First World War Medals


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Collin Ridgway, 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders a former Blast Furnace Labourer born in 1874 in St Peters, Nottingham. Enlisting at Nottingham, he served in France from 18th February 1915. The 2nd Battalion took part in the first day of the Somme offensive 1st July 1916 attacking German positions on Redan Ridge, coming under heavy Machine Gun fire. Drummer Ritchie of the Battalion being awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry this day. Reaching the German third line they were compelled to withdraw having suffered 394 casualties. Killed in action during the attack on Rainy Trench and Gun Pits immediately south of Dewdrop Trench 14th October 1916 aged 42 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial he left behind a widow and five children.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

S-5801 Pte C Ridgway Sea Highrs

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Collin Ridgway

With original letters (2) forwarding the 1914/15 Star and the British War & Victory Medals to his widow, original photograph in uniform, Medal Registered envelope addressed to his widow.

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Collin (correct spelling) Ridgway was born in St Peters, Nottingham in 1874 the son of Simeon Ridgway an Iron Works Labourer and his wife Mary, in 1881 the family were residing at 18 Lot Close, Stapleford, Nottingham. The 1911 census records Collin Ridgway is a 37 year old Blast Furnace Labourer residing with his wife Mary Jane, 4 sons and 1 daughter at 29 Pastures, Stapleford, Nottingham. Enlisting at Nottingham he served in France with the 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders from 18th February 1915.

Surviving his Battalion’s attack on Redan Ridge, Somme sector 1st July 1916, they advanced following the 1st East Lancashire Regiment and 1st Hampshire Regiment into action. Encountering heavy Machine Gun fire from the front and the direction of Beaumont Hamel, they reached the German third line but were forced to with draw having suffered 394 casualties. Drummer Ritchie of this Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry this day. Killed in action during the attack on Rainy Trench and the Gun Pits immediately south of Dewdrop Trench, 14th October 1916 aged 42 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The positions captured on the 14th October were re-captured in a counter attack, the War Diary notes ‘nothing was gained and our lines remained as before’.

The Trio lacquered a possible official correction to ‘w’ of Ridgway on Victory Medal.

NEF £275 Available


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British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque and Memorial Scroll in complete addressed cardboard tube to Private Leonard Henry Dubber, Hampshire Regiment. Born in Portsmouth in 1893 and a former Boot trade Errand Boy he attested in Portsmouth for the 15th (2nd Portsmouth) Battalion. Serving in France from May 1916, the Battalion arrived at the reserve trenches at Montauban, Somme sector 12th September 1916. Killed in action 6th October 1916 near Flers when a German counter attack was repulsed, at the time he was attached 122nd Company Machine Gun Corps.

British War & Victory Medals

18513 Pte L H Dubber Hamps R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Leonard Henry Dubber

Memorial Scroll in cardboard tube addressed to his father

Pte Leonard Henry Dubber Hampshire Regt

With copy casualty details. The Memorial Scroll in Card tube which is complete with both ends addressed ‘Mr G Dubber, 5 Radman St, Southsea, Portsmouth’. The Bronze Memorial Plaque in card envelope with Buckingham Palace condolence letter a most complete lot.

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Leonard Henry Dubber was born in Portsmouth in 1893, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Errand Boy for the Boot trade residing with his father George a Shipyard Driller at HM Dockyard, Portsmouth mother Annie three brothers and one sister at 5 Radnor Street, Southsea. His elder brother Albert was present at the time of the census an Engine Room Artificer, Royal Navy. Attesting for the 15th Battalion (2nd Portsmouth) Hampshire Regiment he served in France from May 1916. The Battalion took over reserve trenches at Montauban, Somme sector  on 12th September and trenches west of Delville Wood on 13th September. Taking part in the attack on Flers 15th September, the left of the attack being held up by Machine Gun fire for 10 minutes, the attack was successful and moving through the village gains were consolidated, casualties recorded as 292. Killed in action 6th October 1916 when a German counter attack north of Flers was repulsed attached 122 Coy Machine Gun Corps. Aged 23 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Both the 15th Battalion Hampshire Regiment and 122 Company Machine Gun Corps were part of 122nd Brigade, 41st Division. Rare to see complete Memorial scroll tube complete and not squashed, Memorial Plaque in card envelope with letter.

NEF £245 SOLD


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British War and Victory Medals to Sergeant George Sydney Powell, 11th (Lambeth) Battalion The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment. A Canadian born in British Columbia he enlisted at Lambeth and served in France from 5th May 1916. Killed in action in the front line trenches at Factory Corner, near Montauban, Somme sector 1st October 1916. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial

British War & Victory Medals

G-10968 SJT G S Powell The Queen’s R

With copy Medal Index Card and casualty details.

George Sydney Powell was born in British Columbia, Canada, year unknown. He does not appear on the UK 1911 census so presumably was still living in Canada. He attested for the 11th (Lambeth) Battalion The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment at Lambeth, he was at the time residing in Cavendish Square, London WC. The 11th Battalion was raised by the Mayor and Borough of Lambeth on 16th June 1915 and formed part of 123rd Brigade 41st Division, landing in France on 5th May 1916. They arrived on the Somme 23rd August 1916 and their Commanding Officer Lt Colonel H B Burnaby was killed while reconnoitring front line trenches near Delville Wood. Entering the front line at Carlton Trench, Tea Lane, Flers Road, Tea Trench and Orchard Trench 10th September. In reserve for the attack on Flers 15th September they moved late that evening to consolidate positions captured north east of Flers. Moving to Montauban Gird Lines 27th September, Factory Corner the following day, ‘C’ and ‘D’ companies advanced 100 yards during the night. Killed in action 1st October 1916 whilst occupying the front line at Factory Corner he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. His next of kin in the Soldiers Effects Book is recorded as his wife Agnes G Powell.

GVF & better £85 Available


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The sons of Edgar and Mildred Cossins of Herne Hill, South East London.

