First World War Medals to Casualties First World War Medals now a separate category


 

British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV with Bronze Memorial Plaque and Memorial Scroll to  Lace Corporal (acting Corporal) John William Wood, Essex Regiment a former Warehouseman born in Bethnal Green, London in 1884. A pre war Territorial Army soldier, he served with the 7th Battalion Essex Regiment and volunteering for overseas service served with the 2nd Battalion in France after January 1916. The 2nd Essex took part in the attack between Beaumont Hamel and Serre on the 1st July 1916 Somme offensive. Strong German counter attacks would force them back sustaining 436 casualties. Killed in action 23rd October 1916 aged 33 years during his Battalion’s attack east of Lesboeufs and Gueudecourt in which it sustained a further 255 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

40263 A-Cpl J W Wood Essex R

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV (TFEM)

389 L Cpl J W Wood 7/Essex Regt

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John William Wood

Memorial Scroll

Cpl John William Wood Essex Regt

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War and Victory Medals only awarded for his IWW service and other research extracted from on line records, original photo in unifo0rm, original War Office casualty reporting letter to his wife, eight original letters dealing with his pay and pension to his widow.

Private John William Wood 7th Battalion Essex Regiment TF prior to the outbreak of War

John William Wood was born in Bethnal Green in 1884, a 28 year old Warehouseman he married at St Like’s Church, Hackney on 6th April 1912 Miss Caroline Elizabeth Cash aged 24 years at the time the couple were residing at 220 Morning Lane, Hackney. A pre war Territorial Army soldier serving with the 7th Battalion Essex Regiment, he volunteered to serve overseas and joined the 2nd Battalion in France after January 1916. The 2nd Essex took part in the attack between Beaumont Hamel and Serre, Somme sector 1st July 1916, advancing at 0835 hrs on the left of the Serre Road they crossed the German line and then moved to the right of Pendant Copse. Later strong counter attacks would force the Battalion back to the captured Quadrilateral. Of the attacking force of 24 officers and 606 men, the evening roll call put the strength at 2 officers and 192 other ranks. Killed in action 23rd October 1916 aged 33 years in the 2nd Essex attack east of Lesboeufs and Gueudecort in which they suffered a further 255 casualties. The son of John and Hannah Wood, husband of Caroline Elizabeth Wood of 20 Halidon Street, Homerton, London. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Scarce 1WW casualty combination.

EF £395 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lance Sergeant James Colclough, 8th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment born in Talke Parish, Stoke on Trent in 1895. A former Coal Miner he enlisted on 1st September 1914 and served in France from 18th July 1915 until evacuated home with pneumonia 22nd December 1915. Recovering at Eastbourne Convalescent Hospital between March and April 1916, he returned to France 9th August 1916 and re-joined the 8th Battalion. Killed in action between 21st and 25th October 1916 in the front line east of Thiepval at Stuff Redoubt, Somme sector aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

15013 L SJT J Colclough N Staff R

British War and Victory Medals

15013 Cpl J Colclough N Staff R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

James Colclough

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, an original photo of Lance Sergeant Colclough in hospital convalescent uniform “Photo studio, Seaside Road, Eastbourn” and reverse “James Colclough, 66 Church Street, Butt Lane” and other research listed here mostly taken from his on line service record.

James Colclough was born in Talke Parish, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire in 1895, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Pit Boy, Engine Minder at the local Coal Mines residing with his 44 year old widowed mother Elizabeth Ann 1 brother and 3 sisters at 123 Church Street, Butt Lane, Talke. A 19 year 280 day old Coal Miner he attested for the North Staffordshire Regiment 1st September 1914 and joined the Depot the same day. Posted to the 7th Battalion 5th September 1914 and the 8th Battalion 10th September 1915. Appointed Lance Corporal 12th December 1914, promoted Corporal 25th January 1915 and appointed Lance Sergeant 1st May 1915. Serving in France with the 8th Battalion from 18th July 1915 he was invalided home with Pneumonia and Empyema 22nd December 1915. Following hospital treatment he arrived at Eastbourne Convalescent Hospital 21st March 1916 (where the photo was taken) and was discharged fit 16th April 1916. Posted to the 10th Battalion 26th May 1916, he re-joined the 8th Battalion in France 10th August 1916. Killed in action between 21st and 25th October 1916 when his Battalion was holding the front line east of Thiepval at Stuff Redoubt, aged 21 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £275 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private John Chappell, 18th (Public Works Pioneers) Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Born in St Lukes, Middlesex in 1885 and a former Bricklayer in the House Building industry, he served in France from 14th November 1915. Killed in action 27th October 1916 whilst the Battalion was working in the Mametz and Delville Wood areas, Somme sector. Aged 31 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

PW-2766 Pte J Chapell Middx R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Chapell

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

John Chappell was born in St Lukes, Middlesex in 1885, the 1911 census records he is a 26 year old Bricklayer employed by the house building trade residing with his widowed mother Elizabeth, one sister and one brother at 83 Provost Street, Hoxton, Middlesex. Serving in France from 14th November 1915 with the 18th (Public Works Pioneer) Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Arriving on the Somme 9th July 1916 they were employed on road maintenance around Mametz Wood area, to the south of Fricourt Wood 17th July they were involved in operations at High Wood until 27th July. Killed in action 27th October 1916 aged 31 years when the Battalion was working in the Mametz and Delville Wood areas. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £275 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Arthur Strongman, Welsh Regiment. Born in Cardiff in 1898 he enlisted in Cardiff and served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 4th May 1915. Killed in action during the attack on what was to become known as Welsh Alley near Mametz Wood 16th July 1916 aged 18 years. Commemorated by name on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

26824 Pte A Strongman Welsh R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Arthur Strongman

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here. With one pressed card Identity tag “26824 A Strongman 2 WEL Bapt”

Arthur Strongman was born in Cardiff, Glamorgan in April 1898, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old school boy residing with his father Albert Edward a Night Watchman for a Fuel Works, mother Mary Jane, brothers and sisters at 59 Llanelly Street, Splott, Cardiff. Enlisting at Cardiff he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 4th May 1915 aged 17 years. The 2nd Battalion arrived at Mametz Wood, Somme sector  15th July 1916 and later advanced to south side of Bazentin-Le-Petit Wood and in action westwards. Attack on communication trench later known as Welsh Alley running north east to the switch line 16th to 17th July. The 16th July action saw an unsuccessful bombing attempt on the German position which commenced at 0200, a frontal attack by 3rd Brigade was ordered for midnight and the Artillery spent the whole day cutting wire. After an intense 10 minute bombardment 1st Gloucesters and 2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers attacked north east while 2nd Welsh bombed in from the right. They reached 300 yards beyond their objective to which they retreated at dawn. Killed in action during the 16th July unsuccessful bombing attack aged 18 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £295 SOLD


 

1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private David Johnston, 1/9th (Glasgow Highlanders) battalion Highland Light Infantry born in Glasgow in 1896. Serving in France from 5th November 1914, the Battalion took part in the battles of Festubert and Loos in 1915 and arrived on the Somme on 9th July 1916. In action at High Wood 14th July, attack on the Switch Line, High Wood the next day, they were driven back to their starting positions by heavy machine gun fire suffering 421 casualties. To Mametz Wood 16th July, Johnston is recorded as killed in action for official purposes 17th July 1916, aged 20 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914 Star

1661 Pte D Johnston 1/9 High LI

British War and Victory Medals

1661 Pte D Johnstone High LI

With details extracted from on line records recorded here.

David Johnston (Johnstone) was born in Glasgow in 1896, the 1901 census records he is 5 years old residing with his father Robert, mother Mary and three brothers at 5 Boyd Terrace, Kinnging Park Burgh, Glasgow. Enlisting at Glasgow, he served with the 1/9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion in France from 5th November 1914. Taking part in the battles of Festubert and Loos in 1915, they arrived on the Somme 9th July 1916. In action at High Wood 14th July, three platoons entering the western side of the wood to engage German positions. Attacked the Switch Line 15th July, they were driven back to their start positions having suffered 421 casualties. To Mametz Wood 16th July until 19th July. Killed in action 17th July 1916 aged 20 years, the soldier’s effects register record he was killed in action between 15th and 17th July 1916, almost certainly during the attack on the Switch Line, High Wood. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

At the edge of High Wood today is a memorial to men of the 1/9 Highland Light Infantry (Glasgow Highlanders), which is relatively recent. Constructed in 1972, it comprises a cairn with 192 stones taken from another High Wood (near Culloden), commemorating the 192 soldiers of the Glasgow Highlanders who were killed here. The height of the cairn, five feet and seven inches, also represents the minimum height accepted for recruits iunto the battalion.

