Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Brother, Distinguished Service Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Naval Sick Berth Auxiliary Reserve GV, St John’s Ambulance Service Medal with Four Long Service clasps to Area Officer Matthew Willey, St John’s Ambulance Brigade late Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve a Collier born in Springwell Colliery, Co Durham in 1893. Mobilized for service with the Royal Navy 2nd August 1914, he served afloat and at the Royal Naval Hospital, Malta. Serving ashore at Dunkirk from 4th May 1917, he was awarded the DSM for his gallantry during several German air raids on Aerodromes in treating and evacuating the wounded. Demobilized in April 1919 he served in the St John’s Ambulance Brigade being awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Brother in 1958. He died in Sunderland in 1975 aged 82 years.

Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Brother silver plated and enamels

Unnamed as awarded

Distinguished Service Medal GV

M.11971 M Willey SRA Bergues Aerodrome 5 & 29 June 1918

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

M.11971 M Willey SRA RN

1939/45 Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve GV

5120 M Willey SBA RNASBR

St John’s Ambulance Brigade Service Medal with Four Long Service clasps

9711 A/Offr M Willey Springwell and Washington Div No 6 Dist 1931

With copy service record and other research.

Provenance: Dr A L Lloyd, OBE, KstJJ collection, Bonhams 16th October 2013 lot 171.

Matthew Willey was born in Springwell Colliery, Co Durham 24th March 1893. The 1911 census records he is 18 years old and employed as a Miner (Putter in Coal Mine) residing with his Grandfather Robert aged 67 years a Coal Miner disabled through an accident, father Robert a 41 year old widower and Coal Miner (Hewer) one brother and two sisters at 9 Hutts Terrace, Springwell. Still a Coal Miner and a member of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve he was mobilized 2nd August 1914 and joined Pembroke as a Junior Reserve Attendant (M.11971). Posted to the Merchant Fleet Auxiliary Ship Delta 7th August 1914, he subsequently joined Pembroke I 1st December 1914, Royal Naval Hospital Malta 29th April 1915, Pembroke I 23rd December 1915, Chrystal Palace 13th March 1917, Roehampton 20th March 1917, Dunkirk 4th May 1917 and finally Pembroke I 1st January 1919 from where he was demobilized. Awarded the Distinguished Service Medal London Gazette 5th October 1918 page 11782.

From: Naval Air Operations Chapter X page 394

“The bombing of the German Naval bases in Belgium brought retaliation. During the nights of 4th, 5th and 6th June 1918 strong attacks were made on the Aerodromes in the Dunkirk area, and on the night of 5th / 6th June, in particular, when about 200 bombs were dropped, two hangers and two aeroplanes were destroyed, and one hanger and thirty seven aeroplanes were slightly damaged. On the night of 6th / 7th, when Couderkerque was attacked by about thirty planes, it happened that all the serviceable Handley Pages had left for a raid, and that three unserviceable aircraft had been removed to safer quarters. Although no aircraft were bombed, two hangers were destroyed and six were damaged along with other Aerodrome buildings. The general damage was such that Couderkerque was abandoned, except as a landing ground”.

Awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Brother London Gazette 21st May 1958

Matthew Willey died in Sunderland in 1975 aged 82 years.

GVF average £2,250 SOLD


Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp 1st Army, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals to Guardsman William Walter Montgomery, 1st Battalion Irish Guards from Belfast, Northern Ireland. The 1st Battalion landed at Anzio on 22nd January 1944 and were engaged in almost continuous action for 4 weeks. Awarded the DCM for his gallantry on 30th January and again on 3rd to 4th February 1944 when as a Bren Gunner he gave covering fire whilst consolidating a position, withdrawing when the positions became untenable and silencing a German Machine Gun position at 150 yards range whilst opening fire in a standing position. On the night of 3rd / 4th February he was again giving covering fire on the Battalion’s exposed right flank when he was overwhelmed by a German assault and taken prisoner. Fighting his way out when the opportunity arose he shot several of his guards and escaped back to Battalion lines on an abandoned carrier, he was wounded in the leg during this action. Taken prisoner of war on 23rd February 1944 whilst serving with No 1 Company, he was held at Stalag 3A at Luckenwalde, Germany the camp being liberated by the Red Army 22nd April 1945. On 1st June 1945 Guardsman Montgomery is recorded as repatriated and on leave at his home address in Vernon Street, Belfast. One of 18 Distinguished Conduct Medals awarded to the Irish Guards for the Second World War.

“A total of 1,080 Irish Guards Officers and men, including reinforcements landed at Anzio, by the end of February just 267 effectives remained“.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GVI

2718746 Gdmn W Montgomery IR GDS

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp 1st Army, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

With copy DCM recommendation, London Gazette entry and headers, War Diary covering DCM citation dates and research from other sources.

The DCM still on its investiture pin, with flattened named card box.

Provenance : Ex Trevor Cambridge Collection (Romsey Medals)

William Walter Montgomery

War Office casualty list records wounded 4th February 1944

War Office casualty list records wounded and missing 23rd February 1944 whilst serving with No 1 Company, later confirmed POW in German hands 23rd February 1944.

POW number 52202.

POW Camp Stalag 3A (Luckenwalde) which was liberated by the Red Army 22nd April 1945, the Irish Guards missing personnel file TNA WO361/784 records on 1st June 1945 Guardsman Montgomery has returned home to 33 Vernon Street, Belfast.

DCM London Gazette 15th June 1944 page 2853

“This Guardsman took part in the successful night attack by No 1 Company on the night of 29th/30th January on the left of the main axis Anzio – Albano Road. On reaching the objective, the ground was found to be covered by enemy tanks which attempted to prevent the Company digging in by putting up flares and firing Machine Guns on the digging parties. All through the night this Guardsman gave what covering fire he could to his comrades by firing at the enemy tanks with his Bren Gun. This covering fire could not be very effective, but it did force the enemy tanks to limit their vision by shutting down their visors and exposed this Guardsman to the continued attention of the enemy.

When morning 30th January came and no supporting arms or British tanks appeared, the Company position was untenable and the Company was ordered to withdraw to another position on the flank. With great coolness and fine courage Guardsman accompanied by Guardsman Taylor, set up his Bren on top of the railway cutting and gave covering fire to the remainder of the Company as they withdrew across 400 yards of open country. The top of the railway cutting was level, clearly silhouetting this Guardsman’s head and shoulders. Besides presenting a good target from the front , he was also liable to be shot in the back by enemy Machine Guns on the other side of the valley. Constant enemy fire did not disturb or deter him from his task.

