Gallantry


British Empire Medal For Gallantry E2 Civil Division, 1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals to Mr Edward Alfred Quigley, Driver and Attendant, London Ambulance Service born in Camberwell, London in 1921. Awarded the BEM For Gallantry in 1969 when, responding to an emergency call, he lowered himself into a sewer filled with poisonous fumes to rescue two men. Giving one man oxygen he tied a rope around him and he was hauled to safety. The second unconscious man was also hauled to safety but was dead on arrival at hospital. Mr Quigley also started to loose consciousness and had to be pulled out by a rope he attached around himself. He retired to Bournemouth and died there in 1995. He is believed to have served in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the Second World War.

British Empire Medal For Gallantry E2 (Civil Division)

Edward Alfred Quigley

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medal

Unnamed as issued

With copy London Gazette entry and headers, corresponding miniatures, letter from The Central Chancery dated 25th October 1993, addressed to “Mr Edward E Quigley, 121 Church Road, Ferndown, Dorset, BH22 9ET”, thanking him for his donation to the Order of the British Empire 75th Anniversary Appeal Fund.

Edward Alfred Quigley was born in Camberwell, London 13th July 1921, he died in Bournemouth, Dorset in 1995.

BEM For Gallantry (Civil Division) London Gazette 8th August 1969 page 8213

Edward Alfred Quigley, Ambulance Driver / Attendant, London Ambulance Service

Joint citation with Thomas Edward Peter Smith, Descaling Engineer, London SE5

“Mr Smith and two other men were engaged in clearing out the interceptor in a drain. It was decided to clear the blockage by using a chemical and about 4 gallons of the acid were poured into the drain. The three men then went to the manhole over the council sewer and one man went down to clear the blockage in the interceptor from behind. He started to push rods back up the sewer, came up to the surface for more rods and then collapsed down into the manhole apparently the result of fumes. Smith’s colleague immediately jumped into the manhole and managed to lift the man up so that Smith was able to get hold of his hands and lift him out of the manhole and lay him on the road.

The man in the manhole now collapsed. Smith, after calling for help took off his jacket and jumped into the manhole. A rope was passed down to Smith and he was told to tie it around the other man. Smith by now was seriously affected by the fumes and although he tied the rope it kept slipping. Smith was too affected to retie the rope but refused to leave his colleague and he eventually became unconscious himself. By this time Mr Quigley arrived following an emergency call to his (ambulance) depot. On being told two men were in the sewer, he looked down the manhole where he saw one man apparently unconscious and the other fighting for breath. Realising there was no time to wait for assistance, he took an oxygen mask and went into the manhole, where he could small what appeared to be acid fumes.

As Smith was the least affected of the two men, he placed the oxygen mask on him and then pulled the head of the other man clear of the sewer. He tied the rope which had been passed down to him around Smith, who was then pulled out of the manhole. The rope was again passed down and Quigley tied it around the other man who was again pulled out. He was found to be dead on arrival at hospital. By this time Quigley was almost unconscious and he too had to be pulled out”.

A rare gallantry award for saving life to the London Ambulance Service.

GVF £1,150 Available


Military Cross GV unnamed as awarded on investiture pin contained in fitted presentation case. 

Military Cross GV

Unnamed as awarded

With fitted presentation case, First World War type hinges and catch all fine.

The Military Cross with original ribbon and investiture pin, nice example.

EF £650 Available


Military Medal GVI, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals to Lance Sergeant James Graham, 5th Battalion The Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders (51st Highland Division) from Renton, Dunbarton, Scotland. Wounded in action North Africa 28th October 1942, during the second battle of El Alamein. Awarded the MM for his gallantry in Sicily commanding a Platoon in a night attack across the Dittaino River in which he silenced two enemy strong points and captured seven prisoners. Originally recommended for an immediate Distinguished Conduct Medal, this was downgraded by the Commander of 30 Corps. Wounded 1st August 1943 during the night attack accross the Dittiano River, he went on to land in Normandy with his Battalion on 7th June 1944. In order to strengthen and enlarge the Bridgehead established by 6th Airborne Division on the east bank of the river Orne, it was decided to capture the village of St Honorine La Chardonrette. The attack was carried out by 5th Battalion Cameron Highlanders, behind a barrage just before dawn on 13th June 1944, Lance Sergeant Graham being wounded for a third time in this attack.

Military Medal GVI

2934111 L SJT J Graham Camerons

1939/45 Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

The MM on investiture pin.

With copy MM recommendation, London Gazette entry and headers for MM, War Office Casualty List entries for all three wounds.

Wounded in action North Africa 28th October 1942 during the second battle of El Alamein, wounded in action a second time in Sicily 1st August 1943 during the action for which he was awarded a MM and wounded in action a third time in Normandy, France 13th June 1944.

MM London Gazette 16th November 1943 page 5064 “For gallant and distinguished services in Sicily”.

The official recommendation TNA reference WO373/3 page 371 states –

The original recommendation for an immediate Distinguished Conduct Medal, downgraded to the MM by Commander 30 Corps.

“On 31st July 1943 Lance Sergeant Graham was commanding No 4 Section of “B” Company on the night attack across the Dittaino River. The Platoon was held up by small arms fire from a farm house and the Platoon Commander was killed. Lance Sergeant Graham directed the fire of his Bren Gun onto an enemy post and then, as the rest of his section had got scattered in the darkness and confusion, went forward with one man and, silencing the post, took five German prisoners. Of these the NCO could speak English and, handing the other four prisoners over to the other soldier, Lance Sergeant Graham induced the NCO to lead him by a covered approach to another post that was holding up the Platoon. He rushed this post single handed with his Tommy Gun taking a further two prisoners. After the opposition had been cleared up in the neighbourhood of the farm, Lance Sergeant Graham collected as many of the Platoon as he could find and led them to contact Company HQ. Whilst doing so he was wounded”.

In order to strengthen and enlarge the Bridgehead established by 6th Airborne Division on the east bank of the river Orne, it was decided to capture the village of St Honorine La Chardonrette. The attack was carried out by 5th Battalion Cameron Highlanders, behind a barrage just before dawn on 13th June 1944, who captured their objective.

The MM dark toned.

NEF £1,750 SOLD


Member of the British Empire (MBE) Civil Division 2nd type 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal with a quantity of original documentation to Chief Engineer Francis William James Benham, Merchant Navy born in Southampton in 1912. Joining the SS Windsor Castle 18th May 1941, he was awarded the MBE for his gallantry in trying to save the Troopship SS Windsor Castle when she was hit by an aerial torpedo off Algiers whilst sailing in convoy on 23rd March 1943. Despite the crews best efforts the ship sank, one Junior Officer lost his life, all other crew and passengers including 300 troops were rescued. Post War Mr Benham continued to serve in the Merchant Navy and retired in October 1970 as Chief Engineer, he died in Southampton in 1989.

Member of the British Empire (OBE) 1st Type Military reverse HM London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Mounted as originally worn.

With original award certificate (Warrant) for MBE to “Francis William James Benham, Esquire” dated 21st December 1943, original Buckingham Palace award letter “Francis W J Benham, ESQ, MBE, 10th April 1946”, origianl award letter for Africa Star and clasp North Africa, Atlantic Star, Italy Star dated 6th November 1944, original letter of congratulations from The Ministry of War Transport dated 20th December 1943 and signed in ink by Cyril Harcomb, Director General, original letter dated 18th December 1945 stating he will be unable to attend an investiture, original letter inviting him to an investiture at Edinburgh on 27th September 1945 dated 12th September 1945, original letter forwarding the Warrant for his MBE from The Central Chancery dated 10th April 1946.

Copy Merchant Navy records covering his service from 1941 to 1972, copy Merchant Navy 2WW Medal roll entry confirming all 2WW Stars and Medal and clasp to Africa Star.

