aaa687 

Military Medal GV, British War & Victory Medals to acting Corporal James Henry Davies, West Yorkshire Regiment a former Coal Miner (Hewer) from Newbridge, Monmouthshire born in 1896. Serving in France with the 9th (Yorkshire Hussars) Battalion he was awarded the MM in July 1919 for his gallantry in the closing actions of the War including the Pursuit to the Selle 9th to 12th October 1918, Battle of the Sambre 4th November 1918 and passage of the Grande Honelle 5th to 7th November 1918. Discharged to Class ‘Z’ Army Reserve 13th January 1919.

Military Medal GV

20003 Pte – A.Cpl J H Davies 9/W York R

British War & Victory Medals

20003 A.Cpl J H Davies W York R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War & Victory Medals only, copy London Gazette entry and headers for MM, copy MM card, census details listed here.

John Henry Davies was born in Newbridge, Monmouthshire, Wales in 1896, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Coal Miner (Hewer) residing with his widowed father David also a Coal Miner (Hewer), four brothers and one sister at 6 Main Street, Newbridge. Serving in France with the 9th (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) Battalion he was awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 23rd July 1919 page 9368.

The 9th (Service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment was formed at York in August 1914 and saw service at Gallipoli during the closing days of the campaign, Egypt and arrived in France 1st July 1916. On 13th November 1917 it absorbed 400 other Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry and was re-named 9th (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) Battalion. Forming part of 32nd Brigade, 11th Division taking part in The pursuit to The Selle 9th to 12th October 1918, Battle of The Sambre 4th November 1918 including the passage of the Sambre-Oise Canal and capture of Le Quesnoy, passage of the Grande Honelle 5th to 7th November 1918.

Discharged to Class ‘Z’ Army Reserve 13th January 1919.

GVF £475 Available


aaa669 

British Empire Medal for Gallantry E2 (Civil Division), British War & Victory Medals, Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GVI 1st type to Mr Cecil Wallace David Allen from Congresbury, Somerset. Serving with the South Wales Borderers and later Machine Gun Corps in the First World War, he was a Special Constable during the Second World War. In 1959 he was a Newsagent at Congresbury and was decorated for apprehending a mentally deranged man armed with two shot guns and a sheath knife who entered his shop. The man had already attempted to shoot Police Officers and would not respond to pleas to give up his weapons. Disarming the man Allen was stabbed twice in the abdomen but managed to hold on to him until he was overpowered by Police. He died in Easton in Gordano, Somerset in October 1961 aged 69 years.

With Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV to his father Mr Wallace Davey Allen born in Congresbury, Somerset in 1865, a Baker and Confectioner he died in Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset in 1954 aged 88 years.

British Empire Medal E2 with For Gallantry Emblem (Civil Division)

Cecil Wallace David Allen

British War & Victory Medals

23474 Pte C W Allen S Wales Bord

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GVI 1st type

Cecil W D Allen

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV Robed Bust type

Wallace D Allen

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War & Victory Medals only, copy London Gazette entry and headers for BEM, census details etc. The BEM in Royal Mint presentation case with For Gallantry emblem for tunic ribbon.

aaa670

Cecil Wallace David Allen was born in 1892 in Bedminster, Somerset, the son of Wallace Davey Allen a Baker and Confectioner and his wife Emily. Residing in Yatton, Somerset on the outbreak of War he first served with the South Wales Borderers and transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. Serving as a Special Constable in the World War he was awarded the BEM for Gallantry in 1959 when he detained a mentally deranged man who entered his shop with two loaded shot guns and a knife.

BEM For Gallantry (Civil Division) London Gazette 17th April 1959 page 2617

Mr Cecil Wallace David Allen, Newsagent, Congresbury a joint citation with Mr Eric Harold Austin, Licensee, Old Inn, Congresbury.