GVF & better £295 Reserved


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Edgar Joseph Goodwin, Worcestershire Regiment born in Kidderminster in 1897. Serving in France from 21st March 1915 he was killed in action 19th July 1916 aged 18 years during the fighting around Ovillers, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the Kidderminster War Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

1946 Pte E J Goodwin Worc R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Edgar Joseph Goodwin

With casualty details and research recorded here taken from on line sources. Copy newspaper article regarding his death with a picture of him in civilian clothes.

Edgar Joseph Goodwin was born in Kidderminster, Worcestershire in October 1897. The 1911 census records he is a 13 year old School boy residing with his father Samuel a Loom Fitter in the Carpet Trade, mother Kate Alice, brother and sister at 54 St George’s Terrace, Kidderminster. Enlisting at Kidderminster aged 16 years he served in France from 31st March 1915 with the 1/7th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment. Killed in action aged 18 years during the Battalions fighting around Ovillers, Somme sector 19th July 1916, a member of the Battalion Machine Gun section he was struck in the head by a shell fragment and killed instantly. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and Kidderminster War Memorial.

GVF & better £275 Reserved


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Albert Leslie Parker, 10th (Service) Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment. Born in Nottingham in 1897 prior to enlistment he was employed at the John Player Tabacco Factory, Radford Nottingham making cigarettes. Serving in Gallipoli with the 9th Battalion he later served in France, the 10th Battalion, which were in action on the Somme from 2nd July 1916 around Fricourt Farm, Railway Alley and Fricourt Wood. Killed in action 5th to 11th  July 1916 aged 19 years in the assault on German trenches around Fricourt Wood. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Albert Leslie Parker

With casualty details and research recorded here.

Albert Leslie Parker was born in Nottingham in 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old school boy residing with his father John Henry a Leather Finisher, mother Agnes and two brothers at 73 Kimbolton Avenue, Derby Road, Nottingham. Enlisting at Nottingham he served with the 9th Battalion in Galliopoli and later the 10th Battalion in France. The 10th Battalion were part of 51st Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division and moved up to the front line from Morlancourt, Somme sector at 2350 hrs on 1st July 1916. “A” company took part in a bombing attack along the trench leading from Fircourt Farm eastwards during the night of 2nd July, 170 yards taken. On 3rd July “D” company moved forward along a communication trench from Fricourt Wood to Railway Alley capturing 200 yards of enemy trench. Casualties for the two days operations 141 killed and wounded. On 7th July they took part in the attack on the Quadrilateral support, in which the battalion suffered 252 killed and wounded.

The Soldiers effects list records Private Albert Leslie Parker was killed in action between 5th and 11th July 1916 during the fierce fighting around Fricourt, for official purposes his death is recorded as 5th July 1916, he could well have been killed any day between these dates. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 

GVF & better £85 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lieutenant Robert Hayward Down, Gloucestershire Regiment. Born at Woburn, Bedfordshire in 1888, educated at Bedford School he became Manager of Lloyd’s Bank, Westbury on Trym, Bristol. Attesting for the 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion as a Private soldier, he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in February 1915 into the same Battalion. Continuing his OTC training until July 1915, married in Bristol in 1915 before proceeding to France on 12th July 1915. Mortally wounded in the unsuccessful attack on Skyline Trench, Poziers Ridge, Somme sector whilst serving with “A” company 16th August 1916, he died of wounds at the Casualty Clearing Station at Puchevillers 17th August 1916 aged 27 years. He now rests in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France and commemorated on the Lloyd’s Bank War Memorial, Canon’s House, Bristol.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Robert Hayward Down

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and information extracted from on line records and copy photo.

Robert Hayward Down was born in Woburn, Bedfordshire in 1888, the youngest son of Henry Edward and Grace Down. Educated at Bedford School, he went into Banking and on the outbreak of the First World War was manager at Lloyd’s Bank in Westbury on Trym, Bristol, he married Gwendoline Wandsborough in Bristol in 1915. On the outbreak of War he enlisted as a Private soldier into the 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 14th February 1915 into the same Battalion he joined them in France 12th July 1915.

On 15th August 1916 the 1/4th Battalion entered the front line near Ovillers and were ordered to attack German positions to the south west of Skyline Trench, Poziers Ridge, a preparatory barrage was ordered for 0200 on 16th August. As soon as the barrage lifted the 1/4th Battalion rushed forward but were met with overwhelming machine gun and rifle fire and many grenades, despite a determined effort they were forced to withdraw. Lieutenant Down of “A” Company was mortally wounded and evacuated to the Casualty Clearing Station at Puchevillers where he died the next day. Aged 27 years he now rests in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France and is commemorated on the Lloyds Bank War Memorial at Canon’s House, Bristol. His daughter Shiela was born in 1916, his widow and daughter residing at 6 Apsley Road, Clifton, Bristol.

GVF & better £195 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Captain Charles Aubrey Town, West Yorkshire Regiment. Born in Leeds in 1885, educated at Mill Hill School and Jesus College Cambridge where he graduated BA and LLB in 1906, he was employed by a firm of solicitors in Leeds. Attesting for the Leeds Pals Battalion 20th September 1914, he was commissioned into the West Yorkshire Regiment shortly after and served with the 11th Battalion in France from 19th April 1916. Twice wounded, he was severely wounded 7th October 1916, gun shot wound to chest in his Battalions attack on the German trenches near Le Sars. Evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment he made a full recovery. Awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry in June 1917 when he organized his company’s defensive positions during a German counter attack. Killed in action 20th September 1917 aged 32 years in leading his company in the successful attack on German positions at Inverness Copse, Ypres sector. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Charles Aubrey Town

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and information extracted from on line records.

Charles Aubrey Town was born in Leeds 12th April 1885, the youngest son of John and Maria Town of Headingley, Leeds. Educated at Mill Hill School and Jesus College Cambridge he graduated BA and LLB in 1906. Articled to Scratcherd, Hopkins and Middlebrook Solicitors, Leeds he qualified as a solicitor in 1910. Attesting for the Leeds Pals Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment as a Private soldier 20th September 1914, he was subsequently commissioned into the West Yorkshire Regiment three months later and served with the 11th Battalion in France from 19th April 1916. Wounded twice, he received a severe gun shot wound chest 7th October 1916 in the attack on German trenches to the left of Le Sars, Somme sector, The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer dated 13th October 1916 page 5 has a photograph of Lieutenant Town stating “Wounded in the chest Saturday last and now in hospital in England”.

Making a full recovery Town returned to his Battalion in France and was awarded the Military Cross London Gazette 25th August 1917 page 8818

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When a counter attack was imminent he walked along the line encouraging the men and organizing the defence. He was at all times exposed to the heaviest shell fire, and displayed the greatest coolness and disregard for danger under the most trying conditions”.

Killed in action 20th September 1917 aged 32 years whilst leading his company in the attack and capture of Inverness Copse, Ypres sector. Captain Town was in command of “A” company, the attack went in at 0540 hrs and was a complete success, the Red Line being captured and consolidated by 0610 hrs. Many dug outs were cleared and prisoners taken, the Battalion casualties amounted to 7 officers killed and wounded with 281 other ranks killed and wounded. Commemorated by name on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

GVF & better £250 Available


 

Brothers from Portsmouth, the sons of William and Margaret Burrows, Publicans of The Red Lion, 29 Havant Street, Portsmouth.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy 2nd type to Chief Engine Room Artificer William Thomas Burrow, Royal Navy a former Fitter and Turner born in Portsea, Portsmouth in 1884. Entering the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class 16th March 1907, during the First World War he served aboard HM Ships Latona, Monarch and Barham. Advanced to Chief ERA 1st Class in February 1923, he was pensioned in 1929. Re-entering the Royal Navy 28th April 1930 as Chief ERA 1st Class (Pensioner) with a change in service number.

1914/15 Star

272359 W T Burrows ERA2 RN

British War and Victory Medals

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 HMS Vernon

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Stoker 1st Class Daniel Burrows, Royal Navy a former Butcher born in Portsmouth in 1895. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 29th September 1913, he joined HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 and was rated Stoker 1st Class the same month. Killed in action 14th March 1915 when Amethyst was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire during the Dardanelles campaign, 22 ratings were killed and 38 men wounded of which 4 died of wounds.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

K.20453 D Burrows Sto 1 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Daniel Burrows

With copy service records.

William Thomas Burrows was born in Portsea, Portsmouth 3rd October 1884 a Fitter and Turner, almost certainly completing his apprenticeship at Portsmouth Dockyard, he entered the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class (ERA) at Victory II 16th March 1907. Confirmed in the rate of ERA 4 aboard HMS Good Hope 21st March 1908, he was advanced to ERA 3 aboard HMS Ariadne 15th March 1910, ERA 2 aboard HMS Latona 21st March 1914, Acting Chief ERA 2nd Class aboard HMS Monarch 1st February 1917, Chief ERA 2 aboard HMS Barham 1st February 1918 and Chief ERA 1st Class aboard HMS Sirdar 1st February 1923. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th March 1922. Discharged to pension in 1929, he re-entered the Royal Navy as Chief ERA 1st Class Pensioner 28th April 1930 with the new number P/MX.48112.

