First World War Medals to Casualties


First World War Medals to CasualtiesFirst World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Stoker 1st Class Charles Edward White, Royal Navy a former Builder’s Labourer born in Alton, Hampshire in 1896. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 7th February 1914, he joined HMS Invincible 3rd August 1914 and was aboard this ship during the battles of Heligoland Bight and the Falkland Islands. Lost aboard Invincible at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial and the Alton, Hampshire War Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

SS-115423 C E White Sto 1 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Charles Edward White

The Bronze Memorial Plaque in Card and paper envelope, the outer envelope addressed “Mr C E White, 1 Amewry Street, Alton”, card box of issue for 1914/15 Star, letter from the Admiralty forwarding the 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, postcard photo of HMS Invincible, copy service record, birth certificate and census entries.

Charles Edward White was born 14th February 1896, a Builders Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at Victory II 17th February 1914, he joined HMS Queen 28th June 1914 and HMS Invincible 3rd August 1914 and served aboard this ship at the battle of Heligoland Bight 28th August 1914 and the battle of the Falklands Islands 8th December 1914 and rated Stoker 1st Class 17th February 1915. Lost aboard HMS Invincible at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. The son of Charles White an Iron Works Labourer and his wife Ellen he is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial and the Alton War Memorial.

At 1821 on 31st May 1916 HMS Invincible opened fire on the German Battle Cruisers Lutzow and Derfflinger at a range of 9,000 yards, hitting Derfflinger three times and Seydlitz once, while Lutzow was hit ten times by HMS Lion. At 1830 Invincible became the target for Lutzow and Derfflinger. The two German Battle Cruisers fired three salvos each and struck Invincible amidships penetrating the front of “Q” turret and detonated the midships magazine which blew the ship in half, she sank in 90 seconds.

EF £475 SOLD


First World War Medals to CasualtiesFirst World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Stoker 1st Class Thomas Ralph Thomas Bunce, Royal Navy. Born 10th October 1886 in Blakfriars, London a Boilermaker, he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class aboard HMS Acheron 3rd January 1906. Discharged on completion of service 6th January 1911, he joined Chatham Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilzed 7th August 1914, he joined HMS Hawke and was lost aboard this ship 15th October 1914 in the North Sea when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine U-9. Commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

SS-1021565 C R T Bunce Sto1 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Thomas Ralph Charles Bunce

With Christening Card, certified copy of birth certificate, four letters written by Bunce to his parents from HMS Hawke (one written 4 days before he was killed dated 11th October 1914), original newspaper article “Disaster to HMS Hawke” from The Daily Chronicle dated October 24th 1914 listing 498 of the crew lost, Admiralty letter forwarding Medals to his father, card box of issue for 1914/15 Star, Brooch containing photo of Bunce, casualty reporting letter from the Admiralty in envelope, Certificate of the Inspector of Seaman’s Wills dated 20th May 1915, two further letters dealing with effects, copy service record and other research details. Parents marriage certificate, fathers death certificate (both original) and other documentation relating to his parents,

Thomas Ralph Thomas Bunce was born 10th October 1886 in Blakfriars, London a Boilermaker, he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class aboard HMS Acheron 3rd January 1906. He subsequently joined HMS Hyacinth 6th February 1907, rated Stoker 1st Class 21st March 1907, HMS Royal Arthur 27th March 1909, Pembroke II 15th May 1909, HMS Attentive 28th July 1909, HMS Foresight 18th August 1910, Pembroke II 1st January 1911, discharged shore time expired 6th January 1911. Joining Chatham Royal Fleet Reserve he was mobilised on the outbreak of war and joined HMS Hawke 7th August 1914 and was lost aboard this ship, when she was sunk in the North Sea 15th October 1914.

In October 1914 the 10th Cruiser Squadron was deployed further south in the North Sea as part of efforts to stop German Warships from attacking troop convoys from Canada. On 15th October the Squadron was on patrol off Aberdeen, deployed in line abreast at intervals of 10 miles. HMS Hawke stopped at 0930 to pick up mail from the steam ship Endymion. After recovering her boat with the mail, Hawke proceeded at 13 knots without zig-zagging to regain her station. Out of sight from the rest of the Squadron at 1030 she was hit by a torpedo from the German Submarine U-9 (which had sunk three British Cruisers on 22nd September). Hawke quickly capsized, the remainder of the Squadron only realising what was happening after an unsuccessful attack on HMS Theseus. The Squadron was ordered to retreat at high speed to the north west, no response to the order being received by Hawke. HMS Swift was dispatched from Scapa Flow to search for Hawke and found a raft carrying 1 officer and 21 men. A boat with a further 49 survivors was rescued by a Norwegian Steamer. A total of 524 officers and men were lost including the Captain Hugh P E T Williams, Royal Navy.

EF £495 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Albert Henry Charman, 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Born in Purley, Croydon, Surrey in 1894 he enlisted at Sheffield and in 1911 he was serving with his Regiment at Cambridge Battacks, Woolwich. Serving in France from 25th October 1914 and died of wounds received in action 29th December 1914 aged 21 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the  Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

 1914 Star

3-3041 Pte A Charman Yorks LI

British War and Victory Medals

3-3041 Pte A Charman Yorks LI

Albert Henry Charman, born 1894 Purley, Croydon, Surrey in 1894, the son of Henry and Emily Charman of 94 Churchill Road, Croydon, Surrey. Albert Charman enlisted at Sheffield and is recorded as a Private on the 1911 Census at Cambridge Barracks, Francis Street, Woolwich, aged 17 years. The 2nd battalion Yorkshire Light Infantry landed at Havre on 16th August 1914, Charman served in France from 25th October 1914. Died of  wounds received in action on 29th December 1914 aged 21 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

GVF  £350 Available


 First World War Medals to Casualties

1914 Star, British War & victory Medals named to Private Arthur Edwin Bennett, 2nd Battalion, Ox & Bucks Light Infantry. A former Billiard Marker and Labourer born in Didcot, Berkshire in 1885, he served in France from 1st September 1914 and was killed in action on 21st October 1914 aged 29 years.

