Campaign Medal Groups


 

General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Private Sidney Charles Parker, 2nd Battalion The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. Enlisting in January 1939, he served with the 2nd Battalion in Palestine and North Africa taking part in the 1940 offensive against the Italians. Withdrawn to assist in the defence of Crete, the Battalion never made it to the Island, the troop carriers coming under sustained air attack from the Luftwaffe were forced to turn back. Wounded in one such air attack aboard HMT Glenroy 26th May 1941, when the convoy was attacked by 12 German bombers, 2 Queens suffered one other rank killed and nine wounded in the attacks. Mentioned in Despatches for his distinguished service. Ordered back to Alexandria, a third of the landing craft being destroyed making it impossible to land the Battalion on Crete. Discharged in June 1943 unfit for further service almost certainly the result of wounds received aboard HM Glenroy.

General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine

6088561 Pte S Parker The Queen’s R

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Sidney Charles Parker attested for The Queen’s Regiment 2nd January 1939, serving the 2nd Battalion in Palestine and North Africa. Taking part in the 1940 offensive in North Africa they were engaged in the fighting at Sidi Barrani and Bardia before being withdrawn to assist in the defence of Crete. The Battalion never made it to the Island, the Luftwaffe successfully preventing the troop carriers making the journey. Wounded at sea en route for Crete when his troop carrier came under air attack on 26th May 1941

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 30th December 1941 page 7346 “For distinguished services in the Middle East during the period February 1941 to July 1941”

The Battalion made two attempts to reach Crete on HM Transport (HMT) Glenroy on 23rd May 1941, a stick of four bombs were dropped 500 yards astern and the ship was ordered to return to Alexandria. The Battalion disembarked in the morning of 25th May and ordered to re-embark at 1130 sailing again at 1900. A second attempt would be made to land the Battalion Tymbaki Bay, HMT Glenroy was escorted by HM Ships Coventry, Stuart and Jaguar. During the morning there were several air raid alerts and it became obvious the convoy was being shadowed. At 1400 an enemy reconnaissance plane dropped two sticks of bombs with no damage to any ships. At 1800 the convoy was attacked by a force of 12 German bombers, this attack was concentrated almost entirely on HMT Glenroy, and splinters from a bear miss ignited 8 tons of cased petrol stored on the after deck. In spite of a considerable Anti Aircraft barrage from HMS Coventry assisted by AA weapons of the rest of the convoy, and very determined fire by the 36 LMG’s manned by 2nd Battalion The Queen’s aboard HMT Glenroy, the enemy planes pressed home their attack, and in all the Glenroy sustained about seven near misses. During the action a fire fighting party composed of the ship’s crew and 2nd Queens worked incessantly on the burning petrol. It speaks very highly of their courage and devotion to duty that the fire was prevented from spreading, and the only damage sustained was the loss of one assault landing craft and one Carley Float.

HMT Glenroy received no serious damage to her hull, but one third of the Landing Craft had been put out of action. One other rank of 2 Queens was killed and nine wounded (including Private Parker) as a result of the action. Considerable delay had been caused as the ship was compelled to alter course during the fire, and the loss of landing craft had made the landing of 2 Queens impossible that night. Orders were subsequently received during the night that 2 Queens was to return to Alexandria.

Discharged unfit for further military service 24th June 1943, almost certainly the result of wounds received aboard HMT Glenroy.

Neat official correction to two letters of naming.

GVF £395 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal “Territorial” to Trooper G L Williams Royal Tank Regiment from Litherland, Liverpool. Attesting for the Liverpool Regiment (TA) the 7th Battalion in 1938 became 40th (King’s) Royal Tank Regiment and served in North Africa earning the nickname “Monty’s Foxhounds” for their part in the pursuit of Axis Forces across Egypt, Libya and into Tunisia.

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal “Territorial” GVI 1st type

3770535 Tpr G L Williams R Tks

Service number indicates enlistment into the King’s Liverpool Regiment (TA).