This Guardsman left the cutting in the last party with his Company Commander. Twice on the way back across the open stretch of ground he halted to return the fire of enemy Machine Guns, once engaging , whilst in a standing position, a concealed German Machine Gun 150 yards away and effectively silencing it. The outstanding courage skill and coolness of this Guardsman greatly facilitated the withdrawal of his Company and there is no doubt that a great many of his comrades owe their lives to his complete disregard for his own safety.

In the action of the night 3rd / 4th February this Guardsman was the first to engage and draw the enemy’s fire when the Battalion’s right flank was exposed. He was eventually taken prisoner but fought his way out, shooting several of his guards and escaped on a carrier. An officer in the same party said his coolness and bravery were quite remarkable. He had serveral days of really hard fighting and constant shelling but despite the physical strain he must have felt he was full of energy, resource and cheerfulness. Despite being wounded in the leg he was back in the Battalion position that night (4th February). No personal danger could prevent this Guardsman from doing more than his duty and he earned the greatest admiration from all who saw him. I strongly recommend this Guardsman for the immediate award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal”.

War Diary

30th January

“The gravity of the situation was further increased by the fact the dominating ground on the right flank was held by the enemy, who had succeeded in preventing the advance of the Scots Guards during the night. In view of this and other considerations it was decided to withdraw No 1 and No2 Companies to temporary positions in the rear. During the withdrawal the companies were caught by heavy Machine Gun fire and several casualties were sustained including Lieutenant De Costa and Lieutenant Preston killed and Lieutenant Gillow fatally wounded.

Finally the time came for the covering party to retire. Unfortunately Guardsman Taylor was wounded in the leg and had to remain with the wounded. Both he and Guardsman Montgomery (both of No 2 Company) did invaluable work by providing continuous fire for about an hour. German mortars and 8mm soon put down an accurate fire on the railway line, killing Lieutenant Preston.

4th February

“A group under Captain S H Combe were taken prisoner, Combe picked up a rifle that was lying on the ground and shot his guard. He then picked up a Tommy Gun and killed five more. In the end of the thirty guards twenty were killed and nine prisoners handed over to the Foresters. The “Micks” and others broke and ran, most under Lieutenant John Bell stayed and fought it out with the Foresters. A few officers and ten Guardsmen went south back down the railway, and once again reached the railway bridge where they found two carriers still intact. These they piled into and going “flat out” up the track past No 3 Company positions reached the Grenadiers lines”.

“A total of 1,080 Irish Guards Officers and men, including reinforcements, landed at Anzio, by the end of February just 267 effectives remained“.

The Battalion embarked for England on 11th April 1944, the 1st Battalion’s war was over. One of just 18 Distinguished Conduct Medals awarded to the Irish Guards for the Second World War.

Slight contact wear therefore

GVF £4,750 Available

 


Distinguished Flying Cross GVI reverse dated 1945, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals, to Squadron Leader Harry William Howe, Royal Air Force born in Marylebone, London in 1923. A member of the Air Training Corps and educated at Marylebone Grammar School he enlisted into the RAFVR in March 1941. Completing his Pilot training in Canada and the USA, he was promoted Sergeant (Pilot) in February 1943. His first operational sortie was a leaflet drop at Chateaudun France 24th March 1944, joining 76 Squadron in June 1944 he completed a most successful tour and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Granted a permanent commission in the Royal Air Force post War he continued to fly all types of aircraft and was promoted Squadron Leader in October 1955. Dismissed the Royal Air Force by sentence of Court Martial 29th June 1965, he died at his home in Crowthorne, Berkshire in 1991, his death certificate records he was a Sales Manager (Retired).

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI

Unnamed as awarded the reverse officially dated 1945

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

With copy DFC recommendation and London Gazette entries and headers for DFC and dismissal, FIVE original Flying Log Books covering the period 12th April 1942 to 22nd April 1959, two original commission scrolls one as Pilot Officer in 1944 and one as Flight Lieutenant in 1948 contained in a card tube addressed to Squadron Leader H W Howe.

Harry William Howe was born in Marylebone, London 6th July 1923, he enlisted into the RAFVR 7th March 1941 and was mobilized 3rd November 1941 as Leading Aircraftsman for Pilot training. Promoted Sergeant on qualifying as a Pilot 27th February 1943, promoted Flight Sergeant 27th February 1944 and commissioned Pilot Officer 20th August 1944. Promoted Flying Officer 21st February 1945, Flight Lieutenant 21st February 1948, he was granted a permanent commission in the RAF as a Pilot 16th August 1948. Promoted Squadron Leader 1st October 1955, he was dismissed the Royal Air Force by sentence of Court Martial 29th June 1965 (London Gazette 24th August 1965 page 43745), he was serving with HQ Flying Training Command at the time of his offence, the exact offence has not been ascertained.

Flight Lt Howe front row seventh from left

Howe joined No 10 Operational Training Unit 20th December 1943 flying Whitley Bombers, completing his first operational sortie 23rd March 1944 a Nickel Operation (Leaflet drop) target Chateaudun, northern France. Joining 1652 Conversion Unit 16th May 1944 flying Halifax Mark II Bombers, he joined 76 Squadron at Holme-on-Spalding Moor 29th June 1944, completing his first sortie 6th July 1944.

DFC London Gazette 20th July 1945 page 3782

Flying Officer Harry William Howe 76 Squadron Royal Air Force

Total Hours flown on operations 192, number of sorties 39

“Flying Officer Howe as Captain of a heavy bomber has completed a tour of 39 operations against Germany and enemy occupied territories. He has attacked such heavily defended targets as Hamburg, Magdeburg, ChemnitzBuisberg and Essen, and has at all times shown great determination and initiative. Throughout his operational career Flying Officer Howe has maintained a cheerful and willing disposition and has inspired his crew to further efforts. It is considered that his excellent record and his press on spirit merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross”.

His Station Commander added –

“This officer has completed a fine tour of operations and has always shown an excellent spirit and quiet determination to find and hit his objective. He is recommended for the no- immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross”.

From a local newspaper article

Local Men Decorated

“F/O H W Howe of Kensal Rise who was a member of the Air Training Corps and enlisted in March 1941. He trained in Canada and was commissioned in August last year. He is an old boy of St Marylebone Grammar School.”

Harry William Howe died at his home in Crowthorne, Berkshire 28th April 1991, his occupation is recorded as Sales Manager (Retired).

