps riveted together.

Kevin Roy Tutt was born in Salisbury, Wiltshire in 1955, LSGC awarded in 1988 and discharged 1995. He died in Poole, Dorset in 2013.

 

NEF £325 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal, Croix De Guerre France with Star to Leading Telegraphist F Boyd, Royal Navy. Awarded the Croix De Guerre for his distinguished service aboard the French Torpedo Destroyer Le Malin in action with a German convoy on 29th February 1944 in which Le Malin sank a German Corvette and damaged another.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star with old copy clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as awarded

France Croix De Guerre with Star

Unnamed as awarded

With original citation for the French Croix De Guerre and 2WW Admiralty Star & Medal Crix De Guerre award / citation letter in French signed and dated 29th June 1944, with damaged enamel Le Malin badge.

“F Boyd Leading Telegraphist on board the Light Cruiser Le Malin. An active and energetic rating, he carried out his duties with the greatest coolness during an engagement led by his ship on 29th February 1944 against an enemy convoy, which was destroyed”.

 

On 29th February the French departed Manfredonia fifty miles North of Bari and headed up the Adriatic. At the same time a German convoy had departed from Pola consisting of a strong escort: the torpedo boats TA36 & TA37, actually the former Italian Ariete Class Stella Polare and Gladio; the submarine chasers UJ201 and UJ205, actually the former Italian Gabbiano Class Corvettes Egeria and Colubrina; and three small minesweepers. They were escorting a freighter of 6,311 tons, the Kapitan Diederichsen. The German escorts had only been recently commissioned and were only on their second operation. The two were heading towards each other in the dark of the night with very little moonlight.

At 2135 hours Le Terrible’s radar soon picked up targets further North and sailed towards them. When it was known that the targets were confirmed as non-allied, the French opened fire at roughly 9,000 yards just West of Ist Island, surprising the Germans. Le Malin opened fire on the largest of the targets which was the freighter and soon scored a hit. The Germans attempted to lay smoke but the destroyers with their speed soon closed in using their radar. Le Terrible scored more hits on the freighter while Le Malin targeted the closest of the escorts. At 4,500 yards the Le Terrible fired a salvo of torpedoes ; the first salvo missed but the first device of the second salvo hit the freighter amidships which then caused her to burn fiercely and she soon drifted helplessly.

Meanwhile UJ201 was soon struck by Le Malin’s well-directed 90 pound shells; now having found the range, the German corvette was hit six more times and was soon a burning wreck. Le Malin was close enough to launch a salvo of torpedoes; one hit and was enough to detonate the ship’s magazine  causing a tremendous explosion lighting up the sky. She sank immediately and all hands went with her. Both Le Terrible and Le Malin then took on the rest of the German escorts; TA36 suffered near misses and was soon hit right on the end of the bow suffering light damage. TA37 however was hit in the engine room and burst into flames which caused her speed to drop rapidly. Lancelot was about to finish off the German ship but on seeing low fast moving silhouettes of potential E-Boats he decided to withdraw. They were in fact the motor minesweepers coming in to help with the crew of the stricken freighter and for survivors of the destroyed UJ201. Lancelot headed south back to port.

GVF £295 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal (Territorial) GVI 1st type to Driver Alfred H Whincup, Royal Army Service Corps born in Sculcoates, Yorkshire in 1916. Serving in North Africa, he was taken prisoner of war 20th June 1942 the day before Tobruk fell to Axis Forces. Held in a POW Camp in Italy, he was repatriated in June 1943. Post War he resided in Hull, Yorkshire.

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal (Territorial) GVI 1st type

T.69464 Dvr A H Whincup RASC

With copy War Office casualty List entry, original named card box of issue for EM(T), card box of issue for 2WW Stars and Medals addressed “Mr A H Whincup, No 3 Louisa Terrace, St Georges Road, Hull, Yorks”.

Alfred Henry Whincip born 1916 in Sculcoates, Yorkshire. Taken POW 20th June 1942 the day before Tobruk fell to Axis Forces. Held at Italian POW Camp No 60 (Colle Compito Lucca). Reported as repatriated in War Office casualty list 30th June 1943.