With copy 40th (King’s) Royal Tank Regiment nominal roll entry (1943), two Royal Tank Regiment tie pins, Identity Disc, Cavalry & RAC Medal award box addressed “Mr G A Williams, 22 Thirlmere Drive, Litherland, Liverpool 21”.

The 40th (King’s) Royal Tank Regiment was originally formed by converting the 7th Battalion King’s Liverpool Regiment in 1938. The Regiment served in North Africa as part of 23rd Armoured Brigade, 8th Army from May 1942 (Valentine Tanks). Present at El Alamein, acquiring the nickname “Monty’s Foxhounds” during the long pursuit of the Axis Forces across Egypt and Libya and into Tunisia.

NEF £175 SOLD


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type to Lieutenant Commander Eric Wingate Rainey, Royal Navy a Hawker born in Hull in 1904. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1920 as Boy 2nd Class, he rose to Chief Petty Officer in 1937 and was promoted Gunner (Warrant Officer) in 1938. Commissioned Lieutenant in 1939, he was appointed to HMS Selkirk in January 1940, HMS Trawler Solon in April 1942 and was Mentioned in Despatches for his services aboard this ship, HMS Selkirk in command 1943 Appointed to the Frigate HMS Cranstown in command in November 1943 until June 1945. Promoted substantive Lieutenant Commander in February 1946, he retired in 1949. Died in Camborne, Redruth, Cornwall in 1979.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued to Royal Navy and Royal Marines

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.96443 E W Rainey PO HMS Drake

With copy service record.

Eric Wingate Rainey born 20th May 1904 in Hull, a Hawker he entered the Royal Navy 27th January 1920 at Ganges as Boy 2nd Class. Rated Ordinary Seaman 20th May 1922 aboard HMS Carisfort and Able Seaman 24th November 1922 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Leading Seaman 1st October 1925 aboard HMS Hood, advanced to acting Petty Officer 26th October 1931 aboard HMS Suffolk, Petty Officer 26th October 1932 aboard HMS Bruce, Chief Petty Officer 24th September 1937 at Drake, promoted Acting Gunner (Warrant Officer) 1st January 1938 and appointed to Caledonia. Long Service & Good Conduct Medal awarded 3rd August 1937.

Lieutenant 15th February 1939, appointed HMS Selkirk 17th October 1940, HM Trawler Solon (in command) 24th April 1942, Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 1st January 1943 page 27 for services aboard this ship. Appointed HMS Selkirk (in command) 25th January 1943, HMS Cranstown (in command) 23rd November 1943 to 23rd June 1945. Acting Lieutenant Commander 1st November 1944, substantive Lieutenant Commander 15th February 1946.

 

An unusual instance for this time, of an ex rating rising to command a Minesweeper and Frigate.

NEF £325 Available


 

Baltic Medal 1854-55, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Boatman in Charge William Foy, HM Coast Guard late Royal Navy born in Ryde, Isle of Wight in 1824. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Vanguard as Boy 2nd Class in April 1840, he was rated  Able Seaman aboard HMS Flying Fish in 1847. Rated Yeoman of Signals aboard HMS Victory in 1848, he was advanced to Captain of the Mast (Petty Officer) aboard HMS Encounter in 1849. Serving aboard HMS Ajax during the Baltic operations of 1854 to 1855 first as Captain of the Mast and later Captain of the After Guard, he was rated Gunner’s Mate in 1856. Transferring to HM Coast Guard on 27th April 1862 as Boatman, advanced to Commissioned Boatman 11th June 1867, Chief Boatman 1st April 1870, appointed Chief Boatman in Charge at Hector (Lydd on Sea, Kent) 1st April 1872, Chief Boatman in Charge Hamble River (Warsash near Southampton) 24th April 1873, Chief Boatman in Charge St Alban’s Head 1st November 1878. Discharged to pension 7th May 1879. He died in Fareham, Hampshire in 1910 aged 85 years.

