Campaign Medal Groups


Campaign Medal Groups

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Jubaland to Able Seaman Robert John Harris, Royal Navy born in Taunton, Somerset 28th December 1880, an Errand Boy he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 20th May 1896. Joining HMS Magicienne 18th November 1897, he took part in the South Africa operations and the Jubaland operations 1900 to 1901. A total of 202 Jubaland clasps awarded to the Royal Navy for service ashore against the Ogaden Somalis. Discharged time expired from HMS Flora 27th December 1910.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

R J Harris AB HMS Magicienne

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Jubaland

R J Harris AB HMS Magicienne

With copy service papers.

Robert John Harris was born in Taunton, Somerset 28th December 1880, an Errand Boy he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 20th May 1896. He subsequently joined Vivid I 20th October 1897, HMS Magicienne 18th November 1897 where he was rated Ordinary Seaman 28th December 1898 and Able Seaman 1st February 1900 and taking part in the South Africa operations 11th October 1899 to 6th November 1900 and the Jubaland operations aboard this ship.

The Jubaland clasp to the Royal Navy fairly scarce, awarded for service under Colonel T P B Ternan, Manchester Regiment against the Ogaden Somalis, including military forces at Kismayu, and to officers and men of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines who landed to supplement the garrison at Kismayu 16th November 1900 to 30th April 1901. A total of 172 clasps awarded to HMS Magicienne, 15 to HMS Scout and 15 to HMS Terpsichore. 

Joining Vivid I 20th June 1901, Cambridge 4th November 1901, Defiance 2nd March 1902, Vivid I 21st October 1903, HMS Monmouth 2nd December 1903, Vivid I 7th  June 1905, Defiance 19th February 1905, Vivid 16th April 1905, HMS New Zealand 24th June 1905, Vivid I 18th June 1907, Defiance 15th March 1908, Vivid I 21st June 1908, HMS Europa 6th August 1908, HMS Andromeda 2nd February 1909, HMS King Alfred 23rd March 1909, HMS Flora  15th January 1910. Discharged time expired 27th December 1910.

GVF & better £550 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Balklava, Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Medal Sardinian issue, New Zealand Medal reverse dated 1860-61 to Private George Whiteway, Royal Marines. Born in Harberton, near Totness, Devon a 21 year old Labourer he attested for the Royal Marines at Stonehouse Barracks 11th December 1843 and served a total of 22 years 33 days. Ten times entered in the Divisional Defaulter’s Book and twice tried by Court Martial, he was once awarded Corporal Punishment, events which would prevent him receiving the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. Serving with the Royal Marine Battalion in the Crimea 1854-55, he was later to take part in the New Zealand Native war of 1861. Discharged to pension 12th January 1866, he served all his time as a Private and was in possession of four Good Conduct Badges when discharged.

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Balaklava, Sebastopol

Unnamed as issued to Royal Navy and Royal Marines

Turkish Crimea Medal Sardinian issue

Unnamed as issued

New Zealand Medal reverse dated 1860-61

George Whiteway RM HMS Isis

With copy service papers.

George Whiteway was born in Harberton, near Totness, Devon a 21 year old Labourer he attested for the Royal Marines at Stonehouse Barracks 11th December 1843. Served aboard HMS Vanguard 11th February 1845 to 17th May 1845 and again from 5th June 1845 to 14th November 1846, HMS Birkenhead 31st July 1848 to 2nd February 1849, HMS Queen 26th January 1849 to 2nd July 1852, HMS Vulture and HMS Britannia 22nd May 1853 to 4th June 1853, HMS Arethusa and RM Battalion in the Crimea 5th June 1853 to 8th December 1855, HMS Edinburgh 11th June 1856 to 8th August 1856, HMS Cambridge 9th September 1856 to 8th January 1857, HMS Iris 11th Match 1857 to 3rd August 1861, HMS Indus 17th September 1864 to 29th September 1865. A total of 13 years 286 days afloat and 8 years 112 days ashore. Discharged 12th January 1866 to pension from 39th Company, Plymouth Division Royal Marines.

His Commanding Officer wrote – “George Whitway’s name appears ten times in the Divisional Defaulter’s Book. He has been twice tried by Court Martial and once received Corporal Punishment. He is in possession of four (sic) Good Conduct Badges he served with the RM Battalion in the Crimea 1854 and 1855 including the battle of Balaklava. Served in New Zealand during the Native was in 1861 including two actions (can’t read it). He wears the Crimea Medal with Balaklava and Sebastopol clasps and the Turkish Medal.

About GVF £950 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups

Campaign Medal Groups

Father : British War Medal to Chief Petty Officer Walter Crawford Grimes, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in named box of issue.

Son : 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, War Medal with Air Ministry Condolence Slip and Card box of issue to Flying Officer (Wireless Operator / Air Gunner) Walter Crawford Grimes, Royal Air Force Volunteer Resrerve born in South Shields in 1921. Awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal in 1943 for completing 53 operational sorties with 218 (Gold Coast) Squadron, he was commissioned 22nd November 1942. Joining 617 Squadron, his Lancaster Mark III ED735 KC-R took off at 2340  on 17th November 1943 from Rabat having landed in Morocco after raiding the Antheir Viaduct on 11th – 12th November his first sortie with this Squadron. Lost without trace after being routed via the Iberian Peninsula and the Bay of Biscay. The son of Walter Crawford and Charlotte Lucy Howard Grimes of South Shields, Co Durham he was 22 years old and is remembered with his entire crew on the Runnymeade Memorial.

British War Medal

TZ.8960 W C Grimes CPO RNVR

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Air Ministry Card Medal Box of issue addressed

W C Grimes ESQ, 3 Saville Street, South Shields, Co Durham

Air Ministry Condolence Slip

Flying Officer W C Grimes DFM

With copy DFM recommendation, copies from 617 Squadron operations book, box of issue for 2WW Stars and Medal, box of issue for BWM, four original head and shoulders photographs of Walter Crawford Grimes in uniform, one in colour, photo of Grimes with his mother and father, his father in a shipping company uniform, photo as Pilot Officer RAFVR taking a salute in South Shields outside town hall, one photo of Grimes with his fiance.

The single British War Medal CPO Grimes only entitlement Reference Admiralty Medal Roll TNA ADM171/126 page 413.

Campaign Medal Groups

Commissioned Pilot Officer from Flight Sergeant 22nd November 1942 (London Gazette 16th February 1943 page 816).

Distinguished Flying Medal London Gazette 12th January 1943 page 269

952886 Flight Sergeant Walter Crawford GRIMES, 218 (Gold Coast) Squadron

Hours flown on operations 299

Number of sorties 53

“952886 Flight Sergeant W C Grimes is a Wireless Operator / Air Gunner of 218 (Gold Coast) Squadron. Between June 1941 and November 1942 he carried out as many as 53 operational sorties embracing 299 hours of operational flying. During these two tours he has always displayed courage and technical skill of a very high order. On 24th July 1941, his aircraft was flying in formation with two other Wellingtons during a daylight raid on the German Battleships in Brest Harbour. The formation was attacked by two ME 109’s. Although one of the Wellingtons was lost in the first attack, the combined fire of the remaining aircraft was sufficient to drive off one of the German machines and shoot the other down in flames.

