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Distinguished Service Medal GVI, British Empire Medal GVI (Military), Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Charles Stanley Carter, Royal Navy born in July 1905 in Penzance, Cornwall. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1921, he rose steadily through the ranks being advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer in January 1937. Joining HMS Broke in July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire, France in June 1940. Awarded the BEM for his skill when Broke rescued 180 survivors from the Armed Merchant Cruiser Comorin  which caught fire on 6th April 1941 and eventually sank in mid Atlantic during severe weather conditions. Awarded the DSM for Operation Torch she landed US troops in Algiers, Broke came under a heavy fire from Vichy French shore batteries but landed troops despite being badly damaged. Disabled by further fire as she withdrew she sank two days later. Promoted to Warrant Engineer in September 1944, he retired in 1949 as a Commissioned Engineer and died in Plymouth in 1970.

Distinguished Service Medal GVI

M.36157 C S Carter CERA

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

Chief ERA Charles Stanley Carter D/M.36157

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M.36157 C S Carter ERA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.36157 C S Carter CERA 2 HMS Fearless

With copy service records, London Gazette entries and headers for BEM and DSM, copy recommendations for both awards. The group mounted for wear, not particularly well, in the wrong order.

Charles Stanley Carter was born in Penzance, Cornwall 2nd July 1905. A Scholar he entered the Royal Navy 29th January 1921 as an Artificer Apprentice, completing his Apprenticeship at Fisgard 1st July 1925 and rated ERA5, advanced to ERA3 at Vivid 1st July 1929, ERA2 aboard HMS Adventure 1st July 1933, acting CERA2 aboard HMS Fame 20th January 1937, he was confirmed in that rate aboard HMS Fearless 20th January 1938 and awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 7th June 1938. Joining HMS Broke 31st July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire in June 1940. Awarded both the BEM and DSM whist serving aboard this ship.

BEM London Gazette 8th July 1944 page 3915 ‘For courage and seamanship in rescuing survivors from a burning vessel’

‘One of HM Ships the SS Comorin caught fire at sea (on 6th April 1941). The fire spread quickly and it was decided to abandon ship. Heavy weather made the removal of the crew difficult. By fine seamanship a Destroyer was brought along side, and the greater part of the crew taken off. In this operation acting Leading Seaman Cook (awarded BEM) was conspicuous. He took the lead in helping survivors who were hurt as they jumped aboard. He worked untiringly, with no regard for his own safety. Chief Engine Room Artificer Carter did fine work during three and a half hours of delicate handling. 685 orders were transmitted to the Engine Room during this time. The names of these two men are put forward as representative of the skill, devotion and courage displayed throughout the action by the lower deck and Engine Room’.

HMS Broke recued 180 survivors, HMS Lincoln and HMS Glenarty also took survivors, 405 of the 426 on board were rescued. SS Comorin sank in mid Atlantic.

DSM London Gazette  6th April 1943 page 1583 ‘For outstanding gallantry and zeal in the Engine Room of HMS Broke throughout the hazardous operations when the Allied Forces were landed in North Africa in November 1942, Operation Terminal’.

Originally recommended for a Mention in Despatches but this upgraded to the DSM, the recommendation states –

‘This man’s bearing and leadership in action were of the highest order and had a most excellent steadying effect. He was also untiring in his efforts in after action damage control. The high state of effectiveness of the Engine Room Department was largely due to his zeal and energy’.