Baltic Medal 1854-55

Unnamed as issued to Royal Navy and Royal Marines

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria early engraved naming type

William Foy Ch Btmn in Chge HM Coast Gd

With copy service record.

William Foy was born in Ryde, Isle of Wight 1st October 1824, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Vanguard 24th April 1840. He subsequently joined HMS Victory 4th November 1843, HMS Flying Fish 13th September 1844 where he was rated Ordinary Seaman 3rd May 1846 and Able Seaman 22nd September 1847. Re-joining HMS Victory 18th March 1848 as Able Seaman he was rated Yeoman of Signals 24th April 1848, joining HMS Encounter 27th September 1849 as Able Seaman he was advanced to Captain of the Mast aboard this ship 1st January 1851. Joining Excellent 16th September 1852 as Captain of the Mast, HMS Ajax 14th September 1853 as Captain of the Mast and Captain of the After Guard from 19th October 1853. Participating in the Baltic operations 1853 to 1854 aboard Ajax, he joined Excellent 27th May 1856 as Captain of the After Guard and HMS Pembroke 19th December 1856 as Gunner’s Mate.

Joining HMS Edinburgh 1st March 1858 as Gunner’s Mate and Excellent 1st April 1862 as Gunner’s Mate, he transferred to HM Coast Guard 27th April 1862 as Boatman at Dauntless. Advanced to Commissioned Boatman 11th June 1867, Chief Boatman 1st April 1870 and Chief Boatman in Charge at Hector (Lydd on Sea, Kent) 1st April 1872, Chief Boatman in Charge Hamble River (Warsash near Southampton) 24th April 1873, Chief Boatman in Charge St Alban’s Head 1st November 1878. Discharged to pension 7th May 1879.

The 1881 census records William Foy is a Naval pensioner residing with his wife Harriet a Dressmaker, three sons and one daughter at 53 Newton Road, Titchfield, Hampshire, he died in Fareham in 1910 aged 85 years.

Scarce rate of Chief Boatman in Charge.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £495 SOLD


 

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Private John McDermott, Royal Irish Rifles a former Labourer born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1872. Enlisting in Belfast in July 1892, he joined the 2nd Battalion from the Depot in June 1893 and served in Malta and India. Discharged to the Army Reserve in January 1899 he was mobilized re-joining the 2nd Battalion in October 1899 and embarked for South Africa. Taken prisoner of war at Stormberg 10th December 1899 he was held by the Boers for over 6 months being released at Waterval in June 1900. Returning to England in September 1902 he was discharged from the Reserve in March 1903.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

3062 Pte H McDermott R Ir Rif

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

3062 Pte C McDermott R Irish Rifles

With details extracted from his on line service record and Boer War casualty List.

John McDermott was born in Londonderry, Ireland in 1872 an 18 year 10 month old Labourer and serving member of the 5th (Militia) Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers he attested for the Royal Irish Rifles Regular Army at Belfast 2nd July 1891. Joining the 2nd Battalion he served in Malta from 11th March 1892 to 17th November 1894 and in India from 18th November 1892 to 25th January 1899. On 1st July 1898 he was sentenced by his Commanding Officer to 14 days in prison with hard labour, the actual offence not recorded. Discharged to the Army Reserve 28th January 1899.

Re-called to the colours 9th October 1899 he joined the 2nd Battalion and embarked for service in South Africa. Taken prisoner of war during the action at Stormberg 10th December 1899, he was held by Boer Forces until released at Waterval 6th June 1900. Sentenced by Field General Court Martial for drunkenness on duty to 98 days field imprisonment and fined one pound on 20th December 1900. Returning home on 12th September 1902, he was discharged from the Army Reserve 19th May 1903.

QSA first type with ghost dates reverse, the Army had a problem with his initial, toned.