British War and Victory Medals to Private Edgar Hugh Cossins 1/15th Battalion London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles) a former Stockbroker’s Clerk born in Newmarket, Cambridgeshire in 1887. Enlisting in London he served in France from 6th May 1916 and  survived his Battalion’s attack on High Wood, Somme sector 15th September 1916. Killed in action during his Battalion’s attack on the Butte de Warlencourt, Somme sector 7th October 1916 aged 29 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Ernest Cossins, 1/21st Battalion London Regiment (First Surrey Rifles) a former Builder’s Clerk born in Lambeth, London in 1892. Enlisting at Whitehall, London, he served in France from 16th June 1916 and survived his Battalion’s attack on High Wood, Somme sector 15th September 1916 in which it suffered 17 officer and 550 other rank casualties and the unsuccessful attack on Snag Trench on the night of 8th October. Killed in action Ypres 30th August 1917 aged 25 years he is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

4668 Pte E H Cossins 15-Lond R

British War & Victory Medals

5805 Pte E Cossins 21-Lond R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Ernest Cossins

With research listed here from on line records.

Edgar High Cossins was born in Newmarket, Cambridgeshire in 1887, the 1911 cesus records he is 24 years old a Stockbroker’s Clerk residing with his father Edgar a Joiner in the building trade, mother Mildred and siblings including his younger brother Ernest at 42 Cambria Road, Cold Harbour Lane, Herne Hiss SE London. Enlisting in London he served with the 1/15th Battalion London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles) in France from 6th May 1916. Taking part in the attack on High Wood, Somme sector 15th September 1916, stiff opposition was encountered with only 150 men reaching their objective, casualties sustained during four days fighting at High Wood recorded as 380. Killed in action during the attack on the Butte de Warlencourt and Warlencourt line 7th October 1916 aged 29 years. High casualties ere sustained from the German barrage whilst advancing through Eaucourt L’Abbaye and Machine Gun fire beyond the village, the attack failed with 349 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Ernest Cossins was born in Lambeth in 1892, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Builder’s Clerk residing with his elder brother above at the same address. Enlisting at Whitehall, London he served with the 1/21st Battalion London Regiment in France from 16th June 1916 and survived his Battalion’s attack on High Wood, Somme sector  15th September 1916, in which his brother also took part. Killed in action Ypres 30th August 1917 aged 24 years he is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial.

GVF & better £300 SOLD


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The sons of Alfred and Elizabeth Deeley of Beighton, Derbyshire

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Albert Edward Deeley, 1/8th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment. Born in Beighton, Derbyshire in 1886 he was a Coal Mine underground Pony Driver and later Coal Miner. Serving in France from 18th July 1915 he was killed in action during the attack on German positions south of Grandcourt, Somme sector 18th November 1916 aged 30 years. He had survived his Battalion’s earlier attacks on La Boisselle on 3rd July 1916 in which his Battalion suffered 284 casualties and occupying positions in Becourt Wood in which his Battalion was subject to heavy shelling suffering 141 casualties.

British War & Victory Medals to Ordinary Seaman Wilfred Deeley, Royal Navy a Coal Miner born in Beighton, Derbyshire in 1899, he entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class aboart HMS Powerful 16th August 1917 and subsequently joined HMS Valiant in November 1917. Rated Ordinary Seaman in December 1917 and Able Seaman in January 1919 he was demobilized in July 1919. He died in Sheffield in 1972.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

14867 Pte A E Deeley N Staff R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Albert Edward Deeley

British War & Victory Medals

J.76707 W Deeley Ord RN

With research listed here from on line records, all medals with original silk ribbons.

Albert Edward Deeley was born in Beighton, Derbyshire in 1886, the 1901 census records he is 15 years old a Coal Mine underground Pony Driver residing with his father Alfred a Coal Miner Hewer, mother Elizabeth and younger siblings including Wilfred. The 1911 census records he is a 23 year old Coal Miner residing with his uncle and family at 36 Central Street, Hoyland Common, Yorkshire. Enlisting at Beighton he served with the 8th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment in France from 18th July 1915. Surviving his Battalions attacks on La Boisselle on 3rd July 1916 in which it suffered 284 casualties and later occupying positions in Becourt Wood where they came under severe shelling suffering a further 141 casualties. Killed in action in the attack on German positions south of Grandcourt 18th November 1916 aged 30 years. The 8th North Staffords were on the right of 57th Brigades attack and disappeared in the blizzard for a time its fate was unknown. German trenches entered west of Stump Road, hand to hand fighting with heavy casualties, survivors withdrew up Battery Alley. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Wilfred Deeley was born in Beighton, Derbyshire 2nd December 1899 although his Royal Navy service record erroneously records Sheffield. A Coal Miner he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Powerful as a Boy 2nd Class 16th August 1917 and subsequently joined HMS Valiant 15th November 1917. Rated Ordinary Seaman 2nd December 1917 and Able Seaman 3rd January 1919 he was demobilized 28th July 1919. He died in Sheffield in 1972.

GVF & better £295 SOLD

 


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1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque and Soldier’s Small Book to Private Frank Parrott, Leicestershire Regiment a former Butcher born in Thorpe Acre, Loughborough in 1888. Enlisting in February 1906 he served with both the 1st and 2nd Battalions, in India from March 1909 until he arrived in France with the 2nd Battalion 13th October 1914. Entering the trenches at La Couture 22nd November 1914. Taking part in the unsuccessful attack on Festubert 24th November. Entering the front line again at Festubert 28th November, Parrott was mortally wounded on 30th November and died the same day whilst in the care of 7 Field Ambulance. Aged 32 years he now rests in the Le Touret Cemetery, France. 

1914 Star

7877 Pte F Parrott 2/Leic R

British War & Victory Medals

7877 Pte F Parrott Leic R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Frank Parrott

With original Soldiers Small or Service Book (fairly good condition and complete), flattened medal boxes of issue, original Third Class Army Education Certificate named to Private Parrott 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and dated 29th August 1913 in India, tatty and torn Registered Post envelope addressed to his father ‘Mr W H Parrott, 62 Derby Road, Loughborough’. Details extracted from his on line service record.