GVF & better £2,250 SOLD


Distinguished Flying Cross GVI reverse dated 1945, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal GVI clasps Malaya, Cyprus to Flight Lieutenant Donald Chisholm Boa, Royal Air Force born in 1922. Qualifying as a Navigator he was commissioned Pilot Officer from Flight Sergeant in June 1944, he completed an impressive 66 operational sorties, 26 with 105 Squadron Flying Mosquitos, 15 as Marker aircraft. His first sortie was flown on 25th June 1943 and his last on 11th April 1945. Resigning his RAFVR commission in May 1947, he was commissioned Lieutenant, South Lancashire Regiment the same month. Resigning his Army commission in September 1950, he was appointed Assistant Superintendent, Federation of Malaya Police and whist so employed was married in Singapore in 1953. Returning to the Royal Air Force he was commissioned in June 1954 into the Provost Branch and appointed Assistant Provost Marshall in September the same year serving in Cyprus. Resigning in December 1957, he died in Reading, Berkshire in 1999.

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI

Unnamed as awarded the reverse officially dated 1945

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal GVI clasps Malaya, Cyprus

ASP D C Boa F of M Pol

With copy London Gazette entries, recommendation for DFC with list of all 66 sorties and other research listed here. The group mounted as originally worn, the France and Germany clasp a copy, a GENUINE clasp will be supplied to the purchaser.

Born 24th November 1922, the 1939 registration records he is residing in Southgate, Middlesex.

Commissioned Pilot Officer (General Duties Branch Aircrew) from Flight Sergeant 2nd June 1944 (London Gazette 8th August 1944 page 3667), Flying Officer (General Duties Branch Aircrew) 2nd December 1944 (London Gazette 29th December 1944 page 5947), promoted Flight Lieutenant 2nd June 1946 (London Gazette 28th June 1946 page 3282). RAFVR commission resigned 1st May 1947 (London Gazette 17th February 1948 page 1117), Lieutenant South Lancashire Regiment from the RAFVR 1st May 1947 with seniority 24th November 1945 (London Gazette 9th September 1947 page 4243).

Resigning his commission in the South Lancashire Regiment 25th September 1950 (London Gazette 27th November 1951 page 6174), he was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Police in the Federation of Malaya Police Force, being awarded the General Service Medal clasp Malaya, whilst serving in the Police he married in Singapore in 1953.

Appointed to Short Service Commission (Provost Branch) as Flying Officer 9th June 1954 with seniority 2nd April 1954 (London Gazette 20th July 1954 page 4246). Assistant Provost Marshall as Flying Officer 24th September 1954 (London Gazette 15th October 1954 page 5829), he qualified for the Cyprus clasp with the Royal Air Force.

As Flight Lieutenant (Provost Branch) he resigned his commission 19th December 1957 (London Gazette 31st December 1957 page 7598) and died in Reading, Berkshire in 1999.

Distinguished Flying Cross London Gazette 21st September 1945 page 4703

Flying Officer (Navigator / Bomb Aimer) Donald Chisholm Boa, 105 Squadron Royal Air Force

Hours flown on operations 248, number of sorties flown 66

‘Flying Officer Boa joined Pathfinder Force in April 1943 and has already carried out a first tour of 40 sorties before starting to operate in this Squadron in December, 1944. Since this date he has completed a further 26 sorties 15 of these being marker sorties.

Flying Officer Boa possesses great skill as a Navigator and also the ability to concentrate on the job in hand under any conditions. This together with his courage, endurance and determination, has made him a great asset to the Squadron and enabled him to compile a fine operational record.’

His impressive number of sorties commenced on 25th June 1943, target Hamburg and included Berlin on fifteen occasions, Frankfurt four times, Hamburg twice, Duisburg three times as well as Dusseldorf, Gelsenkirchen, Leverkusen, and Ludsweighaven, ending his first tour on 4th March 1944. Commencing his second tour 15th December 1944 his aircraft was marker for fifteen sorties, his last sortie was Bayreuth on 11th April 1945.

GVF & better £2,450 Available


Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Driver Albert Edward Keller, Royal Army Service Corps late Royal Army Medical Corps Territorial Force born in Hull, Yorkshire in 1885. Serving with 1/3rd Northumbrian Field Ambulance RAMC in France from 20th April 1915, he transferred to the ASC in September 1916 and served with the same unit, presumably as an ambulance driver. The 1/3rd Northumbrian Field Ambulance was raised in Hull and served with 150 Brigade 50th (Northumbrian) Division in France throughout the war. Awarded the Military Medal in July 1919 for gallantry during the closing actions of the war he was disembodied in July 1919. Returning to Hull he died there in 1976 aged 91 years.

Military Medal GV

T4-251745 Dvr L Cpl A E Keller RASC

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

1584 Pte A E Keller RAMC

With copy Medal Index Card, 1914/15 Star Medal roll entry, London Gazette entry and headers for MM and MM award card which records attached 1/3 Northumbrian Field Ambulance RAMC.

Albert Edward Keller was born in Hull 11th November 1885, the son of Louis Keller a Pork Butcher born in Germany and his wife Mary. The 1901 census records Albert is 15 years old a Pork Butcher working in his father’s business residing at 3 Mytongate, Whitefriars, Hull with his parents, five brothers and two sisters. Residing in Withernsea on enlistment, he served with the 1/3rd Northumbrian Field Ambulance RAMC TF in France from 20th April 1915, the unit being raised in Hull. Transferring to the Army Service Corps as a Driver 1st September 1916, presumably as ambulance driver he was attached to 1/3rd Northumbrian Field Ambulance (150th Brigade, 50th Division). Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 23rd July 1919 page 9391. Disembodied 23rd July 1919 he returned to the Hull area and died there in 1976 aged 91 years.

GVF & better £475 Available


 

Distinguished Service Order Victoria, Order of the British Empire 1st type Military, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War Medal, Victory Medal to Major Henry Read Darley, Staff late 4th Dragoon Guards and South Wales Borderers born in Dublin in 1865. Educated at Clifton College, Trinity College Cambridge and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 4th Dragoon Guards in March 1888. Serving as Adjutant 1891 to 1892, he was placed on Half Pay as a Captain in 1894. Called to the Bar Inner Temple in 1893, he does not appear to have practiced as a Barrister. Commissioned into the 3rd Volunteer Battalion South Wales Borderers in 1894, he volunteered for service in South Africa serving as ADC to Major General Lord C C W Chesham, Inspector General Imperial Yeomanry, awarded the DSO for these services and Mentioned in Despatches. Resigning his commission in 1904, he was employed as Secretary of the Cavalry Club, Mayfair, London. Volunteering for service in the First World War he served in France from May 1916 and was both ADC to the GOC and Assistant Provost Marshall, 11th Division. Awarded the OBE for these services in June 1919. Demobilized in 1919 he returned to his position of Cavalry Club Secretary and died there in April 1931 after a long illness.