GVF £275 Available


 

Naval General Service Medal 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Pacific Star, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Able Seaman Albert Fawdon, Royal Navy from Bermondsey, London born in 1909. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in December 1924, he was serving aboard HMS Wolsey when awarded his LSGC Medal in June 1942. Transferring to the Electrical Branch in 1947, he would have been discharged to pension in 1949. He died in Stepney, London in 1953 aged 44 years.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

J.112669 A Fawdon AB RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI

J.112669 A Fawdon AB HMS Wolsey

The group mounted as worn, original silk ribbons.

Albert Fawdon was born in Bermondsey, London 19th May 1909, the 1911 census records he is 1 year old and an in patient of Bermondsey Infirmary, Lower Road, Rotherhithe, London SE. On 26th September 1917 with his two brothers and sister, he was admitted to St Olave’s Workhouse, Parish Street, Southwark, Bermondsey. The children were brought in by the Police as directed by a Magistrate under the Children’s Act of 1908, their father Walter having been sent to prison and their mother deceased. They were all discharged 17th October 1917 to the care of an Aunt Mrs Taylor.

Albert Fawdon entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 16th December 1924, he subsequently joined HMS Ajax 23rd October 1925, HMS Benbow 17th December 1925, HMS Danae 17th September 1926 where he was rated Ordinary Seaman 19th May 1927 and Able Seaman 17th November 1928. The second part of Fawdon’s service record is not yet in the public domain but he was awarded the LSGC Medal whilst serving aboard the W Class Destroyer HMS Wolsey 25th June 1942. Wolsey gaining the battle honours for Dunkirk 1940, Atlantic 1940-42, North Sea 1941-45 and English Channel 1943. Transferring to the Electrical Branch in 1947, he would have been discharged to pension in 1949. He died in Stepney, London in 1953 at the early age of 44 years.

NEF £350 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal “Territorial” GVI 2nd type to Warrant Officer Robert Cadenhead Granger, Royal Air Force late Royal Artillery Territorial Army. Attesting for the Royal Artillery in 1938, he transferred to the Royal Air Force in June 1941. Awarded the Efficiency Medal “Territorial” in Army Order 101 of 1951, the award being rare named to the Royal Air Force.

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal “Territorial” GVI 2nd type

657026 WO R C Granger RAF

The group mounted as originally worn, with copy Army Order entry and headers.

Robert Cadenhead Granger attested for the Royal Artillery Territorial Army in 1938 (service number 1434225), he transferred to the Royal Air Force 7th June 1941 his RAF service number falls between the numbers allocated for transfers from the Army. Awarded the Efficiency Medal “Territorial” in Army Order 101 of 1951, War Office List No 17 dated 30th June 1951.

A rare Efficiency Medal “Territorial” named to the Royal Air Force.

GVF £850 Available


 

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya to Corporal A Roantree, Somerset Light Infantry late Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Wounded in action during the Rhine crossing 27th March 1945 Operation Varsity serving with the 9th Battalion Cameronians.

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medal

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya

14776145 Cpl A Roantree Som LI

Mounted for wear.

With copy War Office casualty List TNA WO417/90 recording wounded in action 27th March 1945 during the Rhine crossing Operation Varsity serving with 9th Battalion Cameronians.

 

GVF £150 Available


 

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal Territorial GVI 1st type to Private Charles George Shipman, Intelligence Corps late East Surrey Regiment from Twickenham, Middlesex. Attesting for the Territorial Army in 1931 and re-engaged in 1937, he served with the 2/6th Battalion East Surrey Regiment in France in 1940. Captured at Valery Sur Somme 12th June 1940, he escaped from the column of POW’s marching north, hiding in a marsh forest on 26th June 1940. Supplied by locals with civilian clothing, he made his way to Calais where he remained posing as a French civilian until 3rd January 1941. Travelling on foot and by rail he eventually arrived in Gibraltar 23rd May 1941 and boarded a ship, arriving at Greenock 14th June 1941. Transferring to the Intelligence Corps in December 1943, he served in North West Europe with 1025 Field Security Reserve Detachment. Wounded in action in November 1944, he returned to Middlesex after the War and died in Hounslow in 1978.