On 8 November 1942 Broke, together with the Destroyer Malcolm took part in Operation Terminal  part of Operation Torch , the Allied invasion of French North Africa. In “Terminal”, the two Destroyers were to attempt to land infantry directly onto the portside in Algiers in the hope of capturing the port facilities and preventing their destruction by the Vichy French. It was hoped that either complete surprise would be achieved or that the defenders would support the invasion to the extent at least of refusing to fire on the attackers. However, the Vichy forces opened fire on the ships, damaging them heavily. Malcolm was forced to withdraw, but Broke had better luck. On her third attempt, she sliced through the boom and succeeded in landing her troops under fire on the Quai de Fécamp, four hours after the operation started. Broke continued to receive heavy fire and was forced to withdraw at 1030, the unseasoned US troops she landed were quickly taken prisoner. roke was again hit by shore batteries when withdrawing which compounded on earlier damage. She was taken in tow by the Destroyer Zetland, but sank two days later on 10th November at position 36.50N 00.40E.

Promoted to Warrant Engineer 18th September 1944, and to Commissioned Engineer with the same seniority he retired in 1949 and died in Plymouth in 1970.

NEF £3,250 Available


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Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Corporal Edward Forrest, Lancashire Fusiliers a former Cotton Mill Card Room Stripper and Grinder . Born in Oldham in 1880, he first served in France with the 10th Battalion from 15th July 1915. The 10th Battalion fought on the Somme and suffered 407 casualties in their unsuccessful attack on Quadrangle Support Trench, Pearl Alley on 7th July 1916, they subsequently captured enemy position on the SE corner of Delville Wood 12th August 1916. He subsequently served with the 13th and 3rd Reserve Battalions, probably whilst recovering from wounds or sickness, the 18th Battalion and finally 2/5th Territorial Battalion. He was attached 55th Division Trench Mortar Battery when he was awarded his MM in October 1918.

Military Medal GV

4013 Cpl E Forrest 2/5 Lan Fus

1914/15 Star,

4013 Pte E Forrest Lan Fus

British War & Victory Medals

4013 Cpl E Forrest Lan Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry for MM, and other research listed here.

Edward Forrest was born in Oldham, Lancashire in 1880, the 1911 census records he is 31 years old and employed at the local Cotton Mill Card Room Striper and Grinder residing with his wife Jane, daughter and son at 106 Eldon Street, Oldham. Serving in France from 15th July 1915 with the 10th Battalion, part of 52nd Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division they were billeted at Bois des Tailles, Somme sector when the 1st July 1916 offensive went in. Taking part in the unsuccessful attack on Quadrangle Support Trench, Pearl Alley 7th July 1916, the Germans had been unaffected by the British bombardment and quickly fought off the attackers, the 10th suffering 407 casualties. Capturing enemy positions in the SE corner of Deville Wood 12th August, their last attack on 11th November at Gueudecourt was recorded as being waist high in mud.

Probably wounded on the Somme, his BWM/Vict Medal roll records he next served in the 13th and 3rd Reserve Battalions at home. Posted to the 18th Battalion in France, he subsequently transferred to the 2/5th Battalion and was attached Divisional Trench Mortar Battery.

Awarded the MM London Gazette 27th October 1918 page 11828 attached 55th Division Trench Mortar Battery.

Gap between 4013 and Cpl where a number has been officially removed whilst naming.

GVF £500 Available


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Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private James Henry Strapps, Lancashire Fusiliers. Born in Chorlton, Lancashire in 1897, he was residing in Moss Side prior to the outbreak of War. An original 16th (2nd Salford Pals) Battalion soldier serving in V Platoon, ‘B’ Company in France from 23rd November 1915. Surviving ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies attack on Thiepval 1st July 1916 in which they suffered 231 casualties in support of the 1st Salford Pals, he was awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry at Arras on 3rd April 1918. Returning to Moss Side after demobilization, in 1920 when he married he was employed as a Copper Engraver. He died in Bucklow , Cheshire in 1927 aged 29 years.

Military Medal GV

11701 Pte J Strapps 16/Lan Fus

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

11701 Pte J H Strapps Lan Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry for MM, copy War Diary covering the date of his MM action, mentioned in the Diary by name receiving the MM, 1911 census entry and other research listed here.