In September 1942 on the return from Munich, Flight Sergeant Grimes aircraft was subject to very accurate and very intense flak. The aircraft was hit, the second Pilot and Engineer slightly wounded, while the Navigator mistaking an order to “stand by” actually baled out. Flight Sergeant Grimes dressed the second Pilot’s wounds and acted with his as deputy Navigator. On reaching the French coast, wireless navigation became possible and Flight Sergeant Grimes was able to direct his Captain who landed safely at Manston.

Flight Sergeant Grimes Keenness, resolution and technical adroitness are held in very high regard by the other Wireless Operators, to whom he never fails to give the benefit of his knowledge and experience. He is very strongly recommended for the award of the DFM”.

With a list of all 53 sorties first one 12th June 1941 Oshabruck, last one 8th December 1942 Toulon. On 11th August 1942 Flight Sergeant Grimes baled out shortly after take-off to bomb Mainz, the aircraft having technical difficulties. Joining 617 Squadron, his Lancaster Mark III ED735 KC-R took off at 2340  on 17th November 1943 from Rabat having landed in Morocco after raiding the Antheir Viaduct on 11th – 12th November his first sortie with this Squadron. Lost without trace after being routed via the Iberian Peninsula and the Bay of Biscay. The son of Walter Crawford and Charlotte Lucy Howard Grimes of South Shields, Co Durham he is remembered with his entire crew on the Runnymeade Memorial.

EF £695 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Medal British issue to Private James Walker, 20th (East Devonshire) Regiment of Foot. Enlisting in April 1837, he served with the Regiment in Ireland, Bermuda and Canada before embarking at Plymouth for the Crimea 18th July 1854. The Regiment fought at the battles of the Alma, Inkermann was present at the action of Balaklava and the siege of Sebastopol. James Walker died at Scutari 15th February 1855 of sickness.

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol

J Walker 20th Regt

Turkish Crimea Medal British issue

Unnamed as issued

With copy Medal roll entries confirming clasps, this man is the ONLY J Walker on the 20th Foot Medal roll, details extracted from the Regimental Pay and Muster Books from enlistment to death. Copies from the Regimental Musters – enlistment entry and death entry.

The Crimea Medal officially impressed naming.

James Walker enlisted as a Private into HM 20th Regiment of Foot in April 1837, transferring from the Depot to service companies on 1st May 1837 at Canterbury. In March 1838 the Regiment commenced duties at the Tower of London and moved to Weedon in September 1838. Arriving in Manchester in January 1839 and to Stockport in June 1839. Arriving in Dublin in June 1840, Athlone, Ireland October 1840, Limerick, Ireland April 1841, the Regiment moved to Cork and embarked for Bermuda 27th September 1841 arriving in December. Whilst serving in Bermuda Walker was an in patient of the Royal Naval Hospital for 3 days in 1842 and 11 days in 1846. In Regimental cells 13th to 14th April 1847 charged under clause 30 of the Mutiny Act, it appears nothing came of it. In June 1847 the Regiment left for Halifax, Nova Scotia and in September 1847 moved to Kingston, West Canada. Moving to Montreal, Canada in June 1850. Walker was held in confinement 19th to 22nd April and 23rd to 31st May 1853. Returning to Winchester, England in July 1853, granted leave in November, the Regiment moved to Plymouth in January 1854 and on 18th July embarked for service in the Crimea. Present during all the major actions including the battle of Inkermann 5th November 1854, in which the 20th Foot suffered 9 officers and 162 men killed and wounded. James Walker died at Scutari of sickness 15th February 1855.

NEF £1,150 SOLD


Campaign Medal GroupsCampaign Medal Groups

1939/4 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Flying Officer (Flight Engineer) Fred Jackson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve born in 1914 and from Monkseaton, Whitbey Bay, Northumberland. Commissioned from Flight Sergeant 11th December 1943 he was Mentioned in Despatches for distinguished services in June 1944. Killed in action 11th April 1945 aged 32 years when his 619 Squadron Lancaster Mark I bomber crashed near Loberitz, Germany on a mission to bomb Wahren Railway Yards near Leipzig, Germany. He now rests in an identified grave in the Berlin War Cemetery.

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

Air Ministry Medal Condolence Slip

Flying Officer F Jackson

Air Ministry Medal Card box of issue addressed

G Jackson ESQ, 24 Claremont Road, Monkseaton, Whitbey Bay, Northumberland

With Casualty details, copy from Squadron Operations Book, London Gazette details listed here.

Fred Jackson was born in 1914, the son of George and Jane Jackson of Monkseaton, Northumberland. Commissioned Pilot Officer (Flight Engineer) from Flight Sergeant 11th December 1943 (London gazette 14th March 1944 page 1217) he was Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 8th June 1944 page 2624. Promoted Flying Office (War Substantive) 11th June 1944 (London Gazette 14th July 1944 page 3285) I could not find a promotion to Flight Lieutenant and this is probably an error on the Commonwealth War Graves Site. On the night of 10th / 11th April 1945 his 619 Squadron Lancaster Mark I (SW254 PG-S) piloted by Flight Lieutenant A E McMorran, RCAF was detailed to bomb the railway yards at Wahren near Leopzig taking off from RAF Strubby at 1813 hours they failed to return. The aircraft crashed at Loberitz, Germany there was one survivor Flight Sergeant H J Burke who was taken prisoner of war. The remainder of the crew all rest in identified graves in Berlin War Cemetery. This was the first operational sorties for Pilot Officer Fred Jackson with this Squadron.

EF £575 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Defence Medal, War Medal and Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Chief Petty Officer Airman Vivian Read Graham, Fleet Air Arm born in Gateshead, Durham 20th August 1909. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 3rd December 1924, he was rated Ordinary Telegrapher 20th August 1927. Transferring to the Fleet Air Arm 1st June 1939 as a Leading Airman (Telegraphist & Air Gunner), he flew operationally from HMS Ark Royal during the Norway campaign of 1940. Taking part in Operation Menace, the attack on Dakar 13th to 25th September 1940, his aircraft was brought down by anti aircraft fire on 24th during an attack on a Vichy French Destroyer and ditched in the sea, the three man crew rescued by HMS Echo. As a Telegraphist Air Gunner of Swordfish 2B of 810 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm piloted by Lieutenant D F Godfrey-Faussett, DSC, he took part in the attack on German Battleship Bismarck that led to her destruction on 27th May 1941, his aircraft being damaged by Anti-Aircraft fire from Bismarck during the attack. Remaining in the Fleet Air Arm post war, he was discharged to pension in August 1949 and died in Cheltenham in 1986.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

F55072 V R Graham POA HMS Kestrel

With copy research documents by email and service record by email.

