Campaign Medal Groups


 

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals to Sergeant (Flight Engineer) Alexander Neill Griffiths-Buchanan, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve No 78 Squadron born in St Thomas, Exeter, Devon in 1918. Commencing operations on 5th September 1943, his first mission was to bomb Manheim and he had a narrow escape on 22nd September 1943 during a bombing mission to Hanover when his aircraft was forced to take violent evasive action when attacked by German Fighters. He failed to return from his fifth mission to bomb Hannover on the night of 8th / 9th October 1943, his Halifax Mark II aircraft crashing at Strohen, there was only one survivor Sergeant L W Colman who was taken prisoner of war. Aged 25 years Sergeant Griffiths-Buchanan now rests in the Hanover War Cemetery.

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Air Ministry Medal award box addressed

A C Griffiths-Buchanan, 18 Edwin Road, Alphington Road, Exeter, Devon

Air Council Condolence slip

Sergeant A N Griffiths-Buchanan

With research listed here, two original photos one of Sergeant Griffiths-Buchanan (reverse Swift Studios Plymouth and Exeter) and another of his original grave as dug and marked by the Germans. The Medals in waxed packets.

NEF £495 Reserved


 

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, King George VI Coronation Medal 1937, Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV to Squadron Leader Eric Dickens Bourchier Hawksley, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Born in 1902 he was a great grandson of the author Charles Dickens and was President of the Dickens Fellowship 1966 to 1968. Educated at Winchester College, he served in the Colonial Service and from 1940 was commissioned into the Administrative and Special Duties Branch, RAFVR. Mentioned in Despatches in 1945, he worked as a Code Breaker at Bletchley Park. Relinquishing his RAFVR commission in 1954, he died in 1975.

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

King George VI Coronation Medal 1937 engraved

Sergt E D P Hawksley “F” Div MSC

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV Coinage Head

Dep Sergt Eric D P Hawksley

With research listed here, the group mounted as originally worn.

NEF £425 SOLD


 

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, war Medal, Air Ministry named card medal issue box, condolence slip etc to Sergeant (Air Gunner) Jack Stock, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve No 166 Squadron from Shaw, Lancashire. Sergeant Stock failed to return from a mine laying sortie off the French coast on the night of 3rd / 4th April 1943 aged 22 years. The Pilot Sergeant A H Radbourne rests in a cemetery in Moelan-Sur-Mer, the other crew members commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, War Medal

1021498 Sgt J Stock RAF

Air Ministry Medal box of issue addressed

H Stock ESQ, 25 Oldham Road, Shaw, Nr Oldham, Lancs

Air Ministry Condolence Slip

Sergeant J Stock

The three Medals “Boots style” impressed naming.

With copies of his sorties with 166 Squadron (Wellington Mark III aircraft) and casualty details.

4th February 1943 bombing Lorient, fierce fires seen in docks, 13th February bombing Lorient bombs exploded in dock area, 14th February Cologne target bombed as ordered, 16th February bombing Lorient very large explosion seen, 21st February Sea search, nothing seen, 26th February bombing Cologne, problems with starboard engine could not take off,28th February Minelaying in Le Croisssic Point, 12th March Bombing Essen, 16th March Minelaying, 28th March bombing St Nazaire, 3rd April Minelaying, aircraft failed to return from this sortie, nothing was heard of them following take off, light flak encountered by other crews from enemy ships, clear visibility.

Jack Stock was 22 years old, the son of Herbert and Annie Sock of Shaw, Lancashire he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

EF £495 Reserved


 

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Stoker Mechanic George Watkins, Royal Navy a former Labourer born in Sunbury Middlesex in 1904. A Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at Victory 13th April 1923 as Stoker 2nd Class. Joining HMS Somali 6th December 1938, shortly after commissioning he served aboard this ship during the Norway operations of 1940, being damaged by air attack on the 2nd May she was forced to return to Scapa Flow for repairs. Joining Victory 15th September 1941, he subsequently joined HMS Marne 18th November 1941 for Arctic convoy duty and HMS Scylla 20th November 1942, coming ashore 6th February 1943, he was discharged to pension 20th August 1948.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

K.60932 G Watkins Sto 1 RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

K.60932 G Watkins Sto 1 HMS Hawkins.

Mounted as originally worn with original certificate of service.

George Watkins was born in Sunbury, Middlesex 29th March 1904, a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at Victory 13th April 1923 as Stoker 2nd Class. He subsequently joined HMS Assistance 12th September 1923, rated Stoker 1st Class 13th May 1924, HMS Leamington 4th December 1924, Victory 14th October 1925, HMS Yarmouth 8th April 1926, Victory 5th February 1927, HMS Courageous 21st February 1928, HMS Cairo 21st June 1929, Victory 17th September 1930, HMS Frobisher 26th November 1930, HMS Vindictive 21st June 1932, HMS Nelson 1st September 1932, Victory 4th January 1935, Excellent 24th January 1925, HMS Repulse 9th January 1936, Victory 3rd December 1937, HMS Hawkins 22nd January 1938, HMS Somali 6th December 1938, Victory 15th September 1941

HMS Somali was  launched on 24 August 1937, and commissioned on 12 December 1938.On 3 September 1939, Somali intercepted the German Freighter Hannah Boge 350 miles south of Iceland, and took her as a prize. This was the first enemy merchant ship to be captured during the war. On 15 May 1940, during the Norwegian campaign Somali was carrying The Commander of 24th Guards Brigade back to Harstad from a reconnaissance of Mo when she was bombed by German aircraft on 2nd May 1940 and forced to return to the UK for repairs, taking the Brigadier with her. He did not reach Harstad until 23 May. In October 19140 Somali participated in the sinking of the German WSB 5 Adolf Vinnen in the Norwegian Sea off Stadlandet, Norway. As leader of 6th Destryer Flotilla she spent most of the remainder of 1940 and 1941 screening Home Fleet sweeps. In May 1941, Somali boarded the German weather ship München. Prior to being boarded, the crew of München threw overboard the ship’s Enigma Machine in a weighted bag. However, documents on the operation of the Enigma machine were left on board, as were vital code books providing a breakthrough for Allied code breakers.

