Distinguished Flying Medal E2, 1939/45 Star, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals, General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya, Campaign Service Medal E2 clasps Borneo, Malay Peninsula, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Air Force E2 to Flight Lieutenant Ronald Francis Brooks, Royal Air Force a former Grocer’s Assistant born in Loughborough, Leicestershire in 1925. Joining the Royal Air Force 14th December 1942. Selected for Aircrew, he arrived at the Aircrew Receiving Centre 19th April 1943 and trained as a Wireless Operator at No 4 Radio School, Madley, Herefordshire, qualifying in December 1943. Joining 150 Squadron in Italy, his first sortie was completed on 16th July 1944 transferring to 104 Squadron, his first sortie was on 12th December 1944. Joining No 4 Parachute Training School 12th March 1945, he qualified as a parachutist completing five descents. Demobilized in 1947, he re-enlisted 22nd September 1953 as Sergeant (Signals Aircrew), promoted Flight Sergeant 15th August 1957, Master Signaller (Warrant Officer) 1st February 1963, Air Electronics Operator 10th March 1967, discharged on appointment to a commission 26th October 1967. Awarded the DFM in 1957 for his services with 48 Squadron in Malaya, completing an impressive 114 supply drops to troops and security forces operating in the Malayan jungle, his award being presented by HM The Queen at Buckingham Palace on 21st March 1958. Retiring in 1983 after an impressive 40 years service and 7,732 hours day and night flying, he died in 2010 aged 85 years. 

Distinguished Flying Medal E2

1817982 Sgt R F Brooks RAF

1939/45 Star, Italy Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

General Service Medal E2 clasp Malaya

1817982 Sgt R F Brooks RAF

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasps Borneo, Malay Peninsula

M SIG R F Brooks (1817982) RAF

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Air Force E2

M SIG R F Brooks (1817982) RAF

With a whole archive of documentation etc including three Royal Air Force Flying Log Books covering the period 15th October 1943 to. Book containing several aerial photographs taken on his sorties in 1944 with dates and comments, large photograph album covering his entire service, Air Crew Centre Receiving Centre form with photo, Warrant appointing him Warrant Officer (Master Signaller) dated 1st February 1963, Commissioning Certificate as Pilot Officer 1967, Commendation No 3 Group RAF dated 8th June 1963 for services with 254 Squadron with a congratulations letter from Group Captain J A Sowrey, DFC, AFC, RAF dated 7th June 1963. Commendation by Air Officer Commanding Far East Air Force dated 11th June 1966 for services with 48 Squadron with a congratulations letter from Group Captain J E P Thompson, OBE, AFC, RAF dated 10th June 1966, Awarded Air Officer Commanding in Chief Strike Command Commendation in 1981, with letters of congratulations and citation.

Far East Survival and Parachute School Certificate dated 1965 – “This is to certify that Master Signaller R F Brooks has undergone a period of rigorous training in the Malaya jungle and successfully completed combat survival course No 13/6”.Original London Gazette 28th November 1967 page 12986 announcing his commission to Flying Officer from Master Air Electronics Operator with seniority 27th October 1964. Original London Gazette 27th October 1970 page 11758 announcing his promotion to Flight Lieutenant.

Copy service record which confirms his medal entitlement, copy confidential reports 1966 to 1983.

Letter from Air Marshall Sir Charles Ness, KCB, CBE, RAF on his retirement thanking him for his service dated 19th January 1983, letters from MOD regarding his extension of service. Souvenir brochures passing out parade as Pilot Officer 1967, complete list of all units served in with dates from MOD (RAF) records, group photo (all named) on passing out with a commission.

Ronald Francis Brooks was born 1st February 1925 in Loughborough, Leicestershire, he had served with 132 (Loughborough) Air Training Corps for 2 years 2 months, a Grocer’s Assistant, he joined the Royal Air Force 14th December 1942. Selected for Aircrew training at No 13 Air Crew Selection Board Birmingham he arrived at the Aircrew Receiving Centre 19th April 1943.

Brooks commenced his Aircrew Wireless Operator training at No 4 Radio School, Madley, Herefordshire in a Dominic on 15th October 1943 and qualified in December the same year. He joined No 77 Operational Training Unit at Qastina, Palestine 10th April 1944 flying Wellington Mark X bombers and 150 Squadron in Italy 16th July 1944. Promoted Temporary Flight Sergeant 4th January 1945, Temporary Warrant Officer 4th January 1946, he was released to the RAF Reserve 2nd December 1947.

Re-enlisted 22nd September 1953 as Sergeant (Signals Aircrew), promoted Flight Sergeant 15th August 1957, Master Signaller (Warrant Officer) 1st February 1963, Air Electronics Operator 10th March 1967, discharged on appointment to a commission 26th October 1967.

Retired from the Royal Air Force as Flight Lieutenant 31st January 1983 (London Gazette 22nd March 1983 page 3976).

Wartime service with 150 & 104 Squadrons extracted from his Flying Log Book

His first sortie was completed on 16th July 1944 when his aircraft bombed Smedervo oil refinery in Yugoslavia encountering light flak. Subsequent sorties recorded –

19th July Fiume oil refinery northern Italy heavy flak encountered, 24th July Piacenza, Italy no opposition, 26th July supplied dropped to partisans in Italy, moderate to heavy flak encountered, 3rd August Porte De Valence Marshalling Yards southern France, force landed at Tarquinia, 7th August Szombathely Aerodrome, Hungary, night fighters encountered but little flak, 9th August Ploesti oil refinery, Rumania, intense flak, search lights and night fighters encountered, saw 7 of our aircraft shot down, 14th August Marseilles Port installations in southern France, heavy and light flak encountered, saw our invasion craft moving in, 15th August Valence Aerodrome southern France, searchlights and light flak, 20th August Herman Goering AFV factory at St Valentin, Austria, intense heavy flak, searchlights and night fighters, saw a JU88 shot down 22nd August Miskolk Marshalling Yards, Hungary, heavy and light flak, sighted an ME110, 24th August Bologna Marshalling Yards northern Italy, heavy flak, 25th August Ravenna Marshalling yards northern Italy no opposition, 27th July Pesaro area troop and MT concentrations, 31st August Ferrara Marshalling Yards northern Italy, heavy and accurate flak, 1st September Bologna Marshalling Yards northern Italy, heavy and light flak and rockets, 6th September mining River Danube near Budapest, light flak, 10th September Milan Marshalling Yards northern Italy slight to heavy flak, 26th September Borovnica railway viaduct, Yugoslavia, slight to heavy flak and fighters chased by a ME109.