Distinguished Service Order Victoria in silver gilt

Unnamed as awarded

Order of the British Empire 1st type Military

Unnamed as awarded reverse Hallmark for London 1919

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

Capt H R Darley Imp Yeo

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Capt H R Darley DSO S Wales Bord

British War and Victory Medals

Major H R Darley

The group mounted as originally worn contained in a black velvet lined leather case, the lid inscribed “Major H R Darley, DSO, OBE late 4th R I Dragoon Guards, Cavalry Club”.

With research extracted from on line sources listed here, copy photos of recipient (2).

Henry Read Darley born 13th June 1865 in Dublin, son of the late Joseph F Darley, Barister of 5 Northbrook Road, Leeson Park, Dublin.

Educated at Clifton College and Trinity College, Cambridge admitted 4th November 1885, spoke French and German, commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 4th Dragoon Guards from Gentleman Cadet, RMC Sandhurst 14th March 1888 (London Gazette 13th March 1888 page 1563), Lieutenant 30th July 1889, Captain 13th April 1892, Adjutant 4th Dragoon Guards 15th April 1891 to 13th December 1892, to Half Pay 14th February 1894. He married in 1890 Emily, daughter of the Honourable John Pentergast Vereker, four sons, they divorced in 1914. Called to the Bar Inner Temple 17th November 1893. Captain 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion South Wales Borderers 14th February 1894 and volunteered for service in South Africa.

Served in the South Africa War as ADC to GOG Imperial Yeomanry Brigade, DAAG from 15th December 1900 and ADC to Inspector General Imperial Yeomanry Major General Lord C C W Chesham, KCB. Operations in Orange Free State April to May 1900, operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, operations in the Transvaal west of Pretoria July to 29th Nov ember 1900 including the actions at Venterskroom 7th and 9th August, operations in the Orange River Colony May to 29th November 1900, including action at Lindley 1st June and Rhenoster River. Operations in Cape Colony north of Orange River 1900. Operations in Transvaal 30th November 1900 to January 1902.

Distinguished Service Order London Gazette 27th September 1901 page 6305 “In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”, the Insignia presented by HM The King 29th October 1901. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 19th September 1901.

Resigning his commission in the South Wales Borderers 6th June 1904 (London Gazette 17th June 1904 page 3862). The 1911 census records he is employed as Secretary of the Cavalry Club, London. Volunteering his services on the outbreak of War, Major Reserve of Officers late 4th Dragoon Guards 29th August 1914 (London Gazette 28th August 1914 page 6798), appointed ADC 7th June 1915 (London Gazette 2nd July 1915 page 6439) Assistant Military Secretary to GOC Eastern Command, he served in France from 27th May 1916. Appointed Staff Captain with the rank of Major 21st November 1916 (London Gazette 30th January 1917 page 1056) and Assistant Provost Marshall 11th Division. Awarded the OBE London Gazette 3rd June 1919 page 6986 “For valuable services rendered in connection with the War”.

Demobilized in 1919, he returned to his employment as Secretary of the Cavalry Club in Mayfair, London and died there on 25th April 1931 aged 65 years after a long illness.

First time on the market.

GVF £4,250 Available


 

Companion of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels, Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse clasp The Nile 1884-85, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Lieutenant Colonel The Honourable Richard Thompson Lawley, 7th Hussars. Born in August 1856, the second son of the Second Baron Wenlock of Escrick Park, Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire and Colonel Yorkshire Hussars. Educated at Eton 1870 – 74 and the Royal Military College, commissioned in February 1875, he joined the 7th Hussars the following year. Serving in the Nile Expedition 1884-5 as part of the Light Camel Regiment. Promoted Captain in 1885, Major in 1893 and Lieutenant Colonel commanding 7th Hussars in 1899. Serving in South Africa 1901 to 1902, he first commanded the 7th Hussars and from January 1902 commanded a mobile column. Mentioned in Despatches in June 1902 and appointed a Companion of the Bath in June 1902 in recognition of his services in South Africa. Brevet Colonel in June 1903 and placed on Half Pay in November 1904, he succeeded his brother as 4th Baron Wenlock in 1912 and died in July 1918.

Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels

Unnamed as awarded

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882 – 1889 undated reverse clasp The Nile 1884-85

Lieut Hon R T Lawley 7/ Husrs

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Lt Col Hon R T Lawley CB 7/Hrs

Khedives Star 1884-6

Unnamed as issued

With a folder of research, copied photos.

Richard Thompson Lawley was born 21st August 1856 the son of Beilby Richard Lawley 2nd Baron Wenlock of Escrick Park, the Lord Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire and Colonel, Yorkshire Hussars and his wife Lady Elizabeth Grosvenor, daughter of Richard, 2nd Marquess of Westminster. Brother of Sir Beilby Lawley, 3rd Baron Wenlock, Governor of Madras (1891 to 1896), Lt Colonel Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry and Lord of the Bedchamber of HRH The Prince of Wales (1901), whom he succeeded in 1912 as 4th Baron Wenlock.

Captian Hon R T Lawley (left) Captain D Haig (seated) later Field Marshal Earl Haig C in C BEF, India 1888

Educated at Eton (1870 – 74) he married in 1909 Rhonda Edith 2nd daughter of the Reverend Canon Knox-Little of Worcester. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant unattached list from the Royal Military College he was appointed to the 7th Hussars as Lieutenant 11th February 1876. Promoted Captain 21st July 1885, Major 5th May 1893, Lieutenant Colonel 26th June 1899 and Brevet Colonel 26th June 1903. Served throughout the Nile Expedition 1884-5 with the Light Camel Regiment including operations with the desert column including the engagement at Abu Klea Wells 16th to 17th February 1885. Three officers and forty four other ranks of the 7th Hussars served with the Light Camel Regiment.

Appointed to command the 7th Hussars 20th December 1901 to 22nd January 1902, he was then appointed to command a mobile column comprising The Queen’s Bays, 7th Hussars, two guns and a pom pom from 39th Battery Royal Field Artillery. Present during operations in the Transvaal from March to 31st May 1902, Orange River Colony from January to March and May 1902, Cape Colony from January to March and May 1902, Cape Colony from December 1901 to January 1902. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 26th June 1902, appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath London Gazette 26th June 1902 page 4192 “In recognition of services during operations in South Africa” . Retiring 2nd November 1904, he inherited the title as 4th Baron Wenlock from his brother in 1912, he died at Hestercombe near Taunton whilst on a visit 25th July 1918 aged 61 years without issue, his brother inherited the title. Lord Wenlock is buried at St Peter’s Church, Monk Hopton, Shropshire, his home at the time of his death was Monk Hopton House.

Light pitting to Egypt and Sudan Medal otherwise.

