First World War Medals to Casualties


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Captain William Augustine Gallagher, 2nd Battalion East Lancashire Regiment born in Armagh, Ireland in 1882. Educated at Clongowes Wood, County Kildare and Trinity College Dublin where he graduated BA. Commissioned into the East Lancashire Regiment in August 1907, he served in India 1907 to 1912 and in South Africa with a Mounted Infantry Battalion 1912-13. Serving in France from 6th November 1914 as Machine Gun Officer 24th Brigade, 8th Division, he was killed in action on the evening of 10th March 1915 on the first day of the battle of Neuve Chapelle. Carrying despatches with two Orderlies to Commanding Officers in the firing line, he was struck in the head by a shell fragment and killed instantaneously. Posthumously Mentioned in Despatches by Field Marshal Sir John French in May 1915, he now rests in the Vielle-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, France.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Augustine Gallagher

With copy of his entry in The Roll of Honour and copy picture.

William Augustine Gallagher was the son of William and Margaret Gallagher, Claremont Place, Armagh, Ireland was born 9th December 1892 at Armagh. He was educated at Clongowes Wood College, Co Kildare and Trinity College, Dublin where he took his BA degree. He joined the East Lancashire Regiment in August 1907, with antedate (in seniority) to August 1906, by virtue of his degree, Becoming Lieutenent in September 1908. After serving in different stations in India from 1907 to 1912, he went on to South Africa and served at Harrismith, Orange River Colony, with a Battalion of Mounted Infantry till February 1913. He then rejoined his Battalion at Cape Town till the declaration of war. He was selected by the General Officer at Cape Town to bring home the horses of the 10th Hussars, a duty carried out to the entire satisfaction of the Officer Commanding that Regiment, he was promoted Captain in September 1914.

Image result for Captain William Augustine Gallagher

On his arrival in England Captain Gallagher was sent to Hursley Camp, and was appointed Brigade Machine Gun Officer to the 24th Infantry Brigade, 8th Division, a position he held till his death, serving in France from 6th November 1914 he was Mentioned in Despatches in Sir John French’s Despatch of 31st May 1915 (London Gazette 22nd June 1915 page 5996). His death occurred late on the 10th March 1915, the night of the first day’s battle at Neuve Chapelle. He had been fighting that day and at night was sent, with two orderlies, to deliver despatches to Officers Commanding in the firing line. Whilst on his way a shell burst on the little party and a fragment struck him in the head, killing him instantaneously. The Orderlies, who were untouched, took his body back to Headquarters, where he was buried the next day next to a ruined farmhouse. The Staff erected a cross, with his name on it, on his grave as a last tribute of their regard to a dear comrade. His General wrote of him that he was a most gallant officer and the best fellow he had ever met”.

Captain Gallagher now rests in an identified grave in the Vielle-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, France, his headstone bear the inscription “A devoted son and a gallant officer Requiescant in peace”.

Virtually as issued, first time on the market.

EF £225 Available


 

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Transvaal, Orange Free State, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, India General Service Medal EVII clasp North West Frontier 1908, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Sergeant Arthur John Dobson, Gloucestershire Regiment late Devonshire Regiment and Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Born in St Pancras, London in 1882, he attested for the Devons in London and served with the 2nd Battalion in South Africa. Transferring to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment he served with the 1st Battalion during the North West Frontier operations of 1908. Still serving with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment on the outbreak of War he was posted to the 16th (3rd Birmingham Pals) Battalion almost certainly on its formation as an Instructor. Serving in France after 1st January 1916, he transferred to the 13th (Forest of Dean) (Pioneer) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment and was killed in action 27th March 1918 aged 35 years during the German Spring offensive. Commemorated on the Poziers Memorial.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Transvaal, Orange Free State

5835 Pte A Dobson Devon Regt

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

5835 Pte A Dobson Devon Regt

India General Service Medal EVII clasp North West Frontier 1908

953 Lce Corpl A Dobson 1st R War Regt

British War and Victory Medals

953 SJT A J Dobson R War R

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

38062 SJT A J Dobson Glouc R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, copies from the Royal Warwickshire Regimental Journal covering the 1908 North West Frontier operations, casualty details etc.

Arthur John Dobson was born in St Pancras, London in 1882, attesting for the Devonshire Regiment, he served with the 2nd Battalion in South Africa, the King’s South Africa Medal roll entry records he transferred to the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment 28th February 1903. Transferring to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, he served in India with the 1st Battalion including the North West Frontier operations of 1908. On the outbreak of the First World War Sergeant Dobson was still serving with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and was posted to the 16th (3rd Birmingham Pals) Battalion raised at Birmingham by the Lord Mayor and Committee in September 1914, presumably as a Sergeant Instructor.

