First World War Medals to Casualties


 

British War and Victory Medals to Private John Frizzelle, Manchester Regiment a former Invoice Clerk for a Hosiery Warehouse born in Manchester in 1893. Enlisting at Manchester for the 2/6th Battalion he was posted to the 21st Battalion in France after January 1916. Taking part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916, they occupied the western end of Danzig Alley and Bottom Wood. Killed in action on or since 29th August 1916 to 5th September 1916 aged 23 years. Entering the front line south of Delville Wood 29th August 1916, the 21st Battalion remained in this position until relieved on 5th September. They took part in an unsuccessful bombing attack on Ale Alley on 4th September. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

250647 Pte J Frizzelle Manch R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, and other research listed here.

John Frizzelle was born in Manchester in 1893, the son of James Frizzelle a Gas Works Labourer born in Sligo, Ireland and his wife Elizabeth. The 1911 census records John is 18 years old employed as an Invoice Clerk for a Hosiery Warehouse. Enlisting in Manchester for the 2/6th Battalion, he was posted to the 21st Battalion in France after January 1916. Taking part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916, they occupied the western end of Danzig Alley and Bottom Wood. Killed in action on or since 29th August 1916 to 5th September 1916 aged 23 years. Entering the front line south of Delville Wood 29th August 1916, the 21st Battalion remained in this position until relieved on 5th September. They took part in an unsuccessful bombing attack on Ale Alley on 4th September. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £85 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Joseph Henry Lyon, Rifle Brigade  former Great Northern Railway Waggon Checker born in Ancoats, Lancashire in 1889. Enlisting in Manchester, he served in France with the 1st Battalion from 26th January 1915. Taking past in the Second Battle of Ypres the 1st Battalion transferred to the Somme sector. Surviving his Battalions attack on Redan Ridge and the Quadrilateral 1st July 1916 in which a total of 474 casualties were sustained, they were forced to withdraw following a German counter attack. Entering the front line west of Lesboeufs on 16th October, the 1st Battalion were in action on the northern slopes of Morval Spur towards Transloy during the next two days. Killed in action 18th October 1916 aged 27 years, the two days fighting resulted in 261 casualties, he had previously been slightly wounded at the beginning of 1916. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Z-577 Pte J H Lyon Rif Brig

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, copy birth certificate and other research listed here.

Joseph Henry Lyon was born at 13 Wainwright Street, Ancoats, Lancashire 6th November 1899, the son of Henry Lyon a Great Nothern Railway (GNR) worker and his wife Mary Ellen. At the time of his enlistment in Manchester Joseph was a Wagon Checker for GNR at Deansgate. Serving in France from 26th January 1915 with the 1st Battalion, he took part in the First Battle of Ypres. Slightly wounded in early 1916, the 1st Battalion transferred to the Somme and took part in the attack on Redan Ridge and the Quadrilateral 1st July 1916. Entering the German trenches at 1000 hrs, there was heavy close quarter fighting along the trenches, driven back after a counter attack having suffered 474 casualties.

Entering the front line west of Lesboeufs on 16th October, the 1st Battalion were in action on the northern slopes of Morval Spur towards Transloy during the next two days. Killed in action 18th October 1916 aged 27 years, the two days fighting resulted in 261 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £175 Available


 

British War and Victory Medals to Sergeant William Frederick Deven, South Lancashire Regiment late Welsh Regiment a former Labourer born in 1892 in Port Tennant, Swansea, Wales. Enlisting at Swansea 30th September 1914 for the 21st Battalion Welsh Regiment, he was posted to the 8th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment in France 12th July 1916. Arriving on the front line at Leipzig Salient, Somme sector  27th August, the Battalion took part in the unsuccessful attack on Hindenburg trench the following day. Killed in action 29th August 1916 aged 24 years when “C” Company HQ Dugout received a direct hit from an artillery shell, five men were killed and eight wounded. Commemorated on the Theipval Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

34151 SJT W F Deven S Lan R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and details extracted from his on line service record.

Erroneously recorded by Commonwealth War Graves Commission as “Devon”

William Frederick Deven was born in Port Tennant, Swansea, Wales 8th January 1892 the son of William Deven a Ship’s Steward and his wife Elizabeth Jane of 22 Kilvey Terrace, Port Tennant. A Labourer William Frederick Deven attested for the 21st Battalion Welsh Regiment in Swansea 30th September 1914.Appointed Lance Corporal 6th August 1915, promoted Corporal 22nd November 1915 and Sergeant 19th April 1916. Arriving in France 12th July 1916 he transferred to the 8th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment. Killed in action 29th August 1916 aged 24 years. The Battalion War Diary records he was in “C” Company HQ Dugout in the Leipzig Salient when it received a direct hit from an enemy artillery shell. Five men were killed and eight wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £85 SOLD


 

 Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private Thomas Henry Pye, 8th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment a Labourer born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1894. Enlisting on 1st September 1914, he served in France from 27th August 1915. Killed in action 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive aged 22 years. The 8th Battalion suffered 635 casualties in their attack on Ovillers. Clearing the German first line they entered the second and here due to heavy losses their attack was checked and the survivors forced to withdraw. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Thomas Henry Pye

With research extracted from on line sources listed here.