Francis William James Benham was born in Southampton 18th May 1912 and joined SS Windsor Castle (Union castle Mail Steamship Company Limited) as Third Engineer 18th May 1941. Landed at Gibraltar following the sinking of SS Windsor Castle 23rd March 1943, he was back to sea on 29th September 1943. Serving almost continually at Sea post war, his last trip as Chief Engineer was aboard the SS Clan McClay which he left on 30th October 1970. He died in Southampton 30th November 1989.

SS Windsor Castle

Image result for SS Windsor Castle pics

Commissioned as a Troop Ship in the Second World war Windsor Castle was sunk on 23rd March 1943 by a torpedo launched from a German aircraft while in the Mediterranean sea, at the time she was part of  convoy KMF-11. Hit by the torpedo at 0200 she did not sink until 1725, stern first, 110 miles (180 km) WNW of Algiers, Algeria. One crewman, Junior Engineer Officer William Ogilvie Mann, died. 2,699 troops and 289 crew were removed by the Destroyers HMS Whaddon, Eggesford and Douglas.

MBE London Gazette 21st December 1943 page 5523 “For gallantry and initiative in hazardous circumstances”.

The official recommendation TNA Reference T335/78 states –

“The ship, sailing in convoy, was attacked by enemy aircraft (on 23rd March 1943). Severe damage was caused, including the flooding of the engine room. As the ship was helpless and sinking, the disembarkation of the passengers and non essential members of the crew was begun. This operation was carried out smoothly and efficiently and the survivors were put on board other vessels. The Master, with a number of officers and men remained on board to save the ship but before she could be taken in tow the flooding increased rapidly and the nucleus crew were taken on board another vessel standing by.

First Officer Dickinson (awarded MBE), Intermediate Third Engineering Officer Benham (awarded MBE) and Carpenter’s Mate McNeil (awarded BEM) showed courage and devotion to duty. When the ship was hit they went below to investigate the damage and remained there carrying out repairs and continually checking the condition of the damaged bulkheads and machinery. They carried out this dangerous work in the full knowledge that the bulkhead might give way and the ship suddenly sink without any chance of their escape”.

GVF £425 Available


Order of the British Empire (OBE), 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Lieutenant Richard Charles Clavell, Royal Navy born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire in 1891 and the son of a RMLI Major. Commencing his Naval training as Cadet in May 1904 aged 13 years. Appointed Midshipman in January 1909, he joined his first ship HMS Agamemnon. Appointed to HMS Fame in August 1914, to Torpedo Boat 38 (in command) in November 1914, running his ship aground in April 1915 he was court martialled and received a severe reprimand. Appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in September 1915 which was deployed to the Dardanelles. Appointed to HMS Queen in August 1916, HMS Southampton in February 1917 and Vernon in March 1918 for Mine Clearing duties awarded the OBE London Gazette 17 October 1919, ‘For valuable services in the Mine Clearance Force’, his OBE being awarded by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919. Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). He retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth on 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years. His son born in Australia in 1921 became a famous author and film script writer, a former Japanese POW, he moved to Hollywood in 1953.

Order of the British Empire (OBE) 1st Type Military reverse HM London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

Lieut R C Clavell RN

British War & Victory Medals

Lieut R C Clavell RN

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Clavell was born in 1891 in West Bromwich, the son of a Major, RMLI he began his Naval career at the age of 13 as Naval Cadet. Appointed Midshipman 15th January 1909, he served first in the Battleship HMS Agamemnon, then the Battlecruiser Invincible and the Destroyer Scorpion. Acting Sub Lieutenant 21st February 1912, Sub Lieutenant 15th April 1912, Lieutenant 15th April 1914. In 1913 he was appointed to the Destroyer HMS Kennet on the China station. In August 1914 she took part in operations off Tsingtau, the German colony in China. He then took command of Torpedo Boat 38 in Hong Kong on 20th November 1914. Court Martialled on 28th April 1915 for grounding his vessel, he pleaded guilty and received a severe reprimand. Returning to the UK in 1915, he  was appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in the eastern Mediterranean 9th September 1915. Appointed to HMS Queen 2nd August 1916, HMS Southampton 28th February 1917 and to Vernon 26th March 1918 to be trained as a Mine Warfare Specialist. Following the armistice he took part in the enormous operation to clear the minefields. Clavell’s team was allocated a particularly dangerous task – instead of simply blowing up the mines in situ, they had to recover the mines intact so that their effectiveness after months in the sea could be assessed. He was awarded the OBE London Gazette 17th October 1919 page 12778 “For valuable service with the Mine Clearance Force”.

The official recommendation TNA ADM171/84 page 184 states –

“Lieutenant Clavell was detailed by the Mining School for this duty during mine clearance operations in order to obtain information as to the endurance of British mining material when laid under service conditions. All work was carried out in an area of the Yorkshire Minefield between 28th April and 14th August 1919. In all 61 mines were salved and examined, of these, 46 were laid 8 feet deep, 14 were laid 65 feet deep and 1 laid 95 feet deep, the greatest number on mines salved in one day was on 11th June 1919. 8 were recovered the following day, 7 on 3rd June and 6 on 6th June and 22nd July. The remainder were recovered on average 4 a day. The fact that this work has been successfully carried out without mishap of any kind reflects great credit on all concerned and especially on Lieutenant Clavell”.

Presented with the OBE by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919.

Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). Promoted Lieutenant Commander 15th April 1922, he retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years following a heart attack.

Clavell ‘s son James was born in Sydney in 1921. In 1940 he was commissioned into the Royal Artillery and posted in Singapore where he was captured by the Japanese and imprisoned in Changi. Sadly, his father died in 1945 just a few months before his liberation. James Clavell emigrated to the US where he became a successful scriptwriter for Hollywood (The Fly, The Great Escape, To Sir With Love). In 1960 he wrote a novel based on his experiences as a POW – ‘King Rat’. Thereafter James Clavell wrote a series of bestsellers and became one of the most widely-read authors of the 1960s-80s; Tai-Pan, Gai-Jin, Noble House and many others. Most of his novels featured westerners in the Far East. According to his obituary, this fascination with the Orient came from listening to his father’s tales of adventure on the China coast.

A rare post War award for mine recovery and disposal.

GVF £675 Reserved


Military Medal GV, 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Corporal Leonard Barstow, York and Lancaster Regiment a Field Cutler born in Sheffield in 1897. Serving in France from 13th July 1915 with the 7th Battalion, he later transferred to the 8th and finally 10th Battalion. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry in September 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres, he was wounded, gun shot wound forearm and evacuated by hospital train to hospital in Rouen 11th October 1917. On recovery he joined the 10th Battalion in France, the 8th Battalion having left for Italy. Discharged 18th December 1918, he returned to Sheffield and died there in 1984 aged 87 years.

Military Medal GV

16614 Pte L Barstow 8 Y & L R

1914/15 Star

16614 Pte L Barstow York & Lanc R

British War and Victory Medals

16614 Cpl L Barstow Y & L R

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry and headers for MM, other research extracted from on line records.

Leonard Barstow was born on 18th June 1897 in Sheffield, the 1901 census records he is 4 years old residing with his father Frank and mother Elizabeth and one brother at 22 Steward Road, Eccleshall, Sheffield. The 1911 census records Leonard Barstow is a 15 year old Field Cutler residing with his family at 39 Pearl Street, Eccleshall, Sheffield. Serving in France from 13th July 1915 with the 7th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment he transferred to the 8th Battalion and was Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 17th December 1917 page 13187, for gallantry in September 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres.

Wounded in action during the Third Battle of Ypres in October 1917, gun shot wound to forearm, he is recorded as being evacuated from Ypres aboard No 31 Ambulance Train to hospital in Rouen 11th October 1917. The Battalion War Diary records that between 30th September and 3rd October 1917 whilst in the front line, the Battalion suffered 1 officer killed, 1 wounded with 8 other ranks killed, 50 wounded and 3 gassed, mainly from enemy shelling.