‘Early one morning a mentally deranged man was seen on a seat at the cross roads at Congresbury holding a shot gun in a menacing manner. His brother tried to persuade him to hand over the gun but he refused and lunged at him with a large sheath knife. He was next seen by Mr Austin. He was still carrying the shot gun and told Austin it was loaded and that he was going to shoot a Policeman. Austin tried to persuade him to hand over the gun and go home quietly, but he refused. The Police were called and went with Austin towards the man’s caravan. As they did so a shot was fired and the man appeared carrying two shot guns. He had a large sheath knife between his teeth. He fired two or three shots at a Policeman and two shots into a Police patrol car, doing extensive damage.

Mr Austin was by now within 15 yards of the man trying to reason with him, and he followed him up to the village, always within a few yards of him trying to persuade him to put the guns down. The man kept in the open and after firing several more shots at Police Officers he went into the side door of Allan’s shop. It was clear to Mr Allan that the man was in a most dangerous mood, and that it would be an almost certain fatal risk for any Police Officer to try and get near him. Allan picked up a walking stick, came up behind the man and struck a blow on his head, causing him to drop both guns, but he turned and with considerable ferocity stabbed Allen twice in the stomach with the sheath knife. Allan managed to hang on to the man until Austin and the Police Officers ran forward and overpowered him’.

Cecil Wallace Davey Allen died in Easton in Gordano, Somerset on 18th October 1961 aged 69 years.

NEF £1,800 Reserved 


aaa612 

Military Medal GV, British War & Victory Medals to Private George Robert Trollope, 1/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment. Born in Shiphdam, Norfolk in 1898 and a Farm Labourer residing in Swaffham Norfolk before enlistment, he served first with the 1/5th then the 1/6th Battalions in France. Awarded the Military Medal in October 1918 he was demobilized at the end of hostilities and died in East Dareham, Norfolk in 1951 aged 53 years.

Military Medal GV

204646 Pte G R Trollope 1/6 W Rid R

British War & Victory Medals

204646 Pte G R Trollope W Rid R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War & Victory Medals only, copy London Gazette entry and headers.

George Robert Trollope was born 15th April 1898 in Shipdham, Norfolk, the 1911 census records he is a 12 year old Farm Boy residing with his father Brightmere a Farm Labourer and mother Elizabeth and two brothers at ‘Ivy Todd’, Necton, Norfolk. First serving with the 1/5th Battalion and later the 1/6th Battalions in France he was awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 4th October 1918 page 30940.  In 1918 the 1/6th Battalion were in action during the Battles of the Lys, the pursuit to the Selle and the final advance in Picardy. At the Armistice, the 49th Division was resting at Douai, demobilisation began in early 1919. George Robert Trollope returned to Norfolk after demobilization, he died in East Dareham, Norfolk in 1951 aged 53 years.

NEF £450 SOLD


aaa558 

Member of the British Empire (MBE) Military 1st type, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Defence of Ladysmith, Laing’s Nek, Belfast, Orange Free State, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War & Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Lieutenant Herbert Chester Gray, Royal Field Artillery a former Boot Finisher originally from Daventry, Northamptonshire. Attesting for the Royal Artillery in September 1891, he served in India from September 1896 to September 1899. Promoted to Sergeant in April 1900, he served with 2nd Brigade Divisional Ammunition Column during the defence of Ladysmith and was Mentioned in General Sir George Whit’s despatch for distinguished service. Reduced to Corporal in July 1900 for misconduct he was promoted again to Sergeant in February 1901, he served in South Africa from 17th September 1899 to 8th October 1902, from July 1901 with 42nd Battery RFA and later No 3 Local Ammunition Column. Discharged time expired in September 1903, he took employment as a Foreman, Brewery Delivery Department in Newport, Monmouthshire. Volunteering again on the outbreak of war he was commissioned Lieutenant in May 1915 and served in France from 1916, where he was twice Mentioned in Despatches, wounded and had his horse shot from under him on the Somme. Awarded the MBE fin 1918 for an act of gallantry in France not in the presence of the enemy’. Retiring to Bournemouth on relinquishing his commission, he died there in 1942.