Joining HMS Marne 18th November 1941 for Arctic convoy duty, HMS Scylla 20th November 1942, Victory 6th February 1943, rated Stoker Mechanic 2nd May 1947 and discharged 20th August 1948. Awarded the LSGC Medal 14th April 1938. Home address recorded as 209 Ludlow Road, Itchen, Southampton, Hampshire.

GVF & better £345 Available


 

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Alma Balaklava, Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Sardinian issue, Turkey Order of the Medjidie 5th Class, Sardinia Silver War Medal Al Valore Militare 1855-56 to Lieutenant Colonel Robert Douglas Clephane born 1st January 1821 at Kirkness House on the shore of Loch Leven, the son of the Sherrif of Fifeshire. Ensign 79th Regiment of Highlanders by purchase 8th June 1836, promoted Brevet Lieutenant Colonel 6th June 1856 for his services during the assault on the fortifications at Sebastopol 18th June 1855. His book The Story of Sebastopol  A Poem in Two Cantos was published in 1869, a copy accompanies the group. Retired by sale of commission  6th June 1856, he died in Fife in 1887.

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasps Alma, Balaklava, Sebastopol

Major R D Clephane 79th Highlanders

Turkish Crimea Medal Sardinian issue

Unnamed as issued

Turkey Order of the Medjidie 5th Class

Unnamed as awarded

Sardinia Silver War Medal Al Valore Militare engraved reverse

Lt Col Robt Douglas Clephane 79 Regt

All medals with ornate Silver Ribbon Buckle Brooches.

The Crimea Medal contemporary engraved naming in upright capital letters in the correct style, the Sardinian War Medal correct engraved naming.

Robert Douglas Clephane born 1st January 1821 at Kirkness House on the shore of Loch Leven, the son of the Sherrif of Fifeshire.

Ensign 79th Regiment of Highlanders by purchase 8th June 1836 (, Lieutenant by purchase 18th September 1840 (London Gazette 18th September 1840 page 2090), in 1841 the Regiment were serving in Gibraltar, Captain by purchase 11th April 1845 (London Gazette 11th April 1845 page 1113), in 1851 the Regiment were serving in Quebec, Canada, Major without purchase 13th August 1854 (London Gazette 8th September 1854 page 2763), Brevet Lieutenant Colonel 6th June 1856 for his services during the assault on the fortifications at Sebastopol 18th June 1855. He married Annie Laura Pine at St Marylebone Church, London 13th December 1855, retired by sale of commission  6th June 1856. Residing in Duddingston, Midlothian as recorded on the 1861 and 1871 census, in 1881 he was residing in Moffat, Dumfies. He died at Strattendry, Fife 3rd February 1887 aged 67 years.

Order of the Medjidie 5th Class London Gazette 2nd March 1858 “For distinguished services before the enemy in the late war”.

The London Evening Standard 5th September 1857 page 3 announced the award of the Sardinian War  Medal –

“Served in the Eastern campaign of 1854-56 (actually to 25th June 1855), including Alma, Balaklava and siege of Sebastopol, including the assault of 18th June (1855), the expeditions to Kertch and Yenikale”.

With a copy of his book The Story of Sebastopol  A Poem in Two Cantos published by William Elgin & Sons, Edinburgh in 1869, the publication includes –

Canto 1 – Declaration of war, voyage out, Malta, dardanelles, Scutari, Balgaria, Sickness, Embarkation at Varna for the Crimea, Eupatoria, old fort, battle of the Alma.

Canto 2 – Halt after the battle, advance on Balaklava, Balaklava, opening of the siege of Sebastopol, Battle of Balaklava, approach of winter, Battle of Inkermann, winter, return of spring, Assault of 18th June and 8th September, fall of Sebastopol, conclusion.

An account of the siege of Sebastopol 

During the first four months of 1855, low fever and dysentery prevailed in the Regiment to such an extent that it was found necessary to put the 79th under canvass in a position about 300 yards higher up the slope, exposed to the sea breezes from the south-west. Very soon after this move the health of the regiment underwent much improvement. In connection with what we have just stated, we shall introduce here a striking and intensely pathetic reminiscence of the campaign, which has been furnished us by Lieutenant Colonel Clephane. It shows how these comparatively raw soldiers of the Cameron Highlanders displayed a gallant devotion to their duty under the most trying circumstances which would have reflected credit upon veterans of a dozen campaigns.

“Shortly after the opening of the bombardment of Sebastopol, the 79th Highlanders furnished a party for trench duty, consisting of about 150 men, under command of a field officer, and accompanied by a similar number detailed from the brigade of Guards. They marched for the post of duty shortly before daybreak, taking the well-known route through the “Valley of Death,” as it was called. At that time a foe more dreaded than the Russians had persistently dogged the footsteps of the army, never attacking in force, but picking out a victim here and there, with such unerring certainty that to be sensible of his approach was to feel doomed. The glimmering light was at first insufficient for making out aught more than the dark body of men that moved silently along the above gloomy locality in column of march four deep ; but as the sun approached nearer the horizon, and the eye became accustomed to the glimmer, it was seen that one man was suffering under pain of no ordinary nature, and was far from being fit to go on duty that morning.