A couple of neat official corrections to EM(T).

EF £125 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star, War Medal with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Petty Officer Edward Roland Phillips, Royal Navy, a former Errand Boy born in Devonport, Plymouth in 1909. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in July 1924, he was aboard HMS Carlisle when the War broke out. Serving aboard HMS Black Prince in 1944, he was Mentioned in Despatches for his distinguished service whilst in Command of “A” turret during a successful action against four enemy Destroyers in the Channel Operation Tunnel on the night of 25th / 26th April 1944 in which one was sunk and another badly damaged. Released from Naval service in June 1949, he re-entered briefly in 1951 being discharged medically unfit.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star, War Medal with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

J.110956 E R Phillips A/PO HMS Drake

With copy service records, entries from the Admiralty Awards file, mounted as originally worn.

Edward Roland Phillips born 31st March 1909 in Devonport, an Errand Boy he entered the Royal Navy as Boy2 aboard HMS Impregnable 14th July 1924. Rated Ordinary Seaman 31st March 1927 aboard HMS Impregnable and Able Seaman 30th September 1928 aboard HMS Walker. Advanced to Acting Leading Seaman 18th February 1939 aboard HMS Carlisle confirmed in that rate 18th February 1940 aboard HMS Khartoum. Advanced to acting Petty Officer 19th September 1940 aboard HMS Ladybird, confirmed in that rate 18th March 1942 at Drake. Released Class “A” 1st June 1949, he re-entered as Able Seaman 12th February 1951 at Drake, advanced to Petty Officer three days later.  Discharged 27th September 1951 unfit for further service. It whilst serving aboard HMS Black Prince that he was Mentioned in Despatches. Known as Operation Tunnel executed by Force 26 on the night of 25th / 26th April 1944, led to a successful night action with three of four enemy Elbing Class Destroyers, one being sunk and another damaged.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 11th July 1944 page 3237  “For leadership, resolution and skill in HM Ships Black Prince and Ashantee and HM Canadian Ships Athabaskan, Haida and Huron in a successful action with enemy Destroyers in the Channel”.

The recommendation TNA ADM1/29598 states –

“For good services, zeal and devotion to duty in action with enemy Destroyers. As Captain of “A” Turret, Petty Officer Phillips showed outstanding qualities of leadership during the action. At all times this Petty Officer has shown marked zeal and devotion to duty”.

“At 0228 Black Prince opened fire with “A” Turret, the target was practically invisible in the smoke but occasionally splashes were definitely seen in line with the enemy’s gun flashes. The range at this time was about 2,600 yards”.

GVF £350 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type to Able Seaman Albert Percy Allistone, Royal Navy a former Errand Boy born in Teddington, Middlesex in 1905. Entering the Royal Navy in July 1920 as Boy 2nd Class, he was awarded the LSGC Medal in 1938. Serving aboard HMS Redstart on the outbreak of war, the ship was scuttled at Hong Kong on 19th December 1941 to prevent it falling into Japanese hands. Transported from China to Japan aboard the Japanese Armed Troopship Lisbon Maru he survived its sinking by the US Submarine Grouper on 1st October 1942. Eventually held at Osaka, Japan, following repatriation he was released from Naval Service in June 1946. He died in Richmond on Thames in 1966 aged 61 years.

1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type

J.97838 A P Allistone AB HMS Vernon

With copy service records.

Albert Percy Allistone was born 12th May 1905 in Teddington, Middlesex, an Errand Boy he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 6th July 1920 at Ganges. Rated Ordinary Seaman 12th May 1923 aboard HMS Barham and Able Seaman 1st April 1924 aboard HMS Windsor. Awarded the LSGC Medal 19th April 1938 whilst serving at Vernon, this Medal was subsequently lost when taken prisoner of war, a duplicate being awarded following his repatriation sent to his home address 19th January 1953.