Thomas Henry Pye was born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1894. The 1901 census records he is 7 years old residing with his father Isaac and mother Elizabeth at 380 Bright Street, Carbrook, Sheffield. The 1911 census record he is employed as a Labourer and still residing at the same address. Enlisting at Sheffield 1st September 1914 into the 8th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment he stated his address as 68 Jubilee Road, Darnall, Sheffield. Serving in France from 27th August 1915 he was killed in action 1st July 1916 aged 22 years, the first day of the Somme offensive.

On 1st July 1916 the 8th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment attacked Ovillers with 8th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Leading waves cleared the German front line and entered the second. Due to heavy losses the advance was checked and the survivors were forced to withdraw. The Battalion war Diary records –

“The Battalion advanced in four waves as intended but most of the men were shot down in no man’s land including the Commanding Officer and Adjutant. The remainder reached the enemy’s wire. This was still uncut in places and many officers and men were shot down whilst cutting it. So far as can be gathered the first men who reached the enemy trenches got as far as the third line but they were not seen again. Our men in the first and second lines were immediately engaged by the enemy who came out of dug outs and communication tunnels. Signals were sent for reinforcements but none arrived. Bombing continued between parties of the enemy and our men both in the first and second lines, many of the enemy were shot including several officers who attempted to come over the top of the trenches. Eventually all the men in the second line became casualties. The men in the first line joined up with the Lincolns on the right. Shortly afterwards word came down to retire. The enemy then attacked in stronger force and as ammunition and bombs were exhausted some of our men went into no man’s land and searched the casualties, the withdraw continued. It is reported that an enemy machine gun was found in the front line with two Germans chained to it, both were dead, one bayoneted and the other clubbed to death by the butt of a rifle, the gun was destroyed.

Of a total of 22 officers and 680 NCO’s and men who went into action no officers returned unwounded, of the other ranks who returned unwounded there was 1 sergeant, 3 corporals, 10 lance corporals and 54 men.”

Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £195 Available


 

British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque and Memorial Scroll to Private Ellis Robinson, York and Lancaster Regiment a former Wood Working Machinist born in Wadsley, Staffordshire in 1898. Residing in Hillsborough, Sheffield prior to enlistment he enlisted on 3rd June 1916 and was probably a conscript. Mobilized 17th October 1916 he joined the 2nd Battalion in France in January 1917. Hospitalised in October 1917 with trench feet and trench fever contracted in the trenches near Ypres, he was evacuated to England 26th October 1917 and admitted to hospital in Blackpool. Returning to France 20th June 1918 he was wounded in action 4th July 1918 gun shot wound to back (mild). Admitted to No 3 General Hospital Boulogne 5th July 1918 he re-joined his Battalion 13th September and was killed in action 8th October 1918 aged 20 years. He now rests in an identified grave in the Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine-Au-Bois, France.

British War and Victory Medals

37506 Pte E Robinson Y & L R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Ellis Robinson

Memorial Scroll

Pte Ellis Robinson York & Lancaster Regt

With copy Medal Index Card, service papers, casualty details, copies from the Battalion War Diary covering the action in which he was killed. Original letter forwarding the Medals to his mother, addressed card tube for the Memorial Scroll, card medal box of issue, torn registered envelope addressed to his mother.

Ellis Robinson was born in Wadsley, Staffordshire in 1898, the 1911 census records he is a 13 years old Errand Boy residing with his father Ratcliffe, mother Emily and sister at 42 Holme Lane, Hillsborough, Sheffield. Prior to enlistment he was employed as a Wood Work Machinist, subsequent records record his family moved to 22 May Road, Hillsborough. Attesting for the York and Lancaster Regiment 3rd June 1916 aged 18 years, he was placed on the Army Reserve until mobilized 17th October 1916. Arriving in France on 10th January 1917 he joined the 2nd Battalion. Hospitalised with Trench Foot from 15th October 1917 the result of services in the trenches near Ypres, his record suggests he also contracted Trench Fever and was evacuated to England 26th October 1917 where he was treated in hospital in Blackpool. Returning to France 20th June 1918 he was wounded in action, gun shot wound to back (mild) 4th July 1918. Admitted to 17 Field Ambulance the same day, he was transferred to 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station and from there to No 3 General Hospital Boulogne. Following a period of convalescence in France he re-joined the 2nd Battalion 13th September 1918. Initially recorded as wounded and missing in action 8th October 1918, it was later confirmed he had been killed in action on this day.