On recovery Barstow joined the 10th Battalion, the 8th having embarked for Italy. Discharged 18th December 1918 he returned to Sheffield and died there in 1984 aged 87 years.

GVF & better £575 Available


Military Medal GV, 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal John William Ledger, 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster regiment a former Foundry Labourer born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890. Enlisting at Sheffield 1st February 1910 he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 8th September 1914 taking part in the battle of the Aisne and in action at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. One of the first recipients of the new Military Medal decoration which appeared in the London Gazette dated 3rd June 1916, his award was for gallantry in the Ypres Salient in April 1916, in a series of attacks against German positions, notably on 19th to 22nd April 1916. Arriving on the Somme in August 1916, the Battalion was to see much action. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) an accident in October 1916 he was evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916. Discharged unfit in October 1917, he died in 1955.

Military Medal GV

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/Y & L R

1914 Star

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/York & Lanc R

British War and Victory Medals

9679 Pte J W Ledger Y & L R

With details extracted from his on line service record, copy Medal Index Card and London Gazette entries for MM.

John William Ledger was born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890, an Iron Foundry Labourer he attested for the York & Lancaster Regiment at Sheffield 1st February 1910 and joined the Depot. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 25th April 1910, 3rd Battalion 9th June 1914 and back to the 2nd Battalion 8th August 1914. Serving in France from 8th September 1914, the Battalion took part in the battle of the Aisne in September 1914 and the actions at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 3rd June 1916 page 5593 for gallantry during April 1916 in the Ypres Salient the Battalion War Diary records –

From: Brigadier C L Nicholson Commanding 16th Infantry Brigade dated 29th April 1916 –

“The work of 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment since they were sent up in support of 8th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment on the night of 19th/20th (April) has been admirable. The only successful attack on the night of 19th/20th (April) was executed by one company of this Battalion which recaptured D.21. During the 20th and 21st and the night of 21st/22nd they worked hard on the second line and suffered considerable losses. Whilst it is almost certainly due to their hard work and gallant patrolling that S.19 and the Mortaldje Estaminent have been occupied”.

John’s Granddaughter does recall him telling her he was awarded the MM for rescuing a wounded officer, there may be some truth to this as his service record records he was an officer’s servant (purchased from the family).

Arriving on the Somme 3rd August 1916, appointed Lance Corporal 18th August 1916,  they took part in the attack on Leuze Wood and the Quadrilateral 15th September. Soon checked by heavy machine gun fire, all three attacking Battalions were pinned down in their start position. A renewed attempt in the early evening also failed. Taking part in the attack on Morval 25th September all objectives were taken within 15 minutes of Zero hour, casualties for the month of September recorded as 360 killed and wounded and 129 admitted to hospital sick. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) this is noted as an accidental wound but attributable to his active service for which he received a disability pension, could have been a training accident or hit by one of our grenades during the attack on Morval.

Evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916 and admitted to Haxby Road Military Hospital, York. Posted to Command at Ripon 29th July 1917 and to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion 25th August 1917. Discharged no longer fit for military service 11th October 1917, home address recorded as 163 Greystock Street, Sheffield, he died in 1955.

Polishing contact wear particularly to MM, Star gilded.

VF £550 Available


Left to right

Military Medal GV to Private Thomas William Howe, 2/4th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment a former Silver Finisher Attercliffe area of Sheffield in 1891. Attesting  on 20th October 1916 aged 25 years, he joined the 7th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment and arrived in France on 21st January 1917. Transferring to the 2/4th Battalion 25th September 1917, he was slightly wounded in action during an attack on German positions on 25th August 1918. Awarded the Military Medal for gallantry during the fighting on The Marne 15th to 30th July 1918, he was killed in action 2nd September 1918 during the assault and capture of the high ground at Lagincourt.  He now rests in an identified grave in the Vaulx Hill Cemetery, France, he is also commemorated on the St John’s Church Memorial.

Military Medal GV

37633 Pte T W Howe 2/4 York & Lanc R

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Thomas William Howe was born in the Attercliffe area of Sheffield in 1891, the son of George Henry and Clara Howe in 1901 he is residing with his family at 61 Sussex Street, Attercliffe, Sheffield, by 1911 the family are residing at 151 Aston Street, Park, Sheffield Thomas is employed as a Silver Finisher. Attesting at Pontefract aged 25 years on 20th October 1916, he joined the 7th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment. Before arriving in France on 21st January 1917 he had married Matilda Emma Matthews at St Johns Church, Park, Sheffield on 8th January 1917.

Serving first with the 7th Battalion and from 25th September 1917 with the 2/4th Battalion, he was wounded in action, gunshot wound to hand 25th August 1918 during an assault on German positions, he returned to duty the next day. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 11th December 1918 for gallantry during the period 15th to 30th July 1918 during the fighting on the Marne, this recorded in the Battalion War Diary on 30th July 1918.

On 2nd September 1918 the Battalion went into the offensive at Vaulx Vraucourt with their final objective being the high ground at Lagincourt. After a day of heavy fighting their objective was achieved with the loss of 28 killed and 146 wounded and missing, Thomas William Howe was killed during the attack and now rests in an identified grave in the Vaulx Hill Cemetery, France, he is also commemorated on the St John’s Church Memorial. His widow was residing at 26 Stradbroke Road, Richmond, Sheffield and his parents at Cricket Inn Road, Sheffield.

GVF & Better £425 Available

Military Medal GV to Military Medal GV to Private Thomas Callery (Gallery), Rifle Brigade a Bone Scale Cutter and later Silver Stamper born in 1880 in Sheffield and the son of a Sheffield Publican. Attesting for the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry he served in France from 22nd July 1915 with the 7th Battalion before transferring to 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade. Awarded the MM for his gallantry during the attacks on Achiet-Le-Grand, Bihucourt and Favreuil 23rd to 25th August 1918 during the Second Battle of Bapaume.

Military Medal GV

48438 Pte T Gallery 13/Rif Bgde

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll, MM card, London Gazette entry and headers for MM, census etries etc.

Thomas Callery (Gallery), Rifle Brigade a Bone Scale Cutter born in 1880 in Sheffield, the son of James Callery and his wife Eliza, the 1901 census records his father is a Publican of The Cock Inn 59 Holliscroft, Sheffield and Thomas is a Silver Stamper. Attesting for the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (11905) he served in France from 22nd July 1915 with the 7th Battalion, transferring to 13th Battalion Rifle Brigade, an older brother Francis was killed in action 16th September 1916. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 11th February 1919 page 2119, the Battalion War Diary of September 1918 lists 29 recipients of the MM including Callery and strongly suggests the award was for the attacks on Achiet-Le-Grand, Bihucourt and Favreuil 23rd to 25th August 1918, actions during the Second battle of Bapaume.

GVF £325 Available

Military Medal and Bar for SECOND AWARD GV to Sergeant Charles Thompson York, York and Lancaster Regiment born in Finedon, Wellingborough, Northants in 1894, the family moved to Yorkshire, the 1911 census records Charles Thompson York is a Pit Hand employed at the Roundwood Colliery, Rotherham. Serving with the 8th Battalion in France from 27th August 1915, his Battalion was virtually wiped out on 1st July 1916 during the attack on Ovillers. Wounded on 2nd July 1916, he was treated in hospital in France. Recovering he joined the 12th and later 1/4th Battalion, winning both his Military Medals in 1918. He died in Rotherham in 1959.

With copy Newspaper articles (2), Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry and headers for MM and Bar to MM, census searches etc.