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Frank Parrott was born in Thorpe Acre, Loughborough, Leicestershire, the son of John William and Elizabeth Parrott, he attested for the Leicestershire Regiment at Loughborough 12th February 1906 aged 18 years 2 months, he gave his occupation as Butcher. Joining the Depot 16th February 1906, he subsequently transferred to the 2nd Battalion 15th June 1906, 1st Battalion 24th September 1906 and back to the 2nd Battalion 4th March 1909. Serving in India from 4th March 1909, the Battalion left India and arrived in France 13th October 1914.

Taking part in the attack on German positions at Festubert on 24th November 1914, the attack was unsuccessful and although some men entered the enemy trenches they were unable to hold their gains and were forced to withdraw. Moving into the front line trenches again at Festubert on 28th October, Private Parrott was mortally wounded on 30th October and died whilst in the care of 7th Field Ambulance, aged 32 years he now rests in the Le Touret Military Cemetery, France. His service record notes he was initially buried one mile east of Touret on the Bethune – Richebourg Road, right hand side.

First time on the market, virtually as issued.

EF £450 SOLD

 


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with GENUINE Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Captain Rupert Colin Leslie, King’s Own Scottish Borderers and Army Cyclist Corps a former Electrical Engineer originally from Tottenham, London born in 1885. Commissioned in May 1915, he served with the 5th Battalion in Gallipoli from 5th October 1915. Serving in France following the evacuation he was promoted Lieutenant and attached Army Cyclist Corps from March 1916. Mentioned in Despatches in June 1918, he was promoted Captain in July 1918 whilst commanding a Cyclist Company of 6th Divisional Cyclist Battalion. Post War he returned to Electrical Engineering in Lancashire and died in Fylde in 1968.

1914/15 Star

2.Lieut R C Leslie K O Sco Bord

British War & Victory Medals with GENUINE MID Oakleaf

Capt R C Leslie

With research listed here, copy Medal Index Card and MID card. The Trio mounted as originally worn.

Rupert Colin Leslie was born in Tottenham, London in 1885, the 1911 census records he is a 25 year old Electrical Engineer, employed in electricity distribution residing as a boarder at ‘The Hawthorns’, Whitefield, Lancashire. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 6th May 1915 (London Gazette 14th January 1916 page 721), he disembarked at Gallipoli 5th October 1915 and joined the 5th Battalion. Following evacuation, he served in France and was promoted Lieutenant 27th March 1916 and attached Army Cyclist Corps (London Gazette 7th November 1916 page 10751). Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 14th June 1918 page 7052 (Haig, France). Promoted acting Captain whilst commanding a Cyclist Company 18th July 1918 of 6th Divisional Cyclist Battalion (London Gazette 8th March 1919 page 3217). Relinquishing the acting rank of Captain 9th March 1919 on ceasing to be employed by the Corps (London Gazette 27th October 1921 page 8445). Returning to Lancashire on demobilization his home address on his Medal Index Card is recorded as ‘Burford’, Broad Oak Road, Worsley. He died in Fylde, Lancashire in 1968.

GVF £195 SOLD


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private William Henry Insell, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Born in Stratford on Avon in September 1899 he was an original member of the 11th Battalion formed at Warwick in October 1914 enlisting at the age of 15 years. Serving in France from 31st July 1915, his Battalion took part in covering 46th Division’s attack on Gommecourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916.  By 18th August 1916 the 11th Battalion had suffered 758 casualties. Private Insell  was killed in action 16th November 1916 aged 17 years during the attack and capture of Frankfort Trench. The position was captured on 14th November but heavy machine gun fire forced a withdrawal two days later. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

5651 Pte W H Insell R War R

With copy Medal Index Card and research listed here. Original silk ribbons.

William Henry Insell was born in Stratford on Avon Warwickshire in September 1899, the 1901 census records he is 1 year old residing with his father Frederick a window cleaner, mother Emma 3 sisters and 3 brothers at 33 Kings Lane, Stratford on Avon. The 1911 census records he is a 12 year old School Boy residing with his family in Alveston, Stratford on Avon. Enlisting at Alveston, he must have been only 15 years old at the time, joining the 11th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment which was raised in Warwick in October 1914.

Serving in France from 31st July 1915 the 11th Battalion formed part of 112th Brigade, 37th Division. On 1st July 1916 it provided a defensive flank of smoke bombs along the front of 46th Divisions attack on Gommecourt, Somme sector. Remaining on the Somme, between 8th and 11th July the Battalion recorded 170 casualties due to shelling. Taking part in the attack on Pozieres 15th July they suffered another 275 casualties. Taking part in the unsuccessful attack on German trenches north of Bazentin-le-Petit 10th August, ‘A’ and ‘C’ companies sustaining 150 casualties after fierce hand to hand fighting. On 18th August the Battalion historian noted they had sustained 758 casualties, all ranks. On 14th November the 11th Battalion took part in the attack and capture of Frankfort Trench, Private Insell was killed in action 16th November aged 17 years, the day they were forced to withdraw to Waggon Road under heavy enemy machine gun fire from Munich Trench.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £195 SOLD


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The sons of Arthur and Sarah Farnsworth from Matlock, Derbyshire.

British War and Victory Medals to Sergeant Philip John Saxon Farnsworth, 16th (Chatsworth Rifles) Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment. Born in Matlock in 1888, he was a Journeyman and Nurseryman employed at his father’s Nursery prior to enlistment. Serving in France from 6th March 1916, the Battalion arrived on the Somme 24th August 1916. Killed in action 8th October 1916 in the front line at Schwaben Redoubt when a German flamethrower attack was beaten off. Aged 27 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Matlock War Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals to Private Allan Victor Farnsworth, Durham Light Infantry and Labour Corps. Born in Matlock in 1891 he was a Nursery Hand employed at his father’s Nursery prior to enlistment. He survived the War and died in Chorley, Lancashire in 1983 aged 92 years.

British War & Victory Medals

15747 SJT P J S Farnsworth Notts & Derby R

British War & Victory Medals

66986 Pte A V Farnsworth Durh LI

With copy Medal Index Cards confirming both brothers entitled to the British War & Victory Medals only and research recorded here. Original silk ribbons.