1914 Star

8260 Pte A.E.Bennett. 2/Oxf & Bucks LI 

British War & Victory Medals

8260 Pte A E Bennett Oxf & Bucks LI

 With copy Medal Index Card and casualty details.

Arthur Edwin Bennett born in 1885 in Didcot, Berkshire, the son of James and Annie Bennett of Church View, Didcot, Berkshire. The 1911 Census records Arthur Bennett employed as a servant and billiard marker at the Junction Hotel, Didcot aged 26 years. Enlisting at Oxford for the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire light Infantry. The 2nd Battalion landed at Boulogne, France on 14th August 1914, Bennett arrived in France on 1st September 1914. Killed in action 21st October 1914 aged 29 years he now rests in an identified grave in the  Bedford House Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

The 2nd Battalion moved to trenches near Pilckem on 20th October and the following day 21st formed up on the Langemarck-Zonnebeke road for the attack on enemy positions. The Battalion was held up just short of the Haanebeck stream by a long hedge, interwoven with barbed wire. There was an open gate in the middle of the hedge, when the leading companies attempted to pass through every officer and man was cut down by Machine Gun fire. Attack further held up by enfilade fire from the left. The Commanding Officer noted “It was their first big fight, the men advancing splendidly”. Casualties recorded as 4 officers killed and 6 wounded, 61 other ranks killed and 143 wounded.

 GVF  £350 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Archibald Cecil Fulford, Hampshire Regiment born in Winchester in 1898, he attested for the 1/4th (Territorial) Battalion in September 1914 and served in Mesopotamia from 18th March 1915. He was one of four brothers to serve in the Great War, captured when the Garrison at Kut al Amara surrendered to Turkish Forces 29th April 1916, he died whilst a prisoner of war 31st December 1916 aged 18 years and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, IRAQ. Battalion HQ and one company of the 1/4th Battalion were captured at Kut al Amara.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

4-3009 Pte A C Fulford Hamps R

With copy CWGC details,  Medal roll entries, census details and Winchester Roll of Honour entry.

Archibald Cecil Fulford was born in Winchester in the fourth quarter of 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 14 year old Scholar residing with his father William Fulford a Domestic Gardener, mother Martha Ann, three brothers and two sisters at 1 Queens Road, Winchester. Attesting for the 1/4th Battalion at Winchester in September 1914, he served in Mesopotamia from 18th March 1915 and was taken prisoner of war when the Garrison at Kut al Amara surrendered to Turkish Forces on 29th April 1916. Fulford died whilst a prisoner of war on 31st December 1916 aged 19 years and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, IRAQ. One of four brothers to serve in the Great War, his elder brother Sergeant Clarence V Fulford, 8th Battalion Canadian Infantry was killed in action at Lens, 21st August 1917.

The 1/4th Battalion landed at Karachi in India in November 1914 as part of the 4th (Rawalpindi) Brigade in the 2nd (Rawalpindi) Division before moving to Basra in March 1915, it remained in Mesopotamia and Persia for the rest of the war. Battalion HQ and one company of the 1/4th Battalion were captured at Kut al Amara.

EF £275 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Everet Freeman, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry born in Lavendon, Buckinghamshire in 1887. The 1911 census records he is serving with the 1st Battalion in India, serving in Mesopotamia from 5th December 1914, he was catured by Turkish Forces when the Kut al Amara Garrison surrendered on 29th April 1916. About 400 men of the 1st Battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry were captured, 71 returned to England at the end of the war. Private Freeman died whilst a prisoner of war between 1st and 30th June 1916 and is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

8295 Pte E Freeman Oxf & Bucks LI

With copy CWGC details,  Medal roll entries, census details.

Everet Freeman was born in Lavendon, Buckinghamshire in 1883, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Freeman he was one of eight children, in 1901 the family residing in Lavendon. He attested at Thane, Oxfordshire for the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. The 1911 census records Everet Freeman serving with the 1st Battalion in India, the Battalion was to arrive in Mesopotamia 5th December 1914. Captured at Kut al Amara when the Garrison surrendered to Turkish forces 29th April 1916. Private Freeman died whilst a prisoner of war in Turksish hands between 1st and 30th June 1916 aged 33 years he is commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

The battalion took part in the march towards Kut-al-Amara with the intention of capturing it from the Ottomans. The battle for Kut began on 26th September 1915 and raged for a number of days until the Ottomans went into retreat and Kut was captured on 28th September. The battalion then took part in the Battle of Ctesiphon (22nd–24th November) during the pursuit of the Ottoman forces and in the effort to capture the capital Baghdad, which ended in the 6th Poona Division being defeated by the Ottomans. 635 officers and men of the battalion fought in the battle of Ctesiphon and 304 became casualties. The Division subsequently retreated to Kut, reaching it on 3 December, where it was besieged by the Ottomans, beginning on 7th December, with a garrison of 10,000 Britons and Indians. The Ottomans launched numerous attempts to take Kut, all of which were repulsed by the defenders, with both sides suffering heavy casualties. The British launched numerous attempts to relieve Kut, all of which failed with heavy losses. On 26th April 1916 supplies had dwindled significantly and many of the garrison’s defenders were suffering from sickness, the garrison negotiated a cease-fire with the Ottomans and on 29th April the British-Indian force of 8,000 surrendered to the Ottomans, including 400 men of the 1st Ox and Bucks. Many of the Ox and Bucks taken at Kut, like the rest of the prisoners, suffered mistreatment by the Ottomans; only 71 of all ranks of the 1st Ox and Bucks who had been taken prisoner returned home to the UK. It is estimated that just under 2,000 Britons and up to 3,000 Indians perished in captivity.