GVF £2,950 Reserved


 

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Temporary Corporal Walter George Burt, Dorset Regiment a former Gamekeeper born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889. Attesting for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907, he joined the 2nd Battalion for service in India in 1909 and landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, he was also Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon for distinguished service during the period April to September 1915. Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916. Recovering from his wounds he was deemed unfit to return to his Regiment now under siege at Kut al Amara and transferred to the Royal Engineers, discharged in October 1919 in April 1920 he was awarded a 20% disability pension.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

8328 Pte W G Burt 2/Dorset Regt

1914/15 Star

8328 Pte W G Burt Dorset R

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

8328 T Cpl W G Burt Dorset R

With copy Medal Index Card, service record, London Gazette entries for DCM and MID, copy photo and other research listed here.

Walter George Burt was born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889, an 18 year 6 month old Gamekeeper he attested for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907 joining the Depot the same day. Posted to the 1st Battalion 4th October 1907 and to the 2nd Battalion 1st February 1909 for service in India, he landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 5th August 1915 page 7678-

“For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, when he carried an urgent message along the firing line within 400 yards of the enemy’s position under very heavy fire and returned to report having delivered it”

Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon, KCB, ADC General Commanding Indian Expeditionary Force for distinguished services during the period from the middle of April 1915 to the end of September 1915 London Gazette 5th April 1916 page 3669.

Picture from: Western Gazette Almanac 1917 page 209

Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916 and discharged 11th February 1916. Re-admitted with Malaria 2nd April 1916 and discharged 20th April 1916. Unfit for Infantry service he was transferred to the Royal Engineers (No 303511) and promoted to Corporal. Discharged 21st October 1919 he was awarded a 20% disability pension 30th April 1920, the Surgeon commenting “He has an inability to completely extend his left knee joint otherwise general health good”.

Although the Battalion’s landings in the Shatt-al-Arab on 6th November 1914 met little opposition, the Turks, backed by Arab levies, were quick to respond.  The Dorsets faced stiff fighting expelling the Turks from Saihan on 15th November and Saihil two days later.  In eleven days these actions and the diseases prevalent in the marshy conditions of the region cost the Battalion 25% of its fighting strength.  They reached Basra on the 23rd. After minor engagements, mostly against Arab insurgents, the 2nd Dorsets advanced to Shaiba (ancient Sheba).  In February 1915 they were forced to wade knee-deep through the annual flooding of the two rivers.  At Shaiba they endured very difficult conditions, including sand storms.  Mounting frequent offensive patrols, they fought major actions on 3rd March and 14th April in which the depleted Battalion showed great resilience, earning Shaiba (Barjisiyah) as a new Battle Honour.

From : History of the Dorsetshire Regiment 1914 – 1919 published by the Regimental History Committee, 1932.

As far as could be ascertained the Turks had fallen back to a position just east of Marjisiya Wood. General Melliss commenced his advance on Turkish positions at 0930 on 14th April 1915, the Dorsets on the left and the 24th Punjabis on the right leading 16th Brigade. South Mound Ridge was lightly defended and quickly taken, the two Battalions halted 500 yards beyond the Ridge while the enemy positions were reconnoitered.

Just before noon the Dorsets advanced on the left of the Brigade, the 117th Mahrattas now in support. The advance met strong opposition from machine gun and rifle fire as soon as it started, this partly enfiladed the Dorsets which swung half right to face it. Pushing onto about 900 yards in front of the Turkish trenches the advance was held up by a hail of bullets. Ammunition began to run short, but thanks to the gallantry of the Indian Mule Drivers bringing supplies right up to the front stocks were replenished in the nick of time. Casualties were mounting up fast, there were several acts of gallantry including Private Burt who again showed great coolness and determination in carrying a message under heavy fire.

At about 1430 Colonel Rosher the 2nd Battalion Commanding Officer was hit and killed and the Adjutant who went to his assistance was badly wounded. Orders for a retirement were actually issued when the day was saved by 16th Brigade getting up and charging. Lt Colonel Clarkson now in command of the 2nd Battalion jumped up at this point and shouted the order for the Dorsets to advance, he was soon hit but the Dorsets advanced the now 200 yards to the Turkish trenches, by 1615 the Turkish front line had been captured and those Turks who had not been bayoneted or surrendered fell back 150 yards to a new position. The Dorsets continued to advance capturing the second defensive line, Turkish resistance collapsed and they were now in full retreat.

The Dorsets had played a prominent part in the days fighting, losing a quarter of its strength, casualties amongst officers were high with one Commanding Officer killed and the second wounded, three companies were now commanded by 2/Lieutenants.

Scarce DCM to the Regiment, the Dorset Regiment received 101 DCM’s for the entire First World War.

NEF £2,250 Available


 

The sons of John and Kate Ambrose of Cheadle, Cheshire.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lance Corporal Arthur Ambrose, 1/6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, born in Gorton, Manchester in 1896. Enlisting in Manchester, he served in France after January 1916, awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry north of Locon, France 9th to 11th April 1918 in which he took command of his section (12 men) and a party of stragglers after his section leader had become a casualty. By fine powers of leadership, he inflicted severe losses on the enemy. Killed in action between 20th and 26th July 1918 aged 22 years during the attack on Bois de L’Aulnay and surrounding German positions. In December 1918 his father placed a notice in The Manchester Evening News seeking information on his son who was reported missing whilst serving with “C” Company 9th Platoon between 20th and 26th July 1918. Commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, Aisne, France.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

267507 Pte A Ambrose 1/6/Sea Hdrs

British War and Victory Medals

267507 Pte A Ambrose Seaforth

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Alfred Ambrose

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Gunner John Ambrose, Royal Field Artillery born in Gorton, Manchester in 1894 in 1911 he was employed in the family Grocery and Corn Merchant business. Enlisting at Stockport he served in France from 23rd December 1915. Mortally wounded 21st August 1918 during the offensive to capture Albert serving with 122 Brigade, he died in a Casualty Clearing Station the same day following amputation of a leg. Aged 24 years he now rests in the Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

1914/15 Star

W-1903 Gnr J Ambrose RFA

British War and Victory Medals

W-1903 Gnr J Ambrose RA

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Ambrose

With copy Medal Index Cards, London Gazette entry & headers for DCM, copies from 1/6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders War Diary and other research listed here.

Alfred Ambrose was born in Gorton, Manchester in 1896, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old school boy residing with his father John a Grocer and Corn Merchant, mother Kate also employed in the family business and siblings at 122 Wimslow Road,Cheadle, Cheshire. Enlisting in Manchester, he served in France after January 1916and was awarded the DCM London Gazette 3rd September 1918 –

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty (North of Locon 9th April 1918) during an enemy attack. His section leader becoming a casualty, he assumed command of the section and a party of stragglers and by fine powers of leadership, he controlled his party splendidly and inflicted severe losses on the enemy”.