On 8th October 1918 the 4th Army launched an attack on enemy positions in the area of Amiens. Supported by 400 tanks, the 2nd Battalion York and Lancashire Regiment were given the task of capturing the village of Mericourt and the high ground between Mericourt and Beauregard. in February 1919 his body was found and reported by IX Corps Burial Officer, he now rests in an identified grave in the Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine-Au-Bois, France.

EF £225 Reserved


 

British War and Victory Medals to Private Robert Crawford, 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion Highland Light Infantry. Born in Glasgow in 1897, he served in France after January 1916. Killed in action Arras on the opening day of the attack on the Hindenburg Line 20th May 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

British War and Victory Medals

332320 Pte R Crawford HLI

With copy Medal Index Card confirming these two Medals only sent to his next of kin and casualty details.

Robert Crawford was born in Glasgow in 1897, he enlisted in Glasgow and served with the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion Highland Light Infantry in France after January 1916. Killed in action in the opening day of the attack on the Hindenburg Line, battle of Arras 20th May 1917 aged 20 years. The son of Mrs Mary Crawford of 12 Kay Street, Springburn, Glasgow he is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

NEF £85 Reserved


 

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Leonard Posnett, 1/13th Battalion London Regiment (Kensington) a former Leather manufacturer and tanner company manager born in Canterbury in 1891. Enlisting as a Private into the Inns of Court OTC, he was commissioned in March 1917. Arriving in France shortly after commissioning he was killed in action Beaurains, Arras 22nd June 1917 aged 26 years, when the Germans shelled Tool Trench and the Arras-Cambrai Road. Commemorated on the Arras Memorial and the Leys School Memorial, Cambridge.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W L Posnett

With copy officer’s service papers.

William Leonard Posnett was born in Canterbury 10th February 1891 the son of Leonard Walker Posnett, JP Department Manager, Imperial Tabacco Company and his wife Effie Bell of “Westgate”, Cavendish Road, Chester. Educated at The Leys School, Cambridge, he enlisted into the Inns of Court OTC as Private number 9793 on 16th November 1915. Discharged to the Army Reserve the following day he was mobilized 27th October 1916 joining the Inns of Court OTC he was commissioned 27th March 1917 into the 13th Battalion London Regiment (Kensington). Arriving in France shortly after being commissioned he was killed in action Beaurains, Arras 22nd June 1917 aged 26 years when the Germans shelled Tool Trench and the Arras-Cambrai Road the Kensingtons suffering one officer killed (2/Lt Posnett) one officer wounded (2/Lt Sredwick) with 6 other ranks killed and 24 wounded. Commemorated on the Arras Memorial and the Leys School, Cambridge Memorial.

EF £85 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to 2/Lieutenant Joseph Francis House, Wiltshire Regiment attached 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment a former Fitter born in Woolwich in 1894. Enlisting as a Private soldier into the Wiltshire Regiment 31st August 1914 aged 19 years. Serving in France from 4th January 1915 with 1st Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, he transferred to the 9th Battalion West Riding Regiment in April 1916 and promoted Corporal in July the same year. Posted to 11th Officer Cadet Battalion in July 1917, he was commissioned into the Wiltshire Regiment in July 1917. Killed in action France 24th March 1918 aged 24 years whilst attached 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment, during their rear guard action at Bethencourt during the German Spring offensive. Commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Joseph Francis House

With copy service record.

Joseph Francis House was born in Woolwich 14th October 1894, a 19 year old Fitter he attested for the Wiltshire Regiment in London 31st August 1914 and joined the Depot at Devizes the same day. Posted to the 3rd Battalion 2nd September 1914 and the 1st Battalion 4th January 1915, joining the Battalion in the field two days later. Transferring to the 9th Battalion West Riding Regiment 14th April 1916, appointed Lance Corporal 9th April 1916 and promoted Corporal 7th July 1916. Returning to England 17th February 1917, he was posted to No 11 Officer Cadet Battalion 7th April 1917 and was commissioned 2/Lieutenant Wiltshire Regiment 1st August 1917. Returning to France he was attached 2nd Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment and was killed in action 24th March 1918 aged 24 years during the Battalion’s rear guard action at Bethencourt on the third day of the German Spring offensive. Commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, his next of kin is recorded as his wife Mrs A G House, 9 Duke’s Avenue, Chiswick, London W4.