Serving in France after 1st January 1916, he transferred probably with the 16th Battalion (no other Battalion recorded on his First World War Medal roll entry), he transferred to the 13th (Forest of Dean) (Pioneers) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. Killed in action 27th March 1918 aged 35 years during the German Spring offensive,  an account written by Captain Henderson Bland in Actor-Soldier-Poet page 175 records –

“An interesting thing happened in the fighting around Lamotte. It was an awful tangle there. When we were lying out in extended order I saw the smoke screen used for the first time. It certainly worked beautifully. It started on the enemy flank like a cloud let out of a bottle, for all the world like something our old friend Sinbad the Sailor might have seen. Suddenly it grew in volume and drifted like a curtain right across our front. It was quite spectacular and impressive. The Germans were reinforced here, and when we got the news they had crossed the Somme at Cerisy we had orders to retire. This was done in good order, but we had to fall back on a small valley, and on reaching it an aeroplane swooped down on my lot and I ordered the men to extend as much as possible so as to make lesser targets. The pilot loosed off a belt and managed to kill one of my Sergeants”.

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded Army Order October 1918. The son of George and Annie Dobson of 60 Warren Street, Tottenham Court Road, London, hisband of Elizabeth J Dobson of Chapel Terrace, St Mawes, Cornwall he is commemorated on the Poziers Memorial.

A scarce combination of awards to a First World War Regular Soldier casualty.

GVF Average £495 SOLD


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Amos Ellis, The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment a former Warehouseman born in Elstead, Surrey in 1890, he enlisted at Guildford 25th November 1915. Arriving in France 3rd May 1916, he joined the 11th Battalion and was three times wounded, the last time gun shot (shell fragment) wound left leg in action 7th June 1917, resulting in his evacuation to England aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick. Discharged to the Depot from hospital 19th December 1917, he returned to France on 8th August 1918. Joining the 7th Battalion, he was killed in action two weeks later on 23rd August 1918 aged 28 years. He now rests in the Becourt Military Cemetery, Somme, France.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Amos Ellis

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research extracted from on line service record.

Amos Ellis was born in Elstead, Surrey, a 24 year 7 month old Warehouseman residing at 17 Croft Road, Godalming, Surrey with his wife Ellen when he attested for The Queen’s Regiment at Guildford 25th November 1915. Posted to the 4th Battalion 26th November 1915, and to the 11th Battalion 25th February 1916, he arrived in France 3rd May 1916. Wounded in action 24th June 1916 contusion to left leg from a shell fragment he was treated at 140 Field Ambulance and returned to duty 4th July 1916. Wounded a second time in a training exercise contusion from a shell fragment 21st July 1916, he was admitted to No 8 Stationary Hospital 30th July 1916 and rejoined his Battalion 31st August 1916. Wounded for a third time gun shot wound (shell fragment) left leg severe in action 7th June 1917, he was admitted to 46 Casualty Clearing Station the next day and evacuated from No 8 Stationary Hospital to England aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick 13th June 1917.

Admitted to St Alban’s War Hospital, he remained under hospital treatment until discharged to the Depot 19th December 1917. Joining the 2/4th Battalion 7th August 1918, he was posted back to France arriving at Etaples 8th August 1918. Posted to the 7th Battalion 11th August 1918, he was killed in action 23rd August 1918. Aged 28 years, Commonwealth War Graves record he was the husband of Ellen Ellis of School House Lane, Little Downham, Ely, Cambridgeshire, he now rests in the Becourt military cemetery, Somme, France.

Unique name, polishing therefore

VF £80 SOLD


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Joseph Degnan, Coldstream Guards a former Cycle Works Machinist born in Derby in 1893. Residing and working in Coventry when he enlisted, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 13th August 1914. Killed in action 25th September 1914 aged 21 years in the front line trenches astride the Oise-Aisne Canal.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Joseph Degnan

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research extracted from on line records.

Joseph Degnan was born in Derby in 1893, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Ball Grinder Machinist at a Cycle Factory residing with his father Henry a Coach Painter and Sign Writer, mother Adelaide four brothers and two sisters at 50 London Road, Coventry. Enlisting at Coventry he served with the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards in France from 13th August 1914. Killed in action in the front line trenches astride the Oise – Aisne Canal 25th September 1914 aged 21 years and is commemorated in the Vendresse Churchyard, France.

GVF £85 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Herbert Edwards, Rifle Brigade a former Electrician’s Boy born in West Ham, Essex in 1894. Serving in France from 30th July 1915, he was killed in action 14th November 1916 in the attack on Beaucourt Trench, battle of the Ancre, Somme sector aged 22 years whilst serving with the 13th Battalion. The 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade was attached to 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, and attacked with 1/1st Honourable Artillery Company and 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, the attack was successful and all objectives were taken. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

S-3709 Pte H Edwards Rif Brig

With details extracted from on line records.