Sergeant Brooks (far right) and crew of “Flak Happy Harry”

Joining 104 Squadron his first sortie was on 12th December 1944 supply dropping in Yugoslavia and subsequently 26th December supply dropping Yugoslavia, 15th January 1945 supply dropping near Circhino, northern Italy, 18th January sipply dropping near Circhina, 1st February Pola Naal Base northern Italy operation abandoned due to thick cloud, 3rd February supply dropping Yugoslavia, 7th February supply dropping Yugoslavia, 12th February Verona Marshalling Yards northern Italy, hit by flak, 6 inches of starboard prop gone, Fiume Harbour and oil refineries, heavy flak, 20th February Udine Marshalling Yards northern Italy, heavy and light flak, 21st February Pola ammunition dumps, intense and heavy flak saw a Liberator shot down.

Joining No 4 Parachute Training School 12th March 1945 flying in Wellington and Hudson aircraft his roles included Wireless Operator, Passenger and Assistant Despatcher, Brooks himself completing one descent from a Wellington Mark X and four descents from a Dakota C47A. Joining HQ Balkan Air Force Communications Flight 10th May 1945, he was serving with this unit when the war in Europe ended.

Distinguished Flying Medal London Gazette 10th December 1957 page 7191 “In recognition of gallant and distinguished service in Malaya”. For services with 48 Squadron, invested by HM The Queen 21st March 1958, with letters relating to the investiture, letters of congratulations and a press cutting containing a photograph of Flight Sergeant Brooks, his wife and son outside Buckingham Palace.

“An arduous and hazardous task in Malaya, which at the time earned an Air Marshall’s congratulations, had its reward yesterday for Flight Sergeant Ronald Francis Brooks, 32 Castledean Street, Loughborough, who was invested with the Distinguished Flying Medal. Flight Sergeant Brooks earned his award by his work in dropping supplies to security forces in Malaya where he served as Signaller in an air crew. After a long series of such exploits Air Marshall The Earl of Bandon wrote to him from RAF Far East HQ in Singapore – “Supply dropping is arduous and hazardous task and it is vital to the successful prosecution of operations in Malaya. Your contribution to this task has been exceptional and your example outstanding. Your award is well deserved”. Now back from Singapore and home on leave at Loughborough, Flight Sergeant Brooks went to London with his wife and son Christopher aged none to receive his medal. They have two daughters aged 2 and 1. A former pupil of St Mary’s School, Loughborough, he served in Italy and Egypt with the RAF during the war, was demobilized in 1947 and re-joined in 1953”.

Brooks joined 48 Squadron 17th December 1954 flying in Valetta aircraft, his first operational sortie, supply dropping in Malaya was on 9th February 1955 and he completed 114 supply drops into Malaya during his tour with the Squadron. No. 215 Squadron was renumbered No 48 in Singapore on 15 February 1946 and undertook transport duties in Malaya with Dakotas, Valettas and Hastings and was eventually disbanded on 3 March 1967. It was then reformed again with Hercules in Singapore on 1 October 1967 and in September 1971 returned to the UK where it was disbanded on 7 January 1976.

Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 5th February 1967. When he retired in 1983, Brooks had completed an impressive 6,880.30 hours day flying and 851.35 hours night flying, he died in April 2010 aged 85 years.

NEF £8,500 Available


 

The sons of John and Kate Ambrose of Cheadle, Cheshire.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Lance Corporal Arthur Ambrose, 1/6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, born in Gorton, Manchester in 1896. Enlisting in Manchester, he served in France after January 1916, awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his gallantry north of Locon, France 9th to 11th April 1918 in which he took command of his section (12 men) and a party of stragglers after his section leader had become a casualty. By fine powers of leadership, he inflicted severe losses on the enemy. Killed in action between 20th and 26th July 1918 aged 22 years during the attack on Bois de L’Aulnay and surrounding German positions. In December 1918 his father placed a notice in The Manchester Evening News seeking information on his son who was reported missing whilst serving with “C” Company 9th Platoon between 20th and 26th July 1918. Commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, Aisne, France.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

267507 Pte A Ambrose 1/6/Sea Hdrs

British War and Victory Medals

267507 Pte A Ambrose Seaforth

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Alfred Ambrose

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Gunner John Ambrose, Royal Field Artillery born in Gorton, Manchester in 1894 in 1911 he was employed in the family Grocery and Corn Merchant business. Enlisting at Stockport he served in France from 23rd December 1915. Mortally wounded 21st August 1918 during the offensive to capture Albert serving with 122 Brigade, he died in a Casualty Clearing Station the same day following amputation of a leg. Aged 24 years he now rests in the Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

1914/15 Star

W-1903 Gnr J Ambrose RFA

British War and Victory Medals

W-1903 Gnr J Ambrose RA

Bronze Memorial Plaque

John Ambrose

With copy Medal Index Cards, London Gazette entry & headers for DCM, copies from 1/6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders War Diary and other research listed here.

Alfred Ambrose was born in Gorton, Manchester in 1896, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old school boy residing with his father John a Grocer and Corn Merchant, mother Kate also employed in the family business and siblings at 122 Wimslow Road,Cheadle, Cheshire. Enlisting in Manchester, he served in France after January 1916and was awarded the DCM London Gazette 3rd September 1918 –

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty (North of Locon 9th April 1918) during an enemy attack. His section leader becoming a casualty, he assumed command of the section and a party of stragglers and by fine powers of leadership, he controlled his party splendidly and inflicted severe losses on the enemy”.