Vivian Read Graham was born in Gateshead, Durham on 20th August 1909, a scholar he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class (J.112598) 3rd December 1924. Rated Boy Telegrapher aboard HMS Ajax 30th April 1926, he subsequently joined HMS Ark Royal 1st September 1926, HMS Benbow 6th January 1927, HMS Ramillies as Ordinary Telegrapher 20th August 1927, HMS Conquest 14th October 1927, Egmont I 8th March 1928, HMS Ceres 1st April 1928 where he was rated Telegrapher 17th December 1928.

Passing the course as Telegraphist Air Gunner on 16th January 1935. Joining HMS Furious on 5th March 1935, HMS Glorious 29th August 1935 and to HMS Courageous 19th October 1935. He returned to HMS Glorious 18th February 1936 and served on her until 27th July 1936. He saw further on HMS Eagle from 18th January 1937 advanced to Acting Leading Telegraphist 17th November 1937 and confirmed Leading Telegraphist 17th November 1938 he transferred to the Fleet Air Arm as Leading Airman F55072 on 1st June 1939, serving aboard HMS Eagle until  3rd August 1939.
Image result for pictures fairey swordfish 1941 aboard HMS Ark Royal
Fleet Air Arm Fairey Swordfish airborne from HMS Ark Royal during Operation Menace 1940
Joining Daedalus 4th August 1939 and HMS Ark Royal 27th February 1940, advanced to Acting Petty Officer Airman 1st May 1940. Flying from HMS Ark Royal, he took part in the Norway campaign of 1940, and flew the following sorties –

25th April 1940 – Anti Submarine patrol, 28th April 1940 – Bombing Vaernes aerodrome, 16th May 1940 – Bombing Hemnes, 4th June 1940 – Fighter Patrol (Reported on weather at Narvik), 6th June 1940 – Air Defended Area (ADA) Patrol, 6th June 1940 – Patrol for enemy shipping, 8th June 1940 – ADA patrol Risoy, 9th June 1940 – Reconnaissance for Convoy, 9th June 1940 – Reconnaissance, 10th June 1940 – Reconnaissance, 10th June 1940 – Search for enemy battleships, 13th June 1940 – Reconnaissance of evacuation vessels. TNA references ADM199/15, 479 & 480.

Taking part in Operation Menace, the unsuccessful attempt to capture Dakar Harbour from Vichy French Forces 13th to 25th September 1940. The Telegraphist / Air Gunner in Swordfish L2644 of 820 Squadron pilot Lieutenant (A) Richard Sydney Hankey, Royal Navy and Observer Temporary Sub Lieutenant (A) Anthony Wilfred Noel Dayrell, Royal Navy. On 24th September they were part of a formation of six aircraft tasked with attacking Destroyers in Dakar Harbour when they were hit by anti aircraft fire at about 1530 and forced to ditch in the sea. Only the pilot was slightly injured and all three were rescued by HMS Echo. Reference TNA ADM358 and ADM199/907.

As a Telegraphist Air Gunner of Swordfish 2B of 810 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm piloted by Lieutenant D F Godfrey-Faussett, he took part in the attack on German Battleship Bismarck that led to her destruction on 27th May 1941. The aircraft being damaged by Anti-Aircraft fire from Bismarck during the attack. His pilot being awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Petty Officer Graham received no recognition.

On 24 May 1941, the German battleship Bismarck sank the Royal Navy’s flagship HMS Hood, and damaged out of action HMS Prince of Wales. The Aircraft Carrier HMS Ark Royal received an order from Churchill, as part of Force H, to hunt down Bismarck and sink it.On 26 May 1941 Bismarck was running for the safety of the French port of Brest to make repairs to light damage that she had received from the clash with Prince of Wales, and a last-ditch attempt to slow it down with an airborne torpedo attack from Ark Royal’s aircraft was ordered that night so that the pursuing Royal Navy’s heavy ships could catch up with her.

Report of attack by Lt D F Godfrey-Faussett, Royal Navy pilot of Swordfish 2B

TNA references ADM199/1187 and 1188.

“Aircraft was in No 2 Sub Flight part of the striking force of second wave of attack on Bismarck. Attacked from the starboard beam with two aircraft under intense and accurate anti aircraft fire. Long range anti aircraft fire on approach and on return. Aircraft 2A and 2B attacked together coming out of the cloud one mile away. First engaged by close range (red tracer). Fire was also opened with heavier stuff evidently time fused. Some of this went into the sea and some burst beyond and above. Aircraft was hit in tail plane and port lower main plane. The heavy fire continued with accuracy up to four miles and appeared to be predicted all the time as bursts followed the aircraft, going off just above. Armament was sub divided, each aircraft being engaged by a separate control”.

Image result for Swordfish attack bismarck pictures
Fairey Swordfish aircraft attack Bismarck

In evening twilight at 21:05 amid gale force winds, Lt Commander Jock Moffat and his Observer, Temporary Sub Lieutenant (A) J D “Dusty” Miller, and Telegraphist/Air Gunner (TAG) Leading Airman A J Hayman, flying in Fairey Swordfish 5C/L9726 together with 14 other Swordfish attacked Bismarck amidst a torrent of anti-aircraft fire being put up by the ship’s guns. Two torpedoes struck home, one amidships on its port side resulting in slow flooding, and the second in the steering area. Her rudders were consequently jammed in a turning position, and although she was still underway at good speed, she was directionless in the water. Attempts to steer by varying the speed of the three propellers failed. With Bismarck’s steering control jammed the Royal Navy’s Force H and its Home Fleet were able to catch up with it, surround it and subject it to extensive shelling and torpedoing, after which it turned over and sank the following morning. The wreck of the Bismarck was discovered in 1989. At the time of the attack no definitive statement of whose torpedo had hit the Bismarck was released, however following the observation of this wreck historian Mike Rossiter credited John Moffat as by far the most likely, through analysis of the flight paths. However, the son of another Swordfish pilot that attacked the Bismarck Kenneth Pattison believes that it was his father that damaged the ship.

His subsequent postings included 810 Squadron 1st July 1941, Buzzard 11th September 1941, HMS Illustrious 1st December 1941, 810 Squadron 9th January 1942, RN Air Stations ant Daedalus and Kestrel between 13th January 1942 to 30th October 1942, Goshawk 7th November 1942, advanced to Chief Petty Officer Airman 1st May 1943, Daedalus 6th May 1945, Sanderling 25th July 1945, Nighthawk 12th August 1945, Daedalus 12th March 1946.

Post war he joined the RN Air Stations Redford 24th June 1946, Daedalus 6th July 1946, Goldcrest 27th July 1946, Siskin 21st October 1947, appointed Instructor 1st April 1948, Warrior 15th February 1949, 782 Squadron (Merlin helicopters) 8th June 1949, Daedalus 18th July 1949, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 23rd July 1942, discharged to pension 19th August 1949, he died 12th April 1986 at Leckhampton, Cheltenham, Goucestershire.

Official correction to “el” of Kestrel on LSGC.