Indeed, on being closely inspected, it became evident that the destroyer had set his seal on the unfortunate fellow’s brow, and how he had mustered the determination to equip himself and march out with the rest was almost inconceivable. Upon being questioned, however, he persisted that there was not much the matter, though he owned to spasms in his inside and cramps in his legs, and he steadily refused to return to camp without positive orders to that effect, maintaining that he would be better as soon as he could get time to “lie down a bit.” All this time the colour of the poor fellow’s face was positively and intensely blue, and the damps of death were standing unmistakably on his forehead. He staggered as he walked, groaning with clenched teeth but keeping step, and shifting his rifle with the rest in obedience to each word of command. He ought probably to have been at once despatched to the rear, but the party was now close to the scene of action (Gordon’s battery), the firing would immediately commence, and somehow he was for the moment forgotten. The men took their places lining the breastwork, the troops whom they relieved marched off, and the firing began, and was kept up with great fury on both sides. All at once a figure staggered out from the hollow beneath the earthen rampart where the men were lying, and fell groaning upon the earth a few paces to the rear. It was the unfortunate man whose case we have just noticed. He was now in the last extremity, and there was not the ghost of a chance for him in this world; but three or four of his comrades instantly left their place of comparative safety, and surrounded him with a view of doing what they could to alleviate his sufferings. It was not much; they raised him up and rubbed his legs, which were knotted with cramps, and brandy from an officer’s flask was administered without stint.

All in vain, of course; but, curiously enough, even then the dying man did not lose heart, or show any weakness under sufferings which must have been frightful. He was grateful to the men who were busy rubbing his agonised limbs, and expressed satisfaction with their efforts, after a fashion that had even some show of piteous humour about it. “Aye.” groaned he, as they came upon a knot of sinews as large as a pigeon’s egg, “that’s the vaygabone !” It became evident now that the best thing that could be done would be to get him home to camp, so that he might at least die beyond the reach of shot and shell. The open ground to the rear of the battery was swept by a perfect storm of these missiles; but volunteers at once came forward, and placed upon one of the bloodstained litters the dying man, who, now nearly insensible, was carried back to his tent. This was affected without casualty to the bearers, who forthwith returned to their post, leaving their unfortunate comrade at the point of breathing his last.”

GVF & better £3,500 Available


 

Queen’s Korea Medal, United Nations Medal for Korea, Meritorious Service Medal E2 Army, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Regular Army E2 and Bar for Second Award to Warrant Officer Class 2 J N L Hughes, Royal Army Ordnance Corps.

Queen’s Korea Medal

14473664 Sgt J N L Hughes RAOC

United Nations Medal for Korea (British issue)

Unnamed as issued

Meritorious Service Medal Army E2

LS 14473664 WO2 J N L Hughes RAOC

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Regular Army E2

14473664 S Sgt J N L Hughes RAOC

Court mounted as originally worn.

GVF £750 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Petty Officer Arthur James Edwards Wilson born 17th August 1910 in Norwich, Norfolk an Errand By he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 13th January 1924 at Ganges joining HMS Volunteer 28th July 1939, she took part in the Norway operations commencing 9th April 1940. After a period ashore, he joined the King George V Class Battleship HMS Anson 24th August 1943, joining Pembroke 31st July 1944, he remained ashore until the end of hostilities. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th February 1944, discharged to pension 15th January 1952. 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

JX.125704 A J E Wilson PO HMS Anson

With details extracted from his on line service record. Arthur James Edwards Wilson born 17th August 1910 in Norwich, Norfolk an Errand By he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 13th January 1924 at Ganges. Rated Ordinary Seaman 17th August 1928 aboard HMS Ramillies, rated Able Seaman 17th February 1930 aboard HMS Cyclops, advanced to acting Leading Seaman 1st February 1939 aboard HMS Foxhound, joining HMS Volunteer 28th July 1939, confirmed in that rate 1st February 1940. In April Volunteer was assigned to support operations in Norway which began on 9th April. Joining Pembroke I 2nd May 1940,  Seabelle (Royal Naval Base Persian Gulf) 25th June 1940, advanced to acting Petty Officer 10th March 1941, and confirmed in that rate 10th March 1942, Pembroke 15th November 1942, HMS Anson (King George V Class Battleship) 24th August 1943. On the 4th October 1943 Anson provided cover for Operation Leaver, a US Naval operation against German shipping in the vicinity of Bodo, Norway, and during Operation Tungsten on 3rd April 1944, a successful airstrike against the German Battleship Tirpitz.

Joining Pembroke 31st July 1944, HMS Gould 25th May 1946, Sultan 14th September 1946, Bonaventure 21st September 1946, Pembroke 15th November 1946, Bonaventure 1st October 1947, Pembroke I 15th November 1947,  HMS Manxman 24th January 1948, HMS Solebay 6th September 1948, HMS Portland Bill 31st August 1949, advanced to Chief Petty Officer 8th June 1950, Pembroke I 1st July 1950, shore pensioned 15th January 1952. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th February 1944.

NEF £175 Available


 

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Colour Sergeant John Sanders, Gordon Highlanders a former Chair Maker born in Sheffield  in 1871, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders in Glasgow 3rd February 1889. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 16th May 1889 and to the 1st Battalion 26th January 1896. Serving in India from 8th January 1896 to 18th October 1898, the 1st Battalion famous for their assault and capture of the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897, Egypt 19th October 1898 to 8th December 1898, South Africa 9th November 1899 to 3rd July 1900 when invalided home. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Lord Roberts in 1901 page, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded Army Order 242 of 1907. Discharged to pension 5th February 1910, he resided in Glasgow and served in the Special Reserve 1911 to 1914 being medically discharged 9th October 1914.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

3131 Sergt J Sanders 1st Bn Gord Hrs

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein

3131 SJT J Sanders Gordon Highrs

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

3131 C SJT J Sanders Gordon Hrs

With copy service papers, Medal roll entries, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, small copy photo of recipient wearing his IGS (1895).

John Sanders was born in Sheffield, an 18 year 4 month old Chair Maker, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders in Glasgow 3rd February 1889 and joined the Depot two days later. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 16th May 1889, granted 1d Good Conduct Pay 5th February 1891, appointed Lance Corporal 28th February 1891, promoted Corporal 3rd October 1891, and posted to the Depot 9th September 1893. Appointed Lance Sergeant 23rd August 1894, promoted Sergeant 13th June 1895, posted 2nd Battalion 27th November 1895 and to the 1st Battalion 26th January 1896. Posted to the Depot 8th May 1900, 3rd (Reserve) Battalion 1st December 1901, Permanent Staff 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion Gordon Highlanders 1st February 1902 and promoted Colour Sergeant 5th September 1904. Discharged to pension having completed 21 years service 5th February 1910.

