First World War Medals to Casualties
First World War Medals now a separate category


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British War and Victory Medals with Canadian Memorial Cross  to Private John Bell, 31st (Alberta) Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force a Famer originally from Whitehaven, Cumbria, England born in 1896. Enlisting at Guelph, Ontario in March 1915 he arrived in France in March 1916 and joined his Battalion in the Field after two weeks. Admitted to Hospital in France with debility 9th April 1916, he did not re-join his Battalion until 28th May. Killed in action Courcelette 15th September 1916 aged 19 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

602383 Pte J Bell 31 Can Inf

Canadian Silver Memorial Cross

602383 Pte J Bell

With copy service papers.

John Bell was born in Whitehaven, Cumbria, England 6th November 1896, a Farmer he attested first for the 34th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force at Guelph, Ontario and transferred to the 31st Battalion in England. Arriving in France 2nd March 1916, he joined his Battalion in the field 17th March 1916. Admitted to No 4 General Hospital, Camiers, France 9th April 1916 with debility and later No 6 Convalescent Depot, Etaples, he re-joined his Battalion 28th May 1916. Killed in action 15th September 1916 aged 19 years on the opening day of the battle of Flers – Courcelette, Somme sector. The 2nd Canadian Division taking all its objectives that day. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £225 SOLD


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals  to Private Arthur Storer, Yorkshire Regiment a former Publisher’s Assistant from Lambeth born in 1896. Attesting for the Yorkshire Regiment in Brixton, he served first with the 10th Battalion in France from 9th September 1915, the 10th taking part in the battle of Loos the same month. Transferring to the 7th Battalion, which took part in the assault on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916 suffering 351 casualties. Taking part in unsuccessful attacks on Quadrangle Support on 8th and 9th July, and on Gueudecourt 2nd November. Killed in action 11th November 1916 aged 20 years in what appears to have been a trench raid, the Battalion War Diary records ‘One prisoner captured on the night of 11th November’. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

13653 Pte A Storer York R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Arthur Storer

With copy Medal Index Card, letter forwarding 1914/15 Star to his mother, casualty and census details recorded here.

Arthur Storer was born in Lambeth, London in 1896, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Publisher’s Assistant residing with his father Arthur a Carpenter, mother Fanny, two brothers and one sister. Enlisting at Brixton he first served with the 10th Battalion in France from 9th September 1915, the 10th taking part in the battle of Loos the same month. Transferring to the 7th Battalion, the 7th took part in the attack on Fricourt 1st July 1916 sustaining 351 casualties, they were to take part in unsuccessful attacks on Quadrangle Support on 8th and 9th July and on Gueudecourt on 2nd November. Killed in action 11th November 1916 aged 20 years in what appears to have been a Trench Raid, the Battalion War Diary records ‘One prisoner captured on the night of 11th November’. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £275 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals  to Acting Sergeant John Thomas James Egan, West Riding Regiment born in 1889 in Manchester. Attesting fior the Gordon Highlanders in October 1906, he fraudulently enlisted into the 7th Dragoon Guards in September 1908 as a Bandsman. Whilst serving in India he attempted suicide on 14th June 1911 by shooting himself with his revolver, the first round missed, the second went through his upper chest. Recovering in hospital he continued to serve and in October 1915 was posted to the 8th Battalion West Riding Regiment where he gained promotion to acting Sergeant. Serving in Gallipoli and France he was killed in action during the assault on Hessian Trench, Somme sector 29th / 30th September 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

16719 Pte J T J Egan W Rid R

British War & Victory Medals

16719 A SJT J T J Egan W Rid R

With details recorded here from his on line service record.

John Thomas James Egan was born in Manchester in 1889, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders at Willesden 19th October 1906. Whilst still serving with the Gordons he fraudulently attested for the 7th Dragoon Guards as a Bandsman 16th September 1908. Whilst serving with his Regiment at Secunderabad, India he attempted suicide by shooting himself with his revolver, the first round missed but the second went through his upper chest. Found by an on duty Indian Police Officer he was rushed in a cart to hospital where he made a full recovery. The reasons given for the attempted suicide were he was worried about his sick mother and sister at home and he felt he could do nothing right in the Band.

Continuing to serve in the Army he was promoted Acting Corporal 23rd September 1915 and posted to the 8th Battalion West Riding Regiment 27th October 1915 in Gallipoli. Evacuated first to Imbros, promoted acting Sergeant 20th March 1916 he embarked at Alexandria with his Regiment for France 25th June 1916. The 8th Battalion arrived on the Somme 6th September 1916, taking part in an attack on 14th September, they captured all their objectives around Thiepval. A counter attack being repulsed the following day, casualties recorded as 258 killed and wounded. Killed in action during the attack and capture of Hessian Trench 29th / 30th September 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial Commonwealth War Graves Commission record his next of kin as his wife Mrs Kate Dunmore (who re-married 25th December 1918) of Clapton, London E5, the son of Daniel and Ellen Egan of 334 Chester Road, Old Trafford, Manchester.

EF £175 Available

 

 


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lance Corporal John Taylor, 7/8th Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers a former Coal Miner (Hewer) from Darwen, Lancashire born in 1889. Serving in France from 10th July 1915, both the 7th and 8th Battalions suffered heavy losses at the battle of Loos 25th September 1915. Killed in action in forward positions near Martinpuich, Somme sector 15th August 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Darwen War Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15608 Pte J Taylor K O Sco Bord

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Taylor

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and census details recorded here.