Original tatty silk ribbons.

New ribbons will also be supplied.

NEF £295 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 to Private Amos Bruce, 1st Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment a former Farm Labourer born in Hastings, Sussex in 1887, he attested at Rye 7th October 1907. Arriving in India in September 1908, the 1st Battalion were to remain in India for the duration of the First World War taking part in actions against hostile tribesmen on the North West Frontier from 17th August 1915. Later taking part in the Third Afghan War of 1919, Bruce was mortally wounded in action 16th May 1919, gun shot wound to the head and died the same day. Buried in Peshawar, he is commemorated on the Delhi Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

L-8833 Pte A Bruce R Suss R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

L-8833 Pte A Bruce R Suss R

With copy CWGC details, service papers and Medal roll entries.

Original silk ribbons.

Amos Bruce was born in Hastings, Sussex a 20 year 6 month old Farm Labourer he attested for the Royal Sussex Regiment at Rye 7th October 1907 and joined the Depot the same day. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 8th January 1908, he transferred to the 1st Battalion 3rd September 1908 and embarked at Southampton for India 4th September 1908. The 1st Battalion were to remain in India for the duration of the First World War and qualified for the 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals for their actions against hostile tribes on the North West Frontier commencing 17th August 1915. The 1st Battalion took part in the Third Afghan War of 1919, Private Bruce was mortally wounded in action at Ali Musjid 16th May 1919 gun shot wound to the head, he died the same day in hospital. His service record records both killed in action and died of wounds. Aged 32 years he was the son of Alfred and Florence Bruce of Thornden Road, The Layne, Rolvenden, Kent buried at Peshawar, he is commemorated on the Delhi Memorial.

A rare Third Afghan War 1919 casualty.

NEF £595 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal William Harry Parkins Garner, Gloucestershire Regiment born in Cowley St John, Oxford in 1893 and a former Domestic Servant at Frenchay Park House, Frenchay, Bristol. Enlisting at Neath, he served with the 8th (City of Bristol) Battalion in France from 18th August 1915. Killed in action 3rd July 1916 aged 23 years during his Battalion’s successful attack on la Boisselle, in which his Commanding Officer was awarded the Victoria Cross. The 8th Battalion suffered 302 casualties during the attack and defending their gains against subsequent German counter attacks. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

13555 L Cpl W H P Garner Glouc R

British war and Victory Medals

13555 Pte W H P Garner Glouc R

With copy CWGC details, Soldiers Died in the Great War details, Medal Index Card and census details.

Original silk ribbons.

William Harry Parkins Garner was born 4th May 1893 in Cowley St John, Oxford the son of William Parking Garner and his wife Emily Elizabeth. The 1911 census records he is a 17 year old Domestic Servant employed as a Hall Boy for Mr William Henry Jenkins and his wife Caroline residing with their daughter and ten domestic servants at Frenchay Park House, Frenchay, Bristol, Mr Jenkins was a Railway Director. Enlisting at Neath, he served with the 8th (City of Bristol) Battalion in France from 18th August 1915. Killed in action 3rd July 1916 aged 23 years during his Battalion’s successful attack on La Boisselle. During the attack the line running through ruins of a church gained and consolidated. During the action the Commanding Officer of 8th Glosters Lt Colonel A Carto de Wiart won the Victoria Cross, he had personally led the attack and after the other three Battalion Commanders of 57th Brigade had become casualties, played an active role while holding positions against counter attacks. Withdrawing to the support line the next day they returned to dug outs in La Boisselle that evening. Casualties sustained by the 8th Battalion amounted to 302 killed an wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £185 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908-10, Naval General Service Medal GV clsp Persian Gulf 1909-14, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Sergeant Harry Frederic Lovett, Royal Marine Light Infantry a former Errand Boy born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire 30th May 1888. Entering the Royal Marines at the Recruit Depot, Deal 8yh May 1906, he joined Portsmouth Division the following May. Joining HMS Proserpine 25th August 1908, he took part in the operations off Somaliland and in the Persian Gulf aboard this ship, leaving Proserpine in August 1910. Serving aboard HMS Minotaur on the outbreak of war, he served aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Joining the Royal Marine Brigade at Blandford 3rd December 1916, he served in France with 1st Royal Marine Battalion from 2nd February 1917 and was mortally wounded by artillery fire in the front line trenches near Hamel 15th May 1918. Admitted to No 3 Canadian Stationary Hospital, died of wounds 19th May 1918 aged 30 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt. 

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908-10

PO 14482 Pte H F Lovett RMLI HMS Proserpine

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-14

PO 14482 Act Cpl H F Lovett RMLI HMS Proserpine

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

PO 14482 Sgt H F Lovett RMLI

With copy service record, medal roll entries, casualty details.