The Battalion War Diary records –

“At 0700 the Battalion received orders to positions at the canal bank between Busnes and Robecq arriving at 1000. Reconnoitring patrols were sent out, before these patrols returned the Battalion was ordered to occupy the La Couture defences. Moving out at 1250, the Battalion encountered the enemy at the Canal De La Lawe. “A” Company were able to cross the canal at the footbridge less one platoon, the machine gun and rifle fire fairly heavy, but the Germans had been surprised by our men and the advance continued. The Battalion was ordered to hold the line of the canal and “A” Company withdrew to the western side of the canal.

At about this time a company of 6th Battalion Gordon Highlanders moved up on our left and dug in in front of Vielle Chapelle coming under our command….The enemy did not make any further effort to advance further during the day and at night our line was strengthened by 2 platoons of “D” Company. The footbridge was ordered to be destroyed by a section of Royal Engineers but they ran away after blowing up two boards. This conduct is worthy of the greatest censure as it was over this footbridge that the enemy eventually managed to obtain a footing in our line. CO Lt Colonel Macdonald, DSO wounded and evacuated.

In the morning of 10th April the enemy managed to cross the footbridge under cover of heavy machine gun and rifle fire and entered a farm. A supporting platoon counter attacked but was unsuccessful, receiving heavy casualties. At 1600 Three Platoons of 6th Gordons attacked and captured the farm but suffered heavy casualties, only 16 men remained at the end of the engagement.

The enemy continued to show activity on our front and there were several patrol encounters, with casualties inflicted on the enemy. The two companies on the left remained intact although subject to machine gun and rifle fire. At 0200 a report was received that the enemy had broken through at Lestrum Post and was moving south towards Zelobes. About this time heavy machine gun fire was heard and stragglers coming in reported the enemy had broken through between Vielle Chapelle and Zelobes and obtained a footing there. Machine gun fire on the left became more intense and at dawn on 11th April the enemy were seen coming from the left flank from between Zelobes and Vielle Chapelle. At the same time heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy at the footbridge by rifle and machine gun fire, but the position at the farm and all ground in front of Les Lobes became untenable owing to machine gun fire from the left rear and at 0730 the Battalion withdrew. Two platoons of 6th Seaforths are missing, they must have been surrounded by the enemy but did a large amount of damage to them, Lieutenants Oliver and Stacey, who are missing rendered magnificent service in keeping the men together and inflicting losses on the enemy”.

Killed in action 20th July 1918, the Soldier’s Effects Register records Lance Corporal Alfred Ambrose was killed in action between 20th and 26th July 1918 aged 22 years, death being presumed after that date. This is further supported by a newspaper appeal by his father –

From : The Manchester Evening News 10th December 1918 page 4

AMBROSE – Missing after the battle of Champagne July 20th to 26th, “C” Company, 9 Platoon, L/Cpl any information J Ambrose, 122 Wimslow Road, Cheadle, Cheshire”.

The Battalion War Diary has a good account of the operations between 20th to 31st July 1918. Commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, France.

The Battalion War Diary records –

“On 20th July the 1/6th Seaforths were north east of Paradis, Paradis being held by the Germans. “C” company on the left. On 21st July they were subject to intense enemy shell fire suffering 60 killed and wounded. At 1400 the Battalion moved forward in support of 5th Seaforths and 6th Gordons. On 22nd July enemy shell fire remained heavy and at 1600 gas shells were fired. On 23rd July the Brigade attacked, “C” company 1/6th Seaforths suffered very severely from our own barrage and hostile machine gun fire from the left flank before reaching the Bois de L’Aulnay, all officers becoming casualties. Elements of “C” company succeeded in reaching the objective but the main line taken up was in the sunken road 300 yards south of the Bois de L’Aulnay.

On 24th, 25th and 26th the 1/6th Seaforths continued to hold the line after being re-organised into one composite company. Total casualties for the operations are recorded as 5 officers killed and 14 wounded, 46 other ranks killed, 312 wounded and 32 missing.”

John Ambrose was born in Gorton, Manchester in 1894 the 1911 census records he is employed at the family business and residing at 122 Wilslow Road, Cheadle, Cheshire. Enlisting at Stockport in March 1915, he served in France from 23rd December 1915. Mortally wounded whilst serving with 122nd Brigade Royal Field Artillery 21st August 1918 during the allied offensive and capture of Albert. Evacuated to a casualty Clearing Station he died the same day following amputation of a leg. Aged 24 years he now rests in the Bagneux Cemetery, Gezaincourt, France.

A fine DCM to a Private soldier who took command of those around him at a critical moment inflicting severe losses on the enemy.

NEF £1,950 Available


 

Companion of the Order of the Bath in Silver Gilt hallmarked London, 1896, Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882 – 89 dated 1882 reverse clasps Alexandria 11th July, Suakin 1884, El-Teb-Tamaai, Order of the Osmaniah 4th Class, Khedives Star dated 1882 to Lieutenant General Herbert St George Schomberg, Royal Marines Light Infantry. Born in Kilmore, County Monaghan, Ireland 22nd February 1845, the son of Admiral Herbert Schomberg, Royal Navy. Educated at Stubbington, Hampshire. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines 24th June 1863. Present at the bombardment of Alexandria 11th July 1882 aboard HMS Monarch, he landed the following day with a detachment of Marines to occupy the port, awarded the Brevet of Major for these services. Landing again for the operations around Suakin in 1884, he commanded a company of RMLI at the battles of El Teb 29th February 1884 and Tamaai 13th March 1884 where he again distinguished himself. Rising steadily through the officer ranks, he was created a Companion of the Bath in 1897. Reaching the rank of Lieutenant General in 1906, he retired in 1910 after an impressive 47 years service, he died in Frome, Somerset in 1915 aged 70 years.

Companion of the Order of the Bath Silver Gilt & Enamels Hallmark London, 1896

Unnamed as awarded

Egypt and Sudan Medal dated 1882 reverse clasps Alexandria 11th July, Suakin 1884, El-Teb-Tamaai

Bt Maj H St G Schomberg RMLI HMS Monarch

Order of the Osmaniah 4th Class

Unnamed as awarded

Khedives Star dated 1882

Unnamed as issued

With research, London Gazette entries, promotions, copy photos, copy death certificate, copy service record  and obituary.