Daniel Burrows was born in Portsmouth 7th March 1895, a Butcher he entered the Royal Navy at Victory II as Stoker 2nd Class 29th September 1913. He subsequently joined Attentive II 18th February 1914, HMS Syren 23rd October 1914 and HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 where he was rated Stoker 1st Class 28th January 1915. Killed in action aboard HMS Amethyst when she was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire 14th March 1915 whilst in the Dardanelles.

Amethyst took part in the covering operation for the minesweeping effort in the Dardanelles and during the action on 1st March and 4th March 1915 she exchanged fire with Turkish forts. On the evening of 4th March she took on board injured personnel of the landing party and discharged them the next day to the Hospital Ship Soudan and SS Braemar Castle. During the hours of darkness between 6th and 11th March she took part in operations in the Dardanelles against mines, and was frequently in action against field artillery, forts and searchlights. On 14th March at 04:10 she was hit by field artillery and lost 22 men killed. A further 38 men were wounded, of whom 4 later died.  Amethyst retired to Tenedos for repairs. The Captain, Commander G J Todd, Royal Navy and Lieutenant James C J Soutter, Royal Navy, First Lieutenant, were commended in the Naval Dispatch dated 17th March 1915 from Vice Admiral Carden.

Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

GVF & better £575 Available


 

Brothers from Portsmouth, the sons of William and Margaret Burrows, Publicans of The Red Lion, 29 Havant Street, Portsmouth.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy 2nd type to Chief Engine Room Artificer William Thomas Burrow, Royal Navy a former Fitter and Turner born in Portsea, Portsmouth in 1884. Entering the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class 16th March 1907, during the First World War he served aboard HM Ships Latona, Monarch and Barham. Advanced to Chief ERA 1st Class in February 1923, he was pensioned in 1929. Re-entering the Royal Navy 28th April 1930 as Chief ERA 1st Class (Pensioner) with a change in service number.

1914/15 Star

272359 W T Burrows ERA2 RN

British War and Victory Medals

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 HMS Vernon

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Stoker 1st Class Daniel Burrows, Royal Navy a former Butcher born in Portsmouth in 1895. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 29th September 1913, he joined HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 and was rated Stoker 1st Class the same month. Killed in action 14th March 1915 when Amethyst was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire during the Dardanelles campaign, 22 ratings were killed and 38 men wounded of which 4 died of wounds.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

K.20453 D Burrows Sto 1 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Daniel Burrows

With copy service records.

William Thomas Burrows was born in Portsea, Portsmouth 3rd October 1884 a Fitter and Turner, almost certainly completing his apprenticeship at Portsmouth Dockyard, he entered the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class (ERA) at Victory II 16th March 1907. Confirmed in the rate of ERA 4 aboard HMS Good Hope 21st March 1908, he was advanced to ERA 3 aboard HMS Ariadne 15th March 1910, ERA 2 aboard HMS Latona 21st March 1914, Acting Chief ERA 2nd Class aboard HMS Monarch 1st February 1917, Chief ERA 2 aboard HMS Barham 1st February 1918 and Chief ERA 1st Class aboard HMS Sirdar 1st February 1923. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th March 1922. Discharged to pension in 1929, he re-entered the Royal Navy as Chief ERA 1st Class Pensioner 28th April 1930 with the new number P/MX.48112.

Daniel Burrows was born in Portsmouth 7th March 1895, a Butcher he entered the Royal Navy at Victory II as Stoker 2nd Class 29th September 1913. He subsequently joined Attentive II 18th February 1914, HMS Syren 23rd October 1914 and HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 where he was rated Stoker 1st Class 28th January 1915. Killed in action aboard HMS Amethyst when she was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire 14th March 1915 whilst in the Dardanelles.

Amethyst took part in the covering operation for the minesweeping effort in the Dardanelles and during the action on 1st March and 4th March 1915 she exchanged fire with Turkish forts. On the evening of 4th March she took on board injured personnel of the landing party and discharged them the next day to the Hospital Ship Soudan and SS Braemar Castle. During the hours of darkness between 6th and 11th March she took part in operations in the Dardanelles against mines, and was frequently in action against field artillery, forts and searchlights. On 14th March at 04:10 she was hit by field artillery and lost 22 men killed. A further 38 men were wounded, of whom 4 later died.  Amethyst retired to Tenedos for repairs. The Captain, Commander G J Todd, Royal Navy and Lieutenant James C J Soutter, Royal Navy, First Lieutenant, were commended in the Naval Dispatch dated 17th March 1915 from Vice Admiral Carden.

Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

GVF & better £575 Available


 

British War Medal to Captain Harry Driver, DSO, MC, 46th Battalion Royal Fusiliers late 7th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment a former Mathematics teacher, a graduate from London University from Ealing, London born in 1888. Awarded the DSO for his gallantry during a daring night trench raid on enemy positions near Carnoy in 1916, when he was three times wounded, he was subsequently awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry at Glen Copse Wood in 1917 when he was severely wounded, shout through the mouth by a sniper. Killed in action Archangel, North Russia 10th August 1919 on the Dvina Front whilst attached 46th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, he was leading his men in an attack on the Bolshevik position when he was hit by machine gun fire, he now rests in Troitza churchyard, Russia.

British War Medal

Capt H Driver

With a folder of research including copy officers service papers, Medal Index Card, London Gazette entries. From : The Times Wednesday 20th August 1919 “Harry Driver was the second son of Mr & Mrs J B Driver of Ealing, London, educated at Wootton Grammar School and the London University where he graduated BSc in 1913 in Mathematics and became a school teacher. In July 1914 he was preparing to take up an appointment as Surveyor for the Colonial Office, but on the outbreak of war volunteered for the Army. Captain Driver was wounded on five different occasions, awarded the DSO for a night raid on the German trenches near Carnoy at the beginning of the Somme offensive and awarded the MC for his gallantry at Glen Copse Wood in 1917. Last April (1919) he volunteered for the Russian Relief Force”

DSO London Gazette 31st May 1916 page 5406

Temp 2nd Lieutenant Harry Driver 7th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment

“For conspicuous gallantry on several occasions, notably when leading a successful raid on the enemy’s trenches. He forced the enemy back into their dug outs, entered a deep dug out and personally bombed the occupants, shot the sentry over another dug out, and, although himself wounded in two places, remained at the point of exit till every man was reported present. He was wounded a third time on his way back to our trenches”.

Military Cross London Gazette 6th January 1918 page 601 Temp Captain Harry Driver Bedfordshire Regiment

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After gallantly leading his company in the attack, he successfully and at great personal risk, so placed his advanced posts as to continually frustrate hostile counter attacks. He repeatedly visited his posts under heavy and continuous shell fire, and personally directed the fire of his men. It was through his frequent and daring reconnaissance that the movements of the enemy troops were noticed and severely dealt with by our artillery on his information. Although fired at by snipers and machine guns, he showed not the slightest hesitation in continuing his rounds from post to post, even after he had been hit by a sniper, his jaw broken and his tongue shot through, finally only giving up when suffering from loss of blood. Even then he wrote a full report of the situation and stating to whom he was handing over his command. No praise can be too great for his splendid gallantry and devotion to duty”.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 4th January 1917 page 225

Killed in action Archangel, North Russia 10th August 1919 on the Dvina Front whilst attached 46th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, he was leading his men in an attack on the Bolshevik position when he was hit by machine gun fire, he now rests in Troitza churchyard, Russia. In January 1915 the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment carried out tours in the trenches south of Rue du Bacquerot, near Neuve Chapelle, the casualties for January are recorded as 1 officer and 16 other ranks killed with 1 officer and 43 other ranks wounded.

GVF & better £250 SOLD


 

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Private James Rowe, Devonshire Regiment a former Chain Maker originally from Thorpe Hamlet near Norwich, Norfolk born in 1881. Attesting for the Devonshire Regiment at Norwich in October 1899, he proceeded to South Africa in October 1900 and served with both the 2nd and later 1st Battalions. Leaving for India in January 1902, he returned to England in January 1908 and was transferred to the Army Reserve in February 1908. Discharged from the Army Reserve in October 1911. Attesting for the Special Reserve he served in France with the 2nd Battalion from 17th December 1914 and died of wounds received in action at No 2 Red Cross Hospital, Rouen 9th January 1915 aged 33 years.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

5449 Pte J Rowe Devon Regt

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

3-7131 Pte J Rowe Devon R

With copy Boer War period service papers, Medal Index Card, casualty details. With a pressed card type ID tag 1WW bearing Rowe’s details.