Harry Frederic Lovett was born in Alverstoke, Gosport 30th May 1888, an Errand Boy he attested for the Royal Marines at Gosport 8th May 1906 and joined the Recruit Depot at Deal the same day. Posted to “C” Company Portsmouth Division RMLI 16th May 1907, HMS Foresight 30th June 1908, Portsmouth Division 29th July 1908, HMS Proserpine 23rd September 1908, HMS Gibraltar 14th July 1910, Portsmouth Division 29th August 1910, promoted Corporal 30th January 1912, HMS Spartiate 18th April 1912, HMS Minotaur 25th May 1912, serving aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Posted to the Royal Marine Brigade Depot at Blandford 3rd December 1916, he joined 1st Royal Marine Battalion in France 2nd February 1917. Mortally wounded by German Artillery fire in the front line trenches near Hamel 15th May 1918, shrapnel wounds both thighs he was admitted first to No 149 Field Ambulance and evacuated to No 3 Canadian Stationary Hospital the same day TNA reference MH106/263. He died of wounds 19th May 1918 aged 30 years, the son of William and Thirza Lovett of Gosport, husband of Mrs I B Lovett of Myrtle Cottage, Gittisham, Honiton, Devon, he now rests in an identified grave in the Bagneux Bitish Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

A fine Royal Naval Division casualty combination of awards.

EF £675 SOLD


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Private John Glasspool, Hampshire Regiment a former Farm Labourer and Carter born in Overton, Hampshire in 1884. Serving with the 1st Battalion in France from 23rd August 1914, he was killed in action 11th October 1915 whilst in front line trenches near Beaumont Hamel, Somme sector aged 31 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the Hamel Military Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, France.  

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

7167 Pte J Glasspool 1/Hamps R

British War and Victory Medals

7167 Pte J Glasspool Hamps R

With copy Medal Index Card, census details, colour photo of grave and Commonwealth War Graves Commission record.

The Trio mounted for wear, original silk ribbons and old mounting brooch.

John Glasspool was born in Overton, Hampshire in 1884, he was baptised at Overton 21st August 1884. The 1901 census records he is a 16 year old Farm Carter residing with his father William also a Farm Carter, mother Alice Ann, four brothers and three sisters at 37 Southerly Cottages, Overton. The 1911 census records he is a 26 year old Farm Labourer residing as a Boarder at New Barn Cottage, Sparsholt, near Winchester, Hampshire. Attesting for the Hampshire Regiment at Winchester, probably in 1912, he was residing at Overton at the time. Serving with the 1st Battalion in France from 23rd August 1914, the award of the clasp to his 1914 Star is confirmed. Killed in action 11th October 1915 in the front line trenches at Hamel near Beaumont Hamel, Somme sector aged 31 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the Hamel Military Cemetery, France, appears his name was missed from the Overton War Memorial.

EF £325 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914 Star and old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque named to Private John Dyer, 2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders, a former Labourer from Edinburgh, Scotland Attesting in 1900, he served until 1908 when he transferred to the Army Reserve. Mobilised 5th August 1914, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 14th September 1914 and was reported wounded in action in January 1915. Transferring to the 2nd Battalion 16th March 1915, he was  Killed in Action 15th March 1916 aged 37 years on 15th March 1916 aged 37 years and now rests in the Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel-becourt, Somme, France.

1914 Star and old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

7437 Pte J Dyer 1/Gord Highrs

British War & Victory Medals

7437 Pte J Dyer Gordons

First World War Medals to Casualties

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Dyer

With copy Medal index Card whivh confirms the award of the clasp to the 1914 Star, Service Records & Commonwealth War Graves Commission details.

John Dyer born South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland in 1879. Son of Patrick and Mary Dyer of Edinburgh. Attesting at Edinburgh for the Gordon Highlanders on 2nd July 1900 aged 19 years and joined the 2nd Battalion, transferring to the 1st Battalion 6th February 1908, he transferred to the Army Reserve 1st July 1908. Mobilised on the outbreak of war 5th August 1914, he joined the 1st Battalion and served in France from 14th September 1914, The Scotsman Newspaper dated 27th February 1915 page 11 records him as wounded in action, the details being taken from the BEF Base Casualty report dated 22nd January 1915. Transferring to the 2nd Battalion in France 16th March 1915. Killed in Action aged 37 years 15th March 1916 aged 37 years he now rests Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, Somme, France.

Original Silk Ribbons

GVF Condition £395 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties 

British War and Victory Medals named to Private Ernest Edmund Plunkett, Norfolk Regiment, born in St Augustine, Norwich in 1892, he attested for the 2/6th Cyclists Battalion,  at Norwich 14th March 1915 aged 24 years. Posted to the 1st Battalion in France on 31st July 1916, he was Killed in Action 4th September 1916 aged 24 years during the attack on German positions at Falfemont Farm. “A” and “B” Companies led the assault on a front of 500 yards, few men of “A” Company reached the south west corner of the farm and were soon bombed out. All but two officers were killed or wounded, progress was only possible by crawling from one shell hole to the other. Objective taken by 0300 hours and withdrew to trenches north of Hardecourt at 1515 hours having suffered 369 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

British War & Victory Medals

43307 Pte E E Plunkett Norf R

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Ernest Edmund Plunkett born in 1892, the son of Walter and Eliza Plunkett, of 9 Rose Yard, St Augustines’, Norwich, Norfolk, he attested for the 2/6th Cyclists Battalion, Norfolk Regiment at Norwich 14th March 1915 aged 23 years, service numbers 1965 and 43307. On the 21st December 1915 he was appointed Lance Corporal but reverted to Private 17th February 1916 at his own request. On the 30th July 1916 he embarked from Folkestone arriving in France 31st July 1916 and joined the 1st Battalion in the field 19th August 1916. On 7th September 1916 he was reported missing and is accepted to have been killed in action 4th September 1916. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The 1st Battalion reached bivouacs near Bonfray Farm, Somme sector 26th August 1916 and were in reserve during 95th Brigade’s attack towards Leuze Farm on 3rd September. Moved opposite Falfemont Farm and attacked at 1510 hours on 4th September , “A” and “B” Companies led the assault on a front of 500 yards, few men of “A” Company reached the south west corner of the farm and were soon bombed out. All but two officers were killed or wounded, progress was only possible by crawling from one shell hole to the other. Objective taken by 0300 hours and withdrew to trenches north of Hardecourt at 1515 hours having suffered 369 casualties.