An attack on Dargai Heights during the Tirah Campaign resulted in the award of four Victoria Crosses . The Heights were held by Afridi  tribesmen but were successfully stormed by the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders and 2nd Battalion King Edward VII’s Own Gurkha Rifles  on 20  October 1897. Piper George Findlater and Private Edward Lawson of the Gordons both received the award the other two being awarded to soldiers of the Derbyshire and Dorset Regiments.

Image result for Gordon highlanders Dargai Heights

Gordons assault the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897

Serving in India from 8th January 1896 to 18th October 1898, including the attack on Dargai Heights during the Tirah Campaign 20th October 1897, Egypt 19th October 1898 to 8th December 1898, South Africa 9th November 1899 to 3rd July 1900 when invalided home. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Lord Roberts London Gazette 8th February 1901 page 849, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded Army Order 242 of 1907. Attesting for the Army Special Reserve 3rd February 1911 aged 44 years he stated his occupation as Clerk. Promoted to Colour Sergeant 3rd October 1914, he was discharged medically unfit for service 9th October 1914, home address recorded as 70 Balfour Street, Maryhill, Glasgow.

GVF and better £750 Available


 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 clasp Suakin 1885 reverse dated 1882, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, Khedives Star 1882 to Stoker John McCarthy, Royal Navy a former Boiler Maker born in Dublin in 1861 he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Pembroke 30th June 1882. Serving aboard HMS Euphrates during the Egypt operations of 1882, he was to return to this theatre of operations in 1885 aboard HMS Dolphin. Continuing to serve ashore and afloat he joined HMS Dryad 7th December 1899 taking part in the operations off Somaliland in 1902 aboard this ship. Discharged to pension 23rd April 1903, he was not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having been awarded three breaks in “Very Good” conduct.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 reverse dated 1882 clasp Suakin 1885

J McCarthy Stkr 2 Cl HMS Euphrates

Africa General Service Medal VII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

J McCarthy Sto HMS Dryad

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

With copy service papers, Medal roll entries.

John McCarthy was born in Dublin 16th November 1861, a Boiler Maker, he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Pembroke 30th June 1882, he subsequently joined HMS Euphrates 12th July 1882 taking part in the operations off Egypt in 1882, Asia 11th October 1882, Pembroke 18th October 1882 where he was rated Stoker 29th November 1883, HMS Dolphin 1st May 1884 taking part in the Suakin operations of 1885 aboard this ship. Pembroke 1st October 1887, HMS Hotspur 24th January 1888, Pembroke 1st October 1887, HMS Rodney 14th May 1890, Pembroke 15th February 1893, HMS Sphinx 7th April 1893, HMS Magdala 23rd January 1894, HMS Sappho 17th May 1896, Pembroke 18th July 1896, Torpedo Store, Chatham 17th October 1896, Pembroke 20th April 1899, Torpedo Store Chatham 8th November 1899, Pembroke II 1st November 1899, HMS Dryad 7th December 1899 taking part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, Pembroke 29th November 1902 from where he was discharged to pension 23rd April 1903.

Not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, breaks in “Very Good” conduct recorded in 1889, 1890 and 1895.

115 clasps Suakin 1885 awarded to HMS Dolphin

137 clasps Somaliland 1902-04 awarded to HMS Dryad

An unusual combination, light pitting to Egypt and Sudan Medal therefore

VF and better £450 Available


 

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Chief Petty Officer Claude Leslie Williams, Royal Navy born in Harwich, Essex 12th March 1910 a Cabinet Maker he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 15th September 1926. Mentioned in Despatches for his distinguished service during the evacuation of the BEF from the beaches of Dunkirk Operation Dynamo, whilst serving aboard HMS Wolsey. Williams was in charge of one of the ship’s boats ferrying troops from the beach to his ship. HMS Wolsey completed six round trips from Dover to Dunkirk and on one occasion remained 25 hours in the outer harbour and off shore, frequently under air attack as Wireless Telegraphy link ship. She carried a total of 3,650 soldiers between 28th May and 1st June 1940 when she had to go to Portsmouth for essential repairs. Leaving Wolsey in April 1940, he spent the remainder of the war at various shore bases, he retired from the Royal Navy 9th April 1950 and died in Hythe, Southampton, 5th January 1989.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

JX.128094 C L Williams A/PO RN

1939/45 Star Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

JX.128094 C L Williams PO HMS Tyne

 With copy service records covering his entire RN service, copy Medal Card confirming the award of the 1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals only for his 2WW service, London Gazette entry and header for MID, copy recommendation, copy LSGC Medal roll entry and death certificate.

Claude Leslie Williams was born in Harwich, Essex 12th March 1910 a Cabinet Maker he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 15th September 1926, joining HMS Benbow 27th August 1927 he was rated Ordinary Seaman aboard this ship 12th March 1928. Rated Able Seaman aboard HMS Enterprise 12th August 1929, he was advanced to acting Leading Seaman aboard HMS Foxhound 17th April 1936 and confirmed in that rate 17th April 1937 aboard the same ship. Joining HMS Wanderer 1st October 1937, HMS Garland 28th January 1938, he was advanced to acting Petty Officer aboard this ship 12th November 1938 and confirmed in that rate 12th November 1939 aboard the same ship. Joining HMS Wolsey 1st January 1940 he served aboard this ship during the evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk Operation Dynamo.

Image result for hms wolsey pictures

HMS Wolsey returns to Dover from Dunkirk with 800 soldiers aboard.

HMS Wolsey completed six round trips from Dover to Dunkirk and on one occasion remained 25 hours in the outer harbour and off shore, frequently under air attack as Wireless Telegraphy link ship. She carried a total of 3,650 soldiers between 28th and 1st June 1940 when she had to go to Portsmouth for essential repairs.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 16th August 1940 page 5070

“For good services in the withdrawal of the Allied Armies from the beaches of Dunkirk”.