Member of the British Empire (MBE) 1st type Military

Unnamed as awarded with Hallmark for London 1918

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Defence of Ladysmith, Laing’s Nek, Belfast, Orange Free State

86201 Cpl H Gray RFA

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

86201 SERJT H Gray RFA

British War & Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf

Lieut H C Gray

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry for MID’s (2) an original tatty newspaper cutting with picture, an original group photograph containing the recipient and details extracted from his on line other ranks service record. The MBE in Garrard & co presentation case.

aaa556

Herbert Chester Gray was born in Daventry, Northamptonshire an 18 year old Boot Finisher and serving member of the Northampton Rifle Volunteers he attested for the Royal Artillery at Weedon 2nd September 1891 and posted 30th Battalion RA. Promoted acting Bombardier 23rd July 1894, Bombardier 16th June 1896, Corporal 12th January 1899. Posted Indian Division Ammunition Column 27th September 1899 and 2nd Brigade Divisional Ammunition Column which he served with during the defence of Ladysmith. Promoted Sergeant 17th April 1900 and reduced to Corporal for misconduct 3rd July 1900, promoted to Sergeant again 15th February 1901, posted to 42nd Battery Royal Field Artillery 1st July 1901, discharged 1st September 1903 on completion of engagement. Served in India 24th September 1896 to 16th September 1899, South Africa 17th September 1899 to 8th October 1902. Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir George White for distinguished services during the defence of Ladysmith London Gazette 8th February 1901 page 931.

aaa557

Lieutenant Herbert Chester Gray, RFA far right the reverse of the photo written in ink
“The Boshe hunters at rest”

Herbert Chester Gray married just before he left the Army on 7th April 1903 at Bradford, the 1911 census records he is employed as a Foreman, Brewery Delivery Department residing with his wife Ada, daughter and servant at 1 Clytha Crescent, Newport, Monmouthshire. Volunteering his services again on the outbreak of war he was commissioned Temporary Lieutenant 9th May 1915 (London Gazette 8th May 1915 page 5410) and served in France from 1916. The original Northampton Independent newspaper article dated 21st December 1918 with the group records he was wounded on the Somme and had his horse shot from under him. Awarded the MBE London Gazette 18th November 1918 page 13575 ‘In connection with Military operations in France and Flanders, for an act of gallantry not in the presence of the enemy’. Mentioned in Despatches by Sir Douglas Haig London Gazette 18th May 1917 page 4871 and London Gazette 18th May 1917 page 4874. Relinquishing his commission following the Armistice he retired to Bournemouth and died there in 1942.

The Orange Free State clasp to his Queen’s South Africa in the wrong order, it was issued later on the supplementary roll for 42nd Battery with the comments ‘From No 3 Local Ammunition Column, clasp issued 17th August 1904′.

A rare instance of an MBE being awarded for gallantry not in the face of the enemy in France.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £1,250 SOLD


aaa513

aaa512 

British Empire Medal GVI (Military), 1939/45 Defence & War Medals to Corporal Mildred Wilson, Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS).

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

W/38559 Cpl Mildred Wilson ATS

1939/45 Defence & War Medals

Unnamed as issued

With copy London Gazette entry and header for BEM, flattened wartime economy BEM cardboard presentation box, original letter from Buckingham Palace forwarding the BEM.

BEM London Gazette 13th June 1946 page 2808

GVF £350 Available


aaa328

Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels, Egypt Medal reverse dated 1882 no clasp, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, Khedives Star dated 1882 to Colonel Edgar Henry Burney, Royal Berkshire Regiment. Born in St Martin, Jersey in 1860 the son of a Captain, Royal Navy who was also to be awarded the Companion of the Order of the Bath. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 49th Regiment of Foot in January 1879, he took part in the 1882 Egypt Expedition with the 1st Battalion, including the surrender of Kafr Dowar. Appointed Adjutant to the 2nd Battalion 1884 to 1887, attached Army Ordnance Department at Woolwich 1888 to 1893, appointed Adjutant of Militia in 1894 he was promoted Lt Colonel 29th August 1900 and commanded the 2nd Battalion in South Africa from October 1900 to October 1901. Commanding the centre lines of communications and No 4 Mobile Column in the Transvaal he was Mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Order of the Bath in September 1901. Promoted to Colonel on his retirement in August 1904, he died the following year in Paris at the age of only 44 years.