Initially buried in the vicinity of Leuze Wood (as reported by officer commanding 12th Battalion London Regiment, soldiers of his Battalion having found his body), his grave could not be located at the end of the War and he is now commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial

Original Silk Ribbons

EF Condition £85 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties

Territorial Force War Medal to Sapper Edwin Dick, Royal Engineers (Territorial Force). Born in Stoke Bridge, Edinburgh, Scotland in 1896, he enlisted at Edinburgh 19th December 1913. Serving with 1/1st Edinburgh Field Company TF, he served in Egypt from 5th January 1916 and embarked at Alexandria for France 17th April 1916. Killed in Action on 4th October 1916, Somme sector, France he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Territorial Force War Medal 

1307 Spr E Dick RE

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Edwin Dick, born Stoke Bridge, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland in 1896, the  son of George and Jessie Dick of 11 Leslie Place, Edinburgh, Scotland. The 1901 Scotland Census records Edwin Dick aged 5 years. Edwin Dick enlisted into the 1/1st Edinburgh Field Company Royal Engineers TF at Edinburgh on 19th December 1913, aged 17 years 10 months. He joined the Works Company, 1/1st Edinburgh Royal Engineers on 1st July 1914. His service papers record he embarked from Devonport on 19th December 1915 to Port Said in Egypt disembarking on 5th January 1916. On the 17th April 1916 he set sail from Alexandria for France. Killed in Action on 4th October 1916 Somme sector and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France, the son of George and Jessie Dick of 11 Leslie Place, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..

 EF £250 SOLD


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Ernest John Haskins, Leicestershire Regiment, a former Tile Maker and Iron Turner born in Bournemouth in 1894. Enlisting in Nottingham 5th September 1914, he served in France from 29th July 1915 with the 8th Battalion. Killed In Action in Somme sector 15th July 1916 aged 22 years. Assembling at the northern edge of Mametz Wood for the attack on Bazentin-Le-Petit during the night of 13th July, Villa trench taken the next day and counter attacks repulsed, relieved on 17th July 1916. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, his younger brother a Gunner, Royal Field Artillery died of wounds received on the Somme 17th November 1916.

 1914/15 Star

14390 Pte E J Hoskins Leic R

British War and Victory Medals

14390 Pte E J Haskins Leic R

This soldier has two Medal Index Cards, with spellings for both surnames.

Ernest John Haskins was born in 1894, Bournemouth, Hampshire. Son of Frederick and Martha Sarah Haskins of 10 Palmeston Row, West Street, Poole, Dorset. The 1911 Census records Ernest Haskins aged 16 years and working as a Tile Maker in a Pottery Works. Prior to his enlistment at Nottingham, his service documents record him working as an Iron Turner. Attesting for the Leicestershire Regiment on 5th September 1914, he joined the 8th (Service) Battalion 24th September 1914. Serving in in France from 29th July 1915 he was Killed in Action on the Somme on 15th July 1916 aged 21 years and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. Ernest Haskins was one of seven brothers, his younger brother, Clifford Herbert Haskins enlisted as a Gunner in the Royal Field Artillery and died as a result of his wounds received in battle on the Somme on 17th November 1916. He is buried at Bazentin-Le-Petit Military Cemetary, France.

The 8th Battalion Leicester Regiment took over support trenches at Fricourt, Somme sector on the night of 10th July 1916 and assembled on the northern edge of Mametz Wood during the night of 13th July for the attack on Bazentin-Le-Petit. “D” company advanced with 6th and 7th Battalions Leicestershire Regiment at 0325 hours and took Villa Trench, the War Diary records not a single officer left and the assault led by NCO’s. The rest of 8th Battalion went forward at 0425 hours reaching northern end of Bazentin-Le-Petit Wood. Commanding Officer Lt Colonel J G Mignon killed during enemy counter attack up Aston and Villa Trenches. Relieved and to Ribemont on 17th July having suffered 426 casualties.

GVF Condition £175 SOLD


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private William Harold Marchant, Royal Fusiliers a former Glass Bender born in Depford, Kent in 1894. Residing at Forest Gate, East London, he attested in London and served with the 2nd Battalion in Gallipoli from 25th April 1915, the Battalion landing at “X” beach, Helles. Immediately moving forward to attack Hill 114, they captured the position at the point of the bayonet beating off two counter attacks. Constantly in action during April and May, during the First and Second battles of Krithia, the Battalion took part in the Third Battle of Krithia commencing 4th June 1915. Capturing their objective at a cost of 2 officers missing, one wounded, 20 other ranks killed, 52 wounded and 49 missing (most of these being killed) they were relieved on 7th June. Killed in action 6th June 1915 aged 21 years he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.

1914/15 Star

14599 Pte W Marchant R Fus

British War and Victory Medals

L.14599 Pte W H Marchant R Fus

With research details extracted from on line sources.

Original silk ribbons on Trio and each one mounted for wear as originally worn by next of kin.

William Harold Marchant was born in Depford, Kent 17th October 1894, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Glass Bender residing with his father William a Postman, mother Jane, two brothers and two sisters at 109 South Esk Road, Forest Gate, East London. Enlisting in London, he served with the 2nd Battalion in Gallipoli from 25th April 1915, the day the Battalion landed on “W” Beach, Helles. Moving forward following their landing to attack Hill 114 and the enemy trench to the left, the Battalion was met with heavy fore and suffered heavy casualties, by 1100 their objectives were taken at the point of the bayonet. Moving forward to the enemy’s second line of trenches they met strong opposition and were forced to retire.