James Henry Strapps was born in Chorlton, Lancashire 27th July 1897, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old school boy residing with his father John Henry Strapps a Plumber, mother Mary 2 brothers and 1 sister at 17 Cotsworth Street, Moss Side, Manchester. An original 16th (2nd Salford Pals) Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, he is recorded as serving in ‘V’ Platoon of ‘B’ Company. Serving in France from 23rd November 1915, his Battalion was part of 96th Brigade, 32nd Division. In support of the attack on Thiepval, Somme sector 1st July 1916. Hearing that the 1st Salford Pals on the left of the Division’s assault were in trouble ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies moved forward but came under heavy machine gun sire suffering 231 casualties.

Awarded the MM London Gazette 27th June 1918 page 7596 for his gallantry at Arras 3rd April 1918, the award of his MM along with the Military Cross awarded to his officer 2/Lieutenant Sydney Vasey is recorded in the Battalion’s War Diary on 5th May 1918. The citation for Vasey’s MC reads –

‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of two sections detailed to clear a sunken road. He drove the enemy out of the road under heavy Machine Gun and rifle fire, and captured two Machine Guns. Subsequently he greatly helped to consolidate a new line by pushing out boldly 300 yards in front of the objective, thereby assisting the troops in the rear. He handled his men with great skill and determination’.

Following demobilization Strapps returned to Moss Side, Manchester. He married at Oxford Road Wesleyan Chapel Chorlton on Medlock, Manchester on 14th August 1920, he gave his occupation as Copper Engraver residing at 17 Colsworth Street, Moss Side married Alice Tucker. James Henry Strapps died in Bucklow, Cheshire in 1927 aged only 29 years, his exact cause of death un researched.

GVF £625 SOLD


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Distinguished Conduct Medal GV to Private Charles Edward Dean, Durham Light Infantry. Born in July 1872 in Newcastle, Staffordshire and a Potters Placer, he was almost certainly a conscript. Serving in France with the 1/5th Battalion, he was awarded his DCM for gallantry at Estaires on 10th April 1918 when he volunteered with another man to re-capture a bridge which the enemy had taken for the second time. His assault was successful and he was wounded in the ankle by a gun shot. Discharged unfit in May 1919, he died in Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire in 1924 aged 52 years. He was 46 years old when awarded the DCM, probably one of the oldest recipients of this decoration in the Great War.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

59593 Pte C E Dean 5/Durh LI

With copy London Gazette entry & headers, SWB roll entry an other research listed here.

Charles Edward Dean was born in Newcastle, Staffordshire 15th July 1872, the 1911 census records he is a 38 year old Potters Placer residing with his wife Minnie, 4 daughters and 3 sons at 8 Wedgwood Street, Wolstanton, Staffordshire. Almost certainly a conscript he enlisted 11th June 1917 and served in France with the 1/5th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 3rd September 1918 page 1028

‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty(at Estaires, 10th April 1918). Together with another man, he volunteered to rush a bridge, which the enemy had taken for the second time. Owing to the example of these two, others joined them, and the bridge was retaken. Private Dean being wounded in the ankle by gunshot’.

Discharged medically unfit 21st May 1919, he died in Stoke on Trent in March 1924 aged 52 years. Probably one of the oldest recipients of the DCM in the Great War being 46 years of age when he won it.

GVF £750 Available


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British Empire Medal E2 (Civil), Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister, 1939/45 Defence Medal, St John’s Ambulance Brigade Long Service Medal with FOUR Long Service Clasps to Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum, Leeds St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Born in Rathdown, Co Dublin, Ireland in 1904 she received the Defence Medal for services with St Johns Ambulance during the Second World War in Leeds, there were nine bombing raids on Leeds the heaviest being on the night of 14th / 15th March 1941. Awarded the Order of St John Serving Sister in January 1964 and the BEM in January 1980, the latter for services to The Leeds Women’s Hospital. She died in Leeds in 1992 aged 88 years.