NEF £145 Available


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to Acting Sergeant Frederick William Greening, DCM, Royal Fusiliers late 3rd County of London Yeomanry a Hosiery Salesman born in Cheltenham in 1888. Serving in France after January 1916 first with the 2nd Battalion and later the 9th Battalion, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry at Arras in April 1917 when leading his men with the utmost skill and coolness under fire. Killed in action 30th June 1917 aged 29 years, he now rests in the Monchy British Cemetery, Monchy-le-Preux.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Frederick William Greening

With research listed here extracted from on line records.

Frederick William Greening was born in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire in 1888. The 1911 census records he is a 24 year old Retail Hosiery Salesman a boarder residing at 31 St Matthews Road, Cotham, Bristol. Enlisting at Putney for the 3rd County of London Yeomanry (no 3026) he transferred to the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers (No GS/62292) for service in France, arriving after January 1916. As an Acting Sergeant serving with the 9th Battalion he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry during the battle of Arras in April 1917 London Gazette 18th July 1917 –

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed the utmost skill and coolness under heavy fire in leading his men. His pluck and determination under fire were of the utmost value to his men”.

Killed in action 30th June 1917 aged 29 years.

The son of Maria Greening of 12 Oakfield Road, Cannon Hill, Birmingham and the late William Greening, Frederick was unmarried and now rests in an identified grave in the Monchy British Cemetery, Monchy-le-Preux, France. Also commemorated on a family memorial in Uttoxeter New Cemetery, Derby which includes his father William who died 9th December 1906 aged 45 years, the inscription under Sergeant Frederick William Greening DCM reads “My reward is with my God”.

NEF £145 Available


 

British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Edward George Wishart, 1/5th (Buchan and Formartin) Battalion Gordon Highlanders, born in 1897 in Foreven, Aberdeen. Enlisting as a Private soldier into the 4th Battalion Gordon Highlanders in November 1914, he transferred to the 14th (London Scottish) Battalion London Regiment 12th April 1915. Commissioned into the 3/5th Battalion 19th June 1915, he served in France with the 1/5th Battalion from 9th June 1916. Severely wounded in action 18th April 1918, he died of wounds at No 39 Stationary Hospital, France 21st April 1918 aged 21 years and now rests in the Aire Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

British War and Victory Medals

Lieut E G Wishart

 With service papers and other research from on line records listed here.

Edward George Wishart was born in Foreven, Aberdeenshire in 1897, educated Aberdeen Grammar School he attested for the 4th Battalion Gordon Highlanders as a Private soldier at Aberdeen 7th November 1914. Posted 2/4th Battalion (number 3057) and to 3/14th (London Scottish) Battalion London regiment (number 4647) 12th April 1915. Commissioned 3/5th Battalion Gordon Highlanders 19th June 1915, he served in France from 9th June 1916 with the 1/5th Battalion. The 1/5th served on the Somme in 1916 arriving at Halloy on 14th July, Wishart left his Battalion on 21st July sick and was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick arriving on 27th July. Admitted to the Yorkhill War Hospital, Glasgow, he was sent on sick leave 2nd to 16th August and re-joined his Battalion in France. Severely wounded in action 18th April 1918, he died of wounds 21st April 1918 aged 21 years at No 39 Stationary Hospital, France and now rests in the Aire Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais France.

From : The Aberdeen Press and Journal 26th April 1918 page 2

“Lieutenant Edward George Wishart, Gordon Highlanders, fourth surviving son of Mr F W F Wishart, Hill of Fiddes, Foveran died of wounds 21st instant. Lt Wishart who was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School. He was going in (sic) for Farming and quite recently his father had arranged on his behalf a lease on the farm of Westerfolds, Duffus, Morayshire. The farm was owned by Sir Gordon Cumming and extended to 450 acres.

His headstone bears the inscription – “DULCE ET DECORUM EST PRO PATRIA MORI” (It is sweet and right to die for your country)

GVF £225 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private William Thomas Evans, Middlesex Regiment, born in North Kensington, Middlessex in 1880. Enlisting at Hammersmith he served with the 1th Battalion in France from 4th October 1915. Arriving on the Somme 25th July 1916, the 13th Battalion took part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August. Advancing on the right of Trones Wood they were checked by cross fire and forced to withdraw. Taking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August, they were subject to a heavy enemy artillery bombardment in which 400 casualties were sustained. Killed in action 31st August 1916 when his Battalion was attacked and forced out of Tea Trench. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

G-4994 Pte W T Evans Middx R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Thomas Evans

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research recorded here from on line records. Original silk medal ribbons, traces of lead solder centre reverse of plaque where at one time a fixing for display in a case, original silk ribbons faded on the obverse side caused by display in a case.