During the night of 25th April the Turks counter attacked and beaten off. At 1400 on 26th April a counter attack estimated at 1,500 Turks was also beaten off and a third with reinforcements of about 1,000 was beaten off. By 27th April the 2nd Battalion were reduced to half strength and were withdrawn to Reserve 29th. On 1st May the 2nd Battalion were back in the line and assisted to hold off a Turkish counter attack of 18,000 enemy, 200 prisoners being taken by the Battalion and an estimated 2,000 enemy killed. Taking part in the second battle of Krithia, the attack of 22nd May, the Chaplain of 86th Brigade in his book With the Twenty Ninth Division in Gallipoli records “The leading company went forward at 0830, the men, (he heard) seemed to feel it was a counsel of despair and the officers knew they could expect no support, with three officers hit, the men rushed forward magnificently, almost officerless. There was a perfect hail of bullets, and then the Turks started throwing hand grenades, which did most of the damage, making ghastly wounds”.

Taking part in the Third battle of Krithia which commenced on 4th June 1915, “W” company attacked and cleared the enemy redoubt by noon, by the time the Battalion was relieved on 7th June they were down to 2 officers and 278 other ranks. William Harold Marchant was killed in action on 6th June 1915 aged 21 years he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.

First time on the market

NEF £210 SOLD


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902, 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Ernest Robert Jones, Devonshire Regiment. Born in Hackney, Middlesex in 1882, he served with the 2nd Battalion in South Africa and transferred to the 1st Battalion on return to England. By the outbreak of the First World War he was an Army Reservist, employed as a Porter with the General Post Office and residing in Hammersmith. Mobilised, he joined the Depot at Exeter and the 1st Battalion in France 27th August 1914. Killed in action 9th May 1917 in the defence of Fresnoy, Arras sector, captured by German forces on this day. Aged 35 years he is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902

6526 Pte E Jones Devon Regt

1914 Star

6526 Pte E R Jones 1/Devon R

British War and Victory Medals

6526 Pte E R Jones Devon R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, QSA roll verification.

Original silk ribbons on Trio.

Ernest Ronert Jones was born in Hackney, Middlesex in 1882, he enlisted at London for the Devonshire Regiment and served in South Africa in 1902 with the 2nd Battalion, his QSA and four clasps verified correct TNA WO100/174 page 239 dated Bordon 11th December 1903, the roll records he transferred to the 1st Battalion. On 20th April 1913 he married Florence Buck in Hammersmith, London an Army Reservist at the time he stated his occupation as General Post Office Porter. Mobilised on the outbreak of war, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 27th August 1914.

On 21st August 1914 the 1st Devons left Jersey, where they had been stationed since 1911, and landed at Le Havre, where they were reinforced by nearly 500 reservists from Exeter. In September, during their first spell in the line, they suffered 100 casualties from shelling.  In October on the La Bassee Canal they supported the badly mauled 1st Dorsets and helped capture Givenchy Ridge.  The Devons performed well during a bitter three-week battle but lost two thirds of their officers and a third of their men.  From November they occupied Messines Ridge in rain and sleet, often knee- or waist-deep in mud and icy water.

Jones is recorded as admitted to 14 Field Ambulance on 4th April 1915 with Influenza and discharged to recover at the Division Rest camp, Bailleul. On 21st April 1915 they occupied Hill 60, which had been captured on 17th April.  Counter-attacks and heavy shelling cost them more than 200 casualties. On 31st July 1915 they moved to the Somme.  When the offensive began on 1st July 1916 the Devons were at Arras but returned to the Somme, to consolidate the line around Longueval.  Shellfire and German counter-attacks cost them 265 casualties.  In September they made two very successful advances near Guillemont at a cost of 376 casualties. In the Battle of Arras, in April and May 1917, their losses in four attacks nearly wiped out the Battalion. Killed in action 9th May 1917 in the defence of Fresnoy which fell to German forces that day. Aged 35 years he was the son of Herberat and Elizabeth Jones, husband of Florence Jones of 6 Bengeworth Road, camberwell, London and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

EF £425 SOLD


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

First World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Corporal George Reed, Yorkshire Regiment, a Blacksmith’s Labourer born in Glass Houghton, Yorkshire in 1881. Serving in Gallipoli from 28th September 1915, the Battalion served in Egypt from 17th February 1916 and arrived in France 1st July 1916. Arriving on the Somme 3rd September 1916 as part of 32nd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division. Killed in Action 13th September 1916 aged 35 years during the attack and capture of Turk Street and Wonder Work, Thiepval area, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

16051 Pte S Reed York R

British War & Victory Medals

16051 Cpl G Reed York R 

Bronze Memorial Plaque

George Reed

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research from other on line sources.

George Reed was born in Glass Houghton, Yorkshire in 1881, the son of George and Elizabeth Reed of 9 Front Street, Glass Houghton, Yorkshire. The 1901 Census records George Reed aged 20 years and working as a Blacksmith’s Labourer, enlisting at Pontefract for the Yorkshire Regiment he served with the 6th Battalion in Gallipoli from 28th September 1915. The Battalion arrived in Egypt 17th February 1916 and landed in France on 1st July 1916 arriving on the Somme as part of 32nd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division. Killed in action 13th September 1916 in the attack and capture of Turk Street and Wonder Work, Thiepval area, Somme sector aged 35 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

Small hole drilled in Plaque at 12 o’clock

GVF £275 Available


 

First World War Medals to CasualtiesFirst World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Officer’s Steward 2nd Class William John Loker, Royal Navy a former College Servant born in Cambridge in 1893. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy Servant 25th January 1910, he joined HMS Goliath as Officer’s Servant 2nd Class 25th April 1913. During the early months of the war, Goliath was engaged on the East African coast blockading the German Light Cruiser Konigsberg. Arriving in the Dardanelles in March 1915, she took part in the landings on 25th April 1915. Lost on 13th May 1915  when Goliath was sunk in Morto Bay off Cape Helles by three torpedoes from the Turkish Destroyer Muavenet-i-Milliye, 570 officers and ratings were lost from her 750 crew. Commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

L.1627 W J Loker OS2 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William John Loker

With copy service record and other research listed here, flattened named medal card boxes of issue.