The recommendation file TNA ADM116/4504 records –

“Leading Seaman Claude Leslie Williams C/JX.128094 was selected from the boat’s crews as being outstanding for their work in ferrying troops (from the beach to the Destroyer)”.

Joining Osprey (RN Base Portland, Dorset), 7th August 1940, Nimrod (Training Establishment and Anti Submarine Base, Cambletown) 2nd December 1940, Osprey 13th December 1940, Nemesis (Acomodation ship, Iceland) 31st May 1941, Osprey 22nd June 1941, HMS Tyne (Destroyer Depot Ship, Scapa Flow) 28th June 1942, Osprey 9th April 1943, HMS Tyne 23rd April 1943, Osprey 13th December 1943, advanced to Temporary Chief Petty Officer 13th February 1945, Malabar (RN Base Bermuda) 28th October 1946, confirmed in the rate of Chief Petty Officer 1st October 1947, Pembroke I 4th May 1949, HMS Woolwich 11th May 1949, Collingwood 5th February 1950, Pembroke I 4th March 1950 and discharged shore to pension 8th April 1950. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 19th February 1943.

Claude Leslie Williams died at his home 34 Adams Road, Hythe, Southampton 5th January 1989, his occupation is recorded as “Retired Technical Advisor”.

A fine award for Operation Dynamo.

GVF & better £595 SOLD


 

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type with Clasp for Second Award to Chief Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic Matthew Redshaw, Royal Navy a former Coal Miner born in Chester-Le-Street, Durham in 1905. Entering the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class 20th August 1924, he was advanced to Chief Stoker in 1937. Serving aboard HMS Belfast on the outbreak of the Second World War, he had joined Belfast on commissioning, he served aboard this ship until August 1944. Joining HMS King George V in October 1944, he came ashore in April 1946. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 21st July 1939 and the clasp 7th July 1958. Discharged 28th July 1958, after 34 years service, he was employed as a factory cleaner and died at his home in Southsea, Portsmouth in 1978 aged 73 years.

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

K.64619 M Redshaw SPO RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, Pacific Star clasp Burma, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type with clasp for SECOND AWARD

K.64619 M Redshaw Ch Sto HMS Victory

With copy service papers covering the period 1924 to 1958, copy 2WW Medal award card verifying all medals and clasps, copy death certificate. Copy LSGC Medal roll and Bar entty (By Captain K J Douglas-Morris, RN).

The group mounted as originally worn with dark Navy blue serge cloth backing.

Matthew Redshaw was born in Chester-Le-Street, Durham 3rd March 1905 a Coal Miner, he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Victory III 20th August 1924. Joining his first ship HMS Barham, he was rated Stoker 1st Class aboard this ship 20th July 1925. Advanced to acting Leading Stoker aboard HMS Nelson 12th March 1928, he was confirmed in this rate at Fisgard 15th May 1930. Advanced to Acting Stoker Petty Officer aboard HMS Sandwich 20th January 1933 and confirmed in that rate at Victory II 20th January 1934. Advanced to Chief Stoker aboard HMS Ajax 4th September 1937, he joined HMS Belfast 3rd August 1939 (on commissioning) and served aboard this ship until 23rd August 1944 when he joined Victory.

HMS Belfast

Built by Messrs Harland & Wolff in 1936, HMS Belfast was launched by Anne Chamberlain, wife of the then Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, on St Patrick’s Day in 1938. After fitting out and builder’s trials, Belfast was commissioned into the Royal Navy on 5 August 1939 under the command of Captain G A Scott DSO, Royal Navy. Designed for the protection of trade and offensive action she was immediately called into service patrolling the northern waters in efforts to impose a maritime blockade on Germany. However, disaster struck after only two months at sea when Belfast hit a magnetic mine on 21st November 1939. There were few casualties but the damage to her hull was so severe she was out of action for three years.

On rejoining the home fleet in 1942 she was still the largest and most powerful Cruiser in the Royal Navy and most importantly she was equipped with the most advanced radar systems. Belfast was immediately called into action and played a crucial role in protecting the arctic convoys, Russia’s supply route throughout the war. Most notably in her role during the Battle of North Cape which saw the sinking of the German battle cruiser Scharnhorst and the loss of all but 36 of her 1,963 crew. Belfast remained protecting the arctic convoys until 1944, then spent five weeks supporting the D-Day landings and reportedly fired one of the first shots on D-Day itself, firing over 5,000 rounds.

Joining HMS King George V 15th October 1944, Victory II 27th April 1946, he was rated Stoker Mechanic  (new trade rating) 29th July 1950, Leading Stoker Mechanic 30th July 1950, Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic 31st July 1950, Chief Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic 1st August 1950. Joining Belleropheon 1st September 1950, he was discharged 28th July 1958. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 4th July 1939, he would have qualified for the Bar to the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 4th July 1954 and this was awarded 7th July 1957. He died at his home in 13 Mafeking Road, Southsea 24th October 1978, his occupation recorded as factory cleaner (retired).

GVF and better £525 SOLD


 

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Stoker Petty Officer Alfred Henry Binstead, Royal Navy from Belfast. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal aboard the Flower Class Corvette HMS Anemone 5th December 1940, he was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal for his services aboard HMS Balsam in defence of North Atlantic Convoy OS.51 and the destruction of the German Submarine U-135 on 15th July 1943, downgraded to a Mention in Despatches

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

KX.86656 A H Binstead L Sto RN

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medals with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

KX.86656 A H Binstead SPO HMS Anemone

With copy London Gazette entry and header for MID, recommendation for Award, downgraded to an MID.

Mounted as originally worn with dark blue Navy surge cloth backing.

Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 5th December 1940 aboard the Flower Class Corvette HMS Anemone.