William Thomas Evans was born in 1880 in North Kensington, Middlesex, I was unable to locate him on the 1911 census but still residing in Middlesex on the outbreak of war he enlisted at Hammersmith. Serving in France from 4th October 1915 with the 13th Battalion Middlesex Regiment which arrived on the Somme as part of 73rd Brigade, 24th Division. Arriving at Happy Valley 2nd August, they took over the trenches at Arrow Head Copse 17th August. Taking part in the attack towards Guillemont 18th August their advance to the right of Trones Wood came to a standstill when they were caught in cross fire. To the craters in front of Carnoy 19th August and to Sandpit Camp 22nd August. Raking over front line positions at Delville Wood 30th August they were subject to a prolonged German artillery bombardment causing 400 casualties. Killed in action 31st August 1916 aged 36 years (CWGC erroneously record 38 years) when the Germans attacked forcing them out of Tea Trench. The Soldier’s effects list records he left his estate to his sister Florence Emily and brother John T Evans.

GVF £275 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private John Clapperton, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) late Army Cyclist Corps born in Barony, Glasgow in 1896. Serving in France from 11th September 1915 with the 9th (Scottish) Division Cyclist Company, he transferred to the 9th Battalion Cameronians and was killed in action 21st October 1916 aged 20 years whilst in the front line at Happy Valley, Somme sector. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

1587 Pte J Clapperton A Cyc Corps

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Clapperton

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research recorded here from on line records. Original silk medal ribbons.

John Clapperton was born in Barony, Glasgow in 1896, the 1901 census records he is a 5 year old schoolboy residing with his mother Mrs James Clapperton (Agnes) a cotton weaver, lodging at 71 Dale Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow. Enlisting at Glasgow for the Army Cyclist Corps, he served with the 9th (Scottish) Division Cyclist Company in France from 11th September 1915. Transferring to the 9th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) part of 27th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division. Arriving on the front line at Montauban, Somme sector 3rd July 1916, the Battalion were relieved five days later having suffered 139 casualties. Taking part in the attack on the village of Longueval 14th July and the bombing attack north west of Delville Wood 17th July. Taking over the front line at Happy Valley 20th July 1916, John Clapperton was killed in action the next day. Aged 20 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, the Glasgow Memorial record his home address as 65 Mordaunt Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow at the time of his death.

GVF to NEF £325 Reserved


 

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private John Chappell, 18th (Public Works Pioneers) Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Born in St Lukes, Middlesex in 1885 and a former Bricklayer in the House Building industry, he served in France from 14th November 1915. Killed in action 27th October 1916 whilst the Battalion was working in the Mametz and Delville Wood areas, Somme sector. Aged 31 years he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

PW-2766 Pte J Chapell Middx R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Chapell

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and other research listed here.

John Chappell was born in St Lukes, Middlesex in 1885, the 1911 census records he is a 26 year old Bricklayer employed by the house building trade residing with his widowed mother Elizabeth, one sister and one brother at 83 Provost Street, Hoxton, Middlesex. Serving in France from 14th November 1915 with the 18th (Public Works Pioneer) Battalion Middlesex Regiment. Arriving on the Somme 9th July 1916 they were employed on road maintenance around Mametz Wood area, to the south of Fricourt Wood 17th July they were involved in operations at High Wood until 27th July. Killed in action 27th October 1916 aged 31 years when the Battalion was working in the Mametz and Delville Wood areas. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £255 Available


 

Brothers from Portsmouth, the sons of William and Margaret Burrows, Publicans of The Red Lion, 29 Havant Street, Portsmouth.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy 2nd type to Chief Engine Room Artificer William Thomas Burrow, Royal Navy a former Fitter and Turner born in Portsea, Portsmouth in 1884. Entering the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class 16th March 1907, during the First World War he served aboard HM Ships Latona, Monarch and Barham. Advanced to Chief ERA 1st Class in February 1923, he was pensioned in 1929. Re-entering the Royal Navy 28th April 1930 as Chief ERA 1st Class (Pensioner) with a change in service number.

1914/15 Star

272359 W T Burrows ERA2 RN

British War and Victory Medals

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type

272359 W T Burrows CERA 2 HMS Vernon

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Stoker 1st Class Daniel Burrows, Royal Navy a former Butcher born in Portsmouth in 1895. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 29th September 1913, he joined HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 and was rated Stoker 1st Class the same month. Killed in action 14th March 1915 when Amethyst was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire during the Dardanelles campaign, 22 ratings were killed and 38 men wounded of which 4 died of wounds.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

K.20453 D Burrows Sto 1 RN

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Daniel Burrows

With copy service records.