Serving aboard HMS Redstart from 27th October 1938, his ship being scuttled at Hong Kong 19th December 1941 to prevent capture by the invading Japanese Forces. Initially reported killed, he was later confirmed to be prisoner of war. Whilst being transported from China to Japan aboard the Japanese Armed Troop Ship Lisbon Maru. The ship was carrying 1,816 British and Canadian POW’s captured following the fall of Hong Kong. Sunk by the US Submarine Grouper 1st October 1942. A survivor of the sinking, he eventually reached the POW camp at Osaka, Japan where he is listed in September 1945. Following repatriation he was released in Class “A” 19th June 1946. He died in Richmond upon Thames in 1966 aged 61 years.

NEF £450 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1945-48, Efficiency Medal (Territorial) GVI 2nd type with Second Award clasp to Major Norman Haddock, Royal Artillery. Commissioned in December 1940, he served in Palestine as a Major with 13th Anti Tank Regiment Royal Artillery. Efficiency Medal and clasp awarded in August 1952 as Lieutenant (Hon Major).

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1945-48

Major N Haddock RA

Efficiency Medal (Territorial) GVI 2nd type with Second Award clasp

Lt N Haddock RA

Mounted as originally worn.

Norman Haddock was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Royal Artillery from No 122 Officer Cadet Training Unit 21st December 1940 (London Gazette 14th January 1941 page 243). Promoted War Substantive Lieutenant 21st June 1942, Temporary Captain 22nd June 1943. He served in Palestine from 1st April 1945 to 10th January 1947 as a Major with 13th Anti Tank Regiment, the Regiment had fought with 5th (Indian) Division.

 Awarded the Efficiency Medal Territorial and clasp as Lieutenant (Hon Major) London Gazette 22nd August 1952 page 4476.

First time on the market.

GVF and better £325 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type to Lieutenant Commander Eric Wingate Rainey, Royal Navy a Hawker born in Hull in 1904. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1920 as Boy 2nd Class, he rose to Chief Petty Officer in 1937 and was promoted Gunner (Warrant Officer) in 1938. Commissioned Lieutenant in 1939, he was appointed to HMS Selkirk in January 1940, HMS Trawler Solon in April 1942 and was Mentioned in Despatches for his services aboard this ship, HMS Selkirk in command 1943 Appointed to the Frigate HMS Cranstown in command in November 1943 until June 1945. Promoted substantive Lieutenant Commander in February 1946, he retired in 1949. Died in Camborne, Redruth, Cornwall in 1979.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued to Royal Navy and Royal Marines

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.96443 E W Rainey PO HMS Drake

With copy service record.

Eric Wingate Rainey born 20th May 1904 in Hull, a Hawker he entered the Royal Navy 27th January 1920 at Ganges as Boy 2nd Class. Rated Ordinary Seaman 20th May 1922 aboard HMS Carisfort and Able Seaman 24th November 1922 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Leading Seaman 1st October 1925 aboard HMS Hood, advanced to acting Petty Officer 26th October 1931 aboard HMS Suffolk, Petty Officer 26th October 1932 aboard HMS Bruce, Chief Petty Officer 24th September 1937 at Drake, promoted Acting Gunner (Warrant Officer) 1st January 1938 and appointed to Caledonia. Long Service & Good Conduct Medal awarded 3rd August 1937.

Lieutenant 15th February 1939, appointed HMS Selkirk 17th October 1940, HM Trawler Solon (in command) 24th April 1942, Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 1st January 1943 page 27 for services aboard this ship. Appointed HMS Selkirk (in command) 25th January 1943, HMS Cranstown (in command) 23rd November 1943 to 23rd June 1945. Acting Lieutenant Commander 1st November 1944, substantive Lieutenant Commander 15th February 1946.

 

An unusual instance for this time, of an ex rating rising to command a Minesweeper and Frigate.