The Battalion War Diary records –

“At 0700 the Battalion received orders to positions at the canal bank between Busnes and Robecq arriving at 1000. Reconnoitring patrols were sent out, before these patrols returned the Battalion was ordered to occupy the La Couture defences. Moving out at 1250, the Battalion encountered the enemy at the Canal De La Lawe. “A” Company were able to cross the canal at the footbridge less one platoon, the machine gun and rifle fire fairly heavy, but the Germans had been surprised by our men and the advance continued. The Battalion was ordered to hold the line of the canal and “A” Company withdrew to the western side of the canal.

At about this time a company of 6th Battalion Gordon Highlanders moved up on our left and dug in in front of Vielle Chapelle coming under our command….The enemy did not make any further effort to advance further during the day and at night our line was strengthened by 2 platoons of “D” Company. The footbridge was ordered to be destroyed by a section of Royal Engineers but they ran away after blowing up two boards. This conduct is worthy of the greatest censure as it was over this footbridge that the enemy eventually managed to obtain a footing in our line. CO Lt Colonel Macdonald, DSO wounded and evacuated.

In the morning of 10th April the enemy managed to cross the footbridge under cover of heavy machine gun and rifle fire and entered a farm. A supporting platoon counter attacked but was unsuccessful, receiving heavy casualties. At 1600 Three Platoons of 6th Gordons attacked and captured the farm but suffered heavy casualties, only 16 men remained at the end of the engagement.

The enemy continued to show activity on our front and there were several patrol encounters, with casualties inflicted on the enemy. The two companies on the left remained intact although subject to machine gun and rifle fire. At 0200 a report was received that the enemy had broken through at Lestrum Post and was moving south towards Zelobes. About this time heavy machine gun fire was heard and stragglers coming in reported the enemy had broken through between Vielle Chapelle and Zelobes and obtained a footing there. Machine gun fire on the left became more intense and at dawn on 11th April the enemy were seen coming from the left flank from between Zelobes and Vielle Chapelle. At the same time heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy at the footbridge by rifle and machine gun fire, but the position at the farm and all ground in front of Les Lobes became untenable owing to machine gun fire from the left rear and at 0730 the Battalion withdrew. Two platoons of 6th Seaforths are missing, they must have been surrounded by the enemy but did a large amount of damage to them, Lieutenants Oliver and Stacey, who are missing rendered magnificent service in keeping the men together and inflicting losses on the enemy”.

Killed in action 20th July 1918, the Soldier’s Effects Register records Lance Corporal Alfred Ambrose was killed in action between 20th and 26th July 1918 aged 22 years, death being presumed after that date. This is further supported by a newspaper appeal by his father –

From : The Manchester Evening News 10th December 1918 page 4

AMBROSE – Missing after the battle of Champagne July 20th to 26th, “C” Company, 9 Platoon, L/Cpl any information J Ambrose, 122 Wimslow Road, Cheadle, Cheshire”.

The Battalion War Diary has a good account of the operations between 20th to 31st July 1918. Commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, France.

The Battalion War Diary records –

“On 20th July the 1/6th Seaforths were north east of Paradis, Paradis being held by the Germans. “C” company on the left. On 21st July they were subject to intense enemy shell fire suffering 60 killed and wounded. At 1400 the Battalion moved forward in support of 5th Seaforths and 6th Gordons. On 22nd July enemy shell fire remained heavy and at 1600 gas shells were fired. On 23rd July the Brigade attacked, “C” company 1/6th Seaforths suffered very severely from our own barrage and hostile machine gun fire from the left flank before reaching the Bois de L’Aulnay, all officers becoming casualties. Elements of “C” company succeeded in reaching the objective but the main line taken up was in the sunken road 300 yards south of the Bois de L’Aulnay.

On 24th, 25th and 26th the 1/6th Seaforths continued to hold the line after being re-organised into one composite company. Total casualties for the operations are recorded as 5 officers killed and 14 wounded, 46 other ranks killed, 312 wounded and 32 missing.”

John Ambrose was born in Gorton, Manchester in 1894 the 1911 census records he is employed at the family business and residing at 122 Wilslow Road, Cheadle, Cheshire. Enlisting at Stockport in March 1915, he served in France from 23rd December 1915. Mortally wounded whilst serving with 122nd Brigade Royal Field Artillery 21st August 1918 during the allied offensive and capture of Albert. Evacuated to a casualty Clearing Station he died the same day following amputation of a leg. Aged 24 years he now rests in the Bagneux Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

A fine DCM to a Private soldier who took command of those around him at a critical moment inflicting severe losses on the enemy.

NEF £1,950 Reserved 


 

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil), 1939/45 Star, France & Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal GVI “Territorial” 1st type to Company Quarter Master Sergeant Wilfred Herbert Dixon, Parachute Regiment late Suffolk Regiment, born in St Paul’s Cambridge in 1903. Enlisting for the Cambridgeshire Regiment almost certainly after they had left for Singapore he transferred to the Suffolk Regiment and the Parachute Regiment in 1941. Recommended for the BEM by Brigadier Stanley J L Hill, DSO, MC commanding 3rd Parachute Brigade in February 1944. Forming part of 6th Airborne Division, Dixon served with HQ 3 Parachute Brigade throughout the NW Europe campaign including “D” Day Operation Toga, the German Ardennes offensive and Operation Varsity the crossing of the Rhine. He died in Cambridge in 1976.

British Empire Medal GVI Military

5931183 CQMS Wilfred H Dixon

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal “Territorial” GVI 1st type

5931183 C SJT W H Dixon Para R

With copy London Gazette entry and headers for BEM, copy BEM recommendation and other research listed here.

The group mounted as originally worn rather crudely, the miniatures contained in a card box addressed “Mr W H Dixon, 43 Mowbray Road, Cambridge” dated on box May 1953. With corresponding miniatures mounted as worn, the BEM, Defence and War Medals TEM all silver.

Wilfred Herbert Dixon was born in St Paul’s, Cambridge 8th January 1903, the son of Henry Dixon a shoemaker and his wife Mary Jane. In 1911 Wilfred was an 8 year old Scholar residing at 6 Granta Place, Cambridge with his parents, 4 brothers and 1 sister, he married in Cambridge in 1929. His service number indicates enlistment into the Cambridgeshire Regiment, this must have taken place after the Regiment was sent to Singapore as both Battalions were captured there. Transferring to the Suffolk Regiment and later the Parachute Regiment he was recommended for the BEM by Brigadier S J L Hill, DSO, MC dated 20th February 1944.