Charles Thomson York was born in Finedon, Wellingborough, Northants in 1894, the family moved to Yorkshire, the 1911 census records Charles Thompson York is a Pit Hand employed at the Roundwood Colliery residing with his family at 87 Masbro Street, Rotherham. Enlisting at Pontefract 31st August 1914 he joined the 8th Battalion and served in France from 27th August 1915. The 8th Battalion took part in the attack on Ovillers 1st July 1916 the first day of the Somme offensive, they cleared the German front line and entered the second, here due to heavy losses they were unable to hold or progress and the survivors were forced to withdraw, the Battalion suffered 635 killed and wounded. Private York was wounded on 2nd July 1916, shrapnel wounds right hand and was evacuated to No 18 General Hospital, Carniers for treatment.

Re-joining his Battalion 11th July 1916, he was wounded again on 23rd July at Baizieux Wood, Somme sector suffering contusions to the forehead and shell shock. On recovery he transferred to the 12th Battalion 7th August 1916. On 8th February 1917 he was admitted with synovitis right knee after  treatment at 94 Field Ambulance and 29 Casualty Clearing Station was admitted to No 5 General Hospital, Rouen and evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Glenart Castle 26th February 1917 and admitted to The Military Hospital, Haxby Road, York 5th March 1917 where he remained until 13th April 1917.

Returning to France he joined the 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion 8th July 1917, he is wounded on 20th October 1917, mild concussion from a shell explosion. On 21st March 1918, the Germans launched their Spring Offensive, the 1/4th Battalion were in the area of Bailleul and were in action against the German advance, his Military Medal for gallantry during this period is mentioned in the Battalion War Diary on 22nd May 1918.

MM London Gazette 28th August 1918 page 10139

Bar to MM London Gazette 17th June 1919 page 7645 the recommendation states –

“Corporal York was sent with his Platoon, after his Platoon Officer and Sergeant became casualties, to reinforce a front line company. He handled his men skilfully enabling the Company to advance further. He showed such utter disregard for his own personal safety under very heavy Machine Gun fire, that inspired his men to follow him for a long distance”.

VF & better £795 Available


Distinguished Sercice Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British war and Victory Medals to Petty Officer Telegrapher Albert Thomas Sibthorpe, Royal Navy a former Railway Porter born in Bethnal Green, London in 1893. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable, he was Rated Ordinary Telegrapher aboard HMS Neptune 3rd April 1911 and Telegrapher aboard the same ship 24th March 1912. Joining the Submarine Base Dolphin 29th September 1913 and his first Submarine E6 11th December 1913 which completed the first war patrol by a British Submarine commencing 5th August 1914. Sibthorpe was ashore at Maidstone as spare crew when E6 was sunk by a mine off Harwich 26th December 1915. Later joining HM Submarine G10, he was discharged 10th February 1923 on reduction of the Royal Navy, the rating electing for discharge under the terms of Admiralty Fleet Order 1359 of 1922. Post Naval service, he was employed as a Porter with the General Post Office and resided at 31 Cumming Street, Finsbury with his wife, he died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the London Fever Hospital, Liverpool Road, Islington, South East London on 30th August 1928 aged 35 years.

Distinguished Service Medal GV

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe LG TEL Oversea Submarines 1914-6

1914/15 Star

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe L Tel RN

British War and Victory Medals

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe PO Tel RN

With copy London Gazette entry and header for DSM, service record, death certificate and photo.

Albert Thomas Sibthorpe was born in Bethnal Green, London 8th August 1893 a Railway Porter he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 12th February 1910. Rated Ordinary Telegrapher aboard HMS Neptune 3rd April 1911 and Telegrapher aboard the same ship 24th March 1912. Joining the Submarine Base Dolphin 29th September 1913 and the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Maidstone 11th December 1913, he joined HM Submarine E6 the same day and was advanced to Leading Telegrapher aboard this Boat 21st November 1914.

Image result for Submarine E6

On the outbreak of War HM Submarine E6 was commanded by Lt Commander Cecil P Talbot, Royal Navy and completed the first war patrol by a British Submarine commencing 5th August 1914. Present at the battle of Heligoland Bight 24th August 1914, she was nearly rammed by a British Warship. On 25th September 1914 E6 encountered a new minefield 10 miles west of Heligoland, a mine caught in her forward hydrophone she surfaced and eventually the mine was freed by Lieutenant Williams-Freeman (awarded DSO) and Leading Seaman Cremer (awarded Conspicuous Gallantry Medal). On 29th September 1914 E6 attacked a German Destroyer at 500 yards but her torpedo missed, on 30th May 1915 E6 sighted the German High Seas Fleet, fired a torpedo at the leading Battle Squadron but missed. Awarded Distinguished Service Medal London Gazette 1st January 1917 page 9 “In recognition of services rendered by Petty Officers and men in Submarines in enemy waters during the period from the commencement of hostilities to 3rd August 1916”.

Albert Thomas Sibthorpe aboard HM Submarine G10 (3rd from left) an enlargement from a copy photo
of the crew of G10, all identified by name

E6 was mined on 26th December 1915 with the loss of all hands in the North Sea off Harwich. A trawler had been sunk by a mine in the same position shortly before, and a British Torpedo Boat signalled E6 to avoid the minefield, but E6 ignored the warning and was lost, at the time Sibthorpe was ashore at Maidstone, presumably as spare crew.

Sibthorpe subsequently joined Dolphin 1st July 1916, the Submarine depot Ship HMS Lucia 15th November 1916, advanced to Petty Officer Telegraphist 28th June 1917, the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Lucia 15th November 1916 and HM Submarine G10 10th August 1918. Post war he joined Victory I 29th November 1919, HMS Colombo 27th January 1922, HMS Vindictive 27th December 1922 and finally Victory I 29th January 1923 from where he was discharged shore 10th February 1923 on reduction of the Royal Navy and the rating electing for discharge under the terms of Admiralty Fleet Order 1359 of 1922. Sibthorpe married Maud Elizabeth Webb at St James’s Church, Pentonville in the Parish of Clerkenwell 14th September 1915, after leaving the Royal Navy, he was employed as a Porter with the General Post Office and resided at 31 Cumming Street, Finsbury with his wife, he died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the London Fever Hospital, Liverpool Road, Islington, South East London on 30th August 1928 aged 35 years.

A fine early DSM group to a Submariner participating in the first submarine war patrol of the First World War.

GVF & better £2,200 Available


Distinguished Conduct Medal GV to Corporal of Horse James Hamilton Fleming, 1st Life Guards born in Glasgow in 1890. Attesting for the 1st Life Guards 31st May 1910, he served with his Regiment in France and Belgium from 7th October 1914. Awarded the DCM for his gallantry in the counter attack on the village of Klein Zillebeke 6th November 1914 during the First Battle of Ypres. In the successful attack Fleming fell wounded 10 yards from an enemy Machine Gun position. Recovering, he returned to France and was killed in an enemy air raid on Etaples 19th May 1918 and is buried there. There is no trace of a 1914 Star being awarded to this soldier’s next of kin, there is no Medal Index Card for it and he does not appear on the Medal roll. His British War and Victory Medals were returned (undelivered) and not re-issued. One of SIX Distinguished Conduct Medals awarded to 1st Life Guards for the entire First World War.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

2798 Cpl of H J Fleming 1/LG

With copy London Gazette entry and header for DCM, entry in The Roll of Honour and details from the War Diary, two original post card photographs of Fleming in dress uniform and service dress. A curios case, this appears to be his only Medal for the First World War. No Medal Index Card was found for a 1914 Star and he does not appear on the 1st Life Guards 1914 Star Medal roll. A Medal Index Card was found for his British War and Victory Medals but these were returned and not re-issued.