Herbert Edwards was born in West Ham, Essex in 1894, the son of William and Mary Edwards, the 1911 census records Herbert (Bertie) is a 17 year old Electrician’s Boy residing at 119 Harold Road, Upton Park, London with his parents, four brothers and three sisters. Residing at Plaistow, Essex on enlistment, he enlisted at St Paul’s Churchyard, Middlesex. Serving in France from 30th July 1915 with 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade, this Battalion arrived on the Somme 3rd July 1916. Taking part in the attack towards Ovillers on 7th July, the German third line was reached with over 200 prisoners taken, the attack was a costly one, the Battalion suffering 400 killed and wounded. On 13th November the Battalion moved south of Englebelmer and attached 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, moving through Hamel to its assembly positions. Took part in the attack on Beaucourt Trench from Railway Alley 14th November to a point 400 yards north west with 1/1st Honourable Artillery Company on the right and 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers on the left, all objectives taken. Killed in action during the attack on Beaucourt Trench aged 22 years and commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £185 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private George Henry Harvey, King’s Royal Rifle Corps a former Iron Worker born in Attercliffe, Sheffield in 1892. Enlisting on 8th September 1914, he joined the newly formed 13th Battalion 7th October 1914. Serving in France from 30th July 1915, he was killed in action 12th July 1916 whilst manning front line positions around La Boisselle aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

R-3558 Pte G H Harvey K R Rif C

With service details extracted from his on line service record.

George Henry Harvey was born in Attercliffe, Sheffield in 1892, an Iron Worker he enlisted for the King’s Royal Rifle Corps at Attercliffe 8th September 1914, he joined the newly formed 13th Battalion 7th October 1914. Serving in France from 30th July 1915, the Battalion arrived on the Somme from the Arras sector 5th July 1916. To support and front line positions around La Boisselle on 9th July, he was killed in action 12th July aged 24 years. During their period in the front line 9th to 19th July the Battalion suffered 176 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, his next of kin is recorded as his sister Mrs Catherine Annie Hill, 27 Howden Road, Attercliffe, Sheffield.

NEF £185 SOLD


 

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Private Thomas Hayes, 3rd Hussars born in Henley on Thames, Oxfordshire in 1892, the son of a Church Verger and Sexton, the 1911 census records he is serving with his Regiment in South Africa. Serving in France from 15th August 1914, he was killed in action near Ypres 30th October 1914 aged 22 years. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals

4354 Pte T Hayes 3/Hrs

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details.

Original silk ribbons.

Thomas Hayes was born Thomas Westoboy Hayes in Henley on Thames in 1892, the son of David Hayes a Church Verger and Sexton and his wife Pleasant, the 1901 census records the family are residing at 104 South Hill Gardens, Greys, Henley on Thames. Enlisting at Aldershot the 1911 census records Thomas Hayes is serving with the 3rd Hussars in South Africa. Serving in France from 15th August 1914 he was killed in action 30th October 1914 aged 22 years during the first battle of Ypres. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

At 0600 hours on the 30th October 1914 the Germans began bombarding the junction between the British and the French near Broodseinde. For the next three hours the 1st Bn KRRC, 2nd Bn South Staffordshire Regiment and the French 135e Régiment d’Infanterie held the line. The German infantry rarely getting even as far as the little barbed wire that was available. If this had been intended as a diversion to draw reserves away from von Fabeck’s troops facing Geluveld it failed. At about 0700 hours Fabeck’s heavy artillery opened up on the trenches in front of Zandvoorde. These were held by the 1st and 2nd Life Guards of the 7th Cavalry Brigade (including the 3rd Hussars). Situated on the forward slopes of the hill the makeshift trenches were soon devastated and although the four hundred or so defenders hung on for an hour they were quickly overwhelmed when the Germans launched their infantry assault with over a Division of men.

Orders for retirement were given but it was too late and a squadron of each Life Guard Regiment as well as the Royal Horse Guards machine guns were cut off and killed or captured. As the 7th Cavalry Brigade pulled back to a line in front of Klein Zillebeke, the Germans very warily took possession of Zandvoorde. It would remain in German hands until the last months of the war. Although reinforcements were brought up to steady the new position, nothing could be done to assist the 1st Bn Royal Welch Fusiliers who were the right flank unit of 7th Division. Like the troopers of the Household Cavalry, they were in trenches fully exposed to the bombardment and worse, the only way to retire was over open ground.

Once Zandvoorde had fallen their own flank became exposed and the Germans managed to infiltrate a farm right behind them. Raked by close range shrapnel shells the battalion fought on until they too were overwhelmed. Lt Colonel Henry Cadogan was killed with almost a hundred of his men, fifty-four were taken prisoner leaving just eighty-six unwounded men at roll call that evening. Fortunately the 2nd Bn Royal Scots Fusiliers and 2nd Bn Green Howards had just enough time to form a defensive party on their flank which gave reserves enough time to shore up the gap that had formed in the line.