A rare group to a Fairey Swordfish TAG who took part in the Norway campaign 1940, Operation Menace in 1940 where he was shot down and the attack on Bismarck.

NEF £3,250 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Electrical Artificer 1st Class Edward John Reynolds, Royal Navy born 21st July 1907 in Birmingham a Fitter and Turner he entered the Royal Navy at Vernon as Acting Electrical Artificer (EA) 4th Class 23rd July 1928. Serving aboard HMS Fortune during the Palestine operations, he was aboard HMS Gallant on the outbreak of war. Gallant took part in the evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk, being slightly damaged by air attack on 29th May 1940, a near miss caused damage to her hull and electrical systems and knocked out her steering system. Gallant completed two evacuation trips bringing 1,466 soldiers back to Dover, before going to Hull on 30th May 1940 for repairs.on 10th January 1941 killing 65 and injuring 15 of her crew including EA2 Reynolds. On 10th January 1941 during Operation Excess, Gallant hit a mine blowing off her stern. The explosion killed 65 and injured 15 of her crew including EA2 Reynolds. He died in Medway, Kent in 2000 aged 93 years.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M1939/X.47268 E J Reynolds EA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star , Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

MX.47628 E J Reynolds EA1 HMS Vernon

With copy service record.

Edward John Reynolds born 21st July 1907 in Birmingham a Fitter and Turner he entered the Royal Navy at Vernon as Acting Electrical Artificer (EA) 4th Class 23rd July 1928, rated EA 4th Class aboard HMS Curlew 23rd January 1930, advanced to EA 3rd Class 23rd July 1931 aboard HMS Malcolm, advanced to EA 2nd Class 23rd July 1935 aboard HMS Calcutta, joining HMS Fortune 29th February 1936, he served aboard this ship during the Palestine operations. Joining HMS Gallant 13th July 1938, Gallant taking part in the evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk, being slightly damaged by air attack on 29th May 1940, a near miss caused damage to her hull and electrical systems and knocked out her steering system. Gallant completed two evacuation trips bringing 1,466 soldiers back to Dover, following her damage by air attack Gallant made it to Hull under her own power for repair.

During Operation Excess (Supply convoys to Malta and Greece in January 1941) Gallant came under attack by Italian Torpedo Boats off Pantellaria, in which HMS Vega was sunk, Gallant struck a mine which detonated her forward magazine on 10th January 1941 killing 65 and injuring 15 of her crew including EA2 Reynolds. The explosion blew the bow off the ship, her sister ship HMS Griffin rescued the survivors, HMS Mohawk towing the wreck into Malta. Invalided from the Royal Navy 19th May 1948 from the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar, permanently unfit for Naval service probably the result of his wounds received aboard HMS Gallant. He died in Medway, Kent in 2000 aged 93 years.

GVF £375 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Naval Reserve GVI 1st type to Able Seaman Thomas Jackson Baker, Royal Naval Reserve born in Yarmouth, Norfolk 13th December 1913, a Merchant Navy Able Seaman he enrolled for the Royal Naval Reserve 19th July 1934, at the time he was serving aboard Foreign going Merchant Ships sailing from North Shields. Mobilised 1st August 1939, he joined HMS Ceres. Subsequently serving  aboard HMS Carlisle 1942-43 and the Aircraft Carrier HMS Illustrious 1943-45. Demobilised 21st October 1945, he was released from the RNR on completion of service 28th April 1948.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Naval Reserve GVI 1st type

10828.B  T J Baker AB RNR

With copy service records, with original Admiralty Medal award slip recording 8 Medals and clasps awarded.

Thomas Jackson Baker was born in Yarmouth, Norfolk 13th December 1913, a Merchant Navy Able Seaman he enrolled for the Royal Naval Reserve 19th July 1934, at the time he was serving aboard Foreign going Merchant Ships sailing from North Shields, his home address recorded as 11 Langley Road, North Shields. Mobilised 1st August 1939, he joined HMS Ceres serving aboard this ship 21st October 1941. Subsequently joining Drake 22nd October 1941,  Lochinvar 7th March 1942, Drake 31st July 1942, HMS Carlisle 10th November 1942 including service with Malta Convoys, HMS Illustrious 13th April 1943 and was released from service 21st October 1945, the ship being awarded battle honours for “Salerno 1943”, “Sabang 1944”, “Salembang 1945”, “Okinawa 1945”. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 4th May 1945 whilst serving aboard HMS Illustrious. Discharged from the Royal Naval Reserve on completion of service 28th April 1948.

GVF £195 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 3rd type to Petty Officer Stanley Farrar, Royal Navy, born 20th April 1904 in Malton, Yorkshire a scholar, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 22nd September 1920. Serving aboard HMS Curlew on the outbreak of war, he survived the sinking of this ship by JU88 Dive Bombers  on 26th May 1940 in Lavangs Fjord near Narvick, Norway with the loss of 9 of her crew. Joining Drake I (Devonport Dockyard, Plymouth) 17th May 1940, he was killed in an air raid on Plymouth 30th April 1941 and now rests in an identified grave in Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth.

1939/45 Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 3rd type

J.99011 S Farrar PO HMS Royal Sovereign

With copy service record, copies from FO Plymouth report on the raid, and CWGC details.

Stanley Farrar born 20th April 1904 in Malton, Yorkshire a scholar, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 22nd September 1920. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Cambrian 20th April 1922, Able Seaman aboard HMS King George V 9th May 1923. Advanced to Acting Leading Seaman aboard Acasta 13th March 1931, Leading Seaman HMS Carlisle 13th March 1932, advanced to Acting Petty Officer at Drake I 20th October 1934, Petty Officer aboard HMS Royal Sovereign 20th October 1935. Joining HMS Curlew 9th August 1939. The Light Cruiser HMS Curlew was sunk by JU88 air attack on 26th May 1940 in Lavangs Fjord near Narvick, Norway with the loss of 9 of her crew. Joining Drake I 27th May 1940, advanced to Chief Petty Officer 17th September 1940 and was killed during an air raid on Plymouth 30th April 1941 in which seven Royal Navy ratings were killed. Chief Petty Officer Stanley Farrar was the son of Arthur and Mercia Farrar and husband of Elsie Lott Atrill Farrar of Higher Compton, Plymouth and now rests in Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth.

On the 29th/30th April Plymouth and Devonport were again attacked, and, although the raid was on a larger scale than any of its predecessors, it began with inaccurate, bombing in open country North of the city, where wood-fires at Mount Edgcumbe were heavily bombed. It was comparatively late in the raid before the enemy found his targets, and the attack did not therefore seem so heavy as some of its predecessors. The raid lasted nearly four hours, and, though its effects cannot yet be fully assessed, it is clear that, after all that the city and its environs have lately been through, this raid struck a heavy blow. The main weight of attack was felt at Keyham and Milehouse, between Plymouth and Devonport.