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal Territorial GVI 1st type

614o115 Pte C G Shipman Int Corps

With copy Queen’s Regiment attestation book entry, War Office casualty List entries, War Office Escape and Evasion report TNA WO208/3303.

Charles George Shipman born St Margarets, Middlesex 25th September 1913, residing at 9 Devon Croft Gardens, Twickenham, Middlesex on the outbreak of war, he attested for the East Surrey Regiment Territorial Army 17th December 1931 and re-enlisted into the Territorial Army 28th April 1937, serving with 2/6th Battalion as a Drummer with the BEF France in 1940, he was captured 12th June 1940 at St Valery Sur Somme. His account of capture and escape records –

“I was captured at St Valery Sur Somme on 12th June 1940. After a fortnight on the march I escaped at Wingles on 26th June 1940 by slipping into a small marshy wood, and hiding there until the column had passed. Some French youths gave me civilian clothes and set me in the direction of Calais. I followed the canal to Calais on 30th June, where I remained for eight months as a French civilian. I left there on 3rd January 1941 with Lance Sergeant Hargrove (4470381), Sherwood Foresters, and another Sergeant who’s name I have forgotten. After 8 days at Bethune we crossed the Somme at Corbie and then went by rail via Paris to Montchanin Les Mines. About 18th January 1941 we crossed the demarcation line at Chalons Sur Saone. From Macon we went directly to St Hippolyte Du Fort arriving on 22nd January 1941. On 20th March 1941 I was certified unfit for military service by the Medical Commission at Marseilles. On 23rd May 1941 I arrived at Gibraltar from where I was repatriated, arriving at Greenock 14th June 1941.”

Transferring to the Intelligence Corps 2nd December 1943. A member of 1025 Field Security Reserve Detachment  (FSRD) in North West Europe, their ranks included Jews, ethnic Germans and Austrians, their role was to take over forward positions, dealing with the civilian population and POW’s. Also a member of 273 Field Security Section. Wounded in action North West Europe in November 1944, no specific date is recorded on the War Office Casualty List TNA WO417/85, two other Intelligence Corps casualties on the same list are recorded as 11th November 1944.

Post War he returned to Middlesex and died in Hounslow in 1978.

GVF £695 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlanric Star, Africa Star, War Medal, Admiralty Condolence Slip, Medal box of issue to Leading Seaman William John Avery, Royal Navy born in West Malling, Kent in 1905. Entering the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class in August 1921, he was serving aboard HMS Coventry when the Second World War broke out. Assigned to the Mediterranean fleet in 1940, she was torpedoed and damaged by the Italian submarine Neghelli in the eastern Mediterranean, she also participated in the Battle of Cape Spartivento. Aboard Coventry on 18th May 1941 when she came under air attack off Crete, Petty Officer Sephton winning a posthumous Victoria Cross for this action. Killed in action aged 36 years when Coventry was severely damaged by German air attack during Operation Agreement 14th September 1941, a disasterous Commando raid on Tobruk Harbour. Coventry received four direct hits, dead in the water she was sunk by HMS Zulu. Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, war Medal

Unnamed as issued

Admiralty Condolence slip

William John Avery

Admiralty Medal box of issue addressed

Mrs L Avery, 99 Kilminster Street, Buckland, Portsmouth

With details extracted from his on line service records and casualty details.