Philip John Saxon Farnsworth was born in Matlock, Derbyshire in 1888, the 1911 census records he is a 22 year old Nurseryman and Journeyman residing with his father Arthur a Nursery owner and Golf Green Keeper, his mother Sarah and brothers at “Cuckoostone”, Hatlock, Matlock, Derbyshire. Enlisting at Matlock he served with the 16th (Catsworth Rifles) Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment in France from 6th March 1916. Killed in action in defence of the Schwaben Redoubt 8th October 1916 aged 27 years. On the night of 7th / 8th October 1916 the Germans launched a Flamethrower attack on the 16th Battalion positions, this was beaten off. An attack the following day 9th October was unsuccessful, the Battalion sustaining 238 casualties.

The Derbyshire Courier 28th November 1916 page 1 records –

‘News has reached Mr Arthur Farnsworth, Nursery Proprietor of Matlock Moor, that his son Sergeant Philip John Farnsworth has been officially posted as missing. Sergeant Farnsworth is 29 years old (sic) and unmarried, he was employed at his father’s Nursery before enlisting. He has lived in Matlock all his life and is well known’.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Matlock War Memorial, Pic Tor, Matlock.

Allan Victor Farnsworth (on the 1911 census as Victor but born Allan Victor) was born in Matlock in 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Nursery Hand employed at his father’s Nursery, residing with his elder brother as above. He first served with the Durham Light Infantry in France and later transferred to the Labour Corps number 22360. He survived the War and died in Chorley, Lancashire in 1982 aged 92 years.

Dark toned

NEF £135 SOLD


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British War & Victory Medals to Private Richard Brown, South Lancashire Regiment a former Gardener originally from Glossop, Derbyshire. Enlisting in December 1915 at Glossop, Derbyshire and mobilized in April 1916, he arrived in France on 17th July 1916 and joined ‘B’ Company 2nd Battalion South Lancashire Regiment 24th July 1916. Surviving the attack on Thiepval 3rd September 1916 in which the Battalion suffered 130 killed and wounded, he was killed in action 3rd October 1916 in the front line Hessian Trench and Stuff Redoubt, Somme sector aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

27944 Pte R Brown S Lan R

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from his on line service record, original silk ribbons.

Richard Brown was born in Glossop, Derbyshire a 22 year 8 month old Gardener residing at 108 Platt |Street, Hadfield, Derbyshire he attested for the South Lancashire Regiment at Glossop, Derbyshire 6th December 1915. Mobilized 7th April 1916 he arrived in Rouen, France 17th July 1916 and joined ‘B’ Company 2nd Battalion South Lancashire Regiment 24th July 1916 whilst the Battalion were resting in the neighbourhoods of Forceville, Varennes and Bus-Les-Artois. Taking part in the attack on Thiepval 3rd September 1916 leading waves were enfiladed by Machine Gun fire and forced to withdraw, casualties 130 killed and wounded including their Commanding Officer. Killed in action in the front line trenches at Hessian Trench and Zollern Redoubt, Somme sector 3rd October 1916 aged 24 years. He was buried 4 miles North East of Albert but after the Armistice his grave could not be located and he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. Richard Brown left a widow Lily Eleanor and a daughter Agnes Mary born 25th January 1916 six months before he went to France.

GVF & better £85 SOLD


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British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Corporal Ernest Willis, 23rd (4th Tyneside Scottish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former North Seaton Colliery Office Clerk born in North Seaton, Northumberland. Enlisting at Ashington he served in France from January 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 the First Day of the Somme offensive in his Battalion’s attack north of La Boiselle. Advancing from their trenches at 0740, heavy casualties were sustained in their advance up Marsh Valley and in crossing No Man’s Land, the first line of German trenches were taken and the second line entered, but owing to heavy casualties none could be held against counter attacks and the survivors were forced to withdraw. A total of 19 officers and 610 other ranks being killed and wounded, the third highest Battalion casualties of the day. Aged 21 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Newbiggin Memorial Park.

British War & Victory Medals

23-1278 Cpl E Willis North’d Fus

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Ernest Willis

Ernest Willis was born in North Seaton, Northumberland in 1896, the 1911 census records he is 15 years old, employed as an Office Clerk at the North Seaton Colliery residing with his father John a Colliery Master Blacksmith and Foreman, mother Isabella, elder sister Edith a Drapery Assistant at the Co Op and younger brother Edward a Fitter’s Apprentice at the Colliery residing at 34 Railway Row, North Seaton, Northumberland. Enlisting at Ashington, Northumberland he served with the 23rd (4th Tyneside Scottish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers from January 1916. Killed in action 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive aged 21 years. His Battalion were detailed to attack to the North of La Boisselle and advancing through Marsh Valley sustained severe casualties crossing No Man’s Land due to Machine Gun fire. The German front line was taken and the second line was also reached but owing to heavy casualties it was impossible to hold their gains and eventually the survivors returned to British lines. A total of 19 officers and 610 other ranks were killed and wounded, the third highest Battalion loss of the day. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Newbiggin Memorial Park.

NEF £695 SOLD


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British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal with Memorial Plaque to Fireman and Trimmer Joseph Morton, Merchant Navy. Born in Liverpool in 1874 he was lost aboard the Cargo Ship SS Highland Harris when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-96 off County Mayo 6th August 1918, 24 lives were lost.

British War Medal & Mercantile Marine War Medal

Joseph Morton

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Jospeh Morton

With research listed here.

Joseph Morton was born in Liverpool in 1874, he was a Fireman and Trimmer serving in the Merchant Navy aboard the Cargo Ship SS Highland Harris (Nelson Line built 1904) when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U-96 on 6th August 1918. Morton was one of 24 crew lost and in commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial.

The SS Highland Harris was on a voyage from Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro carrying a general cargo and livestock. She was hit by the first torpedo when 82 miles off the coast of County Mayo, Ireland. A second torpedo hit soon after and she sank fairly rapidly.

Mercantile Marine Medal pairs with Memorial Plaques fairly scarce on the market. First time on the market.