Herbert St George Schomberg was born in Kilmore, County Monaghan, Ireland 22nd February 1945, the son of Admiral Herbert Schomberg, Royal Navy. Educated at Stubbington, Hampshire. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines 24th June 1863, he remained at Chatham HQ until 26th November 1866 when he was appointed to HMS Frederick William. Promoted 1st Lieutenant 13th February 1867, Captain 13th April 1879, Brevet Major 11th July 1882, Major 13th April 1885, Brevet Lt Colonel 24th June 1891, Lt Colonel 8th September 1892, Brevet Colonel 8th September 1898, Colonel 2nd Commandant 8th March 1898, Colonel Commandant 30th December 1899, Major General 12th December 1901, Lieutenant General 29th September 1906, placed on the Retired List 22nd February 1910 having reached the age limit.

Appointed to HMS Monarch 12th January 1882, he was present during the bombardment of Alexandria 11th July 1882. Awarded the Brevet of Major 11th July 1882 London Gazette 15th August 1882 page 3795 “In consideration of his services during the bombardment”. Specifically awarded for his services during the landing and occupation of Alexandria which began on 12th July 1882. Present at the occupation of Port Said 20th August 1882. Detached for special services in the Sudan 1884 including operations around Suakin and the relief of Trinkitat, Tokar and Sinkat. Present at the battles of El Teb 29th February 1884 and Tamaai 13th March 1884 where he was “In command of his Company at El Teb and Tamaai and has done good service in both actions” (Extract from Colonel Tuson’s report 23rd March 1884). The Royal Marine Battalion at Tamaai numbered 14 officers and 464 NCO’s and men, divided into six companies under the command of Colonel Tutson, RMA.

During the battle the York and Lancaster Regiment were forces back in the mass Dervish attack, the Royal Marines were wheeled up in support to close the gaps in the square, it was too late and the Royal Marines were also forced back. Under Major Colwell, RMLI 150 rallied and formed a square, closing together in a compact body. In spite of every effort the British fell back 800 yards. The Royal Navy Machine guns were abandoned with 3 officers killed and many ratings killed and wounded. The rally took place in about 20 minutes, greatly assisted by the fire of 1st Brigade from its position at some 400 to 500 yards from the ravine, and by the fire of the cavalry now dismounted, firing volleys into the Dervish’s right flank. The retreating troops now re-formed in line with the Royal Marines on the right of the York and Lancs who were in the centre, the Black Watch and Naval Brigade on the left. After a 15 minute halt and fresh supply of ammunition to each man the 2nd Brigade advanced to the attack. In 10 minutes the lost ground had been regained and the Machine Guns re-captured. Referring to this dangerous crisis General Graham in his despatch records –

“In rear of the square were the Royal Marines, than whom there can be no finer troops, and on whom I had counted as a Reserve in the last emergency. Such, however, was the sudden nature of the disorder, and the impetuosity of the rush, that the Royal Marines were for a few minutes swept back, and mixed up in the general confusion. Yet, I submit,  there was no panic amongst the men, they had been surprised, attacked suddenly, and driven back by a fanatical and determined enemy, who came on utterly regardless of loss, and who were, as I have since learned, led by their bravest chiefs. As soon as the men had time to think, they rallied and re-formed”.

 Awarded the Order of Osmaniah 4th Class London Gazette 6th October 1885 page 4647 “In approbation of his distinguished services before the enemy during operations in the Sudan last year”. Joining Portsmouth Division 27th May 1885. Created a Companion of the Order of the Bath London Gazette 25th June 1897 page 3568 on commemoration of Her Majesty’s Diamond Jubilee.

Lt General Schomberg died on 27th April 1915 at The Vicarage, Norton St Philip, Frome, Somerset the home of his son aged 70 years, he had served 47 years in the Royal Marines.

GVF & better £3,250 Reserved


 

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil), 1939/45 Star, France & Germany Star, Defence and War Medals, Efficiency Medal GVI “Territorial” 1st type to Company Quarter Master Sergeant Wilfred Herbert Dixon, Parachute Regiment late Suffolk Regiment, born in St Paul’s Cambridge in 1903. Enlisting for the Cambridgeshire Regiment almost certainly after they had left for Singapore he transferred to the Suffolk Regiment and the Parachute Regiment in 1941. Recommended for the BEM by Brigadier Stanley J L Hill, DSO, MC commanding 3rd Parachute Brigade in February 1944. Forming part of 6th Airborne Division, Dixon served with HQ 3 Parachute Brigade throughout the NW Europe campaign including “D” Day Operation Toga, the German Ardennes offensive and Operation Varsity the crossing of the Rhine. He died in Cambridge in 1976.

British Empire Medal GVI Military

5931183 CQMS Wilfred H Dixon

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Efficiency Medal “Territorial” GVI 1st type

5931183 C SJT W H Dixon Para R

With copy London Gazette entry and headers for BEM, copy BEM recommendation and other research listed here.

The group mounted as originally worn rather crudely, the miniatures contained in a card box addressed “Mr W H Dixon, 43 Mowbray Road, Cambridge” dated on box May 1953. With corresponding miniatures mounted as worn, the BEM, Defence and War Medals TEM all silver.

Wilfred Herbert Dixon was born in St Paul’s, Cambridge 8th January 1903, the son of Henry Dixon a shoemaker and his wife Mary Jane. In 1911 Wilfred was an 8 year old Scholar residing at 6 Granta Place, Cambridge with his parents, 4 brothers and 1 sister, he married in Cambridge in 1929. His service number indicates enlistment into the Cambridgeshire Regiment, this must have taken place after the Regiment was sent to Singapore as both Battalions were captured there. Transferring to the Suffolk Regiment and later the Parachute Regiment he was recommended for the BEM by Brigadier S J L Hill, DSO, MC dated 20th February 1944.