Awarded the BEM London Gazette 8th June 1944 page 2596

5931183 Company Quartermaster Sergeant Wilfred Herbert Dixon (Suffolk Regt) HQ 3 Parachute Brigade

“This NCO has proved himself to be outstandingly reliable and has been completely responsible for the administrative organisation of Brigade Headquarters personnel for two years as an Infantry Brigade Headquarters, during the conversion period to a Parachute Brigade and for the fourteen months during which the Brigade has been a Parachute Brigade. This has required long hours of work and the exercise of considerable initiative far above the level of an average CQMS”.

3 Parachute Brigade was formed on 7th November 1942.

Under the Command of Brigadier Stanley James Ledger Hill, DSO, MC, 3 Parachute Brigade HQ dropped at 0056 on 6th June 1944, sticks were scattered widely and Brigadier Hill was wounded. By 0900 the Brigade HQ had opened in the area of Le Mesnil, protected by 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion now in the same area.

6th Airborne Division

The Division’s first mission was Operation Toga  on 6 June 1944, “D” Day, part of the Normandy landings, where it was responsible for securing the left flank of the Allied invasion during Operation Overlord, 3 Brigade jumped over Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June in the area of the flooded Dives. Of all the units of the 6th Airborne Division, the 3rd Parachute Brigade were the most seriously tested during the first week of the landings. Their losses incurred on the drop zones on the first night had been severe, and were further worsened by the casualties suffered by the 9th Parachute Battalion when assaulting the Merville Battery. Thereafter the Brigade’s position, along the ridge to the east of Ranville, became the main focus of enemy attacks. Although weak and spread thinly along a wide front, they stubbornly clung to its positions and bloodily repulsed every attack that was made on its lines. Their magnificent performance during these days is frequently overlooked, yet it surely ranks as one of the more remarkable achievements in the history of the Parachute Regiment.

The Division remained in Normandy for three months before being withdrawn in September. Upon their withdrawal to England, the primary concern of the 6th Airborne Division was the replacement of the heavy losses that it had sustained in the previous three months. The proportion of dead, wounded and missing in the 3rd Parachute Brigade may be put at about 75%. Over the coming months its strength was restored and the men were trained back to a full state of physical fitness, something which had unavoidably slipped as a result of several months of static defence in Normandy. While still recruiting and reforming in England, it was mobilised again and sent to Belgium in December 1944, to help counter the surprise German offensive in the Ardennes, the battle of The Bulge. Their final airborne mission followed in March 1945, Operation Varsity, the second Allied airborne assault over the River Rhine.

Wilfred Herbert Dixon died in Cambridge 4th May 1976.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £2,250 SOLD


 

Military Medal GV, 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal John William Ledger, 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster regiment a former Foundry Labourer born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890. Enlisting at Sheffield 1st February 1910 he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 8th September 1914 taking part in the battle of the Aisne and in action at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. One of the first recipients of the new Military Medal decoration which appeared in the London Gazette dated 3rd June 1916, his award was for gallantry in the Ypres Salient in April 1916, in a series of attacks against German positions, notably on 19th to 22nd April 1916. Arriving on the Somme in August 1916, the Battalion was to see much action. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) an accident in October 1916 he was evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916. Discharged unfit in October 1917, he died in 1955.

Military Medal GV

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/Y & L R

1914 Star

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/York & Lanc R

British War and Victory Medals

9679 Pte J W Ledger Y & L R

With details extracted from his on line service record, copy Medal Index Card and London Gazette entries for MM.

John William Ledger was born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890, an Iron Foundry Labourer he attested for the York & Lancaster Regiment at Sheffield 1st February 1910 and joined the Depot. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 25th April 1910, 3rd Battalion 9th June 1914 and back to the 2nd Battalion 8th August 1914. Serving in France from 8th September 1914, the Battalion took part in the battle of the Aisne in September 1914 and the actions at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 3rd June 1916 page 5593 for gallantry during April 1916 in the Ypres Salient the Battalion War Diary records –

From: Brigadier C L Nicholson Commanding 16th Infantry Brigade dated 29th April 1916 –

“The work of 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment since they were sent up in support of 8th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment on the night of 19th/20th (April) has been admirable. The only successful attack on the night of 19th/20th (April) was executed by one company of this Battalion which recaptured D.21. During the 20th and 21st and the night of 21st/22nd they worked hard on the second line and suffered considerable losses. Whilst it is almost certainly due to their hard work and gallant patrolling that S.19 and the Mortaldje Estaminent have been occupied”.

John’s Granddaughter does recall him telling her he was awarded the MM for rescuing a wounded officer, there may be some truth to this as his service record records he was an officer’s servant (purchased from the family).

Arriving on the Somme 3rd August 1916, appointed Lance Corporal 18th August 1916,  they took part in the attack on Leuze Wood and the Quadrilateral 15th September. Soon checked by heavy machine gun fire, all three attacking Battalions were pinned down in their start position. A renewed attempt in the early evening also failed. Taking part in the attack on Morval 25th September all objectives were taken within 15 minutes of Zero hour, casualties for the month of September recorded as 360 killed and wounded and 129 admitted to hospital sick. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) this is noted as an accidental wound but attributable to his active service for which he received a disability pension, could have been a training accident or hit by one of our grenades during the attack on Morval.

Evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916 and admitted to Haxby Road Military Hospital, York. Posted to Command at Ripon 29th July 1917 and to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion 25th August 1917. Discharged no longer fit for military service 11th October 1917, home address recorded as 163 Greystock Street, Sheffield, he died in 1955.

Polishing contact wear particularly to MM, Star gilded.

VF £625 Available


 

Military Medal GV to Private William Riley, 2/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment born in 1887 and a Coal Miner Wath Main Colliery. Enlisting at Rotherham 18th May 1915, he served in France from 13th March 1916 with the 1/5th Battalion. The 1/5th were in reserve on 1st July 1916 Somme offensive and moved forward to Thiepval Wood. On 3rd July they took part in the attack on St Pierre Divion suffering 350 casualties.  Wounded in action 7th July 1916, bullet wound to neck whilst at North Bluff Authuille. Treated in hospital in France, he was discharged to the Depot at Etaples 13th July 1916. An habitual offender he was tried several times for various offences. Promoted to Corporal in April 1917, he was posted as an Instructor to No 1 Training Camp, Etaples, where he was wounded in the face by grenade splinters during a practice throw. Evacuated to the UK, he was treated in hospital in Staffordshire, posted to the 2/4th Battalion he returned to France in October 1918 and was awarded the MM for his gallantry in the attack and capture of Frasnoy 4th November 1918. Discharged 6th February 1919.

Military Medal GV

241394 Pte W Riley 4/York & Lanc R

With details extracted from his on line service record.