NEF £325 Available


 

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Private John McDermott, Royal Irish Rifles a former Labourer born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1872. Enlisting in Belfast in July 1892, he joined the 2nd Battalion from the Depot in June 1893 and served in Malta and India. Discharged to the Army Reserve in January 1899 he was mobilized re-joining the 2nd Battalion in October 1899 and embarked for South Africa. Taken prisoner of war at Stormberg 10th December 1899 he was held by the Boers for over 6 months being released at Waterval in June 1900. Returning to England in September 1902 he was discharged from the Reserve in March 1903.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

3062 Pte H McDermott R Ir Rif

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

3062 Pte C McDermott R Irish Rifles

With details extracted from his on line service record and Boer War casualty List.

John McDermott was born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1872 an 18 year 10 month old Labourer and serving member of the 5th (Militia) Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers he attested for the Royal Irish Rifles Regular Army at Belfast 2nd July 1891. Joining the 2nd Battalion he served in Malta from 11th March 1892 to 17th November 1894 and in India from 18th November 1892 to 25th January 1899. On 1st July 1898 he was sentenced by his Commanding Officer to 14 days in prison with hard labour, the actual offence not recorded. Discharged to the Army Reserve 28th January 1899.

Re-called to the colours 9th October 1899 he joined the 2nd Battalion and embarked for service in South Africa. Taken prisoner of war during the action at Stormberg 10th December 1899, he was held by Boer Forces until released at Waterval 6th June 1900. Sentenced by Field General Court Martial for drunkenness on duty to 98 days field imprisonment and fined one pound on 20th December 1900. Returning home on 12th September 1902, he was discharged from the Army Reserve 19th May 1903.

QSA first type with ghost dates reverse, the Army had a problem with his initial, toned.

GVF £275 Available


 

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya to Corporal A Roantree, Somerset Light Infantry late Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Wounded in action during the Rhine crossing 27th March 1945 Operation Varsity serving with the 9th Battalion Cameronians.

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medal

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya

14776145 Cpl A Roantree Som LI

Mounted for wear.

With copy War Office casualty List TNA WO417/90 recording wounded in action 27th March 1945 during the Rhine crossing Operation Varsity serving with 9th Battalion Cameronians.

 

GVF £150 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type to Chief Petty Officer Writer Eric Charles Jones Royal Navy. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in June 1951 whist serving at HMS Terror, the Royal Navy Base at Singapore.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI Royal Navy 2nd type

MX.52817 E C Jones CPO WTR HMS Terror

Mounted as originally worn.

Chief Petty Officer Writer Eric Charles Jones was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 19th June 1951 whilst serving at HMS Terror, the Royal Navy Base at Singapore.

First time on the market.

GVF £145 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type to Petty Officer Telegrapher Frank Moses Wright, Royal Navy born in Wolverhampton in 1921. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1956 aboard the Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point, he would have been discharged to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type

JX.164178 F M Wright CPO Tel HMS Dodman Point

The group mounted as originally worn, with research from on line records.

Frank Moses Wright born 24th March 1923 in Wolverhampton, he was awarded the LSGC Medal 21st March 1956 whilst serving aboard the 8,580 ton Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point. Wright would have retired to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

A new original silk Atlantic Star Medal ribbon will be supplied.

GVF & better £195 Available


 

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal E2 clasp Cyprus Private D Ferguson, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Late Highland Light Infantry. Wounded 26th June 1944 in Normandy whilst serving with 2nd (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion, Highland Light Infantry on the opening day of Operation Epsom. Also known as the First Battle of the Odon, Operation Epsom was a British offensive that took place between 26th and 30th June 1944, intended to outflank and seize the German-occupied city of Caen, an important Allied objective.

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal E2 clasp Cyprus

3130589 Pte D Ferguson RAOC

With copy War Office casualty list entries for wounding (1)

Private D Ferguson served in the 2nd (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry in Normandy. The battalion was part of 15th (Scottish) Division, landing in Normandy on 14th June 1944. He was wounded on the opening day of Operation Epsom 26th July 1944 when the Battalion attacked towards the village of Cheux finally taking the village with casualties of 12 officers and nearly 200 other ranks. Operation Epsom  also known as the First Battle of the Odon, was a British offensive that took place between 26th and 30th June 1944, intended to outflank and seize the German-occupied city of Caen, an important Allied objective.

GVF £150 Available