Companion of the Order of the Bath silver gilt and enamels with ribbon brooch suspender

Unnamed as awarded

Egypt Medal reverse dated 1882 no clasp

Lieut E Burney 1/Berks Regt

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

Lt Col E H Burney Rl Berks Rgt

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Lt Col E H Burney CB R Berks Rgt

With copy London Gazette entries and headers for CB and MID, research details extracted from The Army List and on line records. A series of photographs of Colonel Burney are held by the Regimental Museum (The Wardrobe) their catalogue can be viewed on line.

Edgar Henry Burney was born in St Martin, Jersey 17th August 1860, the son of Captain Charles Burney, CB, Royal NAVY (Superintendent of the Royal Hospital School, Greenwich 1870 to 1887) and his wife Catherine (nee Jones), baptised at St Martin, Jersey 17th August 1860, the 1861 census records he is 8 months old living with his mother and servants (father at sea) in St Martin. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 49th Foot 22nd January 1879, promoted Lieutenant 8th April 1880, Captain 10th December 1884 and served as Adjutant to the 2nd Battalion 1884 to 1887. Attached to the Army Ordnance Department 1888 to 1893, the 1891 census records he is residing at 28 Hill Street, Woolwich, London married to Marguerita Cecile born in Luxemburg but from a Jersey family. Promoted Major 2nd November 1894 and appointed Adjutant 4th Militia Battalion Manchester Regiment 1893 to 1898, promoted Lt Colonel 29th August 1900 and Colonel 29th August 1904 on his retirement, the father of two children born in Weymouth in 1893 and Germany in 1898.

His overseas service included Gibraltar 8th March 1881 to 17th July 1882, Malta 18th July 1882 to 22nd July 1882, Egypt 23rd July 1882 to 11th April 1883 including the surrender of Kafr Dowar 5th August 1882 (Medal & Khedives Star), Gibraltar 27th September 1883 to 15th June 1884 and again from 28th January 1900 to 8th September 1900. Commanded the 2nd Battalion in South Africa from 27th October 1900 to 11th October 1901, Commanded Lines of Communication Middle Section Transvaal January to 10th May 1901, commanded No 4 Mobile Column Transvaal from May to July 1901. Operations in the Transvaal east of Pretoria October and November 1900, Operations in the Transvaal November 1900 to July 1901, Operations in cape Colony July to October 1901, and May 1902. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 10th September 1901, Companion of the Bath London Gazette 27th September 1901 page 6317.

Colonel Burney died in Neuilly, Paris 16th June 1905 aged 44 years.

GVF £2,450 Available


aaa456

Distinguished Service Medal GVI, British Empire Medal GVI (Military), Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Charles Stanley Carter, Royal Navy born in July 1905 in Penzance, Cornwall. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1921, he rose steadily through the ranks being advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer in January 1937. Joining HMS Broke in July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire, France in June 1940. Awarded the BEM for his skill when Broke rescued 180 survivors from the Armed Merchant Cruiser Comorin  which caught fire on 6th April 1941 and eventually sank in mid Atlantic during severe weather conditions. Awarded the DSM for Operation Torch she landed US troops in Algiers, Broke came under a heavy fire from Vichy French shore batteries but landed troops despite being badly damaged. Disabled by further fire as she withdrew she sank two days later. Promoted to Warrant Engineer in September 1944, he retired in 1949 as a Commissioned Engineer and died in Plymouth in 1970.