British Empire Medal (Civil) E2

Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum

Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister

Unnamed as awarded

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

St John’s Ambulance Brigade Long Service Medal with FOUR Long Service Clasps

40896 Cpl I L Lendrum Yorks SJAB 1949

The group mounted as originally worn, with copy London Gazette entries for both awards and other research listed here and copy photo.

Isabel Lloyd Lendrum William Bailey Lendrum Isabella Mary Horner Miss Isabel Lloyd Lendrum (left) with her uncle and aunt.

Isabel Lloyd Lendrum was born in Rathdown, Co Dublin, Ireland 13th August 1904, the daughter of Christopher Lendrum a Railway Agent and his wife Octavia. In 1911 the family were residing at 48 Military Road, Limerick, Ireland. By 1939 Miss Lendrum was residing in Leeds, Yorkshire and was a long serving member of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Leeds was subject to nine bombing raids during the Second World War the heaviest being on the night of 14th / 15th March 1941, Miss Lendrum receiving her Defence Medal for services with the St Johns Ambulance Brigade during this period. Awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem Serving Sister London Gazette 14th January 1964 page 390 and the British Empire Medal London Gazette 8th January 1980 page 301 ‘For services to Leeds Hospital for Women’.

Miss Lendrum never married and died at The Victoria Home, 224 Kirkstall Lane, Leeds on 28th August 1992 aged 88 years. Worthy of local research.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £450 Available


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Distinguished Conduct Medal Victoria, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Belmont, Modder River, Driefontein, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 to Private Walter Delooze a former Groom from Warrington, Lancashire. Attesting for the Grenadier Guards in Manchester 2nd July 1894, he served in Gibraltar prior to the outbreak of the Boer War and in South Africa from October 1899 to July 1902. Awarded the DCM either for gallantry at Belmont or Modder River, he was also Mentioned in Despatches in September 1901. Discharged to the Army Reserve in July 1902 and from the Reserve in July 1906. In 1911 he was an Electric Brougham (early car) Driver residing with his family in Camberwell, SE London, he did not serve in the First World War and died in Greenwich in 1936 aged 59 years. One of 16 DCM’s awarded to this Regiment for the Boer War.

Distinguished Conduct Medal Victoria

4909 Pte W Delooze Grenadier Gds

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Belmont, Modder River, Driefontein, Transvaal

4909 Pte W Delooze Gren Gds

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

4909 Pte W Delooze Grenadier Guards

With copy London Gazette entries and headers for DCM & MID, details extracted from his on line service record and census details.

Walter Delooze was born in Warrington, Lancashire in 1877, the 1891 census records he is a 14 year old Errand Boy residing with his family at 23 Cumberland Street, Broughton, Salford, Lancashire. Attesting for the Grenadier Guards at Manchester 2nd July 1894, he gave his occupation as Groom and age as 18 years 11 months (actually 17 years 11 months). Joining the 3rd Battalion he served in Gibraltar 23rd September 1899 to 25th October 1899 and South Africa from 26th October 1899 to 21st July 1902. Appointed Lance Corporal 3rd March 1900, he reverted to Private 17th May 1902, discharged to the Army Reserve 29th July 1902 and from the Reserve 1st July 1906.

DCM London Gazette 27th September 1901 page 6310

The DCM appears to be for a single act of gallantry at Belmont, this un researched by vendor.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 10th September 1901 (Lord Roberts)

The 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards in South Africa

The 3rd Battalion sailed from Gibraltar aboard the Ghoorkha on 25th October 1899, and arrived at the Cape about 15th November. Along with the 1st and 2nd Coldstreams and the 1st Scots Guards they composed the 1st (Guards) Brigade. General Buller was in overall command but the Division was independently commanded by Lt-Gen Lord Methuen of the Scots Guards. Maj-Gen Henry Colville of the Grenadier Guards was the Brigade commander assisted by ADC Captain G C Nugent and Brigade Major Captain H G Ruggles-Brise, both Grenadier officers.