Reverse of card stamp and postmarked 26th August 1910 addressed to his sister Miss Fleming, Oakwood, March, Camb and written
“Well Jess, what do you think of this, Jim xxxx”

From: The Marquis De Ruvilgny Roll of Honour

James Hamilton Fleming, DCM, Corporal of Horse 1st Life Guards, youngest son of David Fleming of The Shaws, Harwich Road, Colchester, by his wife Martha daughter of Robert Spittal; born Glasgow Co Lanark 6th May 1890; educated Cheetham Higher Elementary School, Manchester; enlisted in the 1st Life Guards 31st May 1910, served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders and was killed in an enemy air raid on Etaples 19th May 1918. Buried at Etaples, his Commanding Officer, Captain and Adjutant C H Wyndham wrote “I cannot tell you what a loss he is to me. One could rely on him for anything, and on the recent Machine Gun course he came out amongst the best in the Regiment. The Company will not be the same without him. I shall never forget your son the day in 1914 when he got his DCM (November 6th). The village of Klein Zillebeke in Belgium and adjacent trenches were attacked and taken by the enemy. The Regiment was ordered to counter attack and retake them, and incidentally close the gap in the line. Your son displayed great spirit and leadership in this attack and single handed attempted to charge a German Machine Gun. He fell wounded a few yards from it, he was awarded the DCM for gallant and distinguished Conduct in the Field”, he was unmarried.

DCM London Gazette 17th December 1914 page 10783

“On 6th November shewed great coolness and gallantry during advance and was wounded within 10 yards of the enemy’s trenches”.

Image result for 1stlife Guards 6th November 1914 pictures

On 3rd to 4th November 1914 1st Life Guards were in support of 4th Guards Brigade in a wood south of Hooge, the Regiment was billited at Verbranden Molen. On 5th November, two Squadrons went dismounted to reserve trenches of 4th Guards Brigade. Led horses returned to Verbranden Molen. On Friday 6th November Squadrons returned at 0700 and after two hours in billets, rejoined the Brigade in the wood. At 1430 the Brigade was ordered out dismounted, in support. On leaving the wood considerable numbers of French and British troops were seen retiring in the direction of Zillebeke. The Brigade dismounted between Zillebeke and Klein Zillebeke and advanced towards the latter place. 1st and 2nd Life Guards in advance, Blues in support. We drove the enemy back through the wood, the edge of which was held after by 3rd Cavalry Division. During the action Corporal of Horse Wells and two men were killed and eight wounded.

Six DCM’s awarded to the 1st Life Guards for the entire First World War.

GVF & better £2,450 SOLD


Military Medal GVI, 1939/45 Star, Burma Star, War Medal, India War Service Medal 1939-45, General Service Medal GVI clasp SE Asia 1945-46 to Sepoy Mohammed Hussain, 9th Battalion 12th Frontier Force Regiment from Mora Repial, Rawalpindi, India. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry South of Monywa, Burma on 25th January 1945 when, operating behind enemy lines, his Company were surrounded by a superior force of Japanese. Compelled to fight their way out, Sepoy Hussain covered the withdrawal of his Company across 200 yards of open terrain with his Bren Gun, forcing the enemy to take cover. He withdrew only when his entire Company had withdrawn. The 9th battalion later serving in Indo China following the surrender of Japan.

Military Medal GVI

19644 Sep Mohd Hussain FFR

1939/45 Star, Burma Star, War Medal, India War Service Medal 1939/45

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal GVI clasp SE Asia 1945-46

Unnamed as issued

With copy London Gazette entry and header for BEM and recommendation from the Civil Defence Gallantry files TNA T336/11. The group mounted for wear.

With copy London Gazette entry and transcript of citation TNA reference WO373/36

19644 Sepoy Mohammed Hussain, 9th Battalion 12th Frontier Force Regiment

MM London Gazette 19th April 1945 page 2080 (From Mora Repial, Rawalpindi, India)

“On 25th January 1945 (South of Monywa, Burma) “D” Company 9th Battalion 12th Frontier Force Rifles, which had the role of operating in the rear of the enemy position, was surrounded by a larger force and eventually compelled to fight its way out. In order to withdraw, the Company had to cross an open stretch of ground, some 200 yards in length, which the enemy were covering by intensive Light Machine Gun (LMG) fire from both flanks. On seeing this 19644 Sepoy Mohammed Hussain of this Company, immediately took his LMG and continued to give covering fire, forcing the enemy to keep their heads down, until the whole of his Company had crossed the open space. He then followed them. The prompt action of this Sepoy, was undoubtedly instrumental in saving his Company from suffering considerable casualties, by his complete disregard for his own safety”.

The 9th Battalion were raised on 1st April 1941 at Jhansi, India and served in Ceylon, Burma and Indo China post surrender of Japan. Re-constituted as the 2nd Battalion on 30th April 1946, on partition Mohammed Hussain would have gone to Pakistan.

NEF £950 Reserved


British Empire Medal (BEM) Civil GVI “For Meritorious Service” obverse to Mr Alfred William Godfrey, Gun Maker and Gun Filer Royal Small Arms Factor, Ministry of Supply, Ealing. Born in City Road, London in 1871, Mr Godfrey spent all his working life at the factory, he was awarded the BEM in 1943 at the age of 72 years for his long and meritorious service, in particular during two World Wars, he died in Edmonton, Essex in 1954 aged 83 years.

British Empire Medal Civil GVI “For Meritorios Service” obverse

Alfred William Godfrey

With copy London Gazette entry and header for BEM,  which is contained in its Royal Mint presentation case.

Alfred William Godfrey was born in City Road, London 27th August 1871, he married at Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire 25th November 1893, the 1911 census records he is a 39 year old Gun Maker at a Government Factory residing with his wife Bertha, three sons and one daughter at 66 Catisfield Road, Enfield Park, Middlesex. Mr Godfrey did not serve in the Armed Forces in the First World War and continued to work at the Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield. The factor opened in 1816 and was finally closed in 1988, awarded the BEM London Gazette 4th June 1943 page 2501 “Alfred William Godfrey, Filer, Royal Small Arms Factory, Ministry of Supply”. The 1939 Register records he is a Widower employed as a Rifle Assembler residing at 18 Catherine Street, Ealing with his daughter Gladys born in 1906. He died in Edmonton, Essex in 1954 aged 83 years.

First time on the market.
.
NEF £195 SOLD

Distinguished Service Order Victoria, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Paardeburg, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901, Khedives Sudan Medal clasp Nyam Nyam, Imperial Ottoman Order of Osmanieh 4th Class, Imperial Ottoman Order of the Medjidieh 3rd Class to Major Chandos Leigh, King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Born 29th August 1873, the eldest son of The Honourable Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, KCB, JP, KC, Inner Temple and Speaker of the House of Commons and his wife Katherine Fanny. Educated at Harrow 1887-90 and Trinity College Cambridge. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 29th May 1895 into the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, he served in the South Africa War 1900 to 1901 attached 7th Battalion Mounted Infantry, his diary housed at the Regimental Museum records he took part in 45 engagements.Awarded the DSO in September 1901, he was also Mentioned in Despatches. Returning to England sick in July 1901, he was seconded to the Egyptian Army 1902 to 1912. During that period he fought in one major campaign in the Bahrain-el-Ghazel province against the Nyam-Nyam Tribe, and was one of the few British officers to receive the Khedives Sudan Medal with that clasp and was decorated with the Order of the Osmanieh 4th Class London in 1910 and the Order of The Medjidieh 3rd Class in 1912. Serving with the 2nd Battalion in France from 15th August 1914, he was severely wounded and taken prisoner 23rd August 1914 defending the Mons Canal, he died of wounds six days later.