Despite efforts using the reinforcements to recover some of the lost ground the weight of the German numbers told against the defenders and the position of the Scots and Green Howards became ever more perilous, as they were now situated at the apex of a triangle that jutted out towards the Germans. The situation was untenable and early in the afternoon orders were sent out to both battalions to pull back about a kilometre to a new line behind Zandvoorde. Although suffering heavy losses, they had gained such a mastery over their area of the battlefield that when they did pull back the Germans showed no inclination to chase them.

A rare 1914 casualty to this Regiment which during the German onslaught fought dismounted.

EF £450 Available


 

British War Medal to Private Thomas Edward Corlett, Royal Fusiliers, born in West Ham, Essex he was residing in West Ham when he enlisted. Serving in France after January 1916 with the 20th (3rd Public Schools) Battalion he was killed in action during his Battalion’s attack on High Wood, Somme sector. The Battalion was engaged in fierce close quarters fighting in which it suffered 390 killed and wounded, relieved at midnight the survivors withdrew to Mametz Wood. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War Medal

GS-22282 Pte T E Corlett R Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, Medal roll which confirms service with the 20th Battalion only.

Thomas Edward Corlett was born in West Ham, Essex in 1880, he served in France after January 1916 with the 20th (3rd Public Schools) Battalion Royal Fusiliers. He was killed in action in his Battalion’s attack on High Wood, Somme sector 20th July 1916 aged 36 years, the attack resulted in fierce close quarter fighting and cost the Battalion 390 killed and wounded. Relieved at midnight the survivors withdrew to Mametz Wood. The son of Thomas Edward and Esther Corlett of 111 Windsor Road, Forest Gate, Essex, the family had roots on the Isle of Man, his mother and father being born there. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £45 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lance Corporal Walter Patience, Seaforth Highlanders a Paper Ruler born in Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland in 1888. Serving in France with the 7th Battalion from 10th May 1915, he was killed in action 25th September 1915 the first day of the battle of Loos aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

1914/15 Star

3-7930 L Cpl W Patience Sea Highrs

British War and Victory Medals

3-7930 Pte W Patience Seaforth

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Walter Patience

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War and Victory Medals only to his next of kin, 1911 census entry, Medal roll entry casualty details etc. Three old copy photographs of Prince Albert Buildings taken in the 1950’s.

Walter Patience was born Walter Campbell Macadam Patience at 7 Chapel Street, Hamilton, Lanark 5th June 1888, the son of John Patience a Bookbinder and his wife Margaret. The 1911 census records Walter is a 22 year old Paper Ruler residing at 34 Prince Albert Buildings, Edinburgh with his father, mother 3 sisters and 1 brother. Serving in France from 10th May 1915, he was killed in action 25th September 1915 on the first day of the battle of Loos aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

EF £295 SOLD


 

British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Corporal Ernest Willis, 23rd (4th Tyneside Scottish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former North Seaton Colliery Office Clerk born in North Seaton, Northumberland n 1896. Enlsiting at Ashington, he served in France from January 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 the first day of the Somme offensive in his Battalion’s attack north of La Boiselle. Advancing from their trenches at 0740, heavy casualties were sustained  in their advance up Mash Valley and crossing No Man’s Land, the first line of German trenches were taken and the second line entered, but owing to heavy casualties bnone could be held against counter attacks and survivors were forced to withdraw. A total of 19 officers and 610 other ranks were killed and wounded, the third highest Battalion casualties of the day. Aged 21 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Newbiggin Memorial Park.

British War and Victory Medals

23-1278 Cpl E Willis North’d Fus

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Ernest Willis

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War and Victory Medals only to his next of kin, 1911 census entry, Medal roll entry casualty details etc.

Ernest Willis was born in North Seaton, Northumberland in 1896, the 1911 census records he is 15 years old, employed as an Office Clerk at the North Seaton Colliery residing with his father John a Colliery Master Blacksmith and Foreman, mother Isabella, older sister Edith a Draper at the Co Op and younger brother Edward a Fitter’s Apprentice at the Colliery residing at 34 Railway Row, North Seaton, Northumberland. Enlisting at Ashington, Northumberland he served with the 23rd (4th Tyneside Scottish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from January 1916. Killed in action 1st July 1916, the fisrt day of the Somme offensive aged 21 years. His Battalion were detailed to attack to the north of La Boiselle and advancing through Mash Valley sustained severe casualties crossing No Man’s Land from enemy Machine Gun fire. The German front line was taken and the second line was also reached but owing to heavy casualties it was impossible to hold their gains against counter attacks and eventually the survivors withdrew to British lines. A total of 19 officers and 610 other ranks were killed and wounded, the third highest Battalion loss of the day. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Newbiggin Memorial Park.