Gun Hill, Belmont 23 Nov 1899

Advancing to relieve Kimberley at the beginning of the war, Methuen attempted a night attack at Belmont on 22-23 November 1899. He sent Colville off with his brigade to assault Gun Hill: although ‘They were guided by my Brigade Major, Captain Ruggles-Brise, who led them to the exact spot’, Colville admitted that he had miscalculated the distance, and that the commanding officer, Lt Colonel Crabbe of 3rd Grenadier Guards attacked the wrong hill. Crabbe was wounded and the attack was led by Major Kinloch. The hill was in fact the objective of the Coldstream Guards, and a faulty map was to blame for the error. The Grenadiers displayed great bravery in the assault and sustained heavy casualties: 2 officers and 23 men killed, 7 officers and 97 men wounded. These losses represented half the total loss of the whole force.

Modder River 28 Nov 1899

The Boers were entrenched either side of the Modder River at the confluence of the Reit and Modder where a railway bridge remained undamaged. The Transvaalers were commanded by De La Rey and Cronje, and the Free Staters by Prinsloo. Methuen chose to send the Guards Brigade into a frontal attack with the Scots Guards on the right coming in on the enemy flank. The 3rd Grenadiers were in the middle with a mile-long front. The Boers were well armed and able to direct accurate fire on the exposed troops. They were pinned down for many hours in hot sun and suffering from thirst and hunger. One Guards officers wrote afterwards:

“We had no cover except little scrub bushes about 6 inches high, and the ground sloping gently down to the Boers from about 2000 yards. I don’t suppose troops have ever been in a more damnable position. I sat up occasionally to see how things were going, but only for a moment, as it was always the signal for a perfect storm of bullets. My ammunition-bearer had his head blown to bits by a 1lb shell from a 37mm Maxim, a most damnable gun. I happened to be in the line of it just before dark, and they pumped 6 rounds at me. The first 4 pitched in a line about 20, 10, 15 and the fourth 4 yards in front of me, and threw dirt all over me, and the next two just pitched behind me. I didn’t like it a bit…it was the worst I have ever spent in my life. Twelve hours under constant and heavy fire of Maxims, 12-pounders, and other quick-firing guns and rifles, a hot sun, no cover, no water, and no food is more than enough for yours truly… The guns [Royal Artillery 18th, 75th and 62nd Batteries] yesterday fought magnificently, and I believe fired more rounds per gun than have ever been fired in a battle before… We had a lovely wash this morning. I washed shirt and drawers, besides myself – I wanted it. My clothes have not been off since we left the Orange River on November 21.”

The battle continued into the night but the Boers would not have been forced from their defensive positions but for the bravery of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and others who forded the river and took the enemy by surprise. The battle was a victory and gained a battle honour for the regiment. Grenadier Guard casualties: 3 officers wounded, 12 men killed, 50 wounded. The whole Division: 68 men killed, 3 officers killed, 16 officers and 368 men wounded. One of the best known casualties was Major Count Gleichen  who was badly wounded. Also wounded was Lt Hon E Lygon and 2nd Lt A H Travers. Lord Methuen mentioned the following from the 3rd Battalion in his despatch: Sgt Brown and Private Martin who helped Count Gleichen and were both shot. Sergeant Major Cooke, who displayed remarkable coolness under fire. Lt the Hon A Russell showed great coolness in working a machine-gun, which he did with marked success. Capt Hervey Bathurst, Grenadier Guards was of great value in rallying a number of Grenadiers and Coldstreams shaken by the fire.

Walter Delooze married Emma Elizabeth Sewell in Chertsey, Surrey in 1904, the 1911 census records he is a 32 year old Electric Brougham (early car) Driver residing with his wife and two daughters at 67 Boyson Road, Camberwell, SE London, he did not serve in the First World War and died in Greenwich in 1936 aged 59 years.