Awarded the BEM London Gazette 8th June 1944 page 2596

5931183 Company Quartermaster Sergeant Wilfred Herbert Dixon (Suffolk Regt) HQ 3 Parachute Brigade

“This NCO has proved himself to be outstandingly reliable and has been completely responsible for the administrative organisation of Brigade Headquarters personnel for two years as an Infantry Brigade Headquarters, during the conversion period to a Parachute Brigade and for the fourteen months during which the Brigade has been a Parachute Brigade. This has required long hours of work and the exercise of considerable initiative far above the level of an average CQMS”.

3 Parachute Brigade was formed on 7th November 1942.

Under the Command of Brigadier Stanley James Ledger Hill, DSO, MC, 3 Parachute Brigade HQ dropped at 0056 on 6th June 1944, sticks were scattered widely and Brigadier Hill was wounded. By 0900 the Brigade HQ had opened in the area of Le Mesnil, protected by 1 Canadian Parachute Battalion now in the same area.

6th Airborne Division

The Division’s first mission was Operation Toga  on 6 June 1944, “D” Day, part of the Normandy landings, where it was responsible for securing the left flank of the Allied invasion during Operation Overlord, 3 Brigade jumped over Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June in the area of the flooded Dives. Of all the units of the 6th Airborne Division, the 3rd Parachute Brigade were the most seriously tested during the first week of the landings. Their losses incurred on the drop zones on the first night had been severe, and were further worsened by the casualties suffered by the 9th Parachute Battalion when assaulting the Merville Battery. Thereafter the Brigade’s position, along the ridge to the east of Ranville, became the main focus of enemy attacks. Although weak and spread thinly along a wide front, they stubbornly clung to its positions and bloodily repulsed every attack that was made on its lines. Their magnificent performance during these days is frequently overlooked, yet it surely ranks as one of the more remarkable achievements in the history of the Parachute Regiment.

The Division remained in Normandy for three months before being withdrawn in September. Upon their withdrawal to England, the primary concern of the 6th Airborne Division was the replacement of the heavy losses that it had sustained in the previous three months. The proportion of dead, wounded and missing in the 3rd Parachute Brigade may be put at about 75%. Over the coming months its strength was restored and the men were trained back to a full state of physical fitness, something which had unavoidably slipped as a result of several months of static defence in Normandy. While still recruiting and reforming in England, it was mobilised again and sent to Belgium in December 1944, to help counter the surprise German offensive in the Ardennes, the battle of The Bulge. Their final airborne mission followed in March 1945, Operation Varsity, the second Allied airborne assault over the River Rhine.

Wilfred Herbert Dixon died in Cambridge 4th May 1976.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £2,250 Reserved


 

Companion of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels, Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882-89 undated reverse clasp The Nile 1884-85, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Lieutenant Colonel The Honourable Richard Thompson Lawley, 7th Hussars. Born in August 1856, the second son of the Second Baron Wenlock of Escrick Park, Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire and Colonel Yorkshire Hussars. Educated at Eton 1870 – 74 and the Royal Military College, commissioned in February 1875, he joined the 7th Hussars the following year. Serving in the Nile Expedition 1884-5 as part of the Light Camel Regiment. Promoted Captain in 1885, Major in 1893 and Lieutenant Colonel commanding 7th Hussars in 1899. Serving in South Africa 1901 to 1902, he first commanded the 7th Hussars and from January 1902 commanded a mobile column. Mentioned in Despatches in June 1902 and appointed a Companion of the Bath in June 1902 in recognition of his services in South Africa. Brevet Colonel in June 1903 and placed on Half Pay in November 1904, he succeeded his brother as 4th Baron Wenlock in 1912 and died in July 1918.

Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels

Unnamed as awarded

Egypt and Sudan Medal 1882 – 1889 undated reverse clasp The Nile 1884-85

Lieut Hon R T Lawley 7/ Husrs

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Lt Col Hon R T Lawley CB 7/Hrs

Khedives Star 1884-6

Unnamed as issued

With a folder of research, copied photos.

Richard Thompson Lawley was born 21st August 1856 the son of Beilby Richard Lawley 2nd Baron Wenlock of Escrick Park, the Lord Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire and Colonel, Yorkshire Hussars and his wife Lady Elizabeth Grosvenor, daughter of Richard, 2nd Marquess of Westminster. Brother of Sir Beilby Lawley, 3rd Baron Wenlock, Governor of Madras (1891 to 1896), Lt Colonel Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry and Lord of the Bedchamber of HRH The Prince of Wales (1901), whom he succeeded in 1912 as 4th Baron Wenlock.

Captian Hon R T Lawley (left) Captain D Haig (seated) later Field Marshal Earl Haig C in C BEF, India 1888

Educated at Eton (1870 – 74) he married in 1909 Rhonda Edith 2nd daughter of the Reverend Canon Knox-Little of Worcester. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant unattached list from the Royal Military College he was appointed to the 7th Hussars as Lieutenant 11th February 1876. Promoted Captain 21st July 1885, Major 5th May 1893, Lieutenant Colonel 26th June 1899 and Brevet Colonel 26th June 1903. Served throughout the Nile Expedition 1884-5 with the Light Camel Regiment including operations with the desert column including the engagement at Abu Klea Wells 16th to 17th February 1885. Three officers and forty four other ranks of the 7th Hussars served with the Light Camel Regiment.

Appointed to command the 7th Hussars 20th December 1901 to 22nd January 1902, he was then appointed to command a mobile column comprising The Queen’s Bays, 7th Hussars, two guns and a pom pom from 39th Battery Royal Field Artillery. Present during operations in the Transvaal from March to 31st May 1902, Orange River Colony from January to March and May 1902, Cape Colony from January to March and May 1902, Cape Colony from December 1901 to January 1902. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 26th June 1902, appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath London Gazette 26th June 1902 page 4192 “In recognition of services during operations in South Africa” . Retiring 2nd November 1904, he inherited the title as 4th Baron Wenlock from his brother in 1912, he died at Hestercombe near Taunton whilst on a visit 25th July 1918 aged 61 years without issue, his brother inherited the title. Lord Wenlock is buried at St Peter’s Church, Monk Hopton, Shropshire, his home at the time of his death was Monk Hopton House.