James Rowe was born in Thorpe Hamlet, Norwich, Norfolk in 1881 an 18 year 1 month old Chain Maker and serving member of the 3rd (Militia) Battalion Norfolk Regiment, he attested for the Devonshire Regiment at Norwich 31st October 1899. Leaving for service in South Africa 17th October 1900 he served with both the 2nd and 1st Battalions. Leaving for India with the 1st Battalion 19th January 1902, he left for England 24th January 1908 and was transferred to the Army Reserve 1st February 1908 and discharged from the Reserve 30th October 1911. Joining the Special Reserve ar some point prior to the outbreak of war, he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 17th December 1914 and died of wounds received in action at No2 Red Cross Hospital, Rouen 9th January 1915 aged 33 years, he now rests in an identified grave in the St Sever Cemetery, Rouen, also commemorated on the War Memorial in St Martin at Palace Church, Norwich.

In January 1915 the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment carried out tours in the trenches south of Rue du Bacquerot, near Neuve Chapelle, the casualties for January are recorded as 1 officer and 16 other ranks killed with 1 officer and 43 other ranks wounded.

GVF and better £345 SOLD


 

The sons of Thomas and Anna Matchett of Barrowash, Derbyshire

Bronze Memorial Plaque G/3223 Private William Thomas Matchett, Royal West Surrey Regiment born in Barrowash, Derbyshire in 1893 and a Coal Miner Hewer, he enlisted into the 13th Hussars before transferring. Serving in France from 27th July 1915 with the 7th Battalion he was killed in action 20th October 1915 aged 22 years and now rests in the Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, Somme, France.

Bronze Memorial Plaque 15496 Private Wilfred Matchett, Somerset Light Infantry born in Barrowash in 1897 and a former Chemist’s Errand Boy he served in France from 8th September 1915 with the 8th Battalion. Killed in action 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive aged 19 years, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Matthew Thomas Matchett

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Wilfred Matchett

With research from on line records listed here.

William Thomas Matchett was born in Barrowash, Derbyshire in 1893, the 1901 census records the family are residing at 155 Ellen Street, Barrowash, the 1911 census records William is a Coal Miner Hewer residing with his family at Victoria Avenue Barrowash, father Thomas is a Labourer at the local Colour Works, mother Anna, there are 8 children, 6 boys, 2 girls. Enlisting at Derby for the 13th Hussars number 12726, he transferred to the Royal West Surrey Regiment and served with the 7th Battalion in France from 27th July 1915. Killed in action 20th October 1915 aged 22 years he now rests in the Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel – Becourt, Somme, France.

 

Wilfred Matchett was born in Barrowash, Derbyshire in 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 14 year old Chemist’s Errand Boy residing with his family at Victoria Avenue, Barrowash. Enlisting at Derby for the Corps of Hussars number 12764 he transferred to the Somerset Light Infantry and served in France with the 8th Battalion from 8th September 1915. Killed in action 1st July 1916 the first day of the Somme offensive aged 19 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The 8th Battalion Somerset Light Infantry were on the left of 21st Division’s attack on Fricourt on 1st July 1916. Moving into No Man’s Land just before Zero Hour at this point almost all the officers had become casualties. With 50% of the Battalion lost the German lines were entered and by midnight were being consolidated by just 100 men at the west end of Lozenge Wood, casualties amounted to 443 killed and wounded.

GVF £325 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private (Lance Corporal) Andrew Gray, King’s Own Scottish Borderers born in Hawick, Roxburgh, Scotland in 1882. Serving in Gallipoli with the 1/4th Battalion TF from 4th June 1915 he had taken part in his Battalion’s charge to capture Turkish positions and break through at Helles. On the 11th July 1/4th and 1/5th KOSB moved into their allotted attack positions and at 0735 the following morning four ‘waves’ charged simultaneously. The first two waves were made up of the 1/4th KOSB and the third and fourth by the 1/5th KOSB, all having to negotiate very difficult terrain. Leading waves charged forward and gained the first objectives trenches E10 and E11. The advance continued to the enemy’s third line trench E12, but heavy casualties and heavy fire forced a withdrawal to E11. Relieved and to rest camp on 14th July the 1/4th Battalion had suffered 12 officers killed including their Commanding Officer and 319 other ranks killed with 6 officers and 203 other ranks wounded and 13 taken prisoner. Andrew Gray died at sea aboard the Hospital Ship Delta from sickness on 27th October 1915 aged 33 years he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

871 Pte A Gray K O Sco Bord

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Andrew Gray

Copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, copy picture from local newspaper and other research listed here.

Andrew Gray was born in Hawick, Roxburgh in 1882, a married  to Janet Lough Gray, they had four children, the family residing at 22 Dickson Street, Hawick, his father John Gray residing at 17 Dickson Street. Employed by Messers McDonald and Gibb, Manufacturers he enlisted at Galashiels, Selkirk  and served with the 1/4th Battalion in Gallipoli from 4th June 1915 . The Edinburgh Evening News 6th November 1915 page 6 reporting his death at sea notes “He took part in the severe engagement on 12th July 1915 at the Dardanelles” another report records “he came out unscathed from the 12th July charge”.

On 12th July 1915, one final attempt was made by 52nd (Lowland) Division to break through at Helles. The plan for the 12th July was to attack towards Krithia along Achi Baba Nullah. On the 11th July 1/4th and 1/5th KOSB moved into their allotted attack positions and at 0735 the following morning four ‘waves’ charged simultaneously. The first two waves were made up of the 1/4th KOSB and the third and fourth by the 1/5th KOSB, all having to negotiate very difficult terrain. Leading waves charged forward and gained the first objectives trenches E10 and E11. The advance continued to the enemy’s third line trench E12, but heavy casualties and heavy fire forced a withdrawal to E11. Gains held during enemy counter attacks. Relieved and to rest camp on 14th July the 1/4th Battalion had suffered 12 officers killed including their Commanding Officer and 319 other ranks killed with 6 officers and 203 other ranks wounded and 13 taken prisoner.Image may contain: one or more peopleDuring August 1915 the remnants of the Battalion carried out tours in the forward area Krithia Nullah sector and fatigues at “W” beach in September they carried out the same duties and in October carried out tours in the trenches of the Vineyard sector.Private Andrew Gray died of sickness aboard the Hospital Ship Delta 27th October 1915 aged 33 years, he was buried at sea and is commemorated on The Helles Memorial, Gallipoli

GVF £350 Reserved 


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Walter Gale, 8th Battalion Devonshire Regiment a former Builder’s Labourer from Bampton, near Tiverton, Devon born in 1895. Enlisting with his brother Lewis into the 8th Battalion they served in France from 25th July 1915. Gassed during the battle of Loos 25th September 1915 Walter recovered in time to re-join his Battalion for the Somme offensive. Surviving the attack on Mametz in wich the 8th Devons suffered 207 casualties and the attack on Bazentin-Le-Grand Wood in which they suffered a further 171 casualties. Killed in action during the operations around Guinchy, Somme sector, 4th September 1916 aged 21 years when he took up a stretcher party to remove wounded from the front line. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

10755 Pte W Gale Devon R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Walter Gale

Copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

Walter Gale was born in Bampton near Tiverton, Devon in 1895, the son of George Robert Gale a Farm Labourer and his wife Blanche in 1911 Walter was 17 years old employed as a Builder’s Labourer, one of three sons and two daughters the family resided at Lower Town, Sampford Peverell, Tiverton, Devon. Walter and his brother Lewis enlisted for the 8th Battalion Devonshire Regiment together and served in France from 25th July 1916, Walter was gassed during the battle of Loos 25th September 1915 but recovered to re-join his Battalion in time for the Somme offensive.

On 1st July 1916 the 8th Battalion Devonshire Regiment were part of 20th Brigade, 7th Division and were in support during the attack on Mametz. Following 9th Battalion Devon Regiment and 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders through Mansell Copse and loosing heavily on entering No Man’s Land. ‘B’ company moving forward at 1030 hrs took cover in the hollow of Fricourt Road and wound not move again until 1600 hrs, all of its officers being casualties and led by the Company Sergeant Major. Clearing the deep dug outs in Danzig Trench and moving on to Hidden Wood, all objectives were taken. On 2nd July a further advance was made up Orchard Trench North and a strong point established in the Orchard, casualties 207 killed and wounded. The dead of the 8th and 9th Battalions Devon Regiment were buried in Mansell Copse.

Picture

From: The Western Times 21st January 1916

Taking part in the successful attack on Bazentin-Le-Grand Wood on 14th July 1916 both first and second objectives taken. To assembly positions south of High Wood a further attack went in at 0315 hrs on 20th July, the 8th Devons suffering a further 201 casualties. Moving to Mametz and later Montauban on 3rd September they took part in the operations around Ginchy until 7th September 1916.

A newspaper report of his death, published on 22nd September 1916, recorded that –

“Quite a gloom was cast over the village when news came of the death in action, on the Somme front, of Pte W Gale, of the Devons, son of Mr and Mrs G Gale of Sampford Peverell.