Distinguished Service Medal GVI

M.36157 C S Carter CERA

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

Chief ERA Charles Stanley Carter D/M.36157

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M.36157 C S Carter ERA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.36157 C S Carter CERA 2 HMS Fearless

With copy service records, London Gazette entries and headers for BEM and DSM, copy recommendations for both awards. The group mounted for wear, not particularly well, in the wrong order.

Charles Stanley Carter was born in Penzance, Cornwall 2nd July 1905. A Scholar he entered the Royal Navy 29th January 1921 as an Artificer Apprentice, completing his Apprenticeship at Fisgard 1st July 1925 and rated ERA5, advanced to ERA3 at Vivid 1st July 1929, ERA2 aboard HMS Adventure 1st July 1933, acting CERA2 aboard HMS Fame 20th January 1937, he was confirmed in that rate aboard HMS Fearless 20th January 1938 and awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 7th June 1938. Joining HMS Broke 31st July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire in June 1940. Awarded both the BEM and DSM whist serving aboard this ship.

BEM London Gazette 8th July 1944 page 3915 ‘For courage and seamanship in rescuing survivors from a burning vessel’

‘One of HM Ships the SS Comorin caught fire at sea (on 6th April 1941). The fire spread quickly and it was decided to abandon ship. Heavy weather made the removal of the crew difficult. By fine seamanship a Destroyer was brought along side, and the greater part of the crew taken off. In this operation acting Leading Seaman Cook (awarded BEM) was conspicuous. He took the lead in helping survivors who were hurt as they jumped aboard. He worked untiringly, with no regard for his own safety. Chief Engine Room Artificer Carter did fine work during three and a half hours of delicate handling. 685 orders were transmitted to the Engine Room during this time. The names of these two men are put forward as representative of the skill, devotion and courage displayed throughout the action by the lower deck and Engine Room’.

HMS Broke recued 180 survivors, HMS Lincoln and HMS Glenarty also took survivors, 405 of the 426 on board were rescued. SS Comorin sank in mid Atlantic.

DSM London Gazette  6th April 1943 page 1583 ‘For outstanding gallantry and zeal in the Engine Room of HMS Broke throughout the hazardous operations when the Allied Forces were landed in North Africa in November 1942, Operation Terminal’.

Originally recommended for a Mention in Despatches but this upgraded to the DSM, the recommendation states –

‘This man’s bearing and leadership in action were of the highest order and had a most excellent steadying effect. He was also untiring in his efforts in after action damage control. The high state of effectiveness of the Engine Room Department was largely due to his zeal and energy’.

On 8 November 1942 Broke, together with the Destroyer Malcolm took part in Operation Terminal  part of Operation Torch , the Allied invasion of French North Africa. In “Terminal”, the two Destroyers were to attempt to land infantry directly onto the portside in Algiers in the hope of capturing the port facilities and preventing their destruction by the Vichy French. It was hoped that either complete surprise would be achieved or that the defenders would support the invasion to the extent at least of refusing to fire on the attackers. However, the Vichy forces opened fire on the ships, damaging them heavily. Malcolm was forced to withdraw, but Broke had better luck. On her third attempt, she sliced through the boom and succeeded in landing her troops under fire on the Quai de Fécamp, four hours after the operation started. Broke continued to receive heavy fire and was forced to withdraw at 1030, the unseasoned US troops she landed were quickly taken prisoner. roke was again hit by shore batteries when withdrawing which compounded on earlier damage. She was taken in tow by the Destroyer Zetland, but sank two days later on 10th November at position 36.50N 00.40E.

Promoted to Warrant Engineer 18th September 1944, and to Commissioned Engineer with the same seniority he retired in 1949 and died in Plymouth in 1970.