William Thomas Burrows was born in Portsea, Portsmouth 3rd October 1884 a Fitter and Turner, almost certainly completing his apprenticeship at Portsmouth Dockyard, he entered the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class (ERA) at Victory II 16th March 1907. Confirmed in the rate of ERA 4 aboard HMS Good Hope 21st March 1908, he was advanced to ERA 3 aboard HMS Ariadne 15th March 1910, ERA 2 aboard HMS Latona 21st March 1914, Acting Chief ERA 2nd Class aboard HMS Monarch 1st February 1917, Chief ERA 2 aboard HMS Barham 1st February 1918 and Chief ERA 1st Class aboard HMS Sirdar 1st February 1923. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 25th March 1922. Discharged to pension in 1929, he re-entered the Royal Navy as Chief ERA 1st Class Pensioner 28th April 1930 with the new number P/MX.48112.

Daniel Burrows was born in Portsmouth 7th March 1895, a Butcher he entered the Royal Navy at Victory II as Stoker 2nd Class 29th September 1913. He subsequently joined Attentive II 18th February 1914, HMS Syren 23rd October 1914 and HMS Amethyst 18th January 1915 where he was rated Stoker 1st Class 28th January 1915. Killed in action aboard HMS Amethyst when she was hit by Turkish shore battery artillery fire 14th March 1915 whilst in the Dardanelles.

Amethyst took part in the covering operation for the minesweeping effort in the Dardanelles and during the action on 1st March and 4th March 1915 she exchanged fire with Turkish forts. On the evening of 4th March she took on board injured personnel of the landing party and discharged them the next day to the Hospital Ship Soudan and SS Braemar Castle. During the hours of darkness between 6th and 11th March she took part in operations in the Dardanelles against mines, and was frequently in action against field artillery, forts and searchlights. On 14th March at 04:10 she was hit by field artillery and lost 22 men killed. A further 38 men were wounded, of whom 4 later died.  Amethyst retired to Tenedos for repairs. The Captain, Commander G J Todd, Royal Navy and Lieutenant James C J Soutter, Royal Navy, First Lieutenant, were commended in the Naval Dispatch dated 17th March 1915 from Vice Admiral Carden.

Commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

GVF & better £525 SOLD


 

Bronze Memorial Plaque to John Molyneux Crockett, Merchant Navy. 3rd Engineer Crockett, born 1892, Hull, Yorkshire. Son of John Molyneux Crockett & Louise Crockett. The 1911 Census records he was aged 19, living with his parents at 85 Plane Street, Hull, Yorkshire and working as an Apprentice fitter in an engineering company. He married Elsie May Addey in 1916 of 42 Queensgate Street, Hull, Yorkshire. 3rd Engineer Crockett was killed on 12th April 1917 aged 25 years on board SS ‘Toro’, which was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine. Many of the crew escaped the ship before it sunk.

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Molyneux Crockett

Copy 1911 Census entry, CWGC Details etc

GVF £95 Available


 

British War Medal, Victory Medal with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Able Seaman Robert Knowles, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Born 16th September 1896, he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 30th November 1915 and first joined the Royal Naval Division 22nd May 1916 when called up for service. Transferring to sea service the following day, he joined Excellent in May 1916 as Able Seaman for Gunnery training and joined President III in July 1916 for service aboard Defensively Armed Merchant Ships as a Gunner. Lost aboard the SS Zara on 13th April 1917 when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-30 west of Helliso Island, 27 of her crew were lost. Commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

British War & Victory Medals

MZ 868 R Knowles AB RNVR

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Robert Knowles

With copy service record.

Robert Knowles, born 16th September 1896, a former Clerk and son of Mr Knowles of 112 Manton Road, Eccles, Manchester, Lancashire. Attesting for the RNVR 30th November 1915, he was called up for service 22nd May 1916 joining the Royal Naval Division. Transferring to sea service the following day as Able Seaman. Joining Excellent 23rd May 1916 for Gunnery training, he joined President III 20th July 1916 for service aboard Defensively Armed Merchant Ships as a Gunner. Lost aboard the cargo vessel SS Zara 13th April 1917 aged 21 years when she was sunk by the German Submarine U-30 90 miles west of Helliso Island on a voyage from London to Trondhjem with a general cargo, 27 of her crew were lost. Commemorated by name on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Small hole on Plaque at 12 o’clock.