Light pitting to Egypt and Sudan Medal otherwise

GVF & better £3,250 Available


 

Military Medal GV, 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lance Corporal John William Ledger, 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster regiment a former Foundry Labourer born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890. Enlisting at Sheffield 1st February 1910 he served with the 2nd Battalion in France from 8th September 1914 taking part in the battle of the Aisne and in action at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. One of the first recipients of the new Military Medal decoration which appeared in the London Gazette dated 3rd June 1916, his award was for gallantry in the Ypres Salient in April 1916, in a series of attacks against German positions, notably on 19th to 22nd April 1916. Arriving on the Somme in August 1916, the Battalion was to see much action. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) an accident in October 1916 he was evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916. Discharged unfit in October 1917, he died in 1955.

Military Medal GV

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/Y & L R

1914 Star

9679 Pte J W Ledger 2/York & Lanc R

British War and Victory Medals

9679 Pte J W Ledger Y & L R

With details extracted from his on line service record, copy Medal Index Card and London Gazette entries for MM.

John William Ledger was born in Carbrook, Sheffield in 1890, an Iron Foundry Labourer he attested for the York & Lancaster Regiment at Sheffield 1st February 1910 and joined the Depot. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 25th April 1910, 3rd Battalion 9th June 1914 and back to the 2nd Battalion 8th August 1914. Serving in France from 8th September 1914, the Battalion took part in the battle of the Aisne in September 1914 and the actions at Hooge, Ypres sector in July 1915. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 3rd June 1916 page 5593 for gallantry during April 1916 in the Ypres Salient the Battalion War Diary records –

From: Brigadier C L Nicholson Commanding 16th Infantry Brigade dated 29th April 1916 –

“The work of 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment since they were sent up in support of 8th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment on the night of 19th/20th (April) has been admirable. The only successful attack on the night of 19th/20th (April) was executed by one company of this Battalion which recaptured D.21. During the 20th and 21st and the night of 21st/22nd they worked hard on the second line and suffered considerable losses. Whilst it is almost certainly due to their hard work and gallant patrolling that S.19 and the Mortaldje Estaminent have been occupied”.

John’s Granddaughter does recall him telling her he was awarded the MM for rescuing a wounded officer, there may be some truth to this as his service record records he was an officer’s servant (purchased from the family).

Arriving on the Somme 3rd August 1916, appointed Lance Corporal 18th August 1916,  they took part in the attack on Leuze Wood and the Quadrilateral 15th September. Soon checked by heavy machine gun fire, all three attacking Battalions were pinned down in their start position. A renewed attempt in the early evening also failed. Taking part in the attack on Morval 25th September all objectives were taken within 15 minutes of Zero hour, casualties for the month of September recorded as 360 killed and wounded and 129 admitted to hospital sick. Wounded in the right leg by a bomb (grenade) this is noted as an accidental wound but attributable to his active service for which he received a disability pension, could have been a training accident or hit by one of our grenades during the attack on Morval.

Evacuated to the UK for hospital treatment 5th October 1916 and admitted to Haxby Road Military Hospital, York. Posted to Command at Ripon 29th July 1917 and to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion 25th August 1917. Discharged no longer fit for military service 11th October 1917, home address recorded as 163 Greystock Street, Sheffield, he died in 1955.

Polishing contact wear particularly to MM, Star gilded.

VF £650 Available


 

British Empire Medal E2 for Gallantry, Campaign Service Medal E2 clasps South Arabia, Northern Ireland to Lance Corporal Malcolm Charles Sindall, Royal Engineers born in Ilford, Essex in 1944. Awarded the BEM for Gallantry in rescuing three men from two Army helicopters that crashed on the playing field of Chattenden Barracks, near Rochester, Kent on the morning of Wednesday 14th May 1969. One helicopter carrying Brigadier David Allott to a Royal Engineers demonstration at the Barracks burst into flames. Sindall who was sat in the Junior Ranks Club adjacent to the field, immediately rushed to the scene and assisted by two others extracted all three men from both helicopters. He was in danger of receiving severe burns whilst doing so and the fuel tanks of the burning helicopter were in danger of exploding at any second. He showed complete disregard of his personal safety in full knowledge of the dangers. Despite all efforts to save life it was soon established all three extracted from the two crashed helicopters were dead.

British Empire Medal E2 with For Gallantry Emblem

23733801 L/Cpl Malcolm C Sindall RE

Campaign Service Medal E2 clasps South Arabia, Northern Ireland

23733801 L/Cpl M C Sindall RE

With copy London Gazette entry and headers, copy original recommendation, copy Newspaper article.

Clasps riveted together on CSM.

Malcolm Charles Sindall was born in Ilford, Essex in 1944, he was awarded the BEM For Gallantry whilst serving with 12 Royal School of Military Engineering Regiment, Royal Engineers at Chattenden Barracks, near Rochdale, Kent when two Army helicopters collided and crashed.

BEM For Gallantry London Gazette 7th October 1969 page 10212

“On Wednesday 14th May 1969 at about 0926 hours, a helicopter taking off from the sports field of Chattenden Barracks collided in mid air with another helicopter coming in to land. Both crashed to the ground, one in a mass of flames. Lance Corporal Sindall was sitting in the Junior Ranks Club near the sports field. He heard a terrific bang, looked up to see a helicopter falling in flames, immediately dashed out of the Club and ran to the burning helicopter.

Assisted by another soldier, Sapper Pedley, and a civilian Mr Percival, he began to extract the occupants from the burning wreckage. During this time and before fire fighting appliances were brought to bear, there was considerable danger of the rescuers getting very badly burnt as well as a real risk of the helicopter fuel tanks exploding. All three acted in complete disregard for their personal safety in removing the two occupants from the wreckage and in extinguishing their burning clothing.