William John Avery was born in West Malling, Kent 28th August 1905 and entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 28th August 1905 at Ganges. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 18th July 1938 whilst serving at Hyperion, St Angelo II, Malta. This Medal was probably lost aboard HMS Coventry. Joining Coventry 19th August 1939, he was advanced to Leading Seaman aboard this ship 7th September 1939 and was killed in action 14th September 1941 during Operation Agreement, aged 36 years he is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

On 18th May 1941 the first Victoria Cross of the Mediterranean campaign was awarded poshumously to Petty Officer Alfred Edward Sephton for “great courage and endurance” aboard Coventry when she was attacked by German Stuka dive bombers while off Crete. Coventry had gone to the assistance of a Hospital Ship which was being attacked by German dive-bombers. When Coventry was raked by machine-gun fire, Petty Officer Sephton was mortally wounded, a bullet actually passing through his body and injuring an able seaman beside him. Although in great pain and partially blinded, he stuck to his instruments and carried out his duties until the attack was over. He died of his injuries next day and was buried at sea.

Coventry (Capt. Ronald John Robert Dendy, RN) was taking part in Operation “Agreement”, a Commando raid against Tobruk harbour which ended in a complete disaster for the British due to the unexpectedly tenacious resistance of Axis troops and the prompt reaction of Axis’ air units in the area. At 1140 hrs, 14th September, Coventry was north of Marsa Matruh with her escort group (Force “D”), consisting of Destroyers Belvoir, Dulverton, Hursley, Croome. The Cruiser became the main target for a German group of 16 Ju-88s of I/LG.1 (X° Fliegerkorps) from Iraklion (Crete), under Capt Joachim Helbig. Each plane carried 1 x 500- and 3 x 250 kg bombs. In a dive-bombing attack, Coventry sustained 4 direct hits, 3 of the bombs detonating in the engineering spaces, while the 4th wrecked the bows. Coventry now dead in the water and on fire, with 63 killed. At 1515 hrs, in position 32º48’N, 28º17’E. the ship was scuttled by HMS Zulu, which was sunk barely one hour later by 19 Ju-87s.

EF £175 Reserved


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type to Chief Petty Officer Writer Eric Charles Jones Royal Navy. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in June 1951 whist serving at HMS Terror, the Royal Navy Base at Singapore.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI Royal Navy 2nd type

MX.52817 E C Jones CPO WTR HMS Terror

Mounted as originally worn.

Chief Petty Officer Writer Eric Charles Jones was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 19th June 1951 whilst serving at HMS Terror, the Royal Navy Base at Singapore.

First time on the market.

GVF £145 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France & Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Burma Star, Defence & War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI Royal Navy to Leading Seaman William Tedbury Coombes, Royal Navy born in Hornsey, Middlesex in 1907. Entering the Royal Navy in 1922 as a Boy 2nd Class, he qualified as a Diver in November 1930 and was specially advanced to Leading Seaman 23rd August 1939 by the Commander in Chief. Recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal for his gallantry during the Battle of Crete, Coombes was Captain of a 4 inch gun during sustained air attacks on 28 and 29 May 1941 during the evacuation of allied troops from Heraklion. Orion sustained severe damage and 100 of her ships company were killed along with 260 embarked troops. His award recommendation being downgraded to an MID by Admiral Cunningham. Discharged in March 1947, he died in Plymouth in 1982.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Burma Star, Defence & War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI Royal Navy 1st type

J.106202 W T Coombes A/LS HMS Orion

Mounted as worn with original silk ribbons, with copy London Gazette entry and headers for MID and recommendation, originally recommended for an immediate Decoration (DSM), copy LSGC Medal roll entry (LSGC awarded 30 May 1940). With Medal award box addressed ‘Mr W T Coombes, 44 Severn Place, Efford, Plymouth, Devon’ and Admiralty Medal award slip.

William Tedbury Coombes was born in Hornsey, Edmonton, Middlesex 13 May 1907 and entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 14th September 1922. Joining HMS Revenge 22nd August 1923, rated Ordinary Seaman 13th May 1925 aboard HMS Caradoc and Able Seaman 15th July 1926 aboard the same ship. Qualifying as a Diver 2nd Class 7th November 1930 and Diver 1st Class 1st August 1933. Specially advanced to Acting Leading Seaman 23rd August 1939 by the Commander in Chief aboard HMS Orion, he re-qualified as a Diver 1st Class 27 December 1940 and joined HMS Liverpool 30th December 1941. Advanced to Temporary Petty Officer 28th February 1942 at Fortitude (Naval Base at Ardrossan north Ayreshire) and confirmed in the rate of Petty Officer aboard HMS Renown 9th August 1943.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 8 January 1942 ‘For outstanding gallantry, fortitude and resolution during the Battle of Crete’.