Distinguished Service Order Victoria (Silver Gilt)

Unnamed as awarded

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Copony, Paardeburg, Johannesburg, Diamond Hll, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901

Capt C Leigh DSO K O Sco Bord

Khedives Sudan Medal clasp Nyam Nyam

Unnamed as issued

Imperial Ottoman Order of Osmanieh 4th Class, Imperial Ottoman Order of the Medjidieh 3rd Class

Unnamed as awarded

With a folder of research including an inaccurate article on his life and career in Medal News August 1997 pages 20-22, in which the author erroneously records he was awarded the Order of the Nile and implies his 1914 Star Trio was never issued when in fact it was sent to his widow.

Chandos Leigh was born 29th August 1873, the eldest son of The Honourable Sir Edward Chandos Leigh, KCB, JP, KC, Inner Temple and Speaker of the House of Commons and his wife Katherine Fanny. Educated at Harrow 1887-90 and Trinity College Cambridge. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 29th May 1895 into the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, he joined the 1st Battalion stationed at York. In 1897 the Battalion moved to Aldershot and the following year to Dublin. The 1st Battalion left Southampton for South Africa 5th January 1900 aboard the SS Braemar Castle and arrived in Cape town on 26th January. During the relief of Kimberley operations, Leigh was attached to the 7th Mounted Infantry Battalion, he kept a diary of his time in South Africa, now housed in the Regimental Museum at Berwick on Tweed.

The 7th Mounted Infantry pursued the Boer General Cronje and his force from Magersfontein and following his surrender moved to Pretoria, Leigh notes in his dairy the 7th had fought in 45 engagements. and covered 900 miles. In April 1901 Leigh was promoted Captain, becoming sick, probably Enteric, he was admitted to Wynberg Military Hospital where he spent most of July 1901 and then evacuated to the UK. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order London Gazette 10th September 1901 page 6321 and was Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 10th September 1901 page 5952. He was present at the major actions of Magersfontein, Pretoria, Klip Drift, Johannesburg, Diamaond Hill, Wittebergen and Bothaville. In 1902 Leigh was seconded to the Egyptian Army and served with them from 17th April 1902 to 16th April 1912. During that period he fought in one major campaign in the Bahrain-el-Ghazel province against the Nyam-Nyam Tribe, and was one of the few British officers to receive the Khedives Sudan Medal with that clasp and was decorated with the Order of the Osmanieh 4th Class London Gazette 9th December 1910 page 9225 and the Order of The Medjidieh 3rd Class London Gazette 2nd July 1912 4747.

Image result for Major Chandos Leigh

Major Chandos Leigh, DSO, 2nd Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers

Returning to his old Regiment, he joined the 2nd Battalion in Dublin and married Winifred Madeline Jeffreys on 6th June 1912, daughter of The Right Honourable Arthur Frederick Jeffreys, PC, DL, MP of Burklion, Hampshire. On the outbreak of the First World War the 2nd Battalion returned to England the recently promoted to Major Leigh was given command of “D” Company. Arriving in France on 15th August 1914, the 2nd Battalion took part in the initial engagement at Les Herbieres on the Mons Canal during the retreat from Mons. The officer’s dined at a local Belgian farm house during their time at the Canal and signed a tablecloth now known as “The Mons Tablecloth”, now housed in the Regimental Museum. Leigh was severely wounded in action on 23rd August and taken prisoner of war, he died in a German Field Hospital on 29th August 1914.

Slight enamel damage to crescent on Order of The Medjidieh 3rd Class, the SA01 clasp a tailor’s copy.

NEF £2,950 Available


British Empire Medal (BEM) GVI Military, 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star Clasp France & Germany, Africa Star, Italy Star, 1939/45 Defence and War Medals, Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI 1st type to Chief Engine Room Artificer (CERA) Albert William Charles Manley, Royal Navy born in Plymouth, Devon in 1910. Entering the Royal Navy at Fisgard as Artificer Apprentice 4th January 1926, he joined the Battleship HMS Rodney 30th December 1937 as an ERA3 and served aboard this ship for the whole of the Second World War. Mentioned by name in the book HMS Rodney at War by Kenneth Thompson (Published 1946), Manley is acknowledged as providing much help for the work. Awarded the BEM in June 1942 for his exceptional services aboard Rodney, he finally left the ship in June 1945. Rodney had an eventful war taking part in the Norwegian campaign on 1940, she later engaged the German Battleship Bismarck scoring several hits, including a hit from one of her torpedoes. Taking part in the escort of Malta convoys, she later supported the Allied landings in North Africa, Sicily and Italy 1942-43 and Normandy in June 1944. Serving until discharged to pension 15th March 1952, he died in Plymouth in 1962.

British Empire Medal (BEM) GVI Military 

CERA Albert William C Manley D/MX.45274

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star Clasp France & Germany, Africa Star, Italy Star, 1939/45 Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as Issued

Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GVI 1st type

MX.45274 A W C Manley CERA HMS Rodney

With copy service records, copy BEM recommendation, copy of the book HMS Rodney at War by Kenneth Thompson, Hollis and Carter, London, 1946. The group mounted as worn.

Albert Manley was born on 8th November 1910 in Plymouth. Son of Dorothy Manley, the 1911 Census records Albert aged 5 months living with his mother and sister at 13 Napier Terrace, Mutley, Plymouth. A former Scholar, Albert Manley entered the Royal Navy as an Engineer Room Artificer Apprentice 4th January 1926 at Fisgard. Advanced to ERA 5th Class in January 1931, ERA 4th Class  1st January 1933 aboard HMS Lucia, ERA 3rd Class 1st June 1935 aboard HMS Carlisle, ERA 2nd Class 1st January 1939 aboard HMS Rodney and acting Chief Engine Room Artificer 2nd Class 6th August 1939 aboard HMS Rodney in August 1940. CERA Manley was awarded the British Empire Medal in 1942 whilst serving aboard HMS Rodney.

BEM London Gazette 11th June 1942 

“A Chief Engine Room Artificer who shows exceptional skill at his trade and is also an excellent leader. He is outstanding in an emergency, and in making quick repairs, when the work in hand is always hastened by his unfailing cheerfulness, especially under trying or arduous conditions”.

HMS Rodney

HMS Rodney entered British Royal Navy service in 1927, like her sister ship HMS Nelson, all of her primary guns were unusually placed forward of the superstructure. Although her armour protection was less than originally designed (due to the Washington Naval Treaty limitations), she was considered one of the world’s most powerful Battleships through the 1930s. Her pre-Second World War service saw her with the Atlantic Fleet and with the Home Fleet. During the German invasion of Norway, she operated off the coast in support of the ground operations, on 9th April 1940, off Karmøy, she was hit by a German aerial bomb that penetrated the armoured deck but failed to explode. After the completion of the Norwegian campaign, she returned to Britain, from where she would guard against any potential German cross English Channel operations and would set sail to escort convoys crossing the Atlantic Ocean to and from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

In January 1941, Rodney participated in the failed search for German Warships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. On 16th Mar 1941, while escorting a convoy, she made contact with potential German raiders, but no action ensued as the Germans were under orders to avoid confrontation. In May 1941, while escorting the troop ship Britannic to Canada, she received new orders to intercept the German battleship Bismarck; which was engaged in the early morning of 27th May, during which Rodney hit Bismarck several times (including one Battleship-to-Battleship torpedo hit, the only time in history such situation had occurred), contributing decisively to Bismarck’s eventual demise. After some time spent in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, then a non-belligerent nation, for repairs, she joined Force H in Gibraltar, from where she would escort convoys to Malta. She returned to Britain in Nov 1941, and shortly afterwards served briefly from Iceland. In Nov 1942, she supported the Operation Torch landings in North Africa. In 1943, she supported the landings at Sicily and Salerno in Italy. She returned to the Home Fleet in Oct 1943. Her final major responsibility took place during the Allied Cross-Channel invasion of Normandy, during which she bombarded German defensive positions and routes of transportation along the Normandy coast in France. In September 1944, she covered convoys going to and returning from Murmansk, Russia. Having covered 156,000 nautical miles between 1942 and 1945 without going through scheduled maintenance due to war demands, she was deemed to be in poor mechanical shape at the war’s end. She was scrapped in 1948.