John Taylor was born in Darwen, Lancashire in 1889, the 1911 census records he is a 23 year old Coal Miner (Hewer) residing at 11 Watery Lane, Darwen with his father Joseph a Green Grocer with his own shop, mother Mary and two elder brothers. He married Margaret Morrall at St James’s Church, Darwen 15th July 1911 and was at this time residing at 2 Cambridge Street, Darwen. Enlisting at Darwen he served with the King’s Own Scottish Borderers in France from 10th July 1915. Surviving the battle of Loos where on 25th September 1915 both the 7th and 8th Battalions suffered severe casualties. Serving with the amalgamated 7/8th Battalion on the Somme from 28th July 1916, the Battalion were occupying forward positions near Martinpuich when he was killed in action on 15th August 1916 aged 27 years. The Germans launched a massive counter attack two days later so almost certainly killed during a German reconnaissance or Artillery bombardment.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Darwen War Memorial, Commonwealth War Graves Commission record his next of kin as his wife Margaret Collum (formerly Taylor) of 24 March House Lane, Darwen.

EF £275 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Harry Edmonson, Coldstream Guards from Follifoot, near Harrogate, Yorkshire born in 1898. Serving in France with the 3rd Battalion from 11th June 1915, he was killed in action during the attack on the Quadrilateral, Somme sector 15th September 1916 aged 19 years. All three Coldstream Guard Battalions took part in the attack, all suffering heavy casualties, the 3rd Battalion 361 killed and wounded, their Commanding Officer Lt Colonel John Campbell, DSO being awarded the Victoria Cross for this action. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

13437 Pte H Edmondson C Gds

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Harry Edmondson

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and census details recorded here.

Harry Edmondson was born in Follifoot, Yorkshire, he enlisted at Yorkand resided at Harrogate . The 1911 census records he is a 13 year old School Boy residing with his father Tom a Railway Platelayer, mother  Elizabeth Ann and younger sister at Follifoot. Serving in France with the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards from 11th June 1915, he was killed in action 15th September 1916 aged 19 years during the Coldstream Guards attack on the Quadrilateral, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The Guards Division went into action at Ginchy on the 15th September, supported by tanks, but these broke down or stuck in the mud. None of the enemy strongpoints had been silenced, when, for the first and indeed the only time in the Regiments history, three Coldstream Battalions, 1st, 2nd and 3rd, advanced together in line.Very heavy losses were sustained against heavy Machine Gun fire and artillery, and the dead and the wounded, as they fell, frequently disappeared into the engulfing mud.

The first objectives were seized, but there was a serious hold up on the right flank, and the advance ground to a halt. The main resistance came from a complicated and extensive trench system called the Quadrilateral, from which a withering fire was directed at the Coldstreamers. Later in the day, it was penetrated and neutralised by other Guards units, and the Coldstream battalions were able to resume their forward movement. Within an hour the secondary objectives were taken and held, in spite of determined resistance. The three Coldstream battalions suffered crippling losses, no less than 40 officers and 1,326 rank and file killed or wounded. The commanding officer of the 3rd Battalion, Lt Col John Campbell, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry, rallying and encouraging his men with blasts from his hunting horn, in a fierce charge they poured into the sunken road and cleared the enemy by hand to hand fighting. The advance continued Lt Colonel Campbell leading his men capturing his next objective.

Despite their shattered condition, the Coldstreamers were back in the line within a few days, but were relieved on the 27th when the Division was withdrawn for a spell in reserve.

EF £275 SOLD


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British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Edward Henry Riseborough, Coldstream Guards a former Market Gardener from Aylsham, Norfolk born in 1898. Serving in France with the 2nd Battalion, he was killed in action during the attack on the Quadrilateral, Somme sector 16th September 1916 aged 18 years. All three Coldstream Guard Battalions took part in the attack, all suffering heavy casualties, the 2nd Battalion 440 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Aylsham War Memorial, Norfolk.

British War & Victory Medals

16114 Pte E H Riseborough C Gds

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Edward Henry Riseborough

With copy Medal Index Card confirming only the British War & Victory Medals awarded to his next of kin, casualty details and census details recorded here.

Edward Henry Riseborough was born in Ingham, Norfolk, enlisted at Hertford and resided at Aylsham, Norfolk. The 1911 census records he is a 14 year old Errand Boy for a local Market Gardener residing with his father John a Cowman on a Farm, mother Mary and two younger brothers at Cawston Road, Aylsham. Serving in France with the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards he was killed in action 16th September 1916 aged 18 years during the Coldstream Guards attack on the Quadrilateral, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Aylsham War Memorial, Norfolk.

The Guards Division went into action at Ginchy on the 15th September, supported by tanks, but these broke down or stuck in the mud. None of the enemy strongpoints had been silenced, when, for the first and indeed the only time in the Regiments history, three Coldstream Battalions, 1st, 2nd and 3rd, advanced together in line.Very heavy losses were sustained against heavy Machine Gun fire and artillery, and the dead and the wounded, as they fell, frequently disappeared into the engulfing mud.

The first objectives were seized, but there was a serious hold up on the right flank, and the advance ground to a halt. The main resistance came from a complicated and extensive trench system called the Quadrilateral, from which a withering fire was directed at the Coldstreamers. Later in the day, it was penetrated and neutralised by other Guards units, and the Coldstream battalions were able to resume their forward movement. Within an hour the secondary objectives were taken and held, in spite of determined resistance. The three Coldstream battalions suffered crippling losses, no less than 40 officers and 1,326 rank and file killed or wounded. The commanding officer of the 3rd Battalion, Lt Col John Campbell, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry, rallying and encouraging his men with blasts from his hunting horn.

Despite their shattered condition, the Coldstreamers were back in the line within a few days, but were relieved on the 27th when the Division was withdrawn for a spell in reserve.