Stoker Petty Officer Alfred Henry Binfield was Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 9th November 1943 page 4916

“For gallant and distinguished services in action with enemy Submarines while serving in His Majesty’s Ships……Balsam“.

The original recommendation is for a Decoration (Distinguished Service Medal) downgraded to a Mention in Despatches TNA reference ADM1/14503

“For skill and devotion to duty at his action station as Engine Room Stoker Petty Officer during a successful action against an enemy submarine. The manoeuvres of the escorts from the time this U-Boat attacked the convoy at 10:20 until its final destruction at 12:06 were such as to call for a high degree of skill and care from the Engine Room personnel. The operations required of escorts ro ensure destruction of this U-Boat could not have been accomplished without the skill and devotion to duty of the Engine Rood Department”.

The destruction of the U-135 took place on 15th July 1943 in the North Atlantic, a combination of depth charges and ramming, 5 crew were lost, 41 officers and ratings were rescued and taken prisoner of war. The U-135 (Oberleutnant Zur See Otto Luther) ignored standing orders that attacks on convoys should not be attempted and attacked convoy OS.51. He damaged the 4,762 ton freighter Twickenham but was spotted by the escort. The sloop HMS Rochester and corvettes HMS Balsam and Mignonette launched a series of depth charge attacks which blew the submarine to the surface, where she was rammed by HMS Rochester.

Subsequent interrogation of U-135’s crew revealed that the Boat was still seaworthy after depth charging and that Luther had been the first man to abandon her. He had not sunk anything for over a year and was desperate to do so before the end of his patrol, hence his disregard for orders.

Slight edge knock to LSGC, scratch through “i” of Binfield on NGS otherwise

GVF & better £400 Available


 

Crimea Medal 1854-56 clasp Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Sardinian issue, Victoria Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Victoria o Sergeant Thomas Short, 5th Division, Coast Brigade, Royal Artillery.

Crimea Medal Clasp Sebastopol

Gr T Short Ry AR*

Turkish Crimea

Gr T Short RA

Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

2061 Sergt Thos Short Coast Bde RA

 Thomas Short born 1832, Dunban Haddington, attesting for the Royal Artillery at Leigh, Midlothian on 28th January 1851, aged 18 years. Promoted Bombardier 1st October 1862, Corporal on 1st May 1865 and Sergeant 1st December 1869. Sergeant Short served for a period of over 21 years and was discharged on 30th July 1872 aged 40 years. His service records shows the award of the Crimea Medal Clasp Sebastopol, Turkish Crimea Medal and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

Naming worn away in places as indicated by *

Condition Good Fine / GVF £450 Available


 

Queen’s Korea Medal and United Nations Medal for Korea to Sergeant Frank Harold William Christie, Royal Army Service Corps late 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment born Horsham Sussex in 1919, he served with 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment in France 1939 to 1940. Transferring to the Royal Army Service Corps he served in Korea, he died Lambeth, London in 1988.

Queen’s Korea Medal 1st type

S/7890516 Sgt F H W Christie RASC

United Nations Medal for Korea (British issue)

Unnamed as issued

With Copy Muster Roll entry showing basic service details, all clasps confirmed on the Medal roll.

Frank Harold William Christie born in Horsham, Sussex in 1919, he is listed as embarking with 4th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment (4RTR) for France 19th September 1939 reference War Diary TNA WO167/4597, the unit (less tanks) being evacuated from Dunkirk 27th May 1940. Later transferring to the Royal Army Service Corps, he served in Korea, he died in Lambeth, London in 1988.

NEF £225 Available


 

Crimea Medal with three clasps, Sebastopol, Inkermann, Alma, Turkish Crimea (Sardinian issue) Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Victoria Army to Christopher Whipps 50th Regiment of Foot (Queens Own Regiment) and 34th Regiment of Foot, enlisting 25th February 1952, he died at Shorncliffe 26th January 1871 whilst serving with the 34th Regiment.

Crimea Medal Clasps Sebastopol, Inkermann, Alma

362* *** Christopher Whipps 50th ***iment

Turkish Crimea Sardinian issue

3626 Christopher Whipps 50th Regt

Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Victoria

867 C Whipps 34th Regt 

With  Copies Muster Roll entry showing basic service details, all clasps confirmed on the Medal roll.

Christopher Whipps, born Romford Essex. Wife of Sarah Whipps he enlisted in the 50th Regiment on 25th February 1852, he died at Shorncliffe while serving with the 34th Foot on 26th January 1871.

 Copies Muster Roll entry showing basic service details

The Crimea Medal contemporary engraved naming in neat upright capital letters, worn away in places as indicated by **

Good Fine and better £595 Available


 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse, Khedives Star 1882, Long Service and Good Conduct Medals Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Carpenter’s Mate Richard James Kitson Scorey, Royal Navy born in Devonport in 1851 and a Dockyard Apprenticeship served Skilled Shipwright he entered the Royal navy aboard HMS Indus as Skilled Shipwright 22nd June 1877. Serving aboard HMS Agincourt during the Egyptain operations of 1882, rated Skilled Carpenter’s Mate aboard HMS Agamemnon in January 1885 and Chief Carpenter’s Mate aboard HMS Dolphin in July 1889. Awarded the LSGC Medal 17th January 1889, he retired 30th June 1897. He died in Devonport in 1943 aged 92 years.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 dated 1882 reverse no clasp

R S Corey Skd Shipwt HMS Agincourt

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

R J K Scorey Skd Carpt’s Mte HMS Indus

With copy service record.