The 2nd and 3rd Battalions Grenadier Guards served in South Africa between them there were 16 DCM’s awarded.

GVF £2,750 Available

 


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Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB) in silver gilt and enamels, Egypt Medal reverse dated 1882 no clasp, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, Khedives Star dated 1882 to Colonel Edgar Henry Burney, Royal Berkshire Regiment. Born in St Martin, Jersey in 1860 the son of a Captain, Royal Navy who was also to be awarded the Companion of the Order of the Bath. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 49th Regiment of Foot in January 1879, he took part in the 1882 Egypt Expedition with the 1st Battalion, including the surrender of Kafr Dowar. Appointed Adjutant to the 2nd Battalion 1884 to 1887, attached Army Ordnance Department at Woolwich 1888 to 1893, appointed Adjutant of Militia in 1894 he was promoted Lt Colonel 29th August 1900 and commanded the 2nd Battalion in South Africa from October 1900 to October 1901. Commanding the centre lines of communications and No 4 Mobile Column in the Transvaal he was Mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Order of the Bath in September 1901. Promoted to Colonel on his retirement in August 1904, he died the following year in Paris at the age of only 44 years.

Companion of the Order of the Bath silver gilt and enamels with ribbon brooch suspender

Unnamed as awarded

Egypt Medal reverse dated 1882 no clasp

Lieut E Burney 1/Berks Regt

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

Lt Col E H Burney Rl Berks Rgt

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Lt Col E H Burney CB R Berks Rgt

With copy London Gazette entries and headers for CB and MID, research details extracted from The Army List and on line records. A series of photographs of Colonel Burney are held by the Regimental Museum (The Wardrobe) their catalogue can be viewed on line.

Edgar Henry Burney was born in St Martin, Jersey 17th August 1860, the son of Captain Charles Burney, CB, Royal NAVY (Superintendent of the Royal Hospital School, Greenwich 1870 to 1887) and his wife Catherine (nee Jones), baptised at St Martin, Jersey 17th August 1860, the 1861 census records he is 8 months old living with his mother and servants (father at sea) in St Martin. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 49th Foot 22nd January 1879, promoted Lieutenant 8th April 1880, Captain 10th December 1884 and served as Adjutant to the 2nd Battalion 1884 to 1887. Attached to the Army Ordnance Department 1888 to 1893, the 1891 census records he is residing at 28 Hill Street, Woolwich, London married to Marguerita Cecile born in Luxemburg but from a Jersey family. Promoted Major 2nd November 1894 and appointed Adjutant 4th Militia Battalion Manchester Regiment 1893 to 1898, promoted Lt Colonel 29th August 1900 and Colonel 29th August 1904 on his retirement, the father of two children born in Weymouth in 1893 and Germany in 1898.

His overseas service included Gibraltar 8th March 1881 to 17th July 1882, Malta 18th July 1882 to 22nd July 1882, Egypt 23rd July 1882 to 11th April 1883 including the surrender of Kafr Dowar 5th August 1882 (Medal & Khedives Star), Gibraltar 27th September 1883 to 15th June 1884 and again from 28th January 1900 to 8th September 1900. Commanded the 2nd Battalion in South Africa from 27th October 1900 to 11th October 1901, Commanded Lines of Communication Middle Section Transvaal January to 10th May 1901, commanded No 4 Mobile Column Transvaal from May to July 1901. Operations in the Transvaal east of Pretoria October and November 1900, Operations in the Transvaal November 1900 to July 1901, Operations in cape Colony July to October 1901, and May 1902. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 10th September 1901, Companion of the Bath London Gazette 27th September 1901 page 6317.

Colonel Burney died in Neuilly, Paris 16th June 1905 aged 44 years.