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 11th October 1943, Manley was discharged shore to pension 15th March 1952, he died in Plymouth in March 1962 aged 51 years.

Neat official correction to “Rod” of Rodney on LSGC

GVF £750 SOLD


Member of the British Empire (MBE) Military 1st Type, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Frank Lewis Martin, Royal Navy born in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire in 1875 and probably a former Merchant Seaman Engineer, he entered the Royal Navy at Duke of Wellington as Acting Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 4th Class 28th October 1901. Advanced to Acting Chief ERA 2nd Class aboard HMS Sappho in August 1913, he was promoted Artificer Engineer (Warrant Officer) 31st August 1914. Appointed to HMS Malaya 24th November 1914 whilst still being built, he was to serve aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Awarded the MBE in July 1919, the recommendation submitted by Vice Admiral Sir A C Leveson, Commanding 2nd Battle Squadron commends Mr Martin for his valuable services at Jutland in extinguishing the fire in the starboard 6 inch Battery. Malaya suffered 63 killed and 68 wounded at Jutland, being severely damaged by eight hits from German Battleships. Leaving Malaya in December 1921, he was promoted Commissioned Engineer in September 1924 and retired the following year, he died in Gosport, Hampshire in 1945.

Member of the British Empire (MBE) 1st Type the reverse Hallmarked London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Art.Eng F L Martin RN

With folder of research including rating’s and Warrant Officers service records, London Gazette entry and headers for MBE, recommendation for MBE and other research.

Frank Lewis Martin, was born 16th December 1875 in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, the son of John & Mary Ann Martin. Martin entered the Royal Navy as Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class in October 1901 at Duke of Wellington. Noted as having Japanese tattooing on both legs he was almost certainly a former Merchant Navy Engineer. Confirmed in the rate of Engine Room Artificer 4th Class 2nd March 1903 aboard HMS Warrior, he was advanced to Engine Room Artificer 3rd Class 28th October 1904 at Firequeen II, Engine Room Artificer 2nd Class 26th October 1908 aboard HMS Revenge. The 1911 Census records Engine Room Artificer Martin, aged 35 years, living at 110 Sutton Road, Portsmouth with his wife Fanny Martin, aged 31 years. Advanced to Acting Chief ERA 2nd Class 27th August 1913 aboard HMS Sappho he was promoted Acting Artificer Engineer (Warrant Officer) 31st August 1914.

Appointed to HMS Malaya 24th November 1914 whilst still being built and appointed to Malaya on commissioning 28th January 1916. Serving aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he was eventually awarded the MBE for his services during the battle and subsequently, MBE London Gazette 31st July 1916 page 9833 “For valuable services in HMS Malaya“, the official recommendation submitted by Vice Admiral Sir A C Leveson, Royal Navy Commanding 2nd Battle Squadron states –

“Artificer Engineer Frank L Martin has served in HMS Malaya since commissioning. Was Second Officer in Charge of Stoker’s Fire Brigade and rendered valuable services in extinguishing the fire in the starboard 6 inch Battery in the battle of Jutland. Has rendered continuous good service during the war”.

“Malaya’s first serious hit came about 1720 when a shell hit the lower edge of the armoured belt abreast “B” turret, it did not penetrate but the whiplash effect shock ruptured the hull below the armour. Next a 12 inch shell burst on the armoured roof of “X” turret, buckling the roof but the guns crew were unaffected. At about 1720 Malaya was hit again, a shell penetrated the forecastle deck and burst on No 3 Gun of the starboard 6 inch battery, wrecking the gun and killing the entire crew. The cordite supply for the Guns was ignited and a fierce fire raged throughout the battery. Some of the burning cordite fell down the ammunition hoist into the 6 inch shell room and would have ignited a group of shells ready for hoisting had it not been for the fast response of Petty Officer Day and Leading Seaman Watson who removed the burning debris preventing a serious explosion in the 6 inch and 15 inch shell magazines, both received the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal. The fire in the 6 inch battery was extinguished by the Stoker’s Fire Brigade of which Mr Martin was second in command. Malaya suffered 63 killed and 68 wounded and was hit a total of 8 times at one time seven of German Admiral Scheer’s ships were firing at her. Malaya disengaged and rejoined the Fleet suffering a 4 degree list to starboard.”

Mr Martin joined HMS Columbo 31st December 1921, HMS Umpire 11th June 1924, promoted Commissioned Engineer 10th September 1924, he retired 16th December 1925, he died in Gosport, Hampshire 22nd February 1945.

A fine award for services aboard HMS Malaya at Jultland and subsequently.

GVF £850 Reserved


Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence Medal, Meritorious Service Medal GV (Immediate) to Private Albert Edward Deverell, Army Cyclist Corps a former Chemist’s Errand Boy born in Penge, London in 1896. Serving in France from 26th July 1915 with 18th Division Cyclist Company and later XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion. Awarded the Military Medal in August 1919 and the Meritorious Service Medal in January 1919. Discharged to Class Z Army Reserve 11th March 1919 he returned to Penge where he was employed as a Railway Parcel Foreman, he died in Penge in 1953 aged 57 years.

Military Medal GV

2178 Pte A E Deverell ACC

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2178 Pte A E Deverell A Cyc Corps

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

Meritorious Service Medal GV (immediate)

2178 Pte A E Deverall 13/C Bn ACC

With copy research, including Medal Index Card, London Gazette entries for both awards, census entries, 1939 Register entry, Medal roll entries. Original letters forwarding his 1914/15 Star Trio, MM and MSM, original addressed Registered envelope for 1WW Medals, box of issue for Defence Medal addressed “Mr A E Deverell 66 Mosslea Road, Pinge, SE20”, awarded slip for Defence Medal.

Albert Edward Deverell was born in Penge, London 25th May 1895, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Chemist’s Errand Boy residing with his father Frederick a Cab Driver, mother Hannah a Charwoman, three sisters and two brothers in a four room house at 90 Station Road, Penge, SE20. Attesting for the Army Cyclist Corps he first served in France from 26th July 1915 with 18th Division Cyclist Company and later XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 20th August 1919 page 10578, he had previously been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (immediate) London Gazette 18th January 1919 page 997 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders”. Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 11th March 1919 he returned to Penge. In 1939 he is recorded as residing in Penge and employed as a Railway Parcel Foreman, he died in Penge on 24th February 1953.

Scarce combination to the Army Cyclist Corps.

NEF £950 Available


 

Distinguished Service Order Victoria, Order of the British Empire 1st type Military, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War Medal, Victory Medal to Major Henry Read Darley, Staff late 4th Dragoon Guards and South Wales Borderers born in Dublin in 1865. Educated at Clifton College, Trinity College Cambridge and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 4th Dragoon Guards in March 1888. Serving as Adjutant 1891 to 1892, he was placed on Half Pay as a Captain in 1894. Called to the Bar Inner Temple in 1893, he does not appear to have practiced as a Barrister. Commissioned into the 3rd Volunteer Battalion South Wales Borderers in 1894, he volunteered for service in South Africa serving as ADC to Major General Lord C C W Chesham, Inspector General Imperial Yeomanry, awarded the DSO for these services and Mentioned in Despatches. Resigning his commission in 1904, he was employed as Secretary of the Cavalry Club, Mayfair, London. Volunteering for service in the First World War he served in France from May 1916 and was both ADC to the GOC and Assistant Provost Marshall, 11th Division. Awarded the OBE for these services in June 1919. Demobilized in 1919 he returned to his position of Cavalry Club Secretary and died there in April 1931 after a long illness.