High explosives seem to have predominated over incendiary attack, and only 20 fires were reported. Fires were started in Milehouse, at a Devonport gasholder and once again at the Tor Point oil cisterns. In addition to areas of military importance, the city’s civilian life seems again to have suffered severely, and a shopping centre at Mutley, rendered more important by the destruction done elsewhere in earlier raids, was damaged in this one. Residential districts suffered severely, the worst damage of this kind being reported from the Beacon Park and Hartley areas. The fires were all brought under control during the morning.

NEF £350 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star , Burma Star clasps Pacific, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Leading Steward Cecil George Weeks, Royal Navy born 26th June 1906 in Salisbury, Wiltshire a Farm Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as Boy Servant at Victory II 8th June 1923. Joining HMS Bittern 28th August 1939, he survived a sustained air attack on this ship during series of dive bombing attacks at Namsos, Norway. The ship was abandoned and survivors rescued by HMS Janus which came alongside. Sunk by a torpedo from Janus since ship would have drifted into shallow water and allowed enemy to recover latest anti-submarine detection equipment. Later serving aboard the Landing Ship Infantry HMS Glenroy, he was discharged to pension 31st August 1946. He died in Preston, Lancashire 28th June 1972.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

L.14441 C G Weeks L Std HMS Vernon

With copy service record,  RNA lapel badge.

Cecil George Weeks was born 26th June 1906 in Salisbury, Wiltshire a Farm Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as Boy Servant at Victory II 8th June 1923. Rated Officer’s Steward 4th Class 23rd June 1924, advanced to Officer’s Steward 3rd Class aboard HMS Furious 23rd June 1926 and rated Steward 1st October 1931 at Fisgard, advanced to Leading Steward at Victory II 30th December 1934. Joining HMS Bittern 28th August 1939, he survived the sinking of this ship 30th April 1940. Bittern sustained direct hits during series of dive bombing attacks at Namsos, Norway. The ship abandoned and survivors rescued by HMS Janus which came alongside. Sunk by torpedo from Janus since ship would have drifted into shallow water and allowed enemy to recover latest anti-submarine detection equipment. Joining Victory II 1st May 1940, he subsequently joined Collingwood 21st August 1940, HMS Glenroy 13th October 1940 which was awarded the battle honours “Crete 1941”, “Libya 1941”, “Normandy 1944”, “Burma 1945”. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 23rd June 1939 The next entry on his service record shows he was released from Victory 31st August 1946. He died in Preston, Lancashire 28th June 1972.

GVF & better £250 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse, Khedives Star 1882, Long Service and Good Conduct Medals Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) William Bonney, Royal Navy. Born in King’s Tamerton, Plymouth, Devon 3rd August 1856 and entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 9th August 1871.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse no clasp

W Bonney 2nd Cap M Top HMS Northumberland

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

Wm Bonney PO 1st CL HMS Bellerophon

With copy service record.

William Bonney was born in King’s Tamerton, Plymouth, Devon 3rd August 1856 and entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 9th August 1871, he subsequently joined Cambridge 1st January 1873, HMS Implacable 27th February 1873, HMS Pearl 21st May 1873 and rated Ordinary Seaman 3rd August 1874 and Able Seaman 3rd August 1875 aboard this ship. Joining HMS Cambridge 6th June 1879, HMS Northumberland 15th November 1879, where he was advanced to Leading Seaman 1st October 1880, Petty Officer 2nd Class 1st July 1880, Petty Officer 1st Class 17th December 1882, Cambridge 2nd January 1883, HMS Lion 11th November 1884, Cambridge 1st December 1887, Defiance 8th April 1888, HMS Shannon 9th September 1888, Cambridge 8th March 1889, HMS Bellerophon 16th March 1889, Vivid I 30th April 1892, Cambridge 13th June 1892 where he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer 24th April 1893. Discharged to pension 10th August 1894.

GVF & better £425 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse, Khedives Star 1882, Long Service and Good Conduct Medals Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Carpenter’s Mate Richard James Kitson Scorey, Royal Navy born in Devonport in 1851 and a Dockyard Apprenticeship served Skilled Shipwright he entered the Royal navy aboard HMS Indus as Skilled Shipwright 22nd June 1877. Serving aboard HMS Agincourt during the Egyptain operations of 1882, rated Skilled Carpenter’s Mate aboard HMS Agamemnon in January 1885 and Chief Carpenter’s Mate aboard HMS Dolphin in July 1889. Awarded the LSGC Medal 17th January 1889, he retired 30th June 1897. He died in Devonport in 1943 aged 92 years.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse no clasp

R S Corey Skd Shipwt HMS Agincourt

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

R J K Scorey Skd Carpt’s Mte HMS Indus

With copy service record.

Richard James Kitson Scorey was born 30th July 1851 in Devonport, a Shipwright almost certainly employed in HM Dockyard, Devonport, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Indus as Skilled Shipwright 22nd June 1877. He subsequently joined HMS Penguin 4th October 1877, HMS Indus 23rd September 1881, HMS Agincourt 27th May 1882, taking part in the Egypt operations of 1882 aboard this ship. Joining HMS Indus 1st August 1884, HMS Agamemnon 16th September 1884 where he was rated Skilled Carpenter’s Mate 29th January 1885, HMS Indus 13th December 1887, HMS Dolphin 9th May 1889 as Skilled Chief Carpenter’s Mate and Chief Carpenter’s Mate from 1st July 1889. Joining Vivid II 1st April 1893, Vivid I 2nd March 1896 and finally Vivid II 5th May 1896, he was discharged to pension 30th June 1897. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 17th January 1889. The 1911 census records he is a 59 year old Shipwright residing with his wife Annie, two daughters and three sons at 69 George Street, Devonport, he died in Devonport 24th December 1943 aged 92 years

Average VF Minimal pitting £425 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 no clasp, Khedives Star dated 1882 to Bandsman Thomas Jones, Royal Navy a Musician born in St Nicholls, Dublin he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Achilles 20th May 1882 and was discharged shore 19th January 1883. His Royal Navy service record indicates he was a Chelsea Hospital Pensioner dated 19th August 1915 indicating he later served in the Army.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 No clasp

T Jones Bandsn HMS Achilles

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

With copy service record and Medal roll entry.

Thomas Jones was born in St Nicholls, Dublin, Ireland 22nd May 1852 a Musician, he entered the Royal Navy as Bandsman aboard HMS Achilles 20th May 1882. Discharged shore 19th January 1883. His service record suggests further service in the Army, his Royal Navy service record annotated “Traced to Chelsea Hospital 17th June 1915 and “Traced Pension 19th August 1915”.

GVF £275 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 clasps Alexandria 11th July, The Nile 1884-5, Khedives Star dated 1882 to Stoker Thomas Mitchell Doidge, Royal Navy a former Bargeman born in Devonport, Plymouth 25th April 1852. Entering the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Indus 13th April 1877, he joined HMS Inflexible 5th July 1881 and HMS Monarch 1st October 1884 for duty with the Nile Flotilla. An habitual offender, he was reduced to the Second Class for Conduct on four occasions and received two custodial sentences. Discharged invalid from the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th December 1888, he died in Plymouth in 1905.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 clasps Alexandria 11th July, The Nile 1884-5

T M Doidge Stkr HMS Inflexible

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

With copy service record and Medal roll entries confirming both clasps on the Egypt and Sudan Medal.