NEF £3,250 Available


aaa403

British Empire Medal E2 (Civil), Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister, 1939/45 Defence Medal, St John’s Ambulance Brigade Long Service Medal with FOUR Long Service Clasps to Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum, Leeds St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Born in Rathdown, Co Dublin, Ireland in 1904 she received the Defence Medal for services with St Johns Ambulance during the Second World War in Leeds, there were nine bombing raids on Leeds the heaviest being on the night of 14th / 15th March 1941. Awarded the Order of St John Serving Sister in January 1964 and the BEM in January 1980, the latter for services to The Leeds Women’s Hospital. She died in Leeds in 1992 aged 88 years.

British Empire Medal (Civil) E2

Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum

Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister

Unnamed as awarded

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

St John’s Ambulance Brigade Long Service Medal with FOUR Long Service Clasps

40896 Cpl I L Lendrum Yorks SJAB 1949

The group mounted as originally worn, with copy London Gazette entries for both awards and other research listed here and copy photo.

Isabel Lloyd Lendrum William Bailey Lendrum Isabella Mary Horner Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum (left) with her uncle and aunt.

Isabel Lloyd Lendrum was born in Rathdown, Co Dublin, Ireland 13th August 1904, the daughter of Christopher Lendrum a Railway Agent and his wife Octavia. In 1911 the family were residing at 48 Military Road, Limerick, Ireland. By 1939 Miss Lendrum was residing in Leeds, Yorkshire and was a long serving member of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Leeds was subject to nine bombing raids during the Second World War the heaviest being on the night of 14th / 15th March 1941, Miss Lendrum receiving her Defence Medal for services with the St Johns Ambulance Brigade during this period. Awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister London Gazette 14th January 1964 page 390 and the British Empire Medal London Gazette 8th January 1980 page 301 ‘For services to Leeds Hospital for Women’.

Miss Lendrum never married and died at The Victoria Home, 224 Kirkstall Lane, Leeds on 28th August 1992 aged 88 years. Worthy of local research.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £425Available


aaa340

Sea Gallantry Medal (SGM) Large Bronze type, Victoria, British War Medal, Royal Victorian Medal (RVM) EVII Silver to William Henry Parker, Merchant Navy who as Third Mate of the Colonist was awarded the SGM for rescuing the crew of the Schooner Hebe of Greenock 24th February 1890 when she was demisted in a hurricane in the North Atlantic. As Captain of a Mr Bibby’s personal Yacht Jason, he was awarded the RVM in 1909 when HM King Edward VII visited the Yacht at Mamore. Commissioned Lieutenant, RNR in 1915 he was forced to resign his commission on account of ill health, he went on to command the SS Iolanda and died in Wokingham, Berkshire in 1979 aged 92 years.

Large Bronze Sea Gallantry Medal Victoria suspension bar engraved ‘Colonist’

W H Parker Wreck of the “Hebe” on 24 February 1890

British War Medal

Lieut W H Parker RNR

Royal Victorian Medal Silver EVII

Unnamed as awarded

With copy RNR service record, an original letter and award certificate for the RVM, original photo of Captain Parker and other research including a photo of the Yacht Jason.

aaa342

William Henry Parker was born in London in 1881, as Third Mate of the Colonist he was awarded the Sea Gallantry Medal in Bronze by the Board of Trade for saving the lives of the crew of the Schooner Hebe on 24 February 1890 when she was demisted in a hurricane in the North Atlantic. Two Life Boats were launched from the stricken Hebe, one capsized drowning one man and the second Life Boat was lost when trying to lower it onto the deck. The crew were rescued by a boat from Colonist which made two trips in heavy seas with gale force winds at great risk.

Parker became the Captain of a Mr Bibby’s personal Yacht Jason and was awarded the RVM in Silver on 25th September 1909 on the occasion of HM King Edward VII’s visit at Mamore. Commissioned Lieutenant, RNR 18th January 1915, he served aboard the Iolaire and other Armed Trawlers but was found to be unfit for service and discharged in July 1917 due to an old injury, right leg. His last Command was the SS Iolanda and he died in Wokingham, Berkshire in 1979 aged 92 years.

Official correction to ‘N’ of RNR on BWM

NEF £750 Reserved