The recommendation states –

‘Leading Seaman William Tedbury Coombes HMS Orion recommended for an immediate decoration – Evacuation of Heraklion, Crete – For courage, skill and devotion to duty and exemplary conduct as Captain of a 4 inch gun on 29th and 29th May (1941) on which dates the ship was frequently and heavily attacked from the air. During many periods the 4 inch Control was out of action, and much depended on the Ratings at the Gun’. The Commander in Chief (Admiral Cunningham) considered a Mention in Despatches more appropriate so downgraded his award’.

On 28 May 1941 HMS Orion with Cruisers Ajax, Dido, Decoy and the Destroyers Hereward, Hotspur, Imperial, Jackal and Kimberley were deployed as Force ‘B’ to evacuate allied troops from Heraklion. The Group came under air attack during their passage and Orion remained off shore on arrival to embark troops from the Destroyers. On 29th May Orion sailed with 1,900 troops aboard and came under sustained air attacks from first light until about 100 miles from Alexandria. Orion sustained direct hits on ‘A’ Turret and on the bridge structure, she suffered 100 ships company killed with 260 embarked troops killed and 280 wounded, practically disabled with fires on board, extensive damage control saved the ship and she entered Alexandria at 12 knots.

NEF £495 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type to Petty Officer Telegrapher Frank Moses Wright, Royal Navy born in Wolverhampton in 1921. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1956 aboard the Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point, he would have been discharged to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type

JX.164178 F M Wright CPO Tel HMS Dodman Point

The group mounted as originally worn, with research from on line records.

Frank Moses Wright born 24th March 1923 in Wolverhampton, he was awarded the LSGC Medal 21st March 1956 whilst serving aboard the 8,580 ton Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point. Wright would have retired to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

A new original silk Atlantic Star Medal ribbon will be supplied.

GVF & better £195 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star, Burma Star, Italy Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Telegrapher Charles William Long, Royal Navy. Born in Twickenham in 1907 he entered the Royal Navy 18th October 1923. Rated Telegrapher in February 1927, he joined Dolphin in for Submarine course in November 1929. Serving aboard Submarines during 1930 to 1936, he was serving aboard HMS Vidette on the outbreak of war. Serving in the Mediterranean on Malta convoy escort duties Vidette took part in Operation Harpoon. Serving ashore until February 1944 when he joined HMS Sidmouth. Released from the Royal Navy in May 1950, he was awarded the LSGC Medal in 1947.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star, Burma Star, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

J.108637 C W Long Tel HMS Drake

Mounted for wear.

Charles William Long born 22nd December 1907 in Twickenham a Baker he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 18th October 1923 at Ganges, Boy 1st Class 1st June 1924, rated Boy Telegrapher 24th April 1925, Ordinary Telegrapher 22nd December 1925 aboard HMS Revenge and Telegrapher 21st February 1927 aboard HMS Malaya. Joining Dolphin for Submarine course 12th November 1929, he joined Submarine L54 16th July 1930, Submarine Swordfish 1st June 1932, Dolphin 1st September 1933, Submarine Otus 13th October 1933, Medway as spare crew 1st January 1935, Submarine Proteus 1st April 1935, Cyclops 20th January 1936, St Angelo 2nd July 1936, Drake 8th August 1936, HMS Caledon.