EF £725 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Charles Samuel Nash, Norfolk Regiment a former Farm Agricultural Labourer born in Hempnall, Norfolk in 1894. Enlisting at Norwich 10th September 1914, he served with the 9th Battalion in France from 30th August 1915. The 9th Battalion arrived on the Somme 3rd August 1916 and on 11th September moved to positions south of Trones Wood. Killed in action 15th September 1916 aged 22 years during his Battalion’s unsuccessful attack on the Quadrilateral in which it suffered 431 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

115522 Pte C S Nash Norf R

With details extracted from his on line service record, original silk ribbons.

Charles Samuel Nash was born 28th June 1894 in Hempnall, Bungay, Norfolk, a Farm Agricultural Labourer he enlisted at Norwich 10th September 1914 and joined the 9th Battalion two days later. Serving in France from 30th August 1915, the Battalion arrived on the Somme 3rd August 1916. Moving to positions south of Trones Wood 11th September, they took up a line on the Ginchy-Leuze Wood Road for an attack on the Qaurilateral. Killed in action 15th September 1916, the advance on the Quadrilateral was with insufficient Artillery support, the barrage stopping 200 yards in front of the Quadrilateral to allow the advance of tanks. Leading waved of the 9th Norfolks were held up by uncut wire and forced to retire. Relieved at midnight, the unsuccessful attack cost the Battalion 431 casualties. Nash’s service record records he was buried on 17th October 1916 so at one point he had an identified grave, later lost. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £185 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Fred Powell, The King’s Liverpool Regiment born in Leeds, Yorkshire in 1890. Enlisting at Liverpool, he served with the 8th (Liverpool Irish) Battalion TF in France from 2nd May 1915. Arriving on the Somme 21st July 1916, the Battalion occupied trenches at Trones Wood before their unsuccessful attack towards Guillemont on 8th August, which cost the Battalion 570 casualties. Taking part in the attack on Hop and Ale Alley east of Delville Wood 9th September they held their gains until relieved three days later. Killed in action 27th September 1916 aged 26 years during the attack on the Gird Lines, the objective being the Ligny-Thilloy Road. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2157 Pte F Powell L’pool R

With research extracted from on line sources, copy newspaper (unidentified) death notification with poor quality head and shoulders photo in uniform.

Fred Powell was born in Leeds, Yotkshire in 1890, the 1901 census records he is 11 years old residing with his father George a Painter and mother Matilda Elizabeth at 35 Darfield Street, Patter Newtown, Leeds. Residing at Blundell Sands when he enlisted at Liverpool, he served with the 1/8th (London Irish) Battalion in France from 2nd May 1915. The 1/8th Battalion fought at Ypres in 1915 and arrived on the Somme 21st July 1916.  the Battalion occupied trenches at Trones Wood before their unsuccessful attack towards Guillemont on 8th August, which cost the Battalion 570 casualties. Taking part in the attack on Hop and Ale Alley east of Delville Wood 9th September they held their gains until relieved three days later. Killed in action 27th September 1916 aged 26 years during the attack on the Gird Lines, the objective being the Ligny-Thilloy Road. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The Newspaper notification records “Private Fred Powell aged 28 (sic) son of Mr and Mrs Powell of 35 Darfield Street, Ashley Road, Leeds was killed in action on September 27th (1916)”.

NEF £185 Available


 

British War & Victory Medals to Private Graham Montagu, King’s Royal Rifle Corps born in Shepherd’s Bush, Middlesex in 1898. Residing in South Ealing, London on enlistment he served in France after January 1916 with the 12th Battalion and was killed in action in the front line trenches opposite Guillemont, Somme sector 28th August 1916 aged 18 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Ealing, London War Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

R-16277 Pte G Montagu K R Rif C

With research extracted from on line sources.

Graham Montagu was born in Shepherd’s Bush, Middlesex in 1898, the 1901 census records he is 3 years old residing with his mother Marjorie Montagu (1863 to 1956) living on her own means, father absent, two brothers, one sister and a servant at 8 Rusthall Avenue, Acton, Ealing, London. Enlisting at Ealing he served with the 12th Battalion in France after January 1916. The 12th Battalion arrived on the Somme at the end of July 1916 and took over trenches opposite Serre on 6th August. On 27th August they took over front line trenches opposite Guillemont, killed in action the following day 28th August 1916 aged 18 years. The Germans attacked the 12th Battalion positions for two days, all attacks were beaten off. Commemorated on the Theapval Memorial and the Ealing War Memorial, London. Commonwealth War Graves record he was the son of Marjorie and the later Arthur Montagu of 47 Devonshire Road, South Ealing, London. His mother remained in Ealing all her life and never re-married, she died in 1956 aged 92 years.