William Riley was born in 1887, a Coal Miner at the Wath Main Colliery he was a 27 year 3 month old married man with four children residing at 72 Concrete Cottages, Wombwell, Barnsley when he attested for the 3/5th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment at Rotherham 18th May 1915. Posted to the 1/5th Battalion, he served in France from 13th March 1916. The 1/5th were in reserve on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive and moved up to Thiepval Wood during the day. Taking part in the attack on St Peirre Divion 3rd July, they suffered 350 casualties. Riley was wounded on 7th July when his Battalion were in the front line at North Bluff Authuille, bullet wound to neck. Admitted to 1/3 West Riding Field Ambulance and 44 Casualty Clearing Station the same day, he was transferred to No 1 Canadian Hospital 8th July 1916 and discharged to 34 Infantry Base Depot, Etaples 13th July 1916. Re-joining the 1/5th Battalion he was appointed Lance Corporal 24th September 1916 and promoted Corporal 1st April 1917. Posted to No 1 Training Camp, Etaples as an Instructor 3rd September 1917, he was wounded in the face and arm in a bomb throwing practice accident 9th September 1917.

Admitted 44 Casualty Clearing Station following his wounding he was admitted to 55 General Hospital 14th October 1917 and evacuated to England 18th October 1917 for hospital treatment. Returning to France 4th October 1918 he was posted to the 2/4th Battalion 9th October 1918, this Battalion taking part in the battle of the Sambre in Picardy. An attempt to break the Hindenburg line, the 2/4th Battalion would attack and capture the village of Frasnoy on 4th November in spite of stiff opposition mainly from Machine Gun positions. A large number of the enemy were killed and captured along with much material. Consolidating their newly captured positions, the 2/4th were ordered to attack and capture the village of Sous Le Bois on 9th November. The village was captured virtually unopposed, the Germans in retreat or surrendered without fighting. Riley awarded the MM for his gallantry during the capture of Frasnoy, recorded in the Battalion War Diary on 29th November 1918, MM London Gazette 23rd July 1919 page 9383.

An habitual offender he had been tried and punished for various offences throughout his service, reduced to Private from Corporal by order of Field General Court Martial for drunkenness on one occasion. Returning to England 8th January 1919 he was demobilized 6th February 1919.

GVF £325 Available 


aaa456

Distinguished Service Medal GVI, British Empire Medal GVI (Military), Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Charles Stanley Carter, Royal Navy born in July 1905 in Penzance, Cornwall. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1921, he rose steadily through the ranks being advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer in January 1937. Joining HMS Broke in July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire, France in June 1940. Awarded the BEM for his skill when Broke rescued 180 survivors from the Armed Merchant Cruiser Comorin  which caught fire on 6th April 1941 and eventually sank in mid Atlantic during severe weather conditions. Awarded the DSM for Operation Torch she landed US troops in Algiers, Broke came under a heavy fire from Vichy French shore batteries but landed troops despite being badly damaged. Disabled by further fire as she withdrew she sank two days later. Promoted to Warrant Engineer in September 1944, he retired in 1949 as a Commissioned Engineer and died in Plymouth in 1970.

Distinguished Service Medal GVI

M.36157 C S Carter CERA

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

Chief ERA Charles Stanley Carter D/M.36157

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M.36157 C S Carter ERA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.36157 C S Carter CERA 2 HMS Fearless

With copy service records, London Gazette entries and headers for BEM and DSM, copy recommendations for both awards. The group mounted for wear, not particularly well, in the wrong order.

Charles Stanley Carter was born in Penzance, Cornwall 2nd July 1905. A Scholar he entered the Royal Navy 29th January 1921 as an Artificer Apprentice, completing his Apprenticeship at Fisgard 1st July 1925 and rated ERA5, advanced to ERA3 at Vivid 1st July 1929, ERA2 aboard HMS Adventure 1st July 1933, acting CERA2 aboard HMS Fame 20th January 1937, he was confirmed in that rate aboard HMS Fearless 20th January 1938 and awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 7th June 1938. Joining HMS Broke 31st July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire in June 1940. Awarded both the BEM and DSM whist serving aboard this ship.

BEM London Gazette 8th July 1944 page 3915 ‘For courage and seamanship in rescuing survivors from a burning vessel’

‘One of HM Ships the SS Comorin caught fire at sea (on 6th April 1941). The fire spread quickly and it was decided to abandon ship. Heavy weather made the removal of the crew difficult. By fine seamanship a Destroyer was brought along side, and the greater part of the crew taken off. In this operation acting Leading Seaman Cook (awarded BEM) was conspicuous. He took the lead in helping survivors who were hurt as they jumped aboard. He worked untiringly, with no regard for his own safety. Chief Engine Room Artificer Carter did fine work during three and a half hours of delicate handling. 685 orders were transmitted to the Engine Room during this time. The names of these two men are put forward as representative of the skill, devotion and courage displayed throughout the action by the lower deck and Engine Room’.

HMS Broke recued 180 survivors, HMS Lincoln and HMS Glenarty also took survivors, 405 of the 426 on board were rescued. SS Comorin sank in mid Atlantic.

DSM London Gazette  6th April 1943 page 1583 ‘For outstanding gallantry and zeal in the Engine Room of HMS Broke throughout the hazardous operations when the Allied Forces were landed in North Africa in November 1942, Operation Terminal’.

Originally recommended for a Mention in Despatches but this upgraded to the DSM, the recommendation states –

‘This man’s bearing and leadership in action were of the highest order and had a most excellent steadying effect. He was also untiring in his efforts in after action damage control. The high state of effectiveness of the Engine Room Department was largely due to his zeal and energy’.

On 8 November 1942 Broke, together with the Destroyer Malcolm took part in Operation Terminal  part of Operation Torch , the Allied invasion of French North Africa. In “Terminal”, the two Destroyers were to attempt to land infantry directly onto the portside in Algiers in the hope of capturing the port facilities and preventing their destruction by the Vichy French. It was hoped that either complete surprise would be achieved or that the defenders would support the invasion to the extent at least of refusing to fire on the attackers. However, the Vichy forces opened fire on the ships, damaging them heavily. Malcolm was forced to withdraw, but Broke had better luck. On her third attempt, she sliced through the boom and succeeded in landing her troops under fire on the Quai de Fécamp, four hours after the operation started. Broke continued to receive heavy fire and was forced to withdraw at 1030, the unseasoned US troops she landed were quickly taken prisoner. roke was again hit by shore batteries when withdrawing which compounded on earlier damage. She was taken in tow by the Destroyer Zetland, but sank two days later on 10th November at position 36.50N 00.40E.

Promoted to Warrant Engineer 18th September 1944, and to Commissioned Engineer with the same seniority he retired in 1949 and died in Plymouth in 1970.

NEF £3,250 Available