Deceased joined up at the beginning of the war, and had been in France about 18 months.  He is the first from Sampford Peverill to make the supreme sacrifice.  Deceased was spoken highly of in a letter from his commanding officer to the parents:  “He has always done his work splendidly,” he writes “and has shown great courage on all occasions.  At the time he was killed he was taking up a stretcher party to remove wounded from the front line.  All my bearers suffered heavily at this action, as the German artillery fire was very severe.”‘

Traces of glue reverse of plaque at some time stuck to black felt.

GVF £350 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal Henry George Head, Royal Marine Light Infantry born in Salisbury, Wiltshire in 1893. Attesting for the Royal Marines at Southampton 2nd May 1912, he joined the Recruit Depot at Deal the same day. Joining Portsmouth Division RMLI in February 1913, he subsequently joined HMS Diadem in July 1913 and HMS Queen Mary in September 1913. Killed in action aboard this ship when she was sunk at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 aged 23 years. Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

PO.16317 Pte H G Head RMLI

British War and Victory Medals

PO.16317 L Cpl H G Head RMLI

Copy Service record and casualty details.

Henry George Head was born in Salisbury, Wiltshire 6th May 1893, the son of William and Louise Head.  Attesting for the Royal Marines at Southampton 2nd may 1912 joining the Recruit Depot at Deal the same day. Posted to “E” Company Portsmouth Division Royal Marine Light Infantry he subsequently joined HMS Diadem 15th July 1913 and HMS Queen Mary 16th September 1913. Lost aboard this ship when she was sunk at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 aged 23 years. Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

At 1550 hrs on 31st May 1916 HMS Queen Mary opened fire on the German Battle Cruiser SMS Seydlitz with its forward turrets, scoring two hits disabling one of Seydlitz’s after turrets. At 1615 hrs HMS Lion came under intense fire from Hipper’s ships. The smoke from this obscured HMS Princess Royal forcing SMS Derfflinger to shift its fire to Queen Mary. As this new enemy engaged Queen Mary continued to trade hits with Seydlitz. At 1626 a shell from Derfflinger struck Queen Mary detonating one or both of its forward magazines. The resulting explosion broke the Battle Cruiser in half, as the after part of the ship began to roll, it was rocked by a large explosion before sinking. Of the 1,266 officers and ratings aboard Queen Mary only 20 were rescued.

NEF £350 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Albert Lambert, 1/2nd Battalion London Regiment a former Fancy Box Maker born in Bethnal Green, London in 1895. Enlisting in London he served in France from 6th January 1915. Surviving his Battalion’s attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916 in which they suffered 253 casualties, he was killed in action 10th September 1916 during the attack on Loop Trench, Somme sector aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2268 Pte A Lambert 2-Lond R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Albert Lambert

Copy Medal Index Card and casualty details etc.

Albert Lambert was born in Bethnal Green, London in 1895, unable to locate him on the 1901 census his mother Lydia aged 36 years is recorded as a Charwoman, married and residing at the Salvation Army Shelter for Women at 192-194 Hanbury Street, Mile End, Newtown Stepney. By the time of the 1911 census the family are back together again, Lydia is now a widow, two sons, Albert aged 16 years and George and a daughter Marie aged 18 years all are Fancy Box Makers at home, 9 Eagle Wharf Road, Shoreditch a 2 room dwelling. Enlisting in London Albert served in France with the 1/2nd Battalion London Regiment from 6th January 1915.

In 1916 the 1/2nd Battalion were part of 169th Brigade 56th (1st London) Division and on 1st July 1916 were in reserve at the beginning of the attack on Gommecourt. Sent forward at 1400 hrs under heavy machine gun fire from Gommecourt Park they were forced to withdraw in the evening to Hebuterne having suffered 253 casualties. On 9th September the 1/2nd Battalion were in support of 169th Brigade’s attack around Leuze Wood, killed in action 10th September 1916 in the attack on Loop Trench 10th September 1916 aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £275 SOLD


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to John Molyneux Crockett, Merchant Navy. 3rd Engineer Crockett, born 1892, Hull, Yorkshire. Son of John Molyneux Crockett & Louise Crockett. The 1911 Census records he was aged 19, living with his parents at 85 Plane Street, Hull, Yorkshire and working as an Apprentice fitter in an engineering company. He married Elsie May Addey in 1916 of 42 Queensgate Street, Hull, Yorkshire. 3rd Engineer Crockett was killed on 12th April 1917 aged 25 years on board SS ‘Toro’, which was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Many of the crew escaped the ship before it sunk.

 

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Molyneux Crockett

Copy 1911 Census entry, CWGC Details etc GVF £125 Available


 

British War Medal, Victory Medal with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Able Seaman Robert Knowles, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Born 16th September 1896, he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 30th November 1915 and first joined the Royal Naval Division 22nd May 1916 when called up for service. Transferring to sea service the following day, he joined Excellent in May 1916 as Able Seaman for Gunnery training and joined President III in July 1916 for service aboard Defensively Armed Merchant Ships as a Gunner. Lost aboard the SS Zara on 13th April 1917 when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-30 west of Helliso Island, 27 of her crew were lost. Commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

MZ 868 R Knowles AB RNVR

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Robert Knowles

With copy service record.

Robert Knowles, born 16th September 1896, a former Clerk and son of Mr Knowles of 112 Manton Road, Eccles, Manchester, Lancashire. Attesting for the RNVR 30th November 1915, he was called up for service 22nd May 1916 joining the Royal Naval Division. Transferring to sea service the following day as Able Seaman. Joining Excellent 23rd May 1916 for Gunnery training, he joined President III 20th July 1916 for service aboard Defensively Armed Merchant Ships as a Gunner. Lost aboard the cargo vessel SS Zara 13th April 1917 aged 21 years when she was sunk by the German Submarine U-30 90 miles west of Helliso Island on a voyage from London to Trondhjem with a general cargo, 27 of her crew were lost. Commemorated by name on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Small hole on Plaque at 12 o’clock. GVF £195 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Ernest Curtis, 5th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment a former Farm Labourer born in Leigh, Wiltshire in 1878. Enlisting at Devizes, Wiltshire he served in Gallipoli from 17th September 1915 and died of exposure 29th November 1915 aged 37 years whilst his Battalion were working on constructing a communication trench known as Beaufort Road near Scimitar Hill. He now rests in an identified grave in the Green Hill Cemetery, Turkey.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18235 Pte E Curtis Wilts R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here. Ernest Curtis was born in Leigh, Wiltshire  in 1878 the son of Eli and Rachael Curtis. The 1911 census records he is a 31 year old (sic) Farm Labourer residing with his 43 year old wife Jane, two stepsons and one daughter in West Mill Lane, Crickdale, Wiltshire. Attesting at Devizes, he joined the 5th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment in Gallipoli 17th September 1915 and spent most of October working on communication trenches and occupying the front line. In November the 5th Wiltshires began constructing Beaufort Road Communication trench. Ernest Curtis died of exposure on 20th November 1915 aged 37 years and now rests in an identified grave in Green Hill cemetery, he is also commemorated on the Crickdale War Memorial. His next of kin is recorded as his wife Jane of 2 Leigh Manor Cottages, Crickdale, near Swindon, Wiltshire. GVF & better £155 Available


 

 

British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal & Bronze Memorial plaque to Greaser Thomas Phillips, Merchant Navy born in Dublin, Ireland in 1885. Lost aboard the SS Cork (City of Dublin Steam Packet Company) when she was sunk by the German Submarine U-103 on 26th January 1918 aged 33 years. Struck by a torpedo which hit the engine room, port side, she sank in four minutes 9 miles NE of Lynas Point, twelve lives were lost from a ship’s company of forty two. Commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

British War Medal and Mercantile Marine War Medal

Thomas Phillips

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Thomas Phillips

Thomas Phillips was born in Dublin in 1885, son of the late Thomas and Catherine Phillips and Husband of Christine Phillips of 30 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin. Serving as a Greaser aboard the Cargo Ship SS Cork on a journey to Liverpool with a general cargo, she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-103 on 26th January 1918, nine miles North East off Lynas Point, Anglesey, Wales. The ship was struck on the port side, the torpedo hit the engine room and the ship sank within 4 minutes, 12 crew were lost including Thomas Phillips from a ship’s company of 42. Commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

S S Cork was owned by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, built in 1899. She weighed 1,232 Tons.