EF £85 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Lance Corporal John Vickers, Cheshire Regiment a Laundry Van Man born in Glossop in 1883. Enlisting at Glossop, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 7th July 1915. Killed in action 5th September 1916 aged 33 years during his Battalion’s successful assault and capture of Falfemont Farm, Somme sector. During the assault which commenced on 4th September 1916, “D” company attacking the left of the objective were forced to retire owing to heavy machine gun fire, “A” company attacked in the afternoon capturing and consolidating the objective. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Glossop War Memorial in Norfolk Square, Glossop.

1914/15 Star

12433 L Cpl J Vickers Chesh R

British War and Victory Medals

12433 Pte J Vickers Chesh R

With research extracted from on line sources.

John Vickers was born in Glossop, Derbyshire in 1883, the 1911 census records he is a Laundry Van Man residing with his wife Alice Ann a Cotton Weaverand son William at 206 High Street West, Glossop. Enlisting at Glossop he served with first the 1/7th Battalion and later the 1st Battalion in France from 7th July 1915. The 1st Battalion arrived on the Somme 14th July 1916 and moved into positions around High Wood 19th July. Taking part in the attack on Longueval 27th July, the Battalion met strong opposition and was forced to retire. Arriving in the support line at Delville Wood 31st July, they arrived at Angle Wood 3rd September and were in action in the attack on Falfemont Farm. During the assault which commenced on 4th September 1916, “D” company attacking the left of the objective were forced to retire owing to heavy machine gun fire, “A” company attacked in the afternoon capturing and consolidating the objective. The Battalion withdrew on 5th September to Citadel Camp having suffered 460 casualties, John Vickers is recorded as killed in action 5th September 1916 aged 33 years, he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Glossop War Memorial, Norfolk Square, Glossop.

The Sheffield Daily Telegraph 30th September 1916 page 8 records –

“Pte John Vickers, Cheshires of Charles Street Glossop has been killed in action, he was 33 years of age. Formerly employed by the Norfolk Laundry, Glossop, he leaves a widow and two young children”.

The son of Michael and Sarah Ann Vickers, husband of Ann Vickers of 3 Charles Street, Glossop.

NEF £185 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Fred Bingham, 13th (Royal Highlanders of Canada) Battalion Canadian Infantry a Labourer born in Luton, Bedfordshire in 1885. Enlisting at Valcartier 23rd September 1914, the Battalion formed part of 1st Canadian Division, the first unit to proceed overseas, arriving in England on 16th October 1914 and in France on 16th February 1915. Killed in action 24th April 1915 aged 30 years during the Second Battle of Ypres, the Germans used poisonous gas (Chlorine gas) for the first time in their offensive which commenced on 22nd April, the 13th Battalion holding the line until 24th, when subject to heavy enemy fire and gas for two days, were forced to retire to reserve trenches. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

24921 Pte F Bingham 13/Can Inf

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Fred Bingham was born in Luton, Bedfordshire 10th February 1885, his next of kin was recorded as his father Robert residing at 20 George Street, Luton. A Labourer he enlisted at Valcartier 23rd September 1914 and joined the 13th Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada) which formed part of the first contingent to proceed overseas as part of 1st Canadian Division. Killed in action 24th April 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres, the Germans releasing poisonous gas for the first time prior to their attack. Commemorated on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial.

13th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Royal Highlanders of Canada)

On the 25th of September the 13th battalion moved to Quebec and sailed for England on the Troopship Alaunia, arriving on October 16th. The winter months were spent in more training, and on the 10th February 1915, baggage was packed once more and the journey to France resumed. St. Nazaire was reached on the 16th. Four days later the battalion was inspected by Field Marshal Lord French, after which a march was made to Armentieres. On the 24th the battalion companies went into the trenches for the first time, relieving the Buffs.

Image result for canadians at ypres 1915 pictures

The Canadian stand at Ypres 22nd to 24th April 1915 from a painting by Richard Jack

Briefly on arrival in France, the 13th was attached to the 16th (British) Infantry Brigade, employed in routine trench work. It was not until the 16th of April they moved to the village of St. Jean, near St. Julien, that the men knew they were due to come into close contact with the enemy. Though the front line facing the battalion was quiet, there was evidence of severe fighting all around. Throughout the 20th April both Canadian and German artillery were active over the entire area. On the evening of the 21st, the battalion went into the trenches without casualties in spite of heavy shelling, but the trenches were found to be in very poor shape, and many unburied dead lay between the lines. The German attack commenced on the evening of 22nd April..

The day had been comparatively quiet, at about 1700 hours, the enemy artillery began a terrific bombardment, sending over at the same time a great cloud of yellow gas on the front held by the French Turcos on the left of the 13th. This was the first gas attack of the war. As the Canadians saw the yellow cloud rolling along the ground their first thought was that the Germans were using lyddite prodigally but soon the real facts became known. The French Turcos were forced to retire, retreating through the village of St. Julien, where they mingled with other troops moving into and stationed in the village. The confusion was considerable, but the worst feature of the retirement was that it left the left flank of the 13th Battalion open to enemy attack. No. 3 Company was called out of reserve to reinforce the line, and one company of the Buffs was also sent in, Major Buchanan took command of the front line.