Joining HMS Vidette 15th June 1939, serving aboard this ship during Malta Convoy duties including operation Harpoon. Joining Wildfire 9th August 1942, Drake 15th September 1942, Forte 18th November 1942, Drake 16th April 1943, Evolution (Chelsea Court, London, Portsmouth Operations Base) 16th July 1943, Odyssey for Naval Party 1071 (Columbo) 1st November 1943, Drake 17th September 1944, HMS Sidmouth 1st February 1945, Drake 30th August 1945. Awarded the LSGC Medal 12th August 1947, released 18th May 1950.

GVF £175 Available


 

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal E2 clasp Cyprus Private D Ferguson, Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Late Highland Light Infantry. Wounded 26th June 1944 in Normandy whilst serving with 2nd (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion, Highland Light Infantry on the opening day of Operation Epsom. Also known as the First Battle of the Odon, Operation Epsom was a British offensive that took place between 26th and 30th June 1944, intended to outflank and seize the German-occupied city of Caen, an important Allied objective.

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal E2 clasp Cyprus

3130589 Pte D Ferguson RAOC

With copy War Office casualty list entries for wounding (1)

Private D Ferguson served in the 2nd (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry in Normandy. The battalion was part of 15th (Scottish) Division, landing in Normandy on 14th June 1944. He was wounded on the opening day of Operation Epsom 26th July 1944 when the Battalion attacked towards the village of Cheux finally taking the village with casualties of 12 officers and nearly 200 other ranks. Operation Epsom  also known as the First Battle of the Odon, was a British offensive that took place between 26th and 30th June 1944, intended to outflank and seize the German-occupied city of Caen, an important Allied objective.

GVF £150 Available


 

Member of the British Empire 1st Type Military, Queens South Africa Medal no clasp, Royal Navy Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Victoria to Shipwright Lieutenant Commander Valentine Urell, Royal Navy. Born Pottemouth, Devon in 1864, he entered the the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable in October 1880. Promoted to Carpenter (Warrant Officer) in April 1896, he served aboard HMS Monarch during the operations in South Africa in 1901. Promoted Chief Carpenter (Senior Warrant Officer) in April 1912, he was commissioned Shipwright Lieutenant in March 1918 He retired after 39 years in service in November 1919 as a Shipwright Lieutenant. Awarded the MBE in 1919 for valuable services in World War One, he was invested with the Decoration at Buckingham Palace in February 1920. Promoted Shipwright Lieutenant Commander in March 1926 on the Retired List.

Member of the British Empire (MBE) 1st type (Military)

Unnamed as Issued hallmark reverse for London 1919

Queen’s South Africa Medal

Carp V Urell RN HMS Monarch

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

V Urell Ldg Shipwt HMS Swiftsure

With copy ratings & officers service records & medal roll entry for 1WW medal entitlement. The MBE in fitted presentation case.

Valentine Urell was born in Pottemouth, Devon on 11th November 1864. He entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class on 25th October 1880 aboard HMS Impregnable aged 16 years. Advanced Carpenters Crew 2nd Class 9th November 1882 aboard HMS Impregnable  and Carpenters Crew 9th November 1883 aboard  HMS Indus. Rated Shipwright 14th February 1884 aboard HMS Indus and Skilled Shipwright 13th January 1889 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Leading Shipwright 1st November 1889 aboard HMS Bellerophon, Carpenter’s Mate at Pembroke 26th October 1894 and Chief Carpenter’s Mate 11th January 1896 at Vivid II  Awarded the Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal on 28th November 1894 whilst serving aboard HMS Swiftsure. Promoted Carpenter (Warrant Officer) 1st April 1896, he served aboard HMS Monarch during the South African operations of 1901, Chief Carpenter 1st April 1912, commissioned Shipwright Lieutenant 25th March 1918, he retired 1st November 1919 after 39 years service.  His MBE was awarded for valuable service during the First World War London Gazette 16 September 1919 Page 11579, invested at Buckingham Palace with the MBE 20th February 1920, he was also awarded the British War Medal. Promoted to Shipwright Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 25th March 1926.

GVF £495 Available