William John Loker was born in Cambridge 1st March 1893, a College Servant, he entered the Royal Navy as a Boy Servant at Pembroke II 25th January 1910. Rated Officer’s Steward 3rd Class 1st March 1911, he subsequently joined HMS Shearwater 9th June 1911, where he was advanced to Officer’s Steward 2nd Class 20th July 1911, Pembroke I 24th November 1912, HMS Albion 16th January 1913, HMS Goliath 25th April 1913. During the early months of the war, Goliath was engaged on the East African coast blockading the German Light Cruiser Konigsberg. Arriving in the Dardanelles in March 1915, she took part in the landings on 25th April 1915. On 13th May 1915 Goliath was sunk in Morto Bay off Cape Helles by three torpedoes from the Turkish Destroyer Muavenet-i-Milliye, 570 officers and ratings were lost from her 750 crew. Commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial, he was the son of Mr W and Mrs Eliza Loker of 2 Great Eastern Street, Mill Road, Cambridge.

The Medals virtually as issued.

First time on the market.

EF £375 Available


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lieutenant William Stanley Allan, 1/7th Battalion Liverpool Regiment a former Insurance Broker born in Rock Ferry, Cheshire in 1893. A graduate of Liverpool University, he was first commissioned into the 1/7th Battalion in November 1911, but soon after went to Canada. Returning to re-join his old Regiment and Battalion, he served in France from 7th March 1915 and was killed in action 15th May 1915 during the successful attack on Festubert in which they suffered 13 officers and 301 other ranks killed and wounded.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Stanley Allan

With details extracted from on line records.

William Stanley Allan was born in Rock Ferry, Cheshire in 1893, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Insurance Clerk residing at 98 Bidston Road, Oxton, Birkenhead with his family. A graduate of Liverpool University he was an Insurance Broker. First commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 1/7th Battalion Liverpool Regiment TF 2nd November 1911 (London Gazette 1st December 1911 page 9074), he went to Canada before the outbreak of war and returned to re-join his old Battalion and Regiment. Killed in action during the attack on Festubert 17th May 1915, The Gloucester Citizen dated 9th June 1915 page 3 records –

“William Stanley Allan, the eldest son of Mr James Allan, Sub Manager of the London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Company. After leaving Liverpool University he served in the Head Office of the Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Company, but subsequently went to Canada, returning to join his old Regiment. He was killed in action on 15th May in a night attack at Festubert”.

The Regimental Historian Everard Wyrall records –

“On 15th May 1915 the 1/7th Battalion were on the right of the attack (on Festubert). They rushed through torn wire and entered battered trenches between “R1” and “R2″. The King’s men dashed into the battered (German) trenches, bayoneting and shooting down all those who refused to surrender or showed fight. The Battalion later pushed on the the German second line.”

Commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, France.

GVF £175 Available


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Herbert Edwards, Rifle Brigade a former Electrician’s Boy born in West Ham, Essex in 1894. Serving in France from 30th July 1915, he was killed in action 14th November 1916 in the attack on Beaucourt Trench, battle of the Ancre, Somme sector aged 22 years whilst serving with the 13th Battalion. The 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade was attached to 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, and attacked with 1/1st Honourable Artillery Company and 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, the attack was successful and all objectives were taken. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

S-3709 Pte H Edwards Rif Brig

With details extracted from on line records.

Herbert Edwards was born in West Ham, Essex in 1894, the son of William and Mary Edwards, the 1911 census records Herbert (Bertie) is a 17 year old Electrician’s Boy residing at 119 Harold Road, Upton Park, London with his parents, four brothers and three sisters. Residing at Plaistow, Essex on enlistment, he enlisted at St Paul’s Churchyard, Middlesex. Serving in France from 30th July 1915 with 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade, this Battalion arrived on the Somme 3rd July 1916. Taking part in the attack towards Ovillers on 7th July, the German third line was reached with over 200 prisoners taken, the attack was a costly one, the Battalion suffering 400 killed and wounded. On 13th November the Battalion moved south of Englebelmer and attached 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, moving through Hamel to its assembly positions. Took part in the attack on Beaucourt Trench from Railway Alley 14th November to a point 400 yards north west with 1/1st Honourable Artillery Company on the right and 13th Battalion Royal Fusiliers on the left, all objectives taken. Killed in action during the attack on Beaucourt Trench aged 22 years and commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £185 Available


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Corporal James Markie, Royal Fusiliers a Wine and Spirit Merchant’s Warehouseman born in Glasgow in 1886. Residing in Chorlton Cum Hardy, near Manchester when War broke out he enlisted in Manchester and served with the 22nd (Kensington) Battalion Royal Fusiliers in France from 17th November 1915. Killed in action Bernafay Wood, Somme sector 26th July 1916 aged 30 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

517 Pte J Markie R Fus

British War & Victory Medals

K-517 Cpl J Markie R Fus  

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and details extracted from on line records.