EF £395 Available


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1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Bombardier Arnott William Digby, Royal Horse Artillery from Islington, North London. In 1911 he was a 16 year old Boy Soldier serving at the Royal Horse Artillery Depot, Woolwich and served in France from 15th August 1914 with ‘L’ Battery. A survivor of the Battery’s heroic action at Nery on 1st September 1914, in which all but one gun was destroyed during an attack by 4th German Cavalry Division. Three Victoria Crosses were awarded to the men who kept the last 13 pounder gun firing. All the Battery officers and a quarter of the men became casualties and the Battery was withdrawn to England to re-form, later serving in Gallipoli from April 1915. ‘The battle of the Marne was won at Nery’. Digby survived the War and returned to live in the London area, he married in Hammersmith in 1920 and died in Hastings in 1970.  

1914 Star

63133 Gnr A W Digby RHA

British War and Victory Medals

63133 A-Bmbr A W Digby RA

With copy  Medal Index Card confirming entitled to the Clasp on his 1914 Star and service with ‘L’ Battery, 1914 Star Medal roll entry ‘L’ Battery and British War & Victory Medal roll entry, an original postcard size photo of the recipient taken in London .

Arnott William Digby was born in Islington, London in 1894, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Boy Soldier serving at the Depot, Royal Horse Artillery in Woolwich, London.

Nery is set in a north-south oriented valley around a small river, which feeds into the River Autonne to the north; it is overlooked from the east and west by high bluffs. The main landmark was a sugar factory, just south of the village, where ‘L Battery were billeted; the Cavalry Regiments were stationed in and around the village proper. Dawn on 1st September 1914 came with heavy fog lying in the valley; the force had been awakened and prepared for a move at 0430, but due to bad visibility it was decided to wait an hour and a half for the fog to clear, and the men stood down to rest, water the horses, and prepare breakfast. The teams for the Artillery were left harnessed to their guns, but with the limbers lowered to take the weight off the horses. At 0530, a patrol from the  11th Hussars, which had been sent out to the south-east, encountered a strong force of enemy cavalry and escaped back to the village; the Regiment quickly took up dismounted defensive positions along the eastern edge of the village, though the commander of the 5th Dragoon Guards refused to believe an attack was imminent.

At 0540, firing began from the heights overlooking the village from the east, supported by machine-guns and light Artillery. This was the advanced guard of the 4th German Cavalry Division, which had been surprised to encounter a British force, and signalled that it had unexpectedly “been surrounded by considerable hostile forces”. However, the commander, General von Garnier, sized up the situation and quickly ordered a dismounted attack on the village.

The effects of the fire from the heights were dramatic; the riderless horses of the 2nd Dragoon Guards took fright and bolted along the road northwards, whilst the Artillery was immobilised and forced to remain in the firing line. One of the first casualties was the commander of the battery, Major Sclater-Booth, who was knocked unconscious as he ran towards the guns; the second-in-command of the battery, Captain Bradbury, took charge, and managed to get three guns moved into firing positions, facing twelve field guns on the ridge to the east. Two were quickly knocked out, leaving only one gun, under the direction of Captain Bradbury assisted by Sergeant Nelson and three other men. It kept up a steady fire, drawing the attention of the German Artillery away from the cavalry, until its ammunition was almost exhausted; Bradbury was hit by a shell whilst trying to fetch more ammunition, and fatally wounded. The gun continued firing under Nelson and Battery Sergeant-Major Dorrell, but finally fell silent sometime before 0800, when reinforcements arrived. The German attack was unsuccessful.

‘L’ Battery was almost destroyed as an operational unit in the engagement, losing all five officers and a quarter of its men, and was withdrawn to England in order to reform. It did not see active service again until April 1915, when it was sent to Galliopli. Three men of ‘L’ Battery were awarded the Victoria Cross Captain Edward Bradbury (died of wounds), Battery Sergeant Major George Dorrell and Sergeant David Nelson (killed in action 1918).

Arnott William Digby survived the War and married in Hammersmith in 1920, he died in Hastings, Sussex in 1970.

GVF £1,650 Available


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British War & Victory Medals, with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private James Gulley, 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment a former Colliery Banksman originally from Bilston, Staffordshire. Serving in France after January 1916, he was mortally wounded on 1st July 1916 during his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Mametz, Somme sector and died the same day. Aged 38 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and St Lawrence The Martyr War Memorial, Mansfield, Nottingham. The 1st Battalion suffered 10 officers and 300 other ranks killed and wounded.

British War & Victory Medals

20040 Pte J Gulley S Staff R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

James Gulley

With copy Medal Index Card confirming only the British War & Victory Medals awarded to his next of kin and other research listed here.

 

James Gulley was born in Bilston, Staffordshire in 1878, the 1891 census records he is 13 years old residing with his father John a Coal Miner, mother Eliza, two brothers and two sisters at 22 Portland Road, Hucknall Torkland, Nottingham. The 1901 census records he is a 22 year old Colliery Banksman residing with his family at 68 New Street, Kirby in Ashfield. Not found on the 1911 census, Soldiers Died in the Great War, HMSO, 1919 records he was living in Birmingham and enlisted at Chesterfield Derbyshire. Serving in France with the 1st Battalion, he was mortally wounded on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive and died the same day. Aged 38 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the St Lawrence The Martyr War Memorial, Mansfield. The Soldiers effects records show that he left a widow, Jane.

On 1st July 1916 the 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment were part of 91st Brigade, 7th Division and led the assault on Mametz with 22nd Battalion Manchester Regiment. No Man’s Land was 100 to 200 yards wide and the first German line was crossed with few casualties. Heavy Machine Gun fire then opened up from Mametz and Danzig Alley inflicting heavy casualties during the next advance. By 0745 some 700 yards had been covered, the line of Cemetery Trench immediately south of Mametz taken and consolidated. The village was later entered later and the western end of Danzig Alley captured. By 1940 hours final objective had been taken and held, 150 prisoners were taken and two Machine Guns captured. Casualties 10 officers and 300 other ranks killed and wounded.

GVF & better £650 Available

 


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1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy to Colour Sergeant Arthur Edward Morris, Royal Marine Artillery a former French Polisher from St Pauls, Bristol. Attesting for the Royal Marines 26th July 1901 he joined Portsmouth RMA 18th September 1902. Serving at Ostend and Dunkirk in 1914, he served with the RM Howitzer Brigade in France from 15th February 1915 until June 1918. Promoted to Colour Sergeant in August 1920 he was discharged to pension two years later and died in November 1967 aged 84 years.