Includes a copy of the report on the sinking titled  ‘Particulars of Attacks on Merchant Vessels by Enemy Submarines’

EF £350 Available


 

 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Corporal William Fairhurst, 257 Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers. Born in Pemberton, Lancashire in 1879, the 1891 census records he was 12 years old assisting his father a Coal and General Carter. Travelling to work in the gold mines of South Africa he returned to live in Chorley but subsequently went to Canada and South Africa for a second time to work in the mines. Returning to England to enlist he originally joined the Manchester Regiment but transferred to the Royal Engineers Tunnelling Companies and served in France from 23rd September 1915. Gassed in September 1916 he returned to duty following a period as Musketry Instructor. Severely wounded by shell fire 9th April 1918 at Dainville whilst working on the East Arras defences, evacuated to England he was admitted to Exeter War Hospital and died of his wounds on 21st May 1918 aged 38 years. He now rests in the Adlington Cemetery, Lancashire.

1914/15 Star

121521 Spr W Fairhurst RE

British War and Victory Medals

121521 Cpl W Fairhurst RE

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Fairhurst

With casualty details, copy from the 257 Tunnelling Company War Diary recording him wounded, original Plaque paper envelope addressed to his brother Mr A (Ambrose) Fairhurst, 64 Stockport Road, Ardwick, Manchester, copy newspaper article. Original silk ribbons.

William Fairhurst was born in Pemberton, Lancashire in 1879, the 1891 census records he is 12 years old assisting his father William a Coal and General Carter, his mother Ellen, three brothers and two sisters all residing at 443 Warrington Road, Pemberton. A miner who had worked overseas, he enlisted at Manchester, originally for the Manchester Regiment (number 17884) and transferred to the Tunnelling Section, Royal Engineers serving in France from 23rd September 1915. Gassed in September 1916, on recovery he served with 257 Tunnelling Company and was severely wounded by shell fire at Dainville whilst working on defences east of Arras on 9th April 1918. Evacuated to England he was admitted to the Exeter War Hospital and died of his wounds 21st May 1918 aged 38 years, he now rests in Adlington Cemetery, near Chorley, Lancashire.

The Lancashire Evening Post 25th May 1918 records – Military Funeral at Adlington

“Corporal W Fairhurst RE, Adlington whose death occurred in Exeter Hospital on Tuesday, was interred yesterday afternoon at Adlington Cemetery, the service being conducted by the Rev J H Kay, Wesleyan Minister at Chorley. For some years he was employed in the gold mines in South Africa and on returning to England was a member of the Trinity Wesleyan Choir, Chorley. He subsequently went to Canada and again to South Africa, returning to enlist in the Engineers. After serving in France 12 months he was gassed, and subsequently on recovery became Musketry Instructor. His death occurred from the effects of shrapnel wounds”.

EF £425 Available


 

 

British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William Herbert Claridge, Middlesex Regiment a Cycle Assistant born in Hackney, Middlesex in 1891. Enlisting at Clacton on Sea where the family lived, he served in France after January 1916 with the 1/8th Battalion Territorial Force. Killed in action during ‘A’ and ‘B’ companies attack on German positions on the Ginchy-Morval road 12th September 1916 aged 25 years, in which some ground was gained and held under strong counter attacks, the two companies sustaining 165 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

5828 Pte W H Claridge Midd’x R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Herbert Claridge

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War and Victory Medals only awarded, flattened box for British War & Victory Medals, tatty Registered post envelope addressed to his mother “Mrs M F Claridge, 65 Hayes Road, Clacton on Sea, Essex”, an original newspaper cutting with photo and an original photo the reverse written in ink –

“My darling Wills, reported missing (afterwards reported killed), September 12th 1916 after an engagement at midnight at Trones Wood on the Somme”.

William Herbert Claridge was born in Hackney, Middlesex in 1891, the 1911 census records he is 19 years old a Cycle Assistant residing with his father George an 80 year old retired Wheelwright, mother Mary Fanny a 58 year old Apartment Letting Agent and step sister at 65 Hayes Road, Clacton on Sea. Enlisting at Clacton on Sea he served in France after January 1916 with the 1/8th Battalion Middlesex Regiment TF. Part of 167th Brigade, 56th (1st London) Division on 1st July 1916 they were moved forward from reserve positions for the attack on Gommecourt but were not committed. Killed in action aged 25 years 12th September 1916, “A” and “B” companies attacked German positions on the Ginchy-Morval Road at midnight 11th / 12th September 1916, their objective was reached, some ground gained  and held after strong counter attacks. Withdrawn to positions near German Wood having sustained 165 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Black marks across plaque which has never been polished.

EF £195 SOLD


 

 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William Wall, South Staffordshire Regiment born in Wolverhampton in 1897. Enlisting in Wolverhampton he served in France with the 2nd Battalion from 29th September 1915. The 2nd Battalion arrived on the Somme 20th July 1916 and occupied positions at Delville Wood 27th July. Killed in action 27th July 1916 aged 19 years when the 2nd Battalion came under a heavy enemy artillery bombardment followed by an unsuccessful German attack. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

16443 Pte W Wall S Staff R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Wall

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here. Medal Index Card states died of wounds, soldiers died in the great war and soldiers effects list record killed in action.

William Wall was born in Wolverhampton in 1897, the 1901 census records he is 4 years old residing with his father George a House Painter, mother Sarah and siblings at 2 All Saints Road, Wolverhampton. The 1911 census records his mother is a widow and residing at 8 Mark’s Street, Wolverhampton, William Wall is absent from the address. Enlisting at Wolverhampton, he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 29th September 1915. The 2nd Battalion arrived on the Somme 20th July 1916 and on 27th July took up defensive positions in Delville Wood. Killed in action 27th July 1916 during a heavy enemy artillery bombardment and unsuccessful German attack, aged 19 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £275 SOLD


 

 

British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Charles Zechariah Tidman, Bedfordshire Regiment a former Farm Labourer born in Ranworth, Norfolk in 1884 and residing in Panxworth. Enlisting at Norwich he served in France after January 1916 with the 2nd Battalion and was killed in action 30th July 1916 aged 32 years in the successful attack on Maltz Horn Farm, Somme sector, the 2nd Battalion sustaining 192 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and on the Woodbastwick Parish Church Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

28850 Pte C Z Tidman Bedf R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Charles Zechariah Tidman

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

Charles Zechariah Tidman was born in Ranworth, Norfolk 28th April 1884, the son of Edward Tidman a Farm Labourer and his wife Emily. The 1911 census records he is a 28 year old Farm Labourer residing with his parents at 2 Scott’s Corner, Panxworth, Norfolk. Enlisting at Norwich he served with the 2nd Battalion in France after January 1916. Part of 89th Brigade, 30th Division the 2nd Battalion took part in the 1st July 1916 Somme offensive, moving forward for the attack on Montauban, they followed 100 yards in the rear of the attacking Battalions and took over Faviere and Silesia trenches and consolidated. In action at Trones Wood 11th July they suffered heavy casualties, a strong enemy bombing attack forced a withdrawal to La Briqueterie having suffered 244 casualties. Killed in action 30th July 1916 aged 32 years during the successful attack, with French troops, on Maltz Horn Farm and were later in Reserve during the attack on Guillemont suffering 192 casualties.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the War Memorial inside Woodbastwick Parish Church near Panxworth.

EF £195 SOLD


 

 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William George Millar Parsons, Royal Fusiliers born in Brighton in 1897. Enlisting in London, he served with the 24th (2nd Sportsman’s) Battalion in France from 15th November 1915 and was killed in action 30th July 1916 during the attack on German positions around Guillemont Station, Somme sector aged 18 years. ‘C’ company took part in the assault 117 strong, held up by uncut wire they were virtually wiped out with one officer and eleven other ranks returning to allied lines. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

3774 Pte W G M Parsons R Fus

British War & Victory Medals

SPTS-3774 Pte W G M Parsons R Fus

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William George Miller Parsons

With research from on line sources listed here.

Ex Dix Noonan Webb Lot 230 2nd April 2004

William George Miller Parsons was born in Brighton in the fourth quarter of 1897. The 1911 census records he is 13 years old a school boy residing with his father James Miller Parsons a Plasterer in the building trade with his own business, mother Amelia three sisters and two brothers at 22 Gloster Street, Brighton. Enlisting in London he served with the 24th (2nd Sportsman’s) Battalion in France from 15th November 1915. The 24th Battalion arrived on the Somme 21st July 1916, part of 5th Brigade 2nd Division. Entering the front line trenches at Delville Wood and Waterlot Farm, Killed in action during ‘C’ company’s  attack on German positions around Guillemont Station on 30th July 1916 aged 18 years. Virtually wiped out in front of uncut wire, one officer and eleven men returned from an attacking force of 117. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £350 Available


 

 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private George Kingman, Gloucestershire Regiment. Born in High Littleton, Somerset in 1896, in 1911 he was residing in Hallatrow near Bristol. Serving in France from 12th November 1915 with the 12th (City of Bristol) Battalion he was killed in action 30th July 1916 aged 20 years in ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies attack and capture of enemy positions north of Duke Street, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

16712 Pte G Kingman Glouc R

With research from on line sources listed here and copy Medal Index Card and casualty details.