GVF £2,950 Available


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Sea Gallantry Medal (SGM) Large Bronze type, Victoria, British War Medal, Royal Victorian Medal (RVM) EVII Silver to William Henry Parker, Merchant Navy who as Third Mate of the Colonist was awarded the SGM for rescuing the crew of the Schooner Hebe of Greenock 24th February 1890 when she was demisted in a hurricane in the North Atlantic. As Captain of a Mr Bibby’s personal Yacht Jason, he was awarded the RVM in 1909 when HM King Edward VII visited the Yacht at Mamore. Commissioned Lieutenant, RNR in 1915 he was forced to resign his commission on account of ill health, he went on to command the SS Iolanda and died in Wokingham, Berkshire in 1979 aged 92 years.

Large Bronze Sea Gallantry Medal Victoria suspension bar engraved ‘Colonist’

W H Parker Wreck of the “Hebe” on 24 February 1890

British War Medal

Lieut W H Parker RNR

Royal Victorian Medal Silver EVII

Unnamed as awarded

With copy RNR service record, an original letter and award certificate for the RVM, original photo of Captain Parker and other research including a photo of the Yacht Jason.

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William Henry Parker was born in London in 1881, as Third Mate of the Colonist he was awarded the Sea Gallantry Medal in Bronze by the Board of Trade for saving the lives of the crew of the Schooner Hebe on 24 February 1890 when she was demisted in a hurricane in the North Atlantic. Two Life Boats were launched from the stricken Hebe, one capsized drowning one man and the second Life Boat was lost when trying to lower it onto the deck. The crew were rescued by a boat from Colonist which made two trips in heavy seas with gale force winds at great risk.

Parker became the Captain of a Mr Bibby’s personal Yacht Jason and was awarded the RVM in Silver on 25th September 1909 on the occasion of HM King Edward VII’s visit at Mamore. Commissioned Lieutenant, RNR 18th January 1915, he served aboard the Iolaire and other Armed Trawlers but was found to be unfit for service and discharged in July 1917 due to an old injury, right leg. His last Command was the SS Iolanda and he died in Wokingham, Berkshire in 1979 aged 92 years.

Official correction to ‘N’ of RNR on BWM

NEF £750 Reserved 


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Military Medal GVI, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp ‘1st Army’, Italy Star, Defence & War Medals to Sergeant Richard McGarrity, 142nd Regiment Royal Armoured Corps and Royal Tank Regiment a former Cinema Doorman originally from Bellshill, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Attesting for the 7th Battalion Suffolk Regiment 7th March 1940, he transferred to the Royal Armoured Corps on his Battalion’s conversion 22nd November 1941. Serving in North Africa and Italy from 19th January 1943 to 14th January 1946. Awarded an immediate MM for his gallantry on 22nd May 1944 during the assault on the Hitler Line (Senger Line), Italy when his Regiment was in support of 4th Canadian Recce Regiment. Dismounting his tank in order to clear a mined vehicle he came under sustained Mortar and Sniper fire in a mined area, despite this he attached a tow rope and cleared the vehicle allowing the advance to continue. Discharged in November 1947, he re-enlisted in June 1948 and served with the 6th and 8th Battalions Royal Tank Regiment including Germany from 1951 to 1954. Discharged in 1959, he died in Christchurch, Bournemouth in June 1981.

Military Medal GVI

5834474 SJT R McGarrity RAC

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp 1st Army, Italy Star, Defence  War Medals

Unnamed as issued

With copy MM recommendation, service papers, death certificate, original King’s Letter forwarding the MM, and original photograph of the recipient post War in the Royal Tank Regiment.

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Sergeant Richard McGarrity, MM, Royal Tank Regiment (left)

Richard McGarrity was born in Bellshill, Lanarkshire 16th March 1913 a Cinema Doorman he attested for the Army 26th July 1940 and was posted to 7th Battalion Suffolk Regiment. Appointed Lance Corporal 9th December 1940, promoted Corporal 18th July 1941, his Battalion became 142nd Regiment Royal Armoured Corps 22nd November 1941. Date promoted Sergeant not recorded, he served in North Africa and Italy from19th January 1943 to 14th January 1946. Discharged with the rank of Acting Squadron Sergeant Major 30th November 1947. All Medals and clasp confirmed on his service record, his complete entitlement.