By the time the three men had dealt with the occupants of the burning helicopter, others arrived on the scene to help them extract the occupant from the wreckage of the other helicopter, which had not caught fire. It was soon established that all three occupants were dead, but there is no doubt that Lance Corporal Sindall, in company with Sapper Pedley and Mr Percival did everything humanly possible to save life. Lance Corporal Sindall acted with the utmost speed and resolution and with complete disregard for his personal safety in the face of obvious danger, in accordance with the highest traditions of the service”.

From: an Unidentified Local Newspaper –

Three die as helicopters collide

“A Brigadier and two pilots were killed today when two helicopters collided in mid air over Chattenden Barracks, near Rochester, Kent. The crash happened when a Sioux helicopter carrying Brigadier David Allott, 17/21 Lancers aged 44, to a Royal Engineers demonstration at the barracks was coming into land. It was in collision with a Scout helicopter taking off from the sports field at the barracks. Brigadier Alott, Commandant of the Royal Armoured Corps Centre at Bovington was one of 200 senior officers attending the demonstration together with Mr Boyden, Parliamentary Secretary for Defence for the Army. Brigadier Allott was married with a son and two daughters. One of the pilots was Warrant Officer Class 2  H A J Jones, aged 38, of the Army Air Corps. He was married with two daughters and lived in South Wanston, Hampshire. The other pilot was Sergeant David Rogers, aged 25, of the Third Royal Tank Regiment Air Troop. He was married with a son. The demonstration went on as planned while arrangements were made for an immediate enquiry into the cause of the crash”.

GVF £1,750 Available 


 

Military Medal GV to Private William Riley, 2/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment born in 1887 and a Coal Miner Wath Main Colliery. Enlisting at Rotherham 18th May 1915, he served in France from 13th March 1916 with the 1/5th Battalion. The 1/5th were in reserve on 1st July 1916 Somme offensive and moved forward to Thiepval Wood. On 3rd July they took part in the attack on St Pierre Divion suffering 350 casualties.  Wounded in action 7th July 1916, bullet wound to neck whilst at North Bluff Authuille. Treated in hospital in France, he was discharged to the Depot at Etaples 13th July 1916. An habitual offender he was tried several times for various offences. Promoted to Corporal in April 1917, he was posted as an Instructor to No 1 Training Camp, Etaples, where he was wounded in the face by grenade splinters during a practice throw. Evacuated to the UK, he was treated in hospital in Staffordshire, posted to the 2/4th Battalion he returned to France in October 1918 and was awarded the MM for his gallantry in the attack and capture of Frasnoy 4th November 1918. Discharged 6th February 1919.

Military Medal GV

241394 Pte W Riley 4/York & Lanc R

With details extracted from his on line service record.

William Riley was born in 1887, a Coal Miner at the Wath Main Colliery he was a 27 year 3 month old married man with four children residing at 72 Concrete Cottages, Wombwell, Barnsley when he attested for the 3/5th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment at Rotherham 18th May 1915. Posted to the 1/5th Battalion, he served in France from 13th March 1916. The 1/5th were in reserve on 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive and moved up to Thiepval Wood during the day. Taking part in the attack on St Peirre Divion 3rd July, they suffered 350 casualties. Riley was wounded on 7th July when his Battalion were in the front line at North Bluff Authuille, bullet wound to neck. Admitted to 1/3 West Riding Field Ambulance and 44 Casualty Clearing Station the same day, he was transferred to No 1 Canadian Hospital 8th July 1916 and discharged to 34 Infantry Base Depot, Etaples 13th July 1916. Re-joining the 1/5th Battalion he was appointed Lance Corporal 24th September 1916 and promoted Corporal 1st April 1917. Posted to No 1 Training Camp, Etaples as an Instructor 3rd September 1917, he was wounded in the face and arm in a bomb throwing practice accident 9th September 1917.

Admitted 44 Casualty Clearing Station following his wounding he was admitted to 55 General Hospital 14th October 1917 and evacuated to England 18th October 1917 for hospital treatment. Returning to France 4th October 1918 he was posted to the 2/4th Battalion 9th October 1918, this Battalion taking part in the battle of the Sambre in Picardy. An attempt to break the Hindenburg line, the 2/4th Battalion would attack and capture the village of Frasnoy on 4th November in spite of stiff opposition mainly from Machine Gun positions. A large number of the enemy were killed and captured along with much material. Consolidating their newly captured positions, the 2/4th were ordered to attack and capture the village of Sous Le Bois on 9th November. The village was captured virtually unopposed, the Germans in retreat or surrendered without fighting. Riley awarded the MM for his gallantry during the capture of Frasnoy, recorded in the Battalion War Diary on 29th November 1918, MM London Gazette 23rd July 1919 page 9383.

An habitual offender he had been tried and punished for various offences throughout his service, reduced to Private from Corporal by order of Field General Court Martial for drunkenness on one occasion. Returning to England 8th January 1919 he was demobilized 6th February 1919.

GVF £350 Available 


 

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil) to Mr Augustin Joseph Stapleton, Able Seaman, Merchant Navy born in Placentre Bay, Newfoundland, Canada in 1903. Serving aboard the Swedish Passenger and Cargo Liner SS Suecia when she was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic 16th August 1942 by the German Submarine U-596. Awarded the BEM for his “Outstanding courage and skill” during seven days in an open lifeboat. During a 48 hour gale Stapleton steered the lifeboat until he collapsed, in these severe conditions without the actions of Stapleton, it is doubtful whether they would have reached safety. The Swedish Chief Officer was also awarded a King’s Commendation. Returning to sea in November 1942 aboard the SS Benedict, he continued to serve at sea in various Merchant ships, his last ship being the SS Queen Elizabeth 1948 to 1949.

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil)

Augustin Joseph Stapleton

With copy London Gazette entry and header for BEM, details of service from his Merchant Navy record BT382 from 1941 to 1948, copies from the Honours and Awards file.