George Kingman was born in High Littleton, Somerset in 1896, the 1911 census records he is 15 years old, no occupation residing with his father Albert a Coal Miner Hewer, mother Joyce, four brothers and one sister at 1 Bloomfield, Hallatrow near Bristol. Enlisting at Bristol, he served in France from 21st November 1915 with the 12th (City of Bristol) Battalion. The 12th Battalion arrived on the Somme on 14th July 1916 as part of 95th Brigade, 5th Division. Taking over the front line at Longueval and the south side of Delville Wood 23rd July, they were relieved on 26th July and returned on 28th July. Killed in action 30th July 1916 aged 20 years during  ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies attack and capture of enemy positions north of Duke Street , consolidated the companies withdrew to Pommiers Redoubt and to rest camp on 1st August. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £175 SOLD


 

 

British War & Victory Medals to Private (Lance Corporal) Josiah Wilding, Cheshire Regiment. A former Foundry Machine Painter born in Leyland near Blackburn, Lancashire in 1891, he enlisted at Blackburn.Serving in France after January 1916 with the 15th (1st Birkenhead) Battalion. Killed in action 29th July 1916 by shell fire in Maltz Horn Trench, Somme sector aged 26 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

19524 Pte J Wilding Chesh R

With research from on line sources listed here and copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War & Victory Medals only awarded, copy casualty details.

Original silk ribbons.

Josiah Wilding was born in Leyland near Blackburn, Lancashire 12th July 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Foundry Machine Painter residing at 66 Snig Brook, Blackburn with his father David a Farm Labourer, mother Alice a Cotton Winder and three siblings. Enlisting at Blackburn he served with the 15th (1st Birkenhead) Battalion Cheshire Regiment in France after January 1916. Killed in action by shellfire 29th July 1916 aged 26 years whilst manning Maltz Horn Trench, Somme sector. He had married in Blackburn in 1912, his widow Deborah and children were the benefactors of his estate. His wife re-married in 1923, commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £85 SOLD


 

The sons of William Pearce a Farm Labourer and his wife Emily of Crookham Common, Berkshire.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private (Drummer) William Pearce, Royal Berkshire Regiment. Born in Crookham, Berkshire in 1893 and a former Farm Waggoner, he served in France with the 8th Battalion from 7th August 1915 and was killed in action 13th October 1915 in the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt, Loos aged 22 years, the failed attacks on the 13th and 14th October costing the British 3,643 casualties. First reported missing it was not until July 1916 that he was officially reported killed in action. Commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

14538 Pte W Pearce R Berks R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Pearce

With research from on line sources listed here, flattened medal boxes for both brothers, one letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star and original envelope for medals addressed to their father –

Mr W Pearce, The Volunteer Inn, Crookham Common, Newbury.

William Pearce was born in Crookham, Berkshire in 1893, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Farm Waggoner one of eight children residing with his family at Thornford, Crookham Common. Enlisting at Newbury, he served with the 8th Battalion in France from 7th August 1915. Killed in action 13rh October 1915 in the unsuccessful attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt, Loos, in which the British suffered 3,643 casualties. The Reading Mercury dated 27th November 1915 page 8 reported him as missing in action, The Reading Mercury dated 15th July 1916 page 9 finally reported him as killed in action on 13th October 1915. Commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Arthur Joseph Pearce, Grenadier Guards born in Crookham, Berkshire in 1898, he served in France with the 3rd Battalion after January 1916. Killed in action 31st July 1917 the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Pilckem Ridge 31st July to 2nd August 1917) aged 19 years he is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

26966 Pte A J Pearce G Gds

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Arthur Joseph Pearce

Arthur Joseph Pearce was born in Crookham, Berkshire n 1898, the 1911 census records he is a 12 year old school boy residing with his family at Thornford, Crookham Common. Enlisting at Reading he served with the 3rd Battalion in France after January 1916. Killed in action 31st July 1917 on the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Pilckem Ridge 31st July to 2nd August 1917) aged 19 years. On 31st July the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards assaulted the Green Line at 0715 but came under heavy machine gun fire from Blockhouses on the Ypres – Staden railway line. This also affected the advance of 38th Division. By 0800 the Blockhouses were taken and the enemy driven back from Vulcan crossing. Commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

First time on the market.

EF £495 SOLD


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Walter John Long, Middlesex Regiment, born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892 a Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores he attested for the 11th Battalion serving in France from 31st May 1915. On 4th May 1916 he was on leave and married in Battersea, London, returning to France shortly after he was killed in action with the 1st Battalion 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, Somme sector in which they suffered 321 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

G/959 Pte W J Long Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card and research listed here from on line records. With original transmission letters for the British War & Victory Medals (2).

Walter John Long was born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores residing with his father Alfred a retired Police Detective, mother Elizabeth and four sisters at 26 Crown Terrace, Richmond on Thames. Attesting for the 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment he served in France from 31st May 1915. Returning home on leave he married Alice Maude Clarke at St Michael’s Church, Battersea, London on 4th May 1916. In July 1916 he was serving with the 1st Battalion which arrived on the Somme 9th July 1916. Killed in action 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, heavy Machine Gun fire on both flanks brought the advance to a stand still after advancing through the village of Bazentin-le-Petit, casualties recorded as 321 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £175 Available

 


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Thomas Winter, 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. Born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891 and a Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he enlisted on 10th November 1914 and arrived in France on 13th July 1915. On 1st July 1916 the 7th Battalion were in support during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433 they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during an unsuccessful bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support in which the Battalion suffered 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15045 Pte T Winter E York R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, details from his on line service record and research listed here from other on line sources. Original letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star.

Thomas Winter was born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891, the son of John Thomas and Ruth Winter of 65 West Chilton, Ferry Hill, Co Durham. A 23 year 9 month old Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he attested for the 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment at Ferry Hill 10th November 1914. Serving in France from 13th July 1915, the Battalion was in support of the attack on  Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433, they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench, relieved the following day having suffered 123 casualties. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during a bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support, Somme sector failed, the Battalion suffering 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

A photo of Private Winter appears on the North East War Memorials Project Web Site.

NEF £175 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Harry Humphrey, 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former Colliery Labourer above ground, born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896. Serving in France from 25th August 1915, he was killed in action in the attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector 7th July 1916. aged 19 years. His Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from Contalmaison during the attack, suffering 264 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15563 Pte H Humphrey North’d Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here from on line sources.

Harry Humphrey was born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896, the son of Edmund Eckford Humphrey a Raftman for a Timber Merchant and his wife Sarah. The 1911 census records Harry is a 14 year old Colliery Labourer above ground residing at 91 Brussels Street, Gateshead with his widowed father and two sisters. Enlisting at North Shields he served in France with the 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers from 25th August 1915. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 19 years during his Battalion’s attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector in which it suffered 264 casualties mainly from German Machine Gun fire from the direction of Contalmaison. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £175 Available


 

British War & Victory Medals to Private Ernest Frederick Trott, Army Service Corps a former Chauffeur and Mechanic from Lambeth, London born in 1891. Enlisting for the Army Service Corps Motor Transport 1st November 1915, he served in France from 10th April 1916 initially with 1st Australian Division Ammunition Sub Park. Transferring to 17th Division Ammunition Sub Park he was killed in action 5th November 1916 in the vicinity of Zenith Trench, Somme sector aged 25 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and St Marks Church Memorial, Kennington Oval, London SE11.

British War & Victory Medals

M2-135721 Pte E F Trott ASC

With copy Medal Index Card confirming British War & Victory Medals only awarded, casualty details and research listed here from his on line service record.

Ernest Frederick Trott was born in Lambeth in 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 21 year old Railway Messenger residing with his father Henry a Bookbinder, mother Alice Rosalina at 42 Fentiman Road, Clapham, London. Ernest was one of eleven children, at the time of his enlistment into the Army Service Corps Motor Transport on 1st November 1915 he was a Chauffeur and Mechanic. Joining 609 Motor Transport Company in England he arrived in France 10th April 1916 and joined 1st Australian Division Ammunition Sub Park the following day. Transferring to 17th Division Ammunition Sub Park 19th April 1916, he was killed in action in the vicinity of Zenith Trench Somme sector 5th November 1916 aged 25 years, almost certainly by shell fire whilst bringing up ammunition. On 2nd November 1916 51st Brigade, 17th Division took the remainder of Zenith Trench following a surprise attack and repelled a counter attack. The following day the Germans launched a second counter attack which was repulsed.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and the St Marks Church War Memorial, Kennington Oval, London SE11.

EF £75 SOLD


 

British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private John Smith, 12th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers originally from Little Thurlow, Suffolk born in 1898. Enlisting in March 1915, he was killed in action 16th September 1916 by shell fire aged 18 years whilst occupying front line trenches east of Flers. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

35426 Pte J Smith North’d Fus

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Smith

With copy Medal Index Card confirming British War & Victory Medals only awarded, casualty details and research listed here.