1914 Star

RMA.10232 Corpl A E Morris RM Brigade

British War & Victory Medals

RMA 10232 Sgt A E Morris

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 1st type

RMA/10232 A E Morris SERGT RMA

With copy service record.

Arthur Edward Morris was born in St Pauls, Bristol 27th June 1883, a French Polisher he attested for the Royal Marines at Bristol 26th July 1901 and joined the Recruit Depot at Deal the same day. Drafted to Portsmouth Division RMA 18th September 1902, he served ashore and afloat. Promoted Corporal 1st October 1914 aboard HMS Commonwealth he subsequently joined ‘A’ Company RM Artillery 22nd June 1914 and served with the RM Brigade during the defence of Ostend and Dunkirk August to October 1914. Returning to the UK he joined the RM Howitzer Brigade in France 15th February 1915 and served with this unit until 26th June 1918 when he appears to have returned to Portsmouth. Joining HMS Superb 28th August 1918 and RMA Portsmouth 2nd September 1918, promoted Colour Sergeant 12th August 1920 and discharged to pension 1st August 1922. He died 6th November 1967 aged 84 years.

NEF £395 Available

 

 


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Left to right

British War Medal to M2-222790 Warrant Officer Class 2 Albert Hill, Army Service Corps from Salford, Lancashire. A former Regular soldier he served in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1897-1909. Served with 954th Mechanical Transport Company, Army Service Corps and was awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 20th August 1919 for Mesopotamia. With the Motor Transport in Mesopotamia by Lt Colonel F W Leland, page 216 records CSM Hill’s award date as 2ns June 1918 published in Order of the Day 110, 954 Company ASC was involved in the capture of Kirkuk and advance into Persia and Baku.

GVF £60 Available

British War & Victory Medals to 4246 Corporal William Brown, King’s Royal Rifle Corps and Machine Gun Corps a former Bank Apprentice from Crouch End, London. Residing at 34 Ravensdale Mansions, Crouch End when he attested for the 5th Battalion London Regiment at Wood Green 8th March 1916 aged 19 years. Transferred 5th Battalion KRRC, drafted to France 10th July 1916 he was at first attached No 2 Entrenching Battalion. Posted 17th Battalion KRRC 11th September 1916, he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps 7th October 1916 and joined 117th Company. Evacuated to the UK with Influenza in 1917, he spent 42 days in hospital in Cardiff before returning to France. Posted 252 Company MGC he embarked at Leith for Murmansk 18th September 1918 and embarked Murmansk for Archangel 15th November 1918. Evacuated to the UK aboard the SS Kildonan Castle 1st September 1919, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 11th November 1919. Details extracted from on line service record.

GVF £75 Available

British War & Victory Medals to 36630 Private William Parkinson, Leicestershire Regiment a former Slipper Hand from Haslingden, Lancashire. Residing at 350 Manchester Street, Hasligden he attested for the East Lancashire Regiment at Haslingden 4th August 1916. Transferring to the 9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment in January 1917 he was wounded in action, gun shot wound to head 3rd May 1917. Treated by 44 Field Ambulance, 32 Casualty Clearing Station and finally No 2 Australian General Hospital, France he re joined his Battalion 25th June 1917. Posted to the 7th Battalion in February 1918, following disbandment of the 9th Battalion he was wounded and taken prisoner of war 21st March 1918, the first day of the German Spring offensive during the defence of Ephey. Suffering from a bullet wound right side of chest which fractured a rib and entered his lung, he was treated in a German Hospital and made a full recovery. Repatriated to the UK 14th January 1919 he was discharged to the Reserve 31st August 1919. Details extracted from his on line service record.

GVF £95 Available

 


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British War and Victory Medals to Private Wilfred Earthy 1/9th Battalion London Regiment (Queen Victoria’s Rifles) from Hersham, Surrey. Born in 1897 he served in France from 2nd February 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 the First Day of the Somme offensive aged 18 years. The 1/9th Battalion were on the right of 169th Brigade’s attack on Gommecourt and sustained 545 casualties.  Initially the assault was a success, but a series of determined and strong counter attacks eventually forced the Battalion to withdraw, by 1900 the survivors were back in their trenches. Commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

4329 Pte W Earthy 9-Lond R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here.

Wilfred Earthy was born in Hersham, Surrey in 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old Scholar residing with his father Frederick Richard Earthy a Domestic Gardener, mother Helena and siblings at Hersham Road, Walton on Thames, Surrey. Enlisting in London he served with the 1/9th Battalion London Regiment in France from 2nd February 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916 aged 18 years in his Battalion’s attack on Gommecourt in which it sustained 545 casualties.

At 0625 1st July 1916 an intensive bombardment commenced on the German lines and at 0720 smoke was released, at 0725 the first two companies moved forward and at 0730 the assault commenced, the Artillery barrage lifting off the first line of German trenches. A German counter barrage commenced at this time. At 0948 the assaulting companies had reached their objective and occupied Feud, Fellow and Fell after heavy fighting, they did not get in touch with the Battalion on the right. The third company was by now consolidating the German second Line. The Germans were pressing hard at this time and a shortage of bombs became apparent. At 1230 the German counter attack increased in force and companies were driven back from the third line to the second and at 1400 were driven back to the first line, at 1900 survivors were driven out of the first line and returned to their trenches.

Wilfred Earthy is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £395 Available


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British War & Victory Medals to Private Frederick George Lawrence 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment a former Domestic Gardener born in Brimpton, Crookham, Berkshire in 1893. Enlisting in Newbury he served in France after January 1916 and was killed in action 1st July 1916, the First Day of the Somme offensive aged 23 years during his Battalion’s unsuccessful attack on Ovillers in which it sustained 437 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

20090 Pte F G Lawrence R Berks R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and census details. Medal Index Card confirms the award of the British War and Victory Medals only to his next of kin.