Augustin Joseph Stapleton was born in Placentre Bay, Newfoundland 10th May 1903 and in 1941 was serving at the Merchant Navy Reserve Pool, Liverpool. Joining the Swedish Passenger and Cargo ship SS Suecia in August 1941 as Able Seaman, he was aboard this ship when she was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic 16th August 1942 by the German Submarine U-596, the Suecia was part of convoy SC-95 from Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada to England. Awarded the British Empire Medal for his outstanding courage and skill when adrift in a lifeboat for seven days –

BEM London Gazette 16th February 1943 page 824 Augustin Joseph Stapleton, Able Seaman For services when the ship was torpedoed and sunk and for his conduct during seven days in an open boat. “The ship, when sailing alone, was torpedoed and sunk. One of the boats made a voyage of seven days in heavy weather before being picked up. Able Seaman Stapleton displayed outstanding courage and skill. He steered the boat during the whole of a 48 hour gale until he collapsed. In the severe conditions, without his great endurance and his experience in sailing, it is very doubtful whether the boat would have reached safety”. The Swedish Chief Officer Mr John Henry Rey was awarded a King’s Commendation.

Stapleton arrived at the Merchant Navy Reserve Pool, Liverpool 3rd November 1942 and joined the SS Benedict the same day, he continued to serve afloat in various Merchant ships until 30th May 1946 when he was admitted to hospital, sick. Discharged from hospital fit 28th June 1946 he returned to sea aboard the SS Blue Peter 1st July 1947 and subsequently joined SS Queen Elizabeth 13th April 1948 from which he appears to have been discharged 18th September 1949.

Scarce gallantry award to a Newfoundlander.

GVF & better £650 SOLD


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Distinguished Service Medal GVI, British Empire Medal GVI (Military), Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Charles Stanley Carter, Royal Navy born in July 1905 in Penzance, Cornwall. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1921, he rose steadily through the ranks being advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer in January 1937. Joining HMS Broke in July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire, France in June 1940. Awarded the BEM for his skill when Broke rescued 180 survivors from the Armed Merchant Cruiser Comorin  which caught fire on 6th April 1941 and eventually sank in mid Atlantic during severe weather conditions. Awarded the DSM for Operation Torch she landed US troops in Algiers, Broke came under a heavy fire from Vichy French shore batteries but landed troops despite being badly damaged. Disabled by further fire as she withdrew she sank two days later. Promoted to Warrant Engineer in September 1944, he retired in 1949 as a Commissioned Engineer and died in Plymouth in 1970.

Distinguished Service Medal GVI

M.36157 C S Carter CERA

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

Chief ERA Charles Stanley Carter D/M.36157

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M.36157 C S Carter ERA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.36157 C S Carter CERA 2 HMS Fearless

With copy service records, London Gazette entries and headers for BEM and DSM, copy recommendations for both awards. The group mounted for wear, not particularly well, in the wrong order.

Charles Stanley Carter was born in Penzance, Cornwall 2nd July 1905. A Scholar he entered the Royal Navy 29th January 1921 as an Artificer Apprentice, completing his Apprenticeship at Fisgard 1st July 1925 and rated ERA5, advanced to ERA3 at Vivid 1st July 1929, ERA2 aboard HMS Adventure 1st July 1933, acting CERA2 aboard HMS Fame 20th January 1937, he was confirmed in that rate aboard HMS Fearless 20th January 1938 and awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 7th June 1938. Joining HMS Broke 31st July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire in June 1940. Awarded both the BEM and DSM whist serving aboard this ship.

BEM London Gazette 8th July 1944 page 3915 ‘For courage and seamanship in rescuing survivors from a burning vessel’

‘One of HM Ships the SS Comorin caught fire at sea (on 6th April 1941). The fire spread quickly and it was decided to abandon ship. Heavy weather made the removal of the crew difficult. By fine seamanship a Destroyer was brought along side, and the greater part of the crew taken off. In this operation acting Leading Seaman Cook (awarded BEM) was conspicuous. He took the lead in helping survivors who were hurt as they jumped aboard. He worked untiringly, with no regard for his own safety. Chief Engine Room Artificer Carter did fine work during three and a half hours of delicate handling. 685 orders were transmitted to the Engine Room during this time. The names of these two men are put forward as representative of the skill, devotion and courage displayed throughout the action by the lower deck and Engine Room’.

HMS Broke recued 180 survivors, HMS Lincoln and HMS Glenarty also took survivors, 405 of the 426 on board were rescued. SS Comorin sank in mid Atlantic.

DSM London Gazette  6th April 1943 page 1583 ‘For outstanding gallantry and zeal in the Engine Room of HMS Broke throughout the hazardous operations when the Allied Forces were landed in North Africa in November 1942, Operation Terminal’.

Originally recommended for a Mention in Despatches but this upgraded to the DSM, the recommendation states –

‘This man’s bearing and leadership in action were of the highest order and had a most excellent steadying effect. He was also untiring in his efforts in after action damage control. The high state of effectiveness of the Engine Room Department was largely due to his zeal and energy’.

On 8 November 1942 Broke, together with the Destroyer Malcolm took part in Operation Terminal  part of Operation Torch , the Allied invasion of French North Africa. In “Terminal”, the two Destroyers were to attempt to land infantry directly onto the portside in Algiers in the hope of capturing the port facilities and preventing their destruction by the Vichy French. It was hoped that either complete surprise would be achieved or that the defenders would support the invasion to the extent at least of refusing to fire on the attackers. However, the Vichy forces opened fire on the ships, damaging them heavily. Malcolm was forced to withdraw, but Broke had better luck. On her third attempt, she sliced through the boom and succeeded in landing her troops under fire on the Quai de Fécamp, four hours after the operation started. Broke continued to receive heavy fire and was forced to withdraw at 1030, the unseasoned US troops she landed were quickly taken prisoner. roke was again hit by shore batteries when withdrawing which compounded on earlier damage. She was taken in tow by the Destroyer Zetland, but sank two days later on 10th November at position 36.50N 00.40E.

Promoted to Warrant Engineer 18th September 1944, and to Commissioned Engineer with the same seniority he retired in 1949 and died in Plymouth in 1970.

NEF £3,250 Available