Distinguished Service Order Victoria in silver gilt

Unnamed as awarded

Order of the British Empire 1st type Military

Unnamed as awarded reverse Hallmark for London 1919

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

Capt H R Darley Imp Yeo

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Capt H R Darley DSO S Wales Bord

British War and Victory Medals

Major H R Darley

The group mounted as originally worn contained in a black velvet lined leather case, the lid inscribed “Major H R Darley, DSO, OBE late 4th R I Dragoon Guards, Cavalry Club”.

With research extracted from on line sources listed here, copy photos of recipient (2).

Henry Read Darley born 13th June 1865 in Dublin, son of the late Joseph F Darley, Barister of 5 Northbrook Road, Leeson Park, Dublin.

Educated at Clifton College and Trinity College, Cambridge admitted 4th November 1885, spoke French and German, commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 4th Dragoon Guards from Gentleman Cadet, RMC Sandhurst 14th March 1888 (London Gazette 13th March 1888 page 1563), Lieutenant 30th July 1889, Captain 13th April 1892, Adjutant 4th Dragoon Guards 15th April 1891 to 13th December 1892, to Half Pay 14th February 1894. He married in 1890 Emily, daughter of the Honourable John Pentergast Vereker, four sons, they divorced in 1914. Called to the Bar Inner Temple 17th November 1893. Captain 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion South Wales Borderers 14th February 1894 and volunteered for service in South Africa.

Served in the South Africa War as ADC to GOG Imperial Yeomanry Brigade, DAAG from 15th December 1900 and ADC to Inspector General Imperial Yeomanry Major General Lord C C W Chesham, KCB. Operations in Orange Free State April to May 1900, operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, operations in the Transvaal west of Pretoria July to 29th Nov ember 1900 including the actions at Venterskroom 7th and 9th August, operations in the Orange River Colony May to 29th November 1900, including action at Lindley 1st June and Rhenoster River. Operations in Cape Colony north of Orange River 1900. Operations in Transvaal 30th November 1900 to January 1902.

Distinguished Service Order London Gazette 27th September 1901 page 6305 “In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”, the Insignia presented by HM The King 29th October 1901. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 19th September 1901.

Resigning his commission in the South Wales Borderers 6th June 1904 (London Gazette 17th June 1904 page 3862). The 1911 census records he is employed as Secretary of the Cavalry Club, London. Volunteering his services on the outbreak of War, Major Reserve of Officers late 4th Dragoon Guards 29th August 1914 (London Gazette 28th August 1914 page 6798), appointed ADC 7th June 1915 (London Gazette 2nd July 1915 page 6439) Assistant Military Secretary to GOC Eastern Command, he served in France from 27th May 1916. Appointed Staff Captain with the rank of Major 21st November 1916 (London Gazette 30th January 1917 page 1056) and Assistant Provost Marshall 11th Division. Awarded the OBE London Gazette 3rd June 1919 page 6986 “For valuable services rendered in connection with the War”.

Demobilized in 1919, he returned to his employment as Secretary of the Cavalry Club in Mayfair, London and died there on 25th April 1931 aged 65 years after a long illness.

First time on the market.

GVF £4,250 SOLD


 

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Temporary Corporal Walter George Burt, Dorset Regiment a former Gamekeeper born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889. Attesting for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907, he joined the 2nd Battalion for service in India in 1909 and landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, he was also Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon for distinguished service during the period April to September 1915. Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916. Recovering from his wounds he was deemed unfit to return to his Regiment now under siege at Kut al Amara and transferred to the Royal Engineers, discharged in October 1919 in April 1920 he was awarded a 20% disability pension.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

8328 Pte W G Burt 2/Dorset Regt

1914/15 Star

8328 Pte W G Burt Dorset R

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

8328 T Cpl W G Burt Dorset R

With copy Medal Index Card, service record, London Gazette entries for DCM and MID, copy photo and other research listed here.

Walter George Burt was born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889, an 18 year 6 month old Gamekeeper he attested for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907 joining the Depot the same day. Posted to the 1st Battalion 4th October 1907 and to the 2nd Battalion 1st February 1909 for service in India, he landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 5th August 1915 page 7678-

“For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, when he carried an urgent message along the firing line within 400 yards of the enemy’s position under very heavy fire and returned to report having delivered it”

Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon, KCB, ADC General Commanding Indian Expeditionary Force for distinguished services during the period from the middle of April 1915 to the end of September 1915 London Gazette 5th April 1916 page 3669.

Picture from: Western Gazette Almanac 1917 page 209

Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916 and discharged 11th February 1916. Re-admitted with Malaria 2nd April 1916 and discharged 20th April 1916. Unfit for Infantry service he was transferred to the Royal Engineers (No 303511) and promoted to Corporal. Discharged 21st October 1919 he was awarded a 20% disability pension 30th April 1920, the Surgeon commenting “He has an inability to completely extend his left knee joint otherwise general health good”.

Although the Battalion’s landings in the Shatt-al-Arab on 6th November 1914 met little opposition, the Turks, backed by Arab levies, were quick to respond.  The Dorsets faced stiff fighting expelling the Turks from Saihan on 15th November and Saihil two days later.  In eleven days these actions and the diseases prevalent in the marshy conditions of the region cost the Battalion 25% of its fighting strength.  They reached Basra on the 23rd. After minor engagements, mostly against Arab insurgents, the 2nd Dorsets advanced to Shaiba (ancient Sheba).  In February 1915 they were forced to wade knee-deep through the annual flooding of the two rivers.  At Shaiba they endured very difficult conditions, including sand storms.  Mounting frequent offensive patrols, they fought major actions on 3rd March and 14th April in which the depleted Battalion showed great resilience, earning Shaiba (Barjisiyah) as a new Battle Honour.

From : History of the Dorsetshire Regiment 1914 – 1919 published by the Regimental History Committee, 1932.

As far as could be ascertained the Turks had fallen back to a position just east of Marjisiya Wood. General Melliss commenced his advance on Turkish positions at 0930 on 14th April 1915, the Dorsets on the left and the 24th Punjabis on the right leading 16th Brigade. South Mound Ridge was lightly defended and quickly taken, the two Battalions halted 500 yards beyond the Ridge while the enemy positions were reconnoitered.

Just before noon the Dorsets advanced on the left of the Brigade, the 117th Mahrattas now in support. The advance met strong opposition from machine gun and rifle fire as soon as it started, this partly enfiladed the Dorsets which swung half right to face it. Pushing onto about 900 yards in front of the Turkish trenches the advance was held up by a hail of bullets. Ammunition began to run short, but thanks to the gallantry of the Indian Mule Drivers bringing supplies right up to the front stocks were replenished in the nick of time. Casualties were mounting up fast, there were several acts of gallantry including Private Burt who again showed great coolness and determination in carrying a message under heavy fire.

At about 1430 Colonel Rosher the 2nd Battalion Commanding Officer was hit and killed and the Adjutant who went to his assistance was badly wounded. Orders for a retirement were actually issued when the day was saved by 16th Brigade getting up and charging. Lt Colonel Clarkson now in command of the 2nd Battalion jumped up at this point and shouted the order for the Dorsets to advance, he was soon hit but the Dorsets advanced the now 200 yards to the Turkish trenches, by 1615 the Turkish front line had been captured and those Turks who had not been bayoneted or surrendered fell back 150 yards to a new position. The Dorsets continued to advance capturing the second defensive line, Turkish resistance collapsed and they were now in full retreat.

The Dorsets had played a prominent part in the days fighting, losing a quarter of its strength, casualties amongst officers were high with one Commanding Officer killed and the second wounded, three companies were now commanded by 2/Lieutenants.

Scarce DCM to the Regiment, the Dorset Regiment received 101 DCM’s for the entire First World War.

NEF £2,250 Available


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