John Smith was born in Thurlow, Suffolk in 1899, the 1911 census records he is a 12 year old Schoolboy residing at Bradley Road, Little Thurlow, Suffolk with his father Frederick a Farm Labourer, mother Jane, two brothers and five sisters. Enlisting at Bury St Edmonds in March 1915 aged 16 years, he served with the 12th Battalion in France after January 1916 and was killed in action 22nd September 1916 aged 18 years by shell fire in the front line trenches at Flers, one of three soldiers of this Battalion killed that day. All three were buried but their graves were lost when subsequent actions destroyed them and John Smith is now commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

The 12th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers were part of 62nd Brigade, 21st Division and were in Reserve at Empress Support and Queen’s Redoubt on 1st July 1916. They subsequently too part in the attack on Shelter Wood 3rd July 1916 and clearing Mametz Wood on 11th July, by this time they had suffered 30 officer and 507 other rank casualties. Moving into trenches east of Flers on 22nd September 1916, they remained in the front line until 30th September.

EF £185 SOLD


aaa675 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals  to Acting Sergeant John Thomas James Egan, West Riding Regiment born in 1889 in Manchester. Attesting fior the Gordon Highlanders in October 1906, he fraudulently enlisted into the 7th Dragoon Guards in September 1908 as a Bandsman. Whilst serving in India he attempted suicide on 14th June 1911 by shooting himself with his revolver, the first round missed, the second went through his upper chest. Recovering in hospital he continued to serve and in October 1915 was posted to the 8th Battalion West Riding Regiment where he gained promotion to acting Sergeant. Serving in Gallipoli and France he was killed in action during the assault on Hessian Trench, Somme sector 29th / 30th September 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star

16719 Pte J T J Egan W Rid R

British War & Victory Medals

16719 A SJT J T J Egan W Rid R

With details recorded here from his on line service record.

John Thomas James Egan was born in Manchester in 1889, he attested for the Gordon Highlanders at Willesden 19th October 1906. Whilst still serving with the Gordons he fraudulently attested for the 7th Dragoon Guards as a Bandsman 16th September 1908. Whilst serving with his Regiment at Secunderabad, India he attempted suicide by shooting himself with his revolver, the first round missed but the second went through his upper chest. Found by an on duty Indian Police Officer he was rushed in a cart to hospital where he made a full recovery. The reasons given for the attempted suicide were he was worried about his sick mother and sister at home and he felt he could do nothing right in the Band.

Continuing to serve in the Army he was promoted Acting Corporal 23rd September 1915 and posted to the 8th Battalion West Riding Regiment 27th October 1915 in Gallipoli. Evacuated first to Imbros, promoted acting Sergeant 20th March 1916 he embarked at Alexandria with his Regiment for France 25th June 1916. The 8th Battalion arrived on the Somme 6th September 1916, taking part in an attack on 14th September, they captured all their objectives around Thiepval. A counter attack being repulsed the following day, casualties recorded as 258 killed and wounded. Killed in action during the attack and capture of Hessian Trench 29th / 30th September 1916 aged 27 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial Commonwealth War Graves Commission record his next of kin as his wife Mrs Kate Dunmore (who re-married 25th December 1918) of Clapton, London E5, the son of Daniel and Ellen Egan of 334 Chester Road, Old Trafford, Manchester.

EF £175 SOLD


aaa563 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Arthur Henry Twort, 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment a former Cement Manufacturing Works Cooper born in Eccles, Kent. Enlisting in Marylebone, London initially for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served in France from 19th July 1915. Killed in action 2nd July 1916 aged 25 years during his Battalion’s assault on La Boisselle, Somme sector. Assaulting the western end of the village they cleared it and consolidated by 2100 that evening at a cost of 316 casualties.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

17817 Pte A H Twort Wilts R

With details here extracted from on line documents, copy Newspaper article with photo depicted here, copy birth certificate, original silk ribbons to BWM and Vict.

Arthur Henry Twort was born in Eccles, Kent 2nd August 1890, the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Cooper employed at the Cement Manufacturing Works, residing with his father Walter Rolls Twort a Foreman Cooper at the same Works, his mother Eleanor Elizabeth, 2 brothers and 1 sister at Little Culland Cottage, Great Rowlands, Burnham, Kent. Attesting for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Private number 15366) at Marylebone, London he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served with the 6th Battalion in France from 19th July 1915.

aaa562

From : The Kent Messenger 12th August 1916 page 5

On 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive the 6th Battalion moved forward from Albert and on 2nd July took part in the operations around La Boisselle, assaulting the western end of the village and clearing it by 2100 that evening having sustained 312 casualties. Killed in action during this assault aged 25 years Arthur Henry Twort is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £250 Available


aaa561 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Joseph Bradley, 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham he was employed as an underground Coal Miner and Pony Putter  before enlisting. Serving in France from 9th September 1915, the 14th Battalion had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Killed in action whilst wiring 21st Division front lines at Gueudecourt, Somme sector 29th September 1916 aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18746 Pte J Bradley North’d Fus

With details here extracted from on line documents, original silk ribbons.

Joseph Bradley was born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Underground Coal Miner and Puny Putter (Driver of a Pony drawing a Mine Waggon) residing at 11 Bridge Street, Bishop Auckland with his widowed father George also an Underground Coal Miner and Waggon man and two younger brothers. Enlisting at Bishop Auckland he served with the 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 9th September 1915.

The 14th Battalion were the Pioneer Battalion of 21st Division and on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades in their attack on Fricourt. Killed in action 29th September 1916 aged 24 years whilst wiring 21st Division’s front line at Gueudecourt. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £175 Available


aaa560 

The sons of Charles and Jane Seward of Nuneaton, Warwickshire

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Lewis Seward, 1/5th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment a former Domestic Groom born in Buckworth, Cambridgeshire he enlisted at Nuneaton originally for the 7th Battalion and served in Gallipoli from 28th August 1915. Taking part in the attack and capture of Chunuk Bair on the morning of 8th August the Battalion suffered 361 casualties, killed wounded and missing. Transferring to the 1st and later 1/5th Battalion he was killed in action 4th November 1916 aged 25 years in the front line trenches north west of Le Sars, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War Medal to Private Walter Seward, 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment a former Errand Boy for a Boot shop born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire he enlisted at Nuneaton and served in Gallipoli from 24th November 1915. Killed in action Mesopotamia 25th February 1917 aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

20269 Pte L Seward Glouc R

1914/15 Star& British War Medal

19061 Pte W Seward S Lan R

With details here extracted from on line documents.

Lewis Seward was born in Buckworth, Cambridgeshire the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Domestic Groom residing at 38 Fitton Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire with his father Charles a Carter employed by the Borough Council, mother Jane two brothers (including Walter) and sister. Enlisting at Nuneaton, he first served with the 7th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment in Gallipoli from 28th August 1915, the Battalion going straight into action capturing Chunuk Bair sustaining 361 casualties in the process. Later transferring to the 1st Battalion and finally the 1/5th Battalion he was killed in action 4th November 1916 in the from line trenches north west of Le Sars, Somme sector. Aged 25 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Walter Seaward his was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire the 1911 census records he is an Errand Boy for a Boot Shop residing with his brother at the above address. Enlisting at Nuneaton he served with the 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment in Gallipoli from 24th November 1915 and later Mesopotamia where he was killed in action 25th February 1917 aged 21 years. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

GVF & better £325 SOLD


aaa810 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal Alfred Millard, Norfolk Regiment a former Printer’s Warehouse Cropper, originally from Greenfield, Luton Bedfordshire. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion in France from 30th May 1915, taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme 1st July 1916 as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. Killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years in his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyine Trench. Occupying it, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley which were strongly resisted.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

12114 Pte A Millard Norf R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

Alfred Millard was born in Greenfield, near Luton, Bedfordshire, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Printer’s Warehouse Cropper residing with his 43 year old widowed mother Jane and two brothers at 8 St George’s Circus, Blackfriars Road, Southwark, SE London. Enlisting in London he served with the 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment in France from 30th May 1915, the Battalion taking part in the battle of Loos from 30th September 1915. Arriving on the Somme as part of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division on 1st July 1916, he was killed in action 12th August 1916 aged 22 years during his Battalion’s successful attack and capture of Skyline trench.

Zero hour was 2230 and after three minutes of intense bombardment the 7th Norfolk with ‘A’ and ‘B’ companies in front and ‘D’ and ‘C’ companies in support dashed forward and captured their objective, the right of Sixth Avenue at 2240. So rapid was their advance that touch with the flanks was lost. ‘C’ company worked down the trench to the left and gained touch with 9th Essex and at 2340 gained touch with the Australian 4th Division on the right. Strong points were established and the position held, patrols were sent out towards Nab Valley but met strong resistance.

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF £165 SOLD