Thomas Mitchell Doidge as born in Devonport, Devon 25th April 1852, a Bargeman he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at HMS Indus 13th April 1877, quick to become an habitual offender he was awarded the Second Class for Conduct 8th July 1878. Joining HMS Achilles 18th May 1877 and rated Stoker aboard this ship 1st July 1877, he was awarded the Second Class for Conduct for the second time 12th September 1881, this was to be awarded a third time in 1883 and a fourth time in 1888. Joining Indus 1st September 1880, HMS Inflexible 5th July 1881, HMS Monarch 1st October 1884 for duty with the Nile Flotilla. Joining Indus 19th August 1885, Cambridge 8th March 1886, Indus 7th February 1888, Defiance 4th July 1888, Indus 30th August 1888, he received a 19 day custodial sentence for absence 16th September 1888. Invalided from the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th December 1888 with “Fair” character assessment. He died in Plymouth in 1905.

Dark toned some contact wear otherwise

GVF £425 SOLD


Campaign Medal Groups

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04 to Shoeing Smith William Edward Burridge 5th Dragoon Guards late 7th Dragoon Guards and Worcestershire Regiment (Militia) a former Painter born in Birmingham in 1883. Attesting for the Militia 9th October 1900, he joined the 7th Dragoon Guards shortly after and served in South Africa in 1902. Transferring to the 5th Dragoon Guards 23rd October 1902 he served in Somaliland attached Indian Transport and Remounts and was one of only NINE men of this Regiment to receive the AGS Medal and clasp. Transferring to the King’s Dragoon Guards at Aldershot 13th July 1904, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 4th August 1904. In 1921 he was employed as a Decorator and emigrated to Canada arriving st St John, New Brunswick.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902

5579 Pte W Burridge 7th Drgn Gds

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

4776 Sh Sth W Burridge 5th Drgn Gds

With copy QSA & AGS Medal roll entries, Militia service papers, census

William Edward Burridge was born in Birmingham in 1883, a Painter, he attested for the Worcestershire Regiment Militia at Birmingham 9th October 1900 aged 17 years 6 months. He joined the 7th Dragoon Guards shortly after, the 1901 census records he is serving with his Regiment at Shorncliffe Camp. Serving in South Africa in 1902, he transferred to the 5th Dragoon Guards 23rd October 1902 as Shoeing Smith, he served during the Somaliland operations 1902 – 04 attached to the Indian Army Transport and Remounts. One of only NINE men of the 5th Dragoon Guards to receive the Africa General Service Medal with this clasp. Transferring to the King’s Dragoon Guards on arrival at Aldershot 13th July 1904, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 4th August 1904. In 1921 he boarded the SS Empress of France bound for St John, New Brunswick, Canada stating his age as 39 years and occupation as Decorator.

Rare AGS to the 5th Dragoon Guards

GVF & better £750 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Chief Engine Room Artificer Sidney Vernon Suggitt, Royal Navy born 30th August 1909 in Richmond, Yorkshire a Scholar, he entered the Royal Navy as an Engine Room Artificer Apprentice at Fisgard 31st December 1924.  Advanced to CERA 6th April 1940, joining Calliope 1st October 1940, HMS Cleopatra 20th November 1941. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal whilst serving at Moreta, the RN Base at Haifa 1st February 1943. Joining Pembroke 1st October 1947, he was discharged to pension 29th August 1949, in 1950 he applied to join the Indian Navy as a Commissioned Engineer, the result of his application not recorded. He died in Kingston upon Thames in 1971.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.38841 S V Suggitt CERA HMS Moreta

With copy service record and a small original photo of the recipient.

Sidney Vernon Suggitt was born 30th August 1909 in Richmond, Yorkshire a Scholar, he entered the Royal Navy as an Engine Room Artificer Apprentice at Fisgard 31st December 1924. Rated Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 5th Class at Pembroke 1st July 1929, acting ERA 4th Class 1st July 1930 aboard HMS Revenge, ERA 4th Class 20th July 1931, advanced to ERA 3rd Class 1st July 1933 aboard HMS Valiant, ERA 2nd Class 1st July 1937 at Pembroke II, Acting CERA 2nd Class 6th April 1939 aboard HMS Fortune. Joining Pembroke II 28th July 1939, advanced to CERA 6th April 1940, joining Calliope 1st October 1940, HMS Cleopatra 20th November 1941 on commissioning. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal whilst serving at Moreta, the RN Base at Haifa 1st February 1943. Joining Pembroke 1st October 1947, he was discharged to pension 29th August 1949, in 1950 he applied to join the Indian Navy as a Commissioned Engineer, the result of his application not recorded. He died in Kingston upon Thames in 1971.

NEF £165 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Able Seaman James Kendal Tarbet, Royal Navy born 4th September 1904 in Sunderland, an Apprentice Plater he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 10th June 1921. Serving aboard HMS Greenwich during the Palestine operations 1936-39, he was aboard HMS Bideford when the Second World War broke out. Wounded when Bideford was hit by a German bomb which detonated one of the ships depth charges during an air attack on the evening of 29th May 1940, whilst evacuating troops from Dunkirk. 16 ships company and 12 embarked soldiers were killed and 50 seriously wounded. The Dragonfly-Class River Gunboat Locust towed the badly damaged Bideford back to Dover, the journey taking 32 hours and ending on 31st May. Discharged to pension 23rd October 1945 from Drake I. He died in Durham in 1973.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

J.102741 J K Tarbet AB RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

J.102741 J K Tarbet AB HMS Greenwich

With copy service record.

James Kendal Tarbet was born 4th September 1904 in Sunderland, an Apprentice Plater he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 10th June 1921. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Warspite 4th Septermber 1922 and Able Seaman aboard HMS Warwick 26th October 1923. Joining HMS Brazen 18th October 1933, Drake I 7th October 1936, HMS Greenwich 29th December 1936, Cochrane 1st June 1938, Drake I 10th November 1938. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 14th October 1937 aboard HMS Greenwich, he Joined HMS Bideford 28th November 1938 and was still serving aboard this ship at least until October 1941. Discharged to 23rd October 1945 from Drake I. He died in Durham in 1973.