Frederick George Lawrence was born in Brimpton, Crookham, Berkshire in 1893, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Domestic Gardener residing in Crookham with his father Alfred a Farm Labourer, mother Mary and niece. Enlisting at Newbury he joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment in France and was killed in action 1st July 1916, the First Day of the Somme offensive. The 2nd Battalion were part of 25th Brigade, 8th Division and left Long Valley Camp on 30th June to take up positions in readiness for the attack on Ovillers the following day.

Before the attack it was noticed the British wire had not been sufficiently cut so parties were sent out at night to clear it. At 0625 the British artillery bombardment began. At 0715 the Germans opened up with Machine Gun and rifle fire on the 2nd Battalion’s line. At 0730 the three assaulting companies advanced to attack the German line. The intense fire they met preventing them reaching the German positions, a group on the left of the attack got into the German trenches but were bombed out. The Commanding Officer and Second in Command were both wounded and command of the Battalion passed to 2nd Lieutenant C Mollet (Adjutant). The German=s replied with an artillery bombardment on the British lines at 0635. At 1100 orders were received by Brigade HQ to wait and at 1230 orders were received the Brigade would be relieved. The attack had cost the 2nd Berkshires 473 casualties.

Frederck George Lawrence is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £395 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private John Wood, 11th (Service) Battalion Manchester Regiment. Enlisting in July 1915, he served in Gallipoli from 7th November 1915. Evacuated on 16th December 1915 and arrived in Egypt in January 1916. Discharged 23rd June 1916 the result of sickness contracted on active service.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

24986 Pte J Wood Manch R

With copy Medal Index Card, copies from Battalion War Diary for November 1915 and SWB roll entry.

John Wood enlisted on 15th July 1915 and was drafted to the 11th (Service) Battalion in Gallipoli. He arrived on 7th November 1915. In December 1915 the Battalion suffered badly from the cold weather conditions, resulting in 2 officers and 231 other ranks being sent to hospital with a recorded 23 men missing. Evacuated from Sulva Point 15th December, they arrived in Egypt in January 1916. John Wood was evacuated to the UK sick and joined the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion at home being discharged on 23rd June 1916 the result of sickness contracted on active service.

NEF £85 Available


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Silver War Badge to Lieutenant Colonel Cecil Du Pre Powney, OBE, FRGS, JP, Hampshire Regiment late Grenadier Guards. The son of Madras Supreme Court Judge Edward Penton Powney, educated Eton and Trinity College Cambridge he was first commissioned in 1884 and served with the Grenadier Guards until 1894 including the Suakin operations of 1885. Commanding the 3rd Battalion Hampshire Regiment 1914 to 1916 at home, he was then appointed Divisional Commander London Metropolitan Police 1916 to 1919, awarded OBE for these services. A High Sherriff of Hampshire, he died in 1936.

Silver War Badge numbered and engraved

149998 ‘Lt Col Powney Hants Regt 1914-16′

With research recorded below from on line sources, copy SWB roll entry confirming.

Lt Colonel Cecil Du Pre Powney

Born 21st August 1862 in London,  son of Edward Penton Powney, formerly Judge of the Supreme Court of Madras, of Fyfield House, Andover, married Ethel Mary daughter of Colonel Norton Knatchbull of Onelton, Andover. Educated Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, first commissioned 2/Lieutenant Northamptonshire Regiment 14th May 1884,  Lieutenant Grenadier Guards 21st May 1884,  served in the Sudan Expedition of 1885 (Medal and clasp Suakin 1885, Bronze Star), ADC to Lord Frankfort de Montmorency 6th July 1891, Captain 23rd October 1895 retired from Grenadier Guards 1894, Major Hampshire Regiment Militia 30th April 1904. Director Liberian International Corporation,. Commanded 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion Hampshire Regiment 4th August 1914 to 4th January 1916, commanded ‘B’ Division London Metropolitan Special Constabulary 1917 to 1919, awarded the OBE for these services London Gazette 7th January 1919 page 471. Formed the Powney Freemason’s Lodge No 3099, appointed High Sheriff of the County of Southampton 1904 to 1905, residing at Bambridge House, Bishopstoke, Hampshire, Officer of the Order of St John of Jerusalem London Gazette 23rd June 1931 page 4072. He died in 1936.

GVF £135 Available

 


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1914/15 Star British War & Victory Medals to Private Douglas Viney Lidington, Norfolk Regiment a former Grocer’s Warehouseman born in Thame, Oxfordshire in 1879. Residing in the Strand, London on the outbreak of War he enlisted in London and served with the 9th Battalion in France from 30th August 1915. Killed in action 15th September 1916 aged 37 years during the attack on the Quadrilateral, Somme sector. Leading waves held up by uncut wire and forced to retire, the Battalion suffering 431 casualties. Commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

16335 Pte D V Lidington Norf R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty detais and other research listed here.

Douglas Viney Lidington was born in Thame, Oxfordshire he was baptise21st April 1879 at St Mary’s Church, Thame. The 1881 census records he is residing with his father William a Hotel Keeper, mother Joanna at The Spread Eagle Hotel, Corn Market, Thame, he has five brothers and sisters. The 1901 census records he is a 21 year old Newsagent residing with his Aunt at 4 and 5 Adam Street, St Martin in the Fields, London, he married 6th March 1902 Gertrude Emilie Adams. The 19112 census records he is a Grocer’s Warehouseman residing with his wife and four children at 4 Adams Street, Strand, London.

Enlisting in London he served with the 9th Battalion Norfolk Regiment in France from 30th August 1915. The Battalion arrived on the Somme on 3rd August 1916 and took part in the attack on the Quadrilateral 15th September. The advance was conducted with insufficient Artillery support, the barrage left a gap of 200 yards in front of the Quadrilateral to allow for the advance of Tanks. Leading waves were held up by uncut wire and forced to retire. Relieved at midnight the Battalion had suffered 431 killed, wounded and missing. Commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £175 Available


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British War & Victory Medals to Private Bernard John Osborn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, born in Market Bosworth in 1889, the son of a Farmer. Serving with the 1/5th Battalion in France after January 1916, his Battalion releasing smoke for the attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916, it was later to take part in the attacks on Ovillers 16th July, Poziers on 23rd July and Leipzig Redoubt 18th August. Killed in action whilst holding the front line Le Sars sector 10th November 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

6144 Pte B J Osborn R War R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming British war & Victory Medals only awarded, casualty details.