James Markie was born in Glasgow in 1886, the 1911 census records he is a 25 year old Wine and Spirit Merchant Warehouseman residing with his father James a Tailor’s Cutter, mother Elizabeth, three sisters and one brother at 202 Oswald Road, Cholton Cum Candy, near Manchester. Enlisting at Manchester he served with the 22nd (Kensington) Battalion in France from 17th November 1916. Killed in action near Bernafay Wood, Somme sector 26th July 1916 aged 30 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £175 Available


 

First World War Medals to Casualties

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William Thomas Evans, Middlesex Regiment, born in North Kensington, Middlessex in 1880. Enlisting at Hammersmith he served with the 1th Battalion in France from 4th October 1915. Arriving on the Somme 25th July 1916, the 13th Battalion took part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August. Advancing on the right of Trones Wood they were checked by cross fire and forced to withdraw. Taking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August, they were subject to a heavy enemy artillery bombardment in which 400 casualties were sustained. Killed in action 31st August 1916 when his Battalion was attacked and forced out of Tea Trench. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

G-4994 Pte W T Evans Middx R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Thomas Evans

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research recorded here from on line records. Original silk medal ribbons, traces of lead solder centre reverse of plaque where at one time a fixing for display in a case, original silk ribbons faded on the obverse side caused by display in a case.

William Thomas Evans was born in 1880 in North Kensington, Middlesex, I was unable to locate him on the 1911 census but still residing in Middlesex on the outbreak of war he enlisted at Hammersmith. Serving in France from 4th October 1915 with the 13th Battalion Middlesex Regiment which arrived on the Somme as part of 73rd Brigade, 24th Division. Arriving at Happy Valley 2nd August, they took over the trenches at Arrow Head Copse 17th August. Taking part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August their advance to the right of Trones Wood came to a standstill when they were caught in cross fire. To the craters in front of Carnoy 19th August and to Sandpit Camp 22nd August. Raking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August they were subject to a prolonged German artillery bombardment causing 400 casualties. Killed in action 31st August 1916 aged 36 years (CWGC erroneously record 38 years) when the Germans attacked forcing them out of Tea Trench. The Soldier’s effects list records he left his estate to his sister Florence Emily and brother John T Evans.

GVF £275 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Walter John Long, Middlesex Regiment, born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892 a Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores he attested for the 11th Battalion serving in France from 31st May 1915. On 4th May 1916 he was on leave and married in Battersea, London, returning to France shortly after he was killed in action with the 1st Battalion 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, Somme sector in which they suffered 321 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

G/959 Pte W J Long Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card and research listed here from on line records. With original transmission letters for the British War & Victory Medals (2).

Walter John Long was born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores residing with his father Alfred a retired Police Detective, mother Elizabeth and four sisters at 26 Crown Terrace, Richmond on Thames. Attesting for the 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment he served in France from 31st May 1915. Returning home on leave he married Alice Maude Clarke at St Michael’s Church, Battersea, London on 4th May 1916. In July 1916 he was serving with the 1st Battalion which arrived on the Somme 9th July 1916. Killed in action 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, heavy Machine Gun fire on both flanks brought the advance to a stand still after advancing through the village of Bazentin-le-Petit, casualties recorded as 321 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available

 


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Thomas Winter, 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. Born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891 and a Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he enlisted on 10th November 1914 and arrived in France on 13th July 1915. On 1st July 1916 the 7th Battalion were in support during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433 they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during an unsuccessful bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support in which the Battalion suffered 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15045 Pte T Winter E York R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, details from his on line service record and research listed here from other on line sources. Original letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star.

Thomas Winter was born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891, the son of John Thomas and Ruth Winter of 65 West Chilton, Ferry Hill, Co Durham. A 23 year 9 month old Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he attested for the 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment at Ferry Hill 10th November 1914. Serving in France from 13th July 1915, the Battalion was in support of the attack on  Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433, they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench, relieved the following day having suffered 123 casualties. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during a bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support, Somme sector failed, the Battalion suffering 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

A photo of Private Winter appears on the North East War Memorials Project Web Site.

NEF £165 Available


First World War Medals to Casualties 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Harry Humphrey, 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former Colliery Labourer above ground, born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896. Serving in France from 25th August 1915, he was killed in action in the attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector 7th July 1916. aged 19 years. His Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from Contalmaison during the attack, suffering 264 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15563 Pte H Humphrey North’d Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here from on line sources.

Harry Humphrey was born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896, the son of Edmund Eckford Humphrey a Raftman for a Timber Merchant and his wife Sarah. The 1911 census records Harry is a 14 year old Colliery Labourer above ground residing at 91 Brussels Street, Gateshead with his widowed father and two sisters. Enlisting at North Shields he served in France with the 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers from 25th August 1915. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 19 years during his Battalion’s attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector in which it suffered 264 casualties mainly from German Machine Gun fire from the direction of Contalmaison. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available


aaa561 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Joseph Bradley, 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham he was employed as an underground Coal Miner and Pony Putter  before enlisting. Serving in France from 9th September 1915, the 14th Battalion had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Killed in action whilst wiring 21st Division front lines at Gueudecourt, Somme sector 29th September 1916 aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18746 Pte J Bradley North’d Fus

With details here extracted from on line documents, original silk ribbons.

Joseph Bradley was born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Underground Coal Miner and Puny Putter (Driver of a Pony drawing a Mine Waggon) residing at 11 Bridge Street, Bishop Auckland with his widowed father George also an Underground Coal Miner and Waggon man and two younger brothers. Enlisting at Bishop Auckland he served with the 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 9th September 1915.

The 14th Battalion were the Pioneer Battalion of 21st Division and on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades in their attack on Fricourt. Killed in action 29th September 1916 aged 24 years whilst wiring 21st Division’s front line at Gueudecourt. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £175 Available


© J.Collins Medals 2014