HMS Bideford

HMS Bideford was still part of the China Station on the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939, continuing to carry out patrols until being ordered to return to Britain in December 1939. On her journey back to home waters, Bideford formed part of the escort of Convoy HGF 14 from Gibraltar to the UK, attacking a suspected submarine contact off Cape Finisterre on 9 January 1940. In February 1940, Bideford joined the 1st Escort Vessel Division of the Western Approaches Command, and was deployed on escorting convoys between Gibraltar and the United Kingdom. While escorting one such convoy, the Britain-bound HG 19, on 23rd February, Bideford attacked another suspected submarine contact. She attacked another submarine contact on 18 March, while escorting Convoy OG 22F. In May 1940 she took part in the Dunkirk evacuation. On her first evacuation trip, on the evening of 29th May, Bideford was struck by a German bomb, which set off one of Bideford’s depth charges, badly damaging the ship, and killing 28 personnel, 16 from the ship’s crew and 12 passengers with 50 wounded, Able Seaman Tarbet is recorded as wounded during this action on his service record. The aft 40 feet (12 m) of the ship’s stern was blown off and the ship’s mainmast collapsed, with Bideford having to be grounded to avoid sinking. The Minesweeper HMS Kellett took off the surviving troops , but despite the damage to the sloop, other troops later boarded Bideford. The Dragonfly-Class River Gunboat Locust towed Bideford back to Dover, the journey taking 32 hours and ending on 31st May.

GVF & better £425 Available


Campaign Medal Groups

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Burma, War Medal, Queen Elizabeth 2 Coronation Medal 1953, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type to Petty Officer Joseph Charles Willis, Royal Navy. Enlisting in 1934 awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in December 1949, he appears on the Coronation Medal roll as Chief Petty Officer, Royal Navy, he died in Hampshire in 1975.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Burma Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Queen Elizabeth 2 Coronation Medal 1953

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 2nd type

JX.151290 J C Willis PO HMS Excellent

Mounted as originally worn, the Coronation Medal unmounted..

With copy LSGC and Coronation 1953 Medal roll entries.

Joseph Charles Willis born 21st January 1916 in Henley, Oxfordshire, awarded the LSGC Medal in December 1949 , he appears on the 1953 Coronation Medal roll as Chief Petty Officer, Royal Navy, he died SE Hampshire 1975.

GVF & better £195 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Petty Officer Arthur James Edwards Wilson born 17th August 1910 in Norwich, Norfolk an Errand By he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 13th January 1924 at Ganges joining HMS Volunteer 28th July 1939, she took part in the Norway operations commencing 9th April 1940. After a period ashore, he joined the King George V Class Battleship HMS Anson 24th August 1943, joining Pembroke 31st July 1944, he remained ashore until the end of hostilities. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th February 1944, discharged to pension 15th January 1952. 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

JX.125704 A J E Wilson PO HMS Anson

With details extracted from his on line service record. Arthur James Edwards Wilson born 17th August 1910 in Norwich, Norfolk an Errand By he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 13th January 1924 at Ganges. Rated Ordinary Seaman 17th August 1928 aboard HMS Ramillies, rated Able Seaman 17th February 1930 aboard HMS Cyclops, advanced to acting Leading Seaman 1st February 1939 aboard HMS Foxhound, joining HMS Volunteer 28th July 1939, confirmed in that rate 1st February 1940. In April Volunteer was assigned to support operations in Norway which began on 9th April. Joining Pembroke I 2nd May 1940,  Seabelle (Royal Naval Base Persian Gulf) 25th June 1940, advanced to acting Petty Officer 10th March 1941, and confirmed in that rate 10th March 1942, Pembroke 15th November 1942, HMS Anson (King George V Class Battleship) 24th August 1943. On the 4th October 1943 Anson provided cover for Operation Leaver, a US Naval operation against German shipping in the vicinity of Bodo, Norway, and during Operation Tungsten on 3rd April 1944, a successful airstrike against the German Battleship Tirpitz.

Joining Pembroke 31st July 1944, HMS Gould 25th May 1946, Sultan 14th September 1946, Bonaventure 21st September 1946, Pembroke 15th November 1946, Bonaventure 1st October 1947, Pembroke I 15th November 1947,  HMS Manxman 24th January 1948, HMS Solebay 6th September 1948, HMS Portland Bill 31st August 1949, advanced to Chief Petty Officer 8th June 1950, Pembroke I 1st July 1950, shore pensioned 15th January 1952. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th February 1944.

NEF £150 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Colour Sergeant John Sanders, Gordon Highlanders a former Chair Maker born in Sheffield  in 1871, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders in Glasgow 3rd February 1889. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 16th May 1889 and to the 1st Battalion 26th January 1896. Serving in India from 8th January 1896 to 18th October 1898, the 1st Battalion famous for their assault and capture of the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897, Egypt 19th October 1898 to 8th December 1898, South Africa 9th November 1899 to 3rd July 1900 when invalided home. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Lord Roberts in 1901 page, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded Army Order 242 of 1907. Discharged to pension 5th February 1910, he resided in Glasgow and served in the Special Reserve 1911 to 1914 being medically discharged 9th October 1914.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

3131 Sergt J Sanders 1st Bn Gord Hrs

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein

3131 SJT J Sanders Gordon Highrs

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

3131 C SJT J Sanders Gordon Hrs

With copy service papers, Medal roll entries, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, small copy photo of recipient wearing his IGS (1895).

Campaign Medal Groups

John Sanders was born in Sheffield, an 18 year 4 month old Chair Maker, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders in Glasgow 3rd February 1889 and joined the Depot two days later. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 16th May 1889, granted 1d Good Conduct Pay 5th February 1891, appointed Lance Corporal 28th February 1891, promoted Corporal 3rd October 1891, and posted to the Depot 9th September 1893. Appointed Lance Sergeant 23rd August 1894, promoted Sergeant 13th June 1895, posted 2nd Battalion 27th November 1895 and to the 1st Battalion 26th January 1896. Posted to the Depot 8th May 1900, 3rd (Reserve) Battalion 1st December 1901, Permanent Staff 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion Gordon Highlanders 1st February 1902 and promoted Colour Sergeant 5th September 1904. Discharged to pension having completed 21 years service 5th February 1910.

An attack on Dargai Heights during the Tirah Campaign resulted in the award of four Victoria Crosses . The Heights were held by Afridi  tribesmen but were successfully stormed by the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders and 2nd Battalion King Edward VII’s Own Gurkha Rifles  on 20  October 1897. Piper George Findlater and Private Edward Lawson of the Gordons both received the award the other two being awarded to soldiers of the Derbyshire and Dorset Regiments.

Image result for Gordon highlanders Dargai Heights
Gordons assault the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897

Serving in India from 8th January 1896 to 18th October 1898, including the attack on Dargai Heights during the Tirah Campaign 20th October 1897, Egypt 19th October 1898 to 8th December 1898, South Africa 9th November 1899 to 3rd July 1900 when invalided home. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Lord Roberts London Gazette 8th February 1901 page 849, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded Army Order 242 of 1907. Attesting for the Army Special Reserve 3rd February 1911 aged 44 years he stated his occupation as Clerk. Promoted to Colour Sergeant 3rd October 1914, he was discharged medically unfit for service 9th October 1914, home address recorded as 70 Balfour Street, Maryhill, Glasgow.