EF £195 SOLD


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Victory Medal

28557 Pte G E Fletcher G Gds

British War Medal

26690 Pte A E Mole G Gds

George Edwin Fletcher

With copy Medal Index Card (Pair only sent to next of kin), casualty details. George Edwin Fletcher was born in Mosbrough, Derbyshire and enlisted in Sheffield he served with the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards in France and was killed in action 27th November 1917 aged 31 years. The son of John Fletcher of Diamond Row, Moor Hole, Sheffield and the husband of the late Ann Fletcher he is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louveral.

GVF £40 Available

Albert Edward Mole

With copy Medal Index Card (Pair only sent to next of kin), casualty details, newspaper article. Albert Edward Mole was born in Ashwell and enlisted at Hitchin, Hertfordshire he lived in West End, Ashwell before enlisting in October 1916. Serving in France from February 1917 with the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards he was killed in action 3rd December 1917 aged 19 years. Commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louveral and the Ashwell Village Memorial.

NEF £65  SOLD

 


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Bronze Memorial Plaque to Able Seaman John Forfar Stewart, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Hawke Battalion Royal Naval Division a former Iron Fitter from Camelon, Falkirk, Sterling born in April 1894. Enlisting in April 1915 he joined Hawke Battalion in September 1915 and served in Gallipoli. Leaving Mudros in May 1916 he arrived in France 23rd May 1916 and was severely wounded in the attack on Beaucourt, Somme sector 13th November 1916, gun shot wound right thigh with compound fractured femur. Admitted to hospital in Rouen, he at first showed signs of recovery but died of wounds on 24th November 1916.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Forfar Stewart

With copy service record, casualty details, Admiralty Medal roll entry.

John Forfar Stewart was born 29th April 1896 an Iron Fitter he attested for the RNVR 21st April 1915 joining the Clyde Division. Drafted from the Reserve Battalion to Hawke Battalion RND in September 1915 and served in Gallipoli. Serving in France from 23rd May 1916 he was severely wounded in action, gun shot wound right thigh with compound fractured femur,  13th November 1916 during the attack on Beaucourt, advancing at 0545, leading waves were cut down by Machine Guns situated between the German first and second lines, the survivors fighting through to Station Road. Casualties recorded as 419 killed and wounded.

Eventually admitted to No 3 Stationary Hospital at Rouen he showed signs of improvement and a telegram dated 22nd November to his next of kin reported ‘Now out of danger’, he died two days later on 24th November 1916. He now rests in the St Sever Cemetery Estension, Rouen, France.

GVF £95 SOLD


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Bronze Memorial Plaque to Engineer Lieutenant Commander David Duncan Cuninghame, Royal Navy from Saltcoats, Ayrshire, Scotland. Born in August 1879 he was educated privately and at the Merchant Taylor’s School, London. Following his Engineering training, he entered the Royal Navy as Engineer Sub Lieutenant in July 1901, promoted Engineer Lieutenant in July 1907 and Engineer Lieutenant Commander in July 1915. Serving aboard HMS Marlborough during the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he was commended for his Services, Marlborough being hit and badly damaged by a Torpedo forcing her eventually to retire to Rosyth for repair. Appointed to HMS Surprise in July 1916 he was killed aboard this ship when she struck a mine on convoy duty off Holland 23rd December 1917 aged 38 years, his body was recovered and he now rests in the Gravenzande General Cemetery, Holland.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

David Duncan Cuninghame

With copy service record, casualty details, copy photo.

David Duncan Cuninghame was born in Saltcoats, Ayrshire 26th August 1879, the son of Andrew and Jane Cuninghame he was educated privately and at the Merchant Taylor’s School, London. Following his Engineering training probably at Keyham, Devonport, he entered the Royal Navy as Engineer Sub Lieutenant 2nd July 1901. Appointed to HMS Victorious 13th August 1901 he was promoted Engineer Lieutenant 2nd July 1907 aboard HMS Commonwealth. Appointed to HMS Marlborough 3rd January 1913 whilst still being built. Promoted Engineer Lieutenant Commander 1st July 1915 he served aboard HMS Marlborough during the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 and received a Commendation for his services during the battle London Gazette 15th September 1916 page 9073.

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HMS Marlborough at Jutland

……The British ships initially had poor visibility and Marlborough could only faintly make out a group of German Kaiser Class Battleships  at 18:17. In the span of four minutes, she fired seven salvos, first at 10,000 yards (9,100 m) and then at 13,000 yards (12,000 m). Marlboroughs gunners claimed to have made hits with the 5th and 7th salvos but these claims are unlikely. Her guns were then masked by a burning cruiser, probably the armoured cruiser HMS Warrior. Marlborough joined the group of battleships battering the German Light Cruiser SMS Wiesbaden  at 18:25. She fired five salvos, before a premature detonation in the right barrel of “A” turret disabled the gun. She also engaged the ship with her secondary battery. At 18:39, Marlborough again engaged what appeared to be a Kaiser-class ship, firing a salvo before the German vessel disappeared into the haze. During the engagement with Wiesbaden, the German Cruiser launched one or two torpedoes at around 18:45, one of which struck Marlborough around the starboard diesel generator room.

The detonation tore a 28-foot (8.5 m) hole in the hull and causing significant flooding, that forced the forward boilers on that side of the ship to be extinguished and reduced the ship’s speed to 16 knots. Burney initially reported to Jellicoe that his ship had struck a mine or had been hit by a torpedo at 18:57. Several more torpedoes, this time from the torpedo boat SMS V48 , forced Marlborough and the rest of the ships in her division to take evasive action. At 19:03, Marlborough engaged Wiesbaden again, firing four salvos at ranges of 9,500 to 9,800 yards. She hit the German Cruiser with probably three shells from the last two salvos and these finally neutralised the ship, although it took several more hours before Wiesbaden sank. Marlborough then shifted fire to the Konig Class ships leading the German line at 19:12. She fired thirteen salvos in the span of six minutes at SMS Grosser Kurfurst  at ranges of 10,200 to 10,750 yards, scoring three hits, though she incorrectly claimed a fourth hit. During this phase of the battle, Marlborough fired two torpedoes, both of which missed their targets: the first at Wiesbaden at 19:10 and the second at SMS Kaiserat at 19:25

By about 19:30, Marlboroughs pumps had contained the flooding in the boiler rooms but she took on a list of around 7–8 degrees. Instead of using counter-flooding to minimise the list, her crew attempted to correct the list by using coal and oil from the starboard bunkers first. The list caused the generators supplying power to the main battery turrets to flood, hampering the gun crews, particularly as shells were transferred from the magazines to the turrets. The blast from the torpedo was so powerful that forty watertight compartments were damaged. Three more torpedoes approached Marlborough at 19:33, she evaded the first two and the third harmlessly passed under the ship.

After the opposing fleets disengaged late in the day, the Grand Fleet steamed south in an attempt to cut off the retreating Germans and destroy them the following morning. The 6th Division was slowed down by Marlborough, which could make no more than 15 knots . At about 02:00 on 1st June, the 6th Division was about 12 nautical miles  behind the rest of the fleet. At that time, the bulkheads in the starboard forward boiler room started to give way under the strain, forcing Marlborough to reduce speed to 12 knots. The damage control teams believed that if the main battery were to fire, the shoring supporting the damaged bulkheads would give way, greatly increasing the risk to the ship. Jellicoe detached the ship to proceed independently to Rosyth for repair engaging a Zepplin en route.. 

 Loss of HMS Surprise

One of the duties of the Harwich Force destroyers was the so-called “Beef Run”, convoys to and from The Netherlands. Surprise was part of the escort of a Netherlands-bound convoy on 22 December, when the destroyer Valkyrie struck a mine and was badly damaged, having to be towed to Harwich by the destroyer Sylph . The remainder of the convoy reached the Hook of Holland  safely, and the escort waited near the  Maas Light Buoy for the return convoy. At about 02:00 on 23rd December, Surprise, Torrent and Radiant steamed into a German minefield, Torrent struck a German mine. Surprise and Tornado went to rescue Torrents crew, but Torrent set off a second mine and quickly sank. While she was attempting to rescue survivors and recover her boats, Surprise struck a mine and sank.  Only Radiant was undamaged and picked up the survivors from the three ships. In total, 12 officers and 240 other ranks were killed from the three ships. There were only seven survivors from Surprises crew, including her Captain Commander W.A Thompson, who had been blown overboard but was picked up by one of Surprises boats.

The body of Engineer Lieutenant Commander Cuninghame was recovered and he now rests in the Gravenzande General Cemetery, Holland. Aged 38 years he was the husband of Ada Decima Richards Cuninghame whom he married in December 1911 of 3 Sussex Gardens, Hyde Park, London.

EF £275 Available


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British War Medal and Victory Medal with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private James William Dyke, 2/15th (Civil Service Rifles) Battalion London Regiment a former Farm Labourer originally from Penkridge, Staffordshire. Enlisting in November 1916 he joined the 2/15th Battalion in Egypt 30th December 1917. His battalion arrived in France on 23rd June 1918 and Private Dyke was sent on routine leave 24th October 1918. Whilst visiting his former employer at Quarry Farm, Newport, Shropshire he became ill with Influenza on 2nd November 1918, and died four days later aged 19 years. He now rests in the Penkridge (St Michael) Churchyard.

British War & Victory Medals

537000 Pte J W Dyke 15-Lond R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

James William Dyke

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and details extracted from his on line service record.

James William Dyke was born in Penkridge, Staffordshire in 1900, the son of Albert Thomas and Ann Dyke of Stone Cross, Penkridge. On the outbreak of War James William Dyke was employed as a Farm Labourer on the Quarry Farm, Newport, Shropshire. Enlisting at Newport 8th November 1916 he was placed on the Army Reserve and Mobilized 24th July 1917. Moving to Whitehall, London he was posted to the 2/15th (Civil Service Rifles) Battalion London Regiment in Egypt 30th December 1917 serving there until 17th June 1918 when his Battalion left for France. Arriving in France 23rd June 1918, he was sent home on leave 24th October 1918. Whilst visiting Quarry Farm he became ill with Influenza on 2nd November and died four days later 6th November 1918 aged 19 years. The attending Doctor gave the cause of death as Pneumonia secondary to Influenza, he was buried in Penkridge Churchyard on 9th November, his mother having written to the War Office requesting a Military funeral.

2/15th (Civil Service Rifles) Battalion London Regiment

Moved to Egypt 29th June 1917, concentrating at Moascar in the Southern Suez Canal Zone then advanced into Palestine. They were in action during The Third Battle of Gaza including the capture of Beersheba and the capture of the Sheria position and the capture and defence of Jerusalem. In 1918 they saw action in the capture of Jericho, The battle of Tell’Asur, the first Trans-Jordan raid (as part of Shea’s Force) the attack on Amman (as part of Chaytor’s Column) and the second Trans-Jordan raid. In the spring and summer the division received Indian troops, with British units leaving for France and units of the Indian Army taking their place. The 2nd Civil Service Rifles left the Division on the 30th of May and returned to France, joining 90th Brigade, 30th Division 2nd of July. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines.

EF £185 SOLD


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Arthur Henry Twort, 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment a former Cement Manufacturing Works Cooper born in Eccles, Kent. Enlisting in Marylebone, London initially for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served in France from 19th July 1915. Killed in action 2nd July 1916 aged 25 years during his Battalion’s assault on La Boisselle, Somme sector. Assaulting the western end of the village they cleared it and consolidated by 2100 that evening at a cost of 316 casualties.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

17817 Pte A H Twort Wilts R

With details here extracted from on line documents, copy Newspaper article with photo depicted here, copy birth certificate, original silk ribbons to BWM and Vict.

Arthur Henry Twort was born in Eccles, Kent 2nd August 1890, the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Cooper employed at the Cement Manufacturing Works, residing with his father Walter Rolls Twort a Foreman Cooper at the same Works, his mother Eleanor Elizabeth, 2 brothers and 1 sister at Little Culland Cottage, Great Rowlands, Burnham, Kent. Attesting for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Private number 15366) at Marylebone, London he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served with the 6th Battalion in France from 19th July 1915.

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From : The Kent Messenger 12th August 1916 page 5

On 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive the 6th Battalion moved forward from Albert and on 2nd July took part in the operations around La Boisselle, assaulting the western end of the village and clearing it by 2100 that evening having sustained 312 casualties. Killed in action during this assault aged 25 years Arthur Henry Twort is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £250 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Joseph Bradley, 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham he was employed as an underground Coal Miner and Pony Putter  before enlisting. Serving in France from 9th September 1915, the 14th Battalion had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Killed in action whilst wiring 21st Division front lines at Gueudecourt, Somme sector 29th September 1916 aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18746 Pte J Bradley North’d Fus

With details here extracted from on line documents, original silk ribbons.

Joseph Bradley was born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Underground Coal Miner and Puny Putter (Driver of a Pony drawing a Mine Waggon) residing at 11 Bridge Street, Bishop Auckland with his widowed father George also an Underground Coal Miner and Waggon man and two younger brothers. Enlisting at Bishop Auckland he served with the 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 9th September 1915.

The 14th Battalion were the Pioneer Battalion of 21st Division and on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades in their attack on Fricourt. Killed in action 29th September 1916 aged 24 years whilst wiring 21st Division’s front line at Gueudecourt. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £175 Available


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The sons of Charles and Jane Seward of Nuneaton, Warwickshire

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Lewis Seward, 1/5th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment a former Domestic Groom born in Buckworth, Cambridgeshire he enlisted at Nuneaton originally for the 7th Battalion and served in Gallipoli from 28th August 1915. Taking part in the attack and capture of Chunuk Bair on the morning of 8th August the Battalion suffered 361 casualties, killed wounded and missing. Transferring to the 1st and later 1/5th Battalion he was killed in action 4th November 1916 aged 25 years in the front line trenches north west of Le Sars, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War Medal to Private Walter Seward, 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment a former Errand Boy for a Boot shop born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire he enlisted at Nuneaton and served in Gallipoli from 24th November 1915. Killed in action Mesopotamia 25th February 1917 aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

20269 Pte L Seward Glouc R

1914/15 Star& British War Medal

19061 Pte W Seward S Lan R

With details here extracted from on line documents.

Lewis Seward was born in Buckworth, Cambridgeshire the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Domestic Groom residing at 38 Fitton Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire with his father Charles a Carter employed by the Borough Council, mother Jane two brothers (including Walter) and sister. Enlisting at Nuneaton, he first served with the 7th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment in Gallipoli from 28th August 1915, the Battalion going straight into action capturing Chunuk Bair sustaining 361 casualties in the process. Later transferring to the 1st Battalion and finally the 1/5th Battalion he was killed in action 4th November 1916 in the from line trenches north west of Le Sars, Somme sector. Aged 25 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Walter Seaward his was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire the 1911 census records he is an Errand Boy for a Boot Shop residing with his brother at the above address. Enlisting at Nuneaton he served with the 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment in Gallipoli from 24th November 1915 and later Mesopotamia where he was killed in action 25th February 1917 aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

GVF & better £325 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Collin Ridgway, 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders a former Blast Furnace Labourer born in 1874 in St Peters, Nottingham. Enlisting at Nottingham, he served in France from 18th February 1915. The 2nd Battalion took part in the first day of the Somme offensive 1st July 1916 attacking German positions on Redan Ridge, coming under heavy Machine Gun fire. Drummer Ritchie of the Battalion being awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry this day. Reaching the German third line they were compelled to withdraw having suffered 394 casualties. Killed in action during the attack on Rainy Trench and Gun Pits immediately south of Dewdrop Trench 14th October 1916 aged 42 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial he left behind a widow and five children.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

S-5801 Pte C Ridgway Sea Highrs

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Collin Ridgway

With original letters (2) forwarding the 1914/15 Star and the British War & Victory Medals to his widow, original photograph in uniform, Medal Registered envelope addressed to his widow.

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Collin (correct spelling) Ridgway was born in St Peters, Nottingham in 1874 the son of Simeon Ridgway an Iron Works Labourer and his wife Mary, in 1881 the family were residing at 18 Lot Close, Stapleford, Nottingham. The 1911 census records Collin Ridgway is a 37 year old Blast Furnace Labourer residing with his wife Mary Jane, 4 sons and 1 daughter at 29 Pastures, Stapleford, Nottingham. Enlisting at Nottingham he served in France with the 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders from 18th February 1915.

Surviving his Battalion’s attack on Redan Ridge, Somme sector 1st July 1916, they advanced following the 1st East Lancashire Regiment and 1st Hampshire Regiment into action. Encountering heavy Machine Gun fire from the front and the direction of Beaumont Hamel, they reached the German third line but were forced to with draw having suffered 394 casualties. Drummer Ritchie of this Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry this day. Killed in action during the attack on Rainy Trench and the Gun Pits immediately south of Dewdrop Trench, 14th October 1916 aged 42 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The positions captured on the 14th October were re-captured in a counter attack, the War Diary notes ‘nothing was gained and our lines remained as before’.

The Trio lacquered a possible official correction to ‘w’ of Ridgway on Victory Medal.

NEF £275 SOLD


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British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal with Memorial Plaque to Fireman and Trimmer Joseph Morton, Merchant Navy. Born in Liverpool in 1874 he was lost aboard the Cargo Ship SS Highland Harris when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-96 off County Mayo 6th August 1918, 24 lives were lost.

British War Medal & Mercantile Marine War Medal

Joseph Morton

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Jospeh Morton

With research listed here.

Joseph Morton was born in Liverpool in 1874, he was a Fireman and Trimmer serving in the Merchant Navy aboard the Cargo Ship SS Highland Harris (Nelson Line built 1904) when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U-96 on 6th August 1918. Morton was one of 24 crew lost and in commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial.

The SS Highland Harris was on a voyage from Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro carrying a general cargo and livestock. She was hit by the first torpedo when 82 miles off the coast of County Mayo, Ireland. A second torpedo hit soon after and she sank fairly rapidly.

Mercantile Marine Medal pairs with Memorial Plaques fairly scarce on the market. First time on the market.

EF £375 Available


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British War & Victory Medals, with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private James Gulley, 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment a former Colliery Banksman originally from Bilston, Staffordshire. Serving in France after January 1916, he was mortally wounded on 1st July 1916 during his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Mametz, Somme sector and died the same day. Aged 38 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and St Lawrence The Martyr War Memorial, Mansfield, Nottingham. The 1st Battalion suffered 10 officers and 300 other ranks killed and wounded.

British War & Victory Medals

20040 Pte J Gulley S Staff R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

James Gulley

With copy Medal Index Card confirming only the British War & Victory Medals awarded to his next of kin and other research listed here.

 

James Gulley was born in Bilston, Staffordshire in 1878, the 1891 census records he is 13 years old residing with his father John a Coal Miner, mother Eliza, two brothers and two sisters at 22 Portland Road, Hucknall Torkland, Nottingham. The 1901 census records he is a 22 year old Colliery Banksman residing with his family at 68 New Street, Kirby in Ashfield. Not found on the 1911 census, Soldiers Died in the Great War, HMSO, 1919 records he was living in Birmingham and enlisted at Chesterfield Derbyshire. Serving in France with the 1st Battalion, he was mortally wounded on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive and died the same day. Aged 38 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the St Lawrence The Martyr War Memorial, Mansfield. The Soldiers effects records show that he left a widow, Jane.

On 1st July 1916 the 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment were part of 91st Brigade, 7th Division and led the assault on Mametz with 22nd Battalion Manchester Regiment. No Man’s Land was 100 to 200 yards wide and the first German line was crossed with few casualties. Heavy Machine Gun fire then opened up from Mametz and Danzig Alley inflicting heavy casualties during the next advance. By 0745 some 700 yards had been covered, the line of Cemetery Trench immediately south of Mametz taken and consolidated. The village was later entered later and the western end of Danzig Alley captured. By 1940 hours final objective had been taken and held, 150 prisoners were taken and two Machine Guns captured. Casualties 10 officers and 300 other ranks killed and wounded.

GVF & better £625 Reserved

 


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Left to right

British War Medal to M2-222790 Warrant Officer Class 2 Albert Hill, Army Service Corps from Salford, Lancashire. A former Regular soldier he served in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1897-1909. Served with 954th Mechanical Transport Company, Army Service Corps and was awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 20th August 1919 for Mesopotamia. With the Motor Transport in Mesopotamia by Lt Colonel F W Leland, page 216 records CSM Hill’s award date as 2ns June 1918 published in Order of the Day 110, 954 Company ASC was involved in the capture of Kirkuk and advance into Persia and Baku.

GVF £55 Available

British War & Victory Medals to 4246 Corporal William Brown, King’s Royal Rifle Corps and Machine Gun Corps a former Bank Apprentice from Crouch End, London. Residing at 34 Ravensdale Mansions, Crouch End when he attested for the 5th Battalion London Regiment at Wood Green 8th March 1916 aged 19 years. Transferred 5th Battalion KRRC, drafted to France 10th July 1916 he was at first attached No 2 Entrenching Battalion. Posted 17th Battalion KRRC 11th September 1916, he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps 7th October 1916 and joined 117th Company. Evacuated to the UK with Influenza in 1917, he spent 42 days in hospital in Cardiff before returning to France. Posted 252 Company MGC he embarked at Leith for Murmansk 18th September 1918 and embarked Murmansk for Archangel 15th November 1918. Evacuated to the UK aboard the SS Kildonan Castle 1st September 1919, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 11th November 1919. Details extracted from on line service record.

GVF £70 Available

British War & Victory Medals to 36630 Private William Parkinson, Leicestershire Regiment a former Slipper Hand from Haslingden, Lancashire. Residing at 350 Manchester Street, Hasligden he attested for the East Lancashire Regiment at Haslingden 4th August 1916. Transferring to the 9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment in January 1917 he was wounded in action, gun shot wound to head 3rd May 1917. Treated by 44 Field Ambulance, 32 Casualty Clearing Station and finally No 2 Australian General Hospital, France he re joined his Battalion 25th June 1917. Posted to the 7th Battalion in February 1918, following disbandment of the 9th Battalion he was wounded and taken prisoner of war 21st March 1918, the first day of the German Spring offensive during the defence of Ephey. Suffering from a bullet wound right side of chest which fractured a rib and entered his lung, he was treated in a German Hospital and made a full recovery. Repatriated to the UK 14th January 1919 he was discharged to the Reserve 31st August 1919. Details extracted from his on line service record.

GVF £90 SOLD

 


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British War and Victory Medals to Private Wilfred Earthy 1/9th Battalion London Regiment (Queen Victoria’s Rifles) from Hersham, Surrey. Born in 1897 he served in France from 2nd February 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 the First Day of the Somme offensive aged 18 years. The 1/9th Battalion were on the right of 169th Brigade’s attack on Gommecourt and sustained 545 casualties.  Initially the assault was a success, but a series of determined and strong counter attacks eventually forced the Battalion to withdraw, by 1900 the survivors were back in their trenches. Commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

4329 Pte W Earthy 9-Lond R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here.

Wilfred Earthy was born in Hersham, Surrey in 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old Scholar residing with his father Frederick Richard Earthy a Domestic Gardener, mother Helena and siblings at Hersham Road, Walton on Thames, Surrey. Enlisting in London he served with the 1/9th Battalion London Regiment in France from 2nd February 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 aged 18 years in his Battalion’s attack on Gommecourt in which it sustained 545 casualties.

At 0625 1st July 1916 an intensive bombardment commenced on the German lines and at 0720 smoke was released, at 0725 the first two companies moved forward and at 0730 the assault commenced, the Artillery barrage lifting off the first line of German trenches. A German counter barrage commenced at this time. At 0948 the assaulting companies had reached their objective and occupied Feud, Fellow and Fell after heavy fighting, they did not get in touch with the Battalion on the right. The third company was by now consolidating the German second Line. The Germans were pressing hard at this time and a shortage of bombs became apparent. At 1230 the German counter attack increased in force and companies were driven back from the third line to the second and at 1400 were driven back to the first line, at 1900 survivors were driven out of the first line and returned to their trenches.

Wilfred Earthy is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £375 Available


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British War & Victory Medals to Private Frederick George Lawrence 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment a former Domestic Gardener born in Brimpton, Crookham, Berkshire in 1893. Enlisting in Newbury he served in France after January 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916, the First Day of the Somme offensive aged 23 years during his Battalion’s unsuccessful attack on Ovillers in which it sustained 437 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

20090 Pte F G Lawrence R Berks R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and census details. Medal Index Card confirms the award of the British War and Victory Medals only to his next of kin.

Frederick George Lawrence was born in Brimpton, Crookham, Berkshire in 1893, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Domestic Gardener residing in Crookham with his father Alfred a Farm Labourer, mother Mary and niece. Enlisting at Newbury he joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment in France and was killed in action 1st July 1916, the First Day of the Somme offensive. The 2nd Battalion were part of 25th Brigade, 8th Division and left Long Valley Camp on 30th June to take up positions in readiness for the attack on Ovillers the following day.

Before the attack it was noticed the British wire had not been sufficiently cut so parties were sent out at night to clear it. At 0625 the British artillery bombardment began. At 0715 the Germans opened up with Machine Gun and rifle fire on the 2nd Battalion’s line. At 0730 the three assaulting companies advanced to attack the German line. The intense fire they met preventing them reaching the German positions, a group on the left of the attack got into the German trenches but were bombed out. The Commanding Officer and Second in Command were both wounded and command of the Battalion passed to 2nd Lieutenant C Mollet (Adjutant). The German=s replied with an artillery bombardment on the British lines at 0635. At 1100 orders were received by Brigade HQ to wait and at 1230 orders were received the Brigade would be relieved. The attack had cost the 2nd Berkshires 473 casualties.

Frederck George Lawrence is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £375 SOLD


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Silver War Badge to Lieutenant Colonel Cecil Du Pre Powney, OBE, FRGS, JP, Hampshire Regiment late Grenadier Guards. The son of Madras Supreme Court Judge Edward Penton Powney, educated Eton and Trinity College Cambridge he was first commissioned in 1884 and served with the Grenadier Guards until 1894 including the Suakin operations of 1885. Commanding the 3rd Battalion Hampshire Regiment 1914 to 1916 at home, he was then appointed Divisional Commander London Metropolitan Police 1916 to 1919, awarded OBE for these services. A High Sherriff of Hampshire, he died in 1936.

Silver War Badge numbered and engraved

149998 ‘Lt Col Powney Hants Regt 1914-16′

With research recorded below from on line sources, copy SWB roll entry confirming.

Lt Colonel Cecil Du Pre Powney

Born 21st August 1862 in London,  son of Edward Penton Powney, formerly Judge of the Supreme Court of Madras, of Fyfield House, Andover, married Ethel Mary daughter of Colonel Norton Knatchbull of Onelton, Andover. Educated Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, first commissioned 2/Lieutenant Northamptonshire Regiment 14th May 1884,  Lieutenant Grenadier Guards 21st May 1884,  served in the Sudan Expedition of 1885 (Medal and clasp Suakin 1885, Bronze Star), ADC to Lord Frankfort de Montmorency 6th July 1891, Captain 23rd October 1895 retired from Grenadier Guards 1894, Major Hampshire Regiment Militia 30th April 1904. Director Liberian International Corporation,. Commanded 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion Hampshire Regiment 4th August 1914 to 4th January 1916, commanded ‘B’ Division London Metropolitan Special Constabulary 1917 to 1919, awarded the OBE for these services London Gazette 7th January 1919 page 471. Formed the Powney Freemason’s Lodge No 3099, appointed High Sheriff of the County of Southampton 1904 to 1905, residing at Bambridge House, Bishopstoke, Hampshire, Officer of the Order of St John of Jerusalem London Gazette 23rd June 1931 page 4072. He died in 1936.