It became necessary for the left flank of the 3rd Canadian Brigade – of which the 13th Battalion was a unit – to withdraw southward so that the rear and the village of St. Julien were protected. This operation was carried out hurriedly but successfully. During the entire night of 22nd the fighting continued and throughout the next day (23rd) the battalion was shelled and gassed almost continuously. On the 24th they were still being shelled, but held the line until 0730 hours when they were forced to retire to GHQ (Reserve) trenches. ‘On the afternoon of the 25th they were relieved and marched to Brayling, where they took over old French reserve trenches in Divisional reserve. The battalion remained in this position, the battle being still in progress, until they re-entered the trenches on the 28th. During this time they suffered many casualties from the severe enemy shelling, but they kept the position until the 30th April, on which day they were ordered to stand-to while British troops made an attack in the neighbourhood. The following day the battalion went into divisional reserve, with headquarters at Vlamertinge, and two days later marched to Bailleul for re-organisation and refitting.

First time on the market

GVF & better £350 Available


 

914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Corporal James Markie, Royal Fusiliers a Wine and Spirit Merchant’s Warehouseman born in Glasgow in 1886. Residing in Chorlton Cum Hardy, near Manchester when War broke out he enlisted in Manchester and served with the 22nd (Kensington) Battalion Royal Fusiliers in France from 17th November 1915. Killed in action Bernafay Wood, Somme sector 26th July 1916 aged 30 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

517 Pte J Markie R Fus

British War & Victory Medals

K-517 Cpl J Markie R Fus  

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and details extracted from on line records.

James Markie was born in Glasgow in 1886, the 1911 census records he is a 25 year old Wine and Spirit Merchant Warehouseman residing with his father James a Tailor’s Cutter, mother Elizabeth, three sisters and one brother at 202 Oswald Road, Cholton Cum Candy, near Manchester. Enlisting at Manchester he served with the 22nd (Kensington) Battalion in France from 17th November 1916. Killed in action near Bernafay Wood, Somme sector 26th July 1916 aged 30 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £175 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Acting Sergeant Frederick William Greening, DCM, Royal Fusiliers late 3rd County of London Yeomanry a Hosiery Salesman born in Cheltenham in 1888. Serving in France after January 1916 first with the 2nd Battalion and later the 9th Battalion, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry at Arras in April 1917 when leading his men with the utmost skill and coolness under fire. Killed in action 30th June 1917 aged 29 years, he now rests in the Monchy British Cemetery, Monchy-le-Preux.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Frederick William Greening

With research listed here extracted from on line records.

Frederick William Greening was born in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire in 1888. The 1911 census records he is a 24 year old Retail Hosiery Salesman a boarder residing at 31 St Matthews Road, Cotham, Bristol. Enlisting at Putney for the 3rd County of London Yeomanry (no 3026) he transferred to the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers (No GS/62292) for service in France, arriving after January 1916. As an Acting Sergeant serving with the 9th Battalion he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry during the battle of Arras in April 1917 London Gazette 18th July 1917 –

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed the utmost skill and coolness under heavy fire in leading his men. His pluck and determination under fire were of the utmost value to his men”.

Killed in action 30th June 1917 aged 29 years.

The son of Maria Greening of 12 Oakfield Road, Cannon Hill, Birmingham and the late William Greening, Frederick was unmarried and now rests in an identified grave in the Monchy British Cemetery, Monchy-le-Preux, France. Also commemorated on a family memorial in Uttoxeter New Cemetery, Derby which includes his father William who died 9th December 1906 aged 45 years, the inscription under Sergeant Frederick William Greening DCM reads “My reward is with my God”.

NEF £145 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William Thomas Evans, Middlesex Regiment, born in North Kensington, Middlessex in 1880. Enlisting at Hammersmith he served with the 1th Battalion in France from 4th October 1915. Arriving on the Somme 25th July 1916, the 13th Battalion took part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August. Advancing on the right of Trones Wood they were checked by cross fire and forced to withdraw. Taking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August, they were subject to a heavy enemy artillery bombardment in which 400 casualties were sustained. Killed in action 31st August 1916 when his Battalion was attacked and forced out of Tea Trench. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

G-4994 Pte W T Evans Middx R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Thomas Evans

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research recorded here from on line records. Original silk medal ribbons, traces of lead solder centre reverse of plaque where at one time a fixing for display in a case, original silk ribbons faded on the obverse side caused by display in a case.