142nd Regiment Royal Armoured Corps

The Regiment landed at Algiers  on 1st February 1943 taking part in Operation Ochsenkopf  during early March and in April fought at the Battle of Medjez-el-Bab in Tunisia. In May it took part in operations in the Tunis area. On 20th April 1944, 142nd Regiment  RAC landed at Naples to join the Italian campaign, on 22nd May it took part in breaching the Adolf Hitler Line. It was the Recce Troop of 142 RAC that effected the junction between British Eighth Army and the US Fifth Army at Valmontone  on 3rd June. In July and August 1944, the Regiment was in the advance to Florence and on 28th August it took part in breaching the Gothic Line near Rimini. The Regiment was disbanded on 22nd January 1945 in Italy.

Military Medal London Gazette 28th August 1944 page 3923 ‘For gallant and distinguished services in Italy’.

‘Whilst his tank was part of a small tank force acting in support of the 4th Canadian Recce Regiment on 22nd May 1944, it was found that the main axis of advance of the Recce Regiment was blocked by a mined vehicle. Sergeant McGarrity was ordered to clear the obstruction. At that place, vehicles of the Recce Regiment had been halted and they were pinned down by Mortar fire and Sniping. Despite this fire which grew in intensity. Sergeant McGarrity dismounted from his tank, carried out a mine recce and with one of his crew fixed a tow rope to the vehicle and towed it clear of the road. He was Sniped and Mortared during the operation, which owing to the presence of mines, had to be a slow and deliberate process. As a result of his determined efforts, during which he showed great courage, the axis of the advance was cleared and the Recce Regiment were able to continue their advance’.

McGarrity re-enlisted on 28th June 1948 and joined 6th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment (RTR) from the RAC Depot 18th September 1948 as Acting Sergeant. He served in Germany (BAOR) 6th December 1951 to 14th May 1954, joining 8th Battalion RTR 15th July 1957 and promoted Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant 24th April 1958. Discharged 26th January 1959 on reduction of the Establishment, home address recorded as 44 Zouch Avenue, Tidworth. He worked as a Security Officer after leaving the Army and died in Christchurch, Bournemouth 18th June 1981.

NEF £1,700 Available


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British Empire Medal GVI (Civil) to Eugene Daly, Boatswain, Merchant Navy from Cape Clear Island, Ireland. Awarded the BEM for his gallantry when the SS Ramsay was torpedoed ad sunk by the German U-94 commanded by the U-Boat Ace Kapitänleutnant Otto Ites in the North Atlantic on 10th June 1942. Ramsay was part of convoy ONS-100 when she was sunk with the loss of thirty nine crew, hit by two or possibly three torpedoes she sank within three or four minutes. Daly managed, unaided, to launch one of the lifeboats. Despite heavy seas and a haze restricting vision Daly managed to save the Master and two other crew members from the sea, he assisted the Master in sailing the lifeboat for 27 hours before they were rescued by HMS Vervein escorting another convoy. Post War he continued to serve in the Merchant Navy and retired in 1964 aged 65 years.

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil)

Eugene Daly

With copy London Gazette entry and headers for BEM, report from the Master of SS Ramsay, Merchant Navy service record covering the period 1941 to 1964 when Daly retired aged 65 years, copied from the Awards file.

Eugene Daly was born 8th March 1899 in Cape Clear, Ireland. Post War he continued to serve as Boatswain aboard ships, mainly operating from North Shields, his last trip being aboard the Queensland in July 1964 before he retired.

BEM London Gazette 16th February 1943 page 824

Mr Eugene Daly, Boatswain, SS Ramsay (home address 13 Chapel Street, North Shields).

‘The