Bernard John Osborn was born in Market Bosworth, Leicestershire in 1889, the 1901 census records he is 12 years old residing at Pool House, Newbold Verdon, Market Bosworth with his father Joseph Henry a Farmer and mother Emma, he has one brother. Not identified on the 1911 census he enlisted at Coventry and served with the 1/5th Battalion in France. Part of 143rd Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division they provided smoke cover for the attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916 which ended in failure. On 16th July they too part in the attack on Ovillers taking the German second line and held their positions against six counter attacks. In action at Poziers 23rd July when an attempt to link up with the Australian Division failed and the attack on Leipzig Redoubt 18th August which they captured. Killed in action whilst manning the front line Le Sars Sector 10th November 1916 aged 27 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £85 Available


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British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Albert Harvey, 4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment a former Farm Labourer from Warmley, Hertfordshire. Enlisting at Bedford he served in France after January 1916. Killed in action during the assault towards Beaucourt, Somme sector 13th November 1916 aged 28 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Wormley Village War Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

23465 Pte A Harvey Bedf R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Albert Harvey

With casualty details, Medal Index Card confirms the award of the British War and Victory Medals only to his next of kin.

Albert Harvey (Albert James Harvey) was born in Wormley, Hertfordshire in 1888, the son of John Harvey an Agricultural Labourer and his wife Eliza. By the time of the 1901 census, his mother is a Widow and employed as a Charwoman, residing with her only son Albert aged 13 years at 6 Occupation Road, Wormley. The 1911 census records Albert is a 23 year old Farm Labourer residing at the same address with his 69 year old widowed mother and his uncle George Parker a Nurseryman and family. Enlisting in Bedford he served with the 4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment in France after January 1916. The 4th Battalion were part of 190th Brigade, 63rd (Royal Naval) Division and arrived on the Somme 3rd October 1916. Killed in action 13th November 1916 during the assault on Beaucourt aged 28 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Wormley War Memorial.

GVF £225 Available

 


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Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War & Victory Medals to Sergeant Herbert George Thomson, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment a former Clerk from Lambeth, London. Enlisting in January 1896 he served with the 1st Battalion in Malta, Hong Kong and Singapore before joining the 19th Company and 23rd Mounted Infantry in South Africa. Returning to England in April 1903, he transferred to the Army Reserve in September 1905 at his own request having been reduced to Private for drunkenness. Re-engaging in January 1908 for the Reserve he was discharged in January 1912. Re-enlisting at Shoreditch in 1915 he served with the 8th Battalion in France. Killed in action 16th August 1916 aged 40 years during the unsuccessful attack on Lonely Trench near Guillemont, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

4991 SERJT H G Thomson R Lanc Regt MI

British War & Victory Medals

18265 A-SJT H G Thomson R Lanc R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War & Victory Medals only awarded for 1WW, details extracted from his on line service record.

Herbert George Thomson was born in Lambeth, London a 20 year old Clerk he attested for the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment in London 20th January 1896 ststing his next of kin as his mother Mary, 69 St Georges Road, Southwark, Surrey. Posted to the 2nd Battalion in May 1896, appointed Lance Corporal May 1897, he transferred to the 1st Battalion in November 1897 in Malta, serving in Hong Kong from 25th November 1897 to 16th January 1899, promoted Corporal in February 1898, served Singapore 17th January 1899 to 26th March 1900 he returned to the UK. Appointed Lance Sergeant September 1900, promoted Sergeant April 1901, he embarked for South Africa 6th May 1901. Serving with 19th Company Mounted Infantry with the rank of Colour Sergeant from May 1901, he was found guilty of drunkenness whilst on active service by Court Martial in January 1902 and reduced to Sergeant and posted to 23rd Company Mounted Infantry.

Joining the 2nd Battalion in Natal in September 1902 he embarked for the UK in April 1903. Reduced to Corporal in September 1905 for drunkenness and to Private for misconduct shortly after, he transferred to the Army Reserve at his own request in September 1905. Re-engaging for the Reserve in January 1908, he was discharged from the Reserve, on completion of engagement. The 1911 census records he is a 36 year old Printer’s Labourer residing at 69 St George’s Road, Southwark with his 71 year old widowed mother Mary Elizabeth. Re-enlisting at Shoreditch, London in 1915 he served with the 8th Battalion in France and was killed in action 16th August 1916 aged 40 years during his Battalion’s unsuccessful attack on Lonely trench near Guillemont, Somme sector. The attack went in at 1740, heavy casualties were sustained by Machine Gun and rifle fire as soon as the assault was launched. A renewed attack met a similar fate, all the officers and NCO’s of ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies becoming casualties, the attack by ‘D’ company also failed, the Battalion suffering 271 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF to NEF £325 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal Alfred Millard, Norfolk Regiment a former Printer’s Warehouse Cropper, originally from Greenfield, Luton Bedfordshire. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion in France from 30th May 1915, taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme 1st July 1916 as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. Killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years in his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyine Trench. Occupying it, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley which were strongly resisted.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

12114 Pte A Millard Norf R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

Alfred Millard was born in Greenfield, near Luton, Bedfordshire, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Printer’s Warehouse Cropper residing with his 43 year old widowed mother Jane and two brothers at 8 St George’s Circus, Blackfriars Road, Southwark, SE London. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment in France from 30th May 1915, the Battalion taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division on 1st July 1916, he was killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years during his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyline trench.

Zero hour was 2230 and after three minutes of intense bombardment the 7th Norfolk with ‘A’ and ‘B’ companies in front and ‘D’ and ‘C’ companies in support dashed forward and captured their objective, the right of Sixth Avenue at 2240. So rapid was their advance that touch with the flanks was lost. ‘C’ company worked down the trench to the left and gained touch with 9th Essex and at 2340 gained touch with the Australian 4th Division on the right. Strong points were established and the position held, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley but met strong resistance.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £175 Available