GVF £175 Available


 

 

British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal & Bronze Memorial plaque to Greaser Thomas Phillips, Merchant Navy born in Dublin, Ireland in 1885. Lost aboard the SS Cork (City of Dublin Steam Packet Company) when she was sunk by the German Submarine U-103 on 26th January 1918 aged 33 years. Struck by a torpedo which hit the engine room, port side, she sank in four minutes 9 miles NE of Lynas Point, twelve lives were lost from a ship’s company of forty two. Commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

British War Medal and Mercantile Marine War Medal

Thomas Phillips

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Thomas Phillips

Thomas Phillips was born in Dublin in 1885, son of the late Thomas and Catherine Phillips and Husband of Christine Phillips of 30 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin. Serving as a Greaser aboard the Cargo Ship SS Cork on a journey to Liverpool with a general cargo, she was torpedoed by the German Submarine U-103 on 26th January 1918, nine miles North East off Lynas Point, Anglesey, Wales. The ship was struck on the port side, the torpedo hit the engine room and the ship sank within 4 minutes, 12 crew were lost including Thomas Phillips from a ship’s company of 42. Commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.

S S Cork was owned by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company, built in 1899. She weighed 1,232 Tons.

Includes a copy of the report on the sinking titled  ‘Particulars of Attacks on Merchant Vessels by Enemy Submarines’

EF £325 SOLD


 

 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Corporal William Fairhurst, 257 Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers. Born in Pemberton, Lancashire in 1879, the 1891 census records he was 12 years old assisting his father a Coal and General Carter. Travelling to work in the gold mines of South Africa he returned to live in Chorley but subsequently went to Canada and South Africa for a second time to work in the mines. Returning to England to enlist he originally joined the Manchester Regiment but transferred to the Royal Engineers Tunnelling Companies and served in France from 23rd September 1915. Gassed in September 1916 he returned to duty following a period as Musketry Instructor. Severely wounded by shell fire 9th April 1918 at Dainville whilst working on the East Arras defences, evacuated to England he was admitted to Exeter War Hospital and died of his wounds on 21st May 1918 aged 38 years. He now rests in the Adlington Cemetery, Lancashire.

1914/15 Star

121521 Spr W Fairhurst RE

British War and Victory Medals

121521 Cpl W Fairhurst RE

Bronze Memorial Plaque

William Fairhurst

With casualty details, copy from the 257 Tunnelling Company War Diary recording him wounded, original Plaque paper envelope addressed to his brother Mr A (Ambrose) Fairhurst, 64 Stockport Road, Ardwick, Manchester, copy newspaper article. Original silk ribbons.

William Fairhurst was born in Pemberton, Lancashire in 1879, the 1891 census records he is 12 years old assisting his father William a Coal and General Carter, his mother Ellen, three brothers and two sisters all residing at 443 Warrington Road, Pemberton. A miner who had worked overseas, he enlisted at Manchester, originally for the Manchester Regiment (number 17884) and transferred to the Tunnelling Section, Royal Engineers serving in France from 23rd September 1915. Gassed in September 1916, on recovery he served with 257 Tunnelling Company and was severely wounded by shell fire at Dainville whilst working on defences east of Arras on 9th April 1918. Evacuated to England he was admitted to the Exeter War Hospital and died of his wounds 21st May 1918 aged 38 years, he now rests in Adlington Cemetery, near Chorley, Lancashire.

The Lancashire Evening Post 25th May 1918 records – Military Funeral at Adlington

“Corporal W Fairhurst RE, Adlington whose death occurred in Exeter Hospital on Tuesday, was interred yesterday afternoon at Adlington Cemetery, the service being conducted by the Rev J H Kay, Wesleyan Minister at Chorley. For some years he was employed in the gold mines in South Africa and on returning to England was a member of the Trinity Wesleyan Choir, Chorley. He subsequently went to Canada and again to South Africa, returning to enlist in the Engineers. After serving in France 12 months he was gassed, and subsequently on recovery became Musketry Instructor. His death occurred from the effects of shrapnel wounds”.

EF £425 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Walter John Long, Middlesex Regiment, born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892 a Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores he attested for the 11th Battalion serving in France from 31st May 1915. On 4th May 1916 he was on leave and married in Battersea, London, returning to France shortly after he was killed in action with the 1st Battalion 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, Somme sector in which they suffered 321 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

G/959 Pte W J Long Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card and research listed here from on line records. With original transmission letters for the British War & Victory Medals (2).

Walter John Long was born in Holborn, Middlesex in 1892, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Clerk at the Army & Navy Stores residing with his father Alfred a retired Police Detective, mother Elizabeth and four sisters at 26 Crown Terrace, Richmond on Thames. Attesting for the 11th Battalion Middlesex Regiment he served in France from 31st May 1915. Returning home on leave he married Alice Maude Clarke at St Michael’s Church, Battersea, London on 4th May 1916. In July 1916 he was serving with the 1st Battalion which arrived on the Somme 9th July 1916. Killed in action 15th July 1916 aged 24 years in his Battalion’s attack on the Switch Line, heavy Machine Gun fire on both flanks brought the advance to a stand still after advancing through the village of Bazentin-le-Petit, casualties recorded as 321 killed and wounded. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available

 


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Thomas Winter, 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. Born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891 and a Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he enlisted on 10th November 1914 and arrived in France on 13th July 1915. On 1st July 1916 the 7th Battalion were in support during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433 they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during an unsuccessful bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support in which the Battalion suffered 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15045 Pte T Winter E York R

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details, details from his on line service record and research listed here from other on line sources. Original letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star.