Richard James Kitson Scorey was born 30th July 1851 in Devonport, a Shipwright almost certainly employed in HM Dockyard, Devonport, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Indus as Skilled Shipwright 22nd June 1877. He subsequently joined HMS Penguin 4th October 1877, HMS Indus 23rd September 1881, HMS Agincourt 27th May 1882, taking part in the Egypt operations of 1882 aboard this ship. Joining HMS Indus 1st August 1884, HMS Agamemnon 16th September 1884 where he was rated Skilled Carpenter’s Mate 29th January 1885, HMS Indus 13th December 1887, HMS Dolphin 9th May 1889 as Skilled Chief Carpenter’s Mate and Chief Carpenter’s Mate from 1st July 1889. Joining Vivid II 1st April 1893, Vivid I 2nd March 1896 and finally Vivid II 5th May 1896, he was discharged to pension 30th June 1897. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 17th January 1889. The 1911 census records he is a 59 year old Shipwright residing with his wifeAnnie, two daughters and three sons at 69 George Street, Devonport, he died in Devonport 24th December 1943 aged 92 years

Average VF Minimal pitting £450 Available


 

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse no clasp, Khedives Star 1884-6, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria to Chief Officer William Samuel Hill, HM Coast Guard late Royal Navy born in Lambeth, Surrey a former Labourer and Gas Fitter, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 8th April 1873. Serving aboard HMS Euryalus during the operations in the Sudan in 1885 as Captain’s Coxswain. Disrated in July 1885 to Able Seaman, he transferred to HM Coast Guard as Boatman 16th November 1887 and served at various stations in Ireland and Scotland. Advanced to Chief Boatman in Charge 13th June 1904 and Chief Officer (Warrant Officer) 1st January 1909, he retired 29th May 1912 after 39 years service.

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse no clasp

W S Hill Coxn 1 CL HMS Euryalus

Khedives Star dated 1884-6

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

W S Hill Comd Biatn HM Coast Guard

William Samuel Hill was born in Lambeth, Surrey 29th May 1857 a Labourer and Gas Fitter he entered the Royal Navy at Fisgard as Boy 2nd Class 8th April 1873. Reated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Endymion 29th May 1875 and Able Seaman aboard HMS Royal Adelaide 3rd August 1876. Advanced to Leading Seaman 23rd March 1881, to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class aboard HMS London and to the 1st Class 16th September 1883. Joining HMS Euryalus, he was rated Captain’s Coxswian from 1st April 1884. Disrated to Able Seaman 2nd July 1885, he joined Excellent 24th July 1885, HMS Devastation 8th June 1886 where he was advanced to Leading Seaman 15th December 1886.

Transferring to HM Coast Guard as Boatman 16th November 1887, he served at stations at Dunbar, Elie (Fifeshire), Crail (Fifeshire), Berwick, Leith, Redheugh (Newcastle on Tyne), Rosehearty (Aberdeen), Mean Queensford, Butt of Lewes and Queensferry. Advanced to Commissioned Boatman 9th February 1894, Chief Boatman 14th February 1901, Chief Boatman in Charge (at Mean) 13th June 1904, Chief Officer (Warrant Officer) at Queensferry 1st January 1909. Discharged to pension 29th May 1912 after 39 years’ service, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 21st January 1901.

Average GVF Minimal pitting £450 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Defence Medal, War Medal and Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Chief Petty Officer Airman Vivian Read Graham, Fleet Air Arm born in Gateshead, Durham 20th August 1909. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 3rd December 1924, he was rated Ordinary Telegrapher 20th August 1927. Transferring to the Fleet Air Arm 1st June 1939 as a Leading Airman (Telegraphist & Air Gunner), he flew operationally from HMS Ark Royal during the Norway campaign of 1940. Taking part in Operation Menace, the attack on Dakar 13th to 25th September 1940, his aircraft was brought down by anti aircraft fire on 24th during an attack on a Vichy French Destroyer and ditched in the sea, the three man crew rescued by HMS Echo. As a Telegraphist Air Gunner of Swordfish 2B of 810 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm piloted by Lieutenant D F Godfrey-Faussett, DSC, he took part in the attack on German Battleship Bismarck that led to her destruction on 27th May 1941, his aircraft being damaged by Anti-Aircraft fire from Bismarck during the attack. Remaining in the Fleet Air Arm post war, he was discharged to pension in August 1949 and died in Cheltenham in 1986.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

F55072 V R Graham POA HMS Kestrel

With copy research documents by email and service record by email.

Vivian Read Graham was born in Gateshead, Durham on 20th August 1909, a scholar he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class (J.112598) 3rd December 1924. Rated Boy Telegrapher aboard HMS Ajax 30th April 1926, he subsequently joined HMS Ark Royal 1st September 1926, HMS Benbow 6th January 1927, HMS Ramillies as Ordinary Telegrapher 20th August 1927, HMS Conquest 14th October 1927, Egmont I 8th March 1928, HMS Ceres 1st April 1928 where he was rated Telegrapher 17th December 1928.

Passing the course as Telegraphist Air Gunner on 16th January 1935. Joining HMS Furious on 5th March 1935, HMS Glorious 29th August 1935 and to HMS Courageous 19th October 1935. He returned to HMS Glorious 18th February 1936 and served on her until 27th July 1936. He saw further on HMS Eagle from 18th January 1937 advanced to Acting Leading Telegraphist 17th November 1937 and confirmed Leading Telegraphist 17th November 1938 he transferred to the Fleet Air Arm as Leading Airman F55072 on 1st June 1939, serving aboard HMS Eagle until  3rd August 1939.

Image result for pictures fairey swordfish 1941 aboard HMS Ark Royal
Fleet Air Arm Fairey Swordfish airborne from HMS Ark Royal during Operation Menace 1940

Joining Daedalus 4th August 1939 and HMS Ark Royal 27th February 1940, advanced to Acting Petty Officer Airman 1st May 1940. Flying from HMS Ark Royal, he took part in the Norway campaign of 1940, and flew the following sorties –

25th April 1940 – Anti Submarine patrol, 28th April 1940 – Bombing Vaernes aerodrome, 16th May 1940 – Bombing Hemnes, 4th June 1940 – Fighter Patrol (Reported on weather at Narvik), 6th June 1940 – Air Defended Area (ADA) Patrol, 6th June 1940 – Patrol for enemy shipping, 8th June 1940 – ADA patrol Risoy, 9th June 1940 – Reconnaissance for Convoy, 9th June 1940 – Reconnaissance, 10th June 1940 – Reconnaissance, 10th June 1940 – Search for enemy battleships, 13th June 1940 – Reconnaissance of evacuation vessels. TNA references ADM199/15, 479 & 480.