GVF and better £695 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 clasp Suakin 1885 reverse dated 1882, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, Khedives Star 1882 to Stoker John McCarthy, Royal Navy a former Boiler Maker born in Dublin in 1861 he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Pembroke 30th June 1882. Serving aboard HMS Euphrates during the Egypt operations of 1882, he was to return to this theatre of operations in 1885 aboard HMS Dolphin. Continuing to serve ashore and afloat he joined HMS Dryad 7th December 1899 taking part in the operations off Somaliland in 1902 aboard this ship. Discharged to pension 23rd April 1903, he was not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having been awarded three breaks in “Very Good” conduct.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 clasp Suakin 1885

J McCarthy Stkr 2 Cl HMS Euphrates

Africa General Service Medal VII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

J McCarthy Sto HMS Dryad

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

With copy service papers, Medal roll entries.

John McCarthy was born in Dublin 16th November 1861, a Boiler Maker, he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Pembroke 30th June 1882, he subsequently joined HMS Euphrates 12th July 1882 taking part in the operations off Egypt in 1882, Asia 11th October 1882, Pembroke 18th October 1882 where he was rated Stoker 29th November 1883, HMS Dolphin 1st May 1884 taking part in the Suakin operations of 1885 aboard this ship. Pembroke 1st October 1887, HMS Hotspur 24th January 1888, Pembroke 1st October 1887, HMS Rodney 14th May 1890, Pembroke 15th February 1893, HMS Sphinx 7th April 1893, HMS Magdala 23rd January 1894, HMS Sappho 17th May 1896, Pembroke 18th July 1896, Torpedo Store, Chatham 17th October 1896, Pembroke 20th April 1899, Torpedo Store Chatham 8th November 1899, Pembroke II 1st November 1899, HMS Dryad 7th December 1899 taking part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, Pembroke 29th November 1902 from where he was discharged to pension 23rd April 1903.

Not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, breaks in “Very Good” conduct recorded in 1889, 1890 and 1895.

115 clasps Suakin 1885 awarded to HMS Dolphin

137 clasps Somaliland 1902-04 awarded to HMS Dryad

An unusual combination, light pitting to Egypt and Sudan Medal therefore

VF and better £425 Reserved


 Campaign Medal Groups

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasp Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Sardinian issue, Victoria Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Victoria o Sergeant Thomas Short, 5th Division, Coast Brigade, Royal Artillery.

Crimea Medal Clasp Sebastopol

Gr T Short Ry AR*

Turkish Crimea

Gr T Short RA

Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

2061 Sergt Thos Short Coast Bde RA

 Thomas Short born 1832, Dunban Haddington, attesting for the Royal Artillery at Leigh, Midlothian on 28th January 1851, aged 18 years. Promoted Bombardier 1st October 1862, Corporal on 1stMay 1865 and Sergeant 1st December 1869. Sergeant Short served for a period of over 21 years and was discharged on 30th July 1872 aged 40 years. His service records shows the award of the Crimea Medal Clasp Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Medal and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

Naming worn away in places as indicated by *

Condition Good Fine / GVF £400 Available


 Campaign Medal Groups

Queen’s Korea Medal and United Nations Medal for Korea to Sergeant Frank Harold William Christie, Royal Army Service Corps late 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment born Horsham Sussex in 1919, he served with 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment in France 1939 to 1940. Transferring to the Royal Army Service Corps he served in Korea, he died Lambeth, London in 1988.

Queen’s Korea Medal 1st type

S/7890516 Sgt F H W Christie RASC

United Nations Medal for Korea (British issue)

Unnamed as issued

With Copy Muster Roll entry showing basic service details, all clasps confirmed on the Medal roll.

Frank Harold William Christie born in Horsham, Sussex in 1919, he is listed as embarking with 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment (4RTR) for France 19th September 1939 reference War Diary TNA WO167/4597, the unit (less tanks) being evacuated from Dunkirk 27th May 1940. Later transferring to the Royal Army Service Corps, he served in Korea, he died in Lambeth, London in 1988.

NEF £225 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

Crimea Medal with three clasps, Sebastopol, Inkermann, Alma, Turkish Crimea (Sardinian issue) Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Victoria Army to Christopher Whipps 50th Regiment of Foot (Queens Own Regiment) and 34th Regiment of Foot, enlisting 25th February 1952, he died at Shorncliffe 26th January 1871 whilst serving with the 34th Regiment.

Crimea Medal Clasps Sebastopol, Inkermann, Alma

362* *** Christopher Whipps 50th ***iment

Turkish Crimea Sardinian issue

3626 Christopher Whipps 50th Regt

Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Victoria

867 C Whipps 34th Regt 

With  Copies Muster Roll entry showing basic service details, all clasps confirmed on the Medal roll.

Christopher Whipps, born Romford Essex. Wife of Sarah Whipps he enlisted in the 50th Regiment on 25th February 1852, he died at Shorncliffe while serving with the 34th Foot on 26th January 1871.

 Copies Muster Roll entry showing basic service details

The Crimea Medal contemporary engraved naming in neat upright capital letters, worn away in places as indicated by **

Good Fine and better £545 Available


Campaign Medal Groups 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse no clasp, Khedives Star 1884-6, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Officer William Samuel Hill, HM Coast Guard late Royal Navy born in Lambeth, Surrey a former Labourer and Gas Fitter, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 8th April 1873. Serving aboard HMS Euryalus during the operations in the Sudan in 1885 as Captain’s Coxswain. Disrated in July 1885 to Able Seaman, he transferred to HM Coast Guard as Boatman 16th November 1887 and served at various stations in Ireland and Scotland. Advanced to Chief Boatman in Charge 13th June 1904 and Chief Officer (Warrant Officer) 1st January 1909, he retired 29th May 1912 after 39 years service.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse no clasp

W S Hill Coxn 1 CL HMS Euryalus

Khedives Star dated 1884-6

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

W S Hill Comd Biatn HM Coast Guard

William Samuel Hill was born in Lambeth, Surrey 29th May 1857 a Labourer and Gas Fitter he entered the Royal Navy at Fisgard as Boy 2nd Class 8th April 1873. Reated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Endymion 29th May 1875 and Able Seaman aboard HMS Royal Adelaide 3rd August 1876. Advanced to Leading Seaman 23rd March 1881, to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class aboard HMS Londonand to the 1st Class 16th September 1883. Joining HMS Euryalus, he was rated Captain’s Coxswian from 1st April 1884. Disrated to Able Seaman 2nd July 1885, he joined Excellent 24th July 1885, HMS Devastation 8th June 1886 where he was advanced to Leading Seaman 15th December 1886.

Transferring to HM Coast Guard as Boatman 16th November 1887, he served at stations at Dunbar, Elie (Fifeshire), Crail (Fifeshire), Berwick, Leith, Redheugh (Newcastle on Tyne), Rosehearty (Aberdeen), Mean Queensford, Butt of Lewes and Queensferry. Advanced to Commissioned Boatman 9th February 1894, Chief Boatman 14th February 1901, Chief Boatman in Charge (at Mean) 13th June 1904, Chief Officer (Warrant Officer) at Queensferry 1st January 1909. Discharged to pension 29th May 1912 after 39 years’ service, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 21st January 1901.

Average GVF Minimal pitting £450 Available