Thomas Winter was born in Medomsley, Co Durham in 1891, the son of John Thomas and Ruth Winter of 65 West Chilton, Ferry Hill, Co Durham. A 23 year 9 month old Coal Miner at Roddymoor Colliery, he attested for the 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment at Ferry Hill 10th November 1914. Serving in France from 13th July 1915, the Battalion was in support of the attack on  Fricourt, Somme sector taking over the British front line shortly after Zero. Attacking at 1433, they could not reach their objective in the face of heavy Machine Gun fire, ‘B’ Company was unable to get out of its trench, relieved the following day having suffered 123 casualties. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 25 years during a bombing attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle support, Somme sector failed, the Battalion suffering 145 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

A photo of Private Winter appears on the North East War Memorials Project Web Site.

NEF £165 Available


 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Harry Humphrey, 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers a former Colliery Labourer above ground, born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896. Serving in France from 25th August 1915, he was killed in action in the attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector 7th July 1916. aged 19 years. His Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from Contalmaison during the attack, suffering 264 casualties. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15563 Pte H Humphrey North’d Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, casualty details and research listed here from on line sources.

Harry Humphrey was born in Quay Corner, Jarrow on Tyne in 1896, the son of Edmund Eckford Humphrey a Raftman for a Timber Merchant and his wife Sarah. The 1911 census records Harry is a 14 year old Colliery Labourer above ground residing at 91 Brussels Street, Gateshead with his widowed father and two sisters. Enlisting at North Shields he served in France with the 11th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers from 25th August 1915. Killed in action 7th July 1916 aged 19 years during his Battalion’s attack on Bailiff Wood, Somme sector in which it suffered 264 casualties mainly from German Machine Gun fire from the direction of Contalmaison. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

EF £165 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Arthur Henry Twort, 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment a former Cement Manufacturing Works Cooper born in Eccles, Kent. Enlisting in Marylebone, London initially for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served in France from 19th July 1915. Killed in action 2nd July 1916 aged 25 years during his Battalion’s assault on La Boisselle, Somme sector. Assaulting the western end of the village they cleared it and consolidated by 2100 that evening at a cost of 316 casualties.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

17817 Pte A H Twort Wilts R

With details here extracted from on line documents, copy Newspaper article with photo depicted here, copy birth certificate, original silk ribbons to BWM and Vict.

Arthur Henry Twort was born in Eccles, Kent 2nd August 1890, the 1911 census records he is a 20 year old Cooper employed at the Cement Manufacturing Works, residing with his father Walter Rolls Twort a Foreman Cooper at the same Works, his mother Eleanor Elizabeth, 2 brothers and 1 sister at Little Culland Cottage, Great Rowlands, Burnham, Kent. Attesting for the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Private number 15366) at Marylebone, London he transferred to the Wiltshire Regiment and served with the 6th Battalion in France from 19th July 1915.

aaa562

From : The Kent Messenger 12th August 1916 page 5

On 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive the 6th Battalion moved forward from Albert and on 2nd July took part in the operations around La Boisselle, assaulting the western end of the village and clearing it by 2100 that evening having sustained 312 casualties. Killed in action during this assault aged 25 years Arthur Henry Twort is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

NEF £250 Available


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1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Joseph Bradley, 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham he was employed as an underground Coal Miner and Pony Putter  before enlisting. Serving in France from 9th September 1915, the 14th Battalion had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades during the attack on Fricourt, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Killed in action whilst wiring 21st Division front lines at Gueudecourt, Somme sector 29th September 1916 aged 24 years. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

18746 Pte J Bradley North’d Fus

With details here extracted from on line documents, original silk ribbons.

Joseph Bradley was born in Bishop Auckland, Co Durham, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Underground Coal Miner and Puny Putter (Driver of a Pony drawing a Mine Waggon) residing at 11 Bridge Street, Bishop Auckland with his widowed father George also an Underground Coal Miner and Waggon man and two younger brothers. Enlisting at Bishop Auckland he served with the 14th (Pioneer) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France from 9th September 1915.

The 14th Battalion were the Pioneer Battalion of 21st Division and on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive had assisted 63rd and 64th Brigades in their attack on Fricourt. Killed in action 29th September 1916 aged 24 years whilst wiring 21st Division’s front line at Gueudecourt. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GVF & better £175 Available