Taking part in Operation Menace, the unsuccessful attempt to capture Dakar Harbour from Vichy French Forces 13th to 25th September 1940. The Telegraphist / Air Gunner in Swordfish L2644 of 820 Squadron pilot Lieutenant (A) Richard Sydney Hankey, Royal Navy and Observer Temporary Sub Lieutenant (A) Anthony Wilfred Noel Dayrell, Royal Navy. On 24th September they were part of a formation of six aircraft tasked with attacking Destroyers in Dakar Harbour when they were hit by anti aircraft fire at about 1530 and forced to ditch in the sea. Only the pilot was slightly injured and all three were rescued by HMS Echo. Reference TNA ADM358 and ADM199/907.

As a Telegraphist Air Gunner of Swordfish 2B of 810 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm piloted by Lieutenant D F Godfrey-Faussett, he took part in the attack on German Battleship Bismarck that led to her destruction on 27th May 1941. The aircraft being damaged by Anti-Aircraft fire from Bismarck during the attack. His pilot being awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Petty Officer Graham received no recognition.

On 24 May 1941, the German battleship Bismarck sank the Royal Navy’s flagship HMS Hood, and damaged out of action HMS Prince of Wales. The Aircraft Carrier HMS Ark Royal received an order from Churchill, as part of Force H, to hunt down Bismarck and sink it.On 26 May 1941 Bismarck was running for the safety of the French port of Brest to make repairs to light damage that she had received from the clash with Prince of Wales, and a last-ditch attempt to slow it down with an airborne torpedo attack from Ark Royal’s aircraft was ordered that night so that the pursuing Royal Navy’s heavy ships could catch up with her.

Report of attack by Lt D F Godfrey-Faussett, Royal Navy pilot of Swordfish 2B

TNA references ADM199/1187 and 1188.

“Aircraft was in No 2 Sub Flight part of the striking force of second wave of attack on Bismarck. Attacked from the starboard beam with two aircraft under intense and accurate anti aircraft fire. Long range anti aircraft fire on approach and on return. Aircraft 2A and 2B attacked together coming out of the cloud one mile away. First engaged by close range (red tracer). Fire was also opened with heavier stuff evidently time fused. Some of this went into the sea and some burst beyond and above. Aircraft was hit in tail plane and port lower main plane. The heavy fire continued with accuracy up to four miles and appeared to be predicted all the time as bursts followed the aircraft, going off just above. Armament was sub divided, each aircraft being engaged by a separate control”.

Image result for Swordfish attack bismarck pictures

Fairey Swordfish aircraft attack Bismarck

In evening twilight at 21:05 amid gale force winds, Lt Commander Jock Moffat and his Observer, Temporary Sub Lieutenant (A) J D “Dusty” Miller, and Telegraphist/Air Gunner (TAG) Leading Airman A J Hayman, flying in Fairey Swordfish 5C/L9726 together with 14 other Swordfish attacked Bismarck amidst a torrent of anti-aircraft fire being put up by the ship’s guns. Two torpedoes struck home, one amidships on its port side resulting in slow flooding, and the second in the steering area. Her rudders were consequently jammed in a turning position, and although she was still underway at good speed, she was directionless in the water. Attempts to steer by varying the speed of the three propellers failed. With Bismarck’s steering control jammed the Royal Navy’s Force H and its Home Fleet were able to catch up with it, surround it and subject it to extensive shelling and torpedoing, after which it turned over and sank the following morning. The wreck of the Bismarck was discovered in 1989. At the time of the attack no definitive statement of whose torpedo had hit the Bismarck was released, however following the observation of this wreck historian Mike Rossiter credited John Moffat as by far the most likely, through analysis of the flight paths. However, the son of another Swordfish pilot that attacked the Bismarck Kenneth Pattison believes that it was his father that damaged the ship.

His subsequent postings included 810 Squadron 1st July 1941, Buzzard 11th September 1941, HMS Illustrious 1st December 1941, 810 Squadron 9th January 1942, RN Air Stations ant Daedalus and Kestrel between 13th January 1942 to 30th October 1942, Goshawk 7th November 1942, advanced to Chief Petty Officer Airman 1st May 1943, Daedalus 6th May 1945, Sanderling 25th July 1945, Nighthawk 12th August 1945, Daedalus 12th March 1946.

Post war he joined the RN Air Stations Redford 24th June 1946, Daedalus 6th July 1946, Goldcrest 27th July 1946, Siskin 21st October 1947, appointed Instructor 1st April 1948, Warrior 15th February 1949, 782 Squadron (Merlin helicopters) 8th June 1949, Daedalus 18th July 1949, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 23rd July 1942, discharged to pension 19th August 1949, he died 12th April 1986 at Leckhampton, Cheltenham, Goucestershire.

Official correction to “el” of Kestrel on LSGC.

A rare group to a Fairey Swordfish TAG who took part in the Norway campaign 1940, Operation Menace in 1940 where he was shot down and the attack on Bismarck.

NEF £4,250 Available


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type to Petty Officer Telegrapher Frank Moses Wright, Royal Navy born in Wolverhampton in 1921. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1956 aboard the Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point, he would have been discharged to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Burma Star clasp Pacific, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy E2 1st type

JX.164178 F M Wright CPO Tel HMS Dodman Point

The group mounted as originally worn, with research from on line records.

Frank Moses Wright born 24th March 1923 in Wolverhampton, he was awarded the LSGC Medal 21st March 1956 whilst serving aboard the 8,580 ton Repair Ship HMS Dodman Point. Wright would have retired to pension in 1963, he died in Birmingham in 2000.

A new original silk Atlantic Star Medal ribbon will be supplied.

GVF & better £175 Reserved


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