GVF £135 Available

 


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British War & Victory Medals to Private Bernard John Osborn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, born in Market Bosworth in 1889, the son of a Farmer. Serving with the 1/5th Battalion in France after January 1916, his Battalion releasing smoke for the attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916, it was later to take part in the attacks on Ovillers 16th July, Poziers on 23rd July and Leipzig Redoubt 18th August. Killed in action whilst holding the front line Le Sars sector 10th November 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

6144 Pte B J Osborn R War R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming British war & Victory Medals only awarded, casualty details.

Bernard John Osborn was born in Market Bosworth, Leicestershire in 1889, the 1901 census records he is 12 years old residing at Pool House, Newbold Verdon, Market Bosworth with his father Joseph Henry a Farmer and mother Emma, he has one brother. Not identified on the 1911 census he enlisted at Coventry and served with the 1/5th Battalion in France. Part of 143rd Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division they provided smoke cover for the attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916 which ended in failure. On 16th July they too part in the attack on Ovillers taking the German second line and held their positions against six counter attacks. In action at Poziers 23rd July when an attempt to link up with the Australian Division failed and the attack on Leipzig Redoubt 18th August which they captured. Killed in action whilst manning the front line Le Sars Sector 10th November 1916 aged 27 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £80 Available


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Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War & Victory Medals to Sergeant Herbert George Thomson, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment a former Clerk from Lambeth, London. Enlisting in January 1896 he served with the 1st Battalion in Malta, Hong Kong and Singapore before joining the 19th Company and 23rd Mounted Infantry in South Africa. Returning to England in April 1903, he transferred to the Army Reserve in September 1905 at his own request having been reduced to Private for drunkenness. Re-engaging in January 1908 for the Reserve he was discharged in January 1912. Re-enlisting at Shoreditch in 1915 he served with the 8th Battalion in France. Killed in action 16th August 1916 aged 40 years during the unsuccessful attack on Lonely Trench near Guillemont, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

4991 SERJT H G Thomson R Lanc Regt MI

British War & Victory Medals

18265 A-SJT H G Thomson R Lanc R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War & Victory Medals only awarded for 1WW, details extracted from his on line service record.

Herbert George Thomson was born in Lambeth, London a 20 year old Clerk he attested for the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment in London 20th January 1896 ststing his next of kin as his mother Mary, 69 St Georges Road, Southwark, Surrey. Posted to the 2nd Battalion in May 1896, appointed Lance Corporal May 1897, he transferred to the 1st Battalion in November 1897 in Malta, serving in Hong Kong from 25th November 1897 to 16th January 1899, promoted Corporal in February 1898, served Singapore 17th January 1899 to 26th March 1900 he returned to the UK. Appointed Lance Sergeant September 1900, promoted Sergeant April 1901, he embarked for South Africa 6th May 1901. Serving with 19th Company Mounted Infantry with the rank of Colour Sergeant from May 1901, he was found guilty of drunkenness whilst on active service by Court Martial in January 1902 and reduced to Sergeant and posted to 23rd Company Mounted Infantry.

Joining the 2nd Battalion in Natal in September 1902 he embarked for the UK in April 1903. Reduced to Corporal in September 1905 for drunkenness and to Private for misconduct shortly after, he transferred to the Army Reserve at his own request in September 1905. Re-engaging for the Reserve in January 1908, he was discharged from the Reserve, on completion of engagement. The 1911 census records he is a 36 year old Printer’s Labourer residing at 69 St George’s Road, Southwark with his 71 year old widowed mother Mary Elizabeth. Re-enlisting at Shoreditch, London in 1915 he served with the 8th Battalion in France and was killed in action 16th August 1916 aged 40 years during his Battalion’s unsuccessful attack on Lonely trench near Guillemont, Somme sector. The attack went in at 1740, heavy casualties were sustained by Machine Gun and rifle fire as soon as the assault was launched. A renewed attack met a similar fate, all the officers and NCO’s of ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies becoming casualties, the attack by ‘D’ company also failed, the Battalion suffering 271 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF to NEF £310 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal Alfred Millard, Norfolk Regiment a former Printer’s Warehouse Cropper, originally from Greenfield, Luton Bedfordshire. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion in France from 30th May 1915, taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme 1st July 1916 as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. Killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years in his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyine Trench. Occupying it, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley which were strongly resisted.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

12114 Pte A Millard Norf R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

Alfred Millard was born in Greenfield, near Luton, Bedfordshire, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Printer’s Warehouse Cropper residing with his 43 year old widowed mother Jane and two brothers at 8 St George’s Circus, Blackfriars Road, Southwark, SE London. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment in France from 30th May 1915, the Battalion taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division on 1st July 1916, he was killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years during his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyline trench.

Zero hour was 2230 and after three minutes of intense bombardment the 7th Norfolk with ‘A’ and ‘B’ companies in front and ‘D’ and ‘C’ companies in support dashed forward and captured their objective, the right of Sixth Avenue at 2240. So rapid was their advance that touch with the flanks was lost. ‘C’ company worked down the trench to the left and gained touch with 9th Essex and at 2340 gained touch with the Australian 4th Division on the right. Strong points were established and the position held, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley but met strong resistance.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £165 Available