William Thomas Evans was born in 1880 in North Kensington, Middlesex, I was unable to locate him on the 1911 census but still residing in Middlesex on the outbreak of war he enlisted at Hammersmith. Serving in France from 4th October 1915 with the 13th Battalion Middlesex Regiment which arrived on the Somme as part of 73rd Brigade, 24th Division. Arriving at Happy Valley 2nd August, they took over the trenches at Arrow Head Copse 17th August. Taking part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August their advance to the right of Trones Wood came to a standstill when they were caught in cross fire. To the craters in front of Carnoy 19th August and to Sandpit Camp 22nd August. Raking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August they were subject to a prolonged German artillery bombardment causing 400 casualties. Killed in action 31st August 1916 aged 36 years (CWGC erroneously record 38 years) when the Germans attacked forcing them out of Tea Trench. The Soldier’s effects list records he left his estate to his sister Florence Emily and brother John T Evans.

GVF £275 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to John Molyneux Crockett, Merchant Navy. 3rd Engineer Crockett, born 1892, Hull, Yorkshire. Son of John Molyneux Crockett & Louise Crockett. The 1911 Census records he was aged 19, living with his parents at 85 Plane Street, Hull, Yorkshire and working as an Apprentice fitter in an engineering company. He married Elsie May Addey in 1916 of 42 Queensgate Street, Hull, Yorkshire. 3rd Engineer Crockett was killed on 12th April 1917 aged 25 years on board SS ‘Toro’, which was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Many of the crew escaped the ship before it sunk.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Molyneux Crockett

Copy 1911 Census entry, CWGC Details etc

GVF £95 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Walter John Long, Middlesex Regiment, born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892 a Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores he attested for the 11th Battalion serving in France from 31st May 1915. On 4th May 1916 he was on leave and married in Battersea, London, returning to France shortly after he was killed in action with the 1st Battalion 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, Somme sector in which they suffered 321 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

G/959 Pte W J Long Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card and research listed here from on line records. With original transmission letters for the British War & Victory Medals (2).

Walter John Long was born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores residing with his father Alfred a retired Police Detective, mother Elizabeth and four sisters at 26 Crown Terrace, Richmond on Thames. Attesting for the 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment he served in France from 31st May 1915. Returning home on leave he married Alice Maude Clarke at St Michael’s Church, Battersea, London on 4th May 1916. In July 1916 he was serving with the 1st Battalion which arrived on the Somme 9th July 1916. Killed in action 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, heavy Machine Gun fire on both flanks brought the advance to a stand still after advancing through the village of Bazentin-le-Petit, casualties recorded as 321 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available

 


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Thomas Winter, 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. Born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891 and a Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he enlisted on 10th November 1914 and arrived in France on 13th July 1915. On 1st July 1916 the 7th Battalion were in support during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433 they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during an unsuccessful bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support in which the Battalion suffered 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15045 Pte T Winter E York R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, details from his on line service record and research listed here from other on line sources. Original letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star.

Thomas Winter was born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891, the son of John Thomas and Ruth Winter of 65 West Chilton, Ferry Hill, Co Durham. A 23 year 9 month old Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he attested for the 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment at Ferry Hill 10th November 1914. Serving in France from 13th July 1915, the Battalion was in support of the attack on  Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433, they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench, relieved the following day having suffered 123 casualties. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during a bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support, Somme sector failed, the Battalion suffering 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

A photo of Private Winter appears on the North East War Memorials Project Web Site.

NEF £165 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Harry Humphrey, 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former Colliery Labourer above ground, born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896. Serving in France from 25th August 1915, he was killed in action in the attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector 7th July 1916. aged 19 years. His Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from Contalmaison during the attack, suffering 264 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15563 Pte H Humphrey North’d Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here from on line sources.

Harry Humphrey was born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896, the son of Edmund Eckford Humphrey a Raftman for a Timber Merchant and his wife Sarah. The 1911 census records Harry is a 14 year old Colliery Labourer above ground residing at 91 Brussels Street, Gateshead with his widowed father and two sisters. Enlisting at North Shields he served in France with the 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers from 25th August 1915. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 19 years during his Battalion’s attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector in which it suffered 264 casualties mainly from German Machine Gun fire from the direction of Contalmaison. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available


aaa561 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Joseph Bradley, 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham he was employed as an underground Coal Miner and Pony Putter  before enlisting. Serving in France from 9th September 1915, the 14th Battalion had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Killed in action whilst wiring 21st Division front lines at Gueudecourt, Somme sector 29th September 1916 aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18746 Pte J Bradley North’d Fus

With details here extracted from on line documents, original silk ribbons.

Joseph Bradley was born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Underground Coal Miner and Puny Putter (Driver of a Pony drawing a Mine Waggon) residing at 11 Bridge Street, Bishop Auckland with his widowed father George also an Underground Coal Miner and Waggon man and two younger brothers. Enlisting at Bishop Auckland he served with the 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 9th September 1915.

The 14th Battalion were the Pioneer Battalion of 21st Division and on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades in their attack on Fricourt. Killed in action 29th September 1916 aged 24 years whilst wiring 21st Division’s front line at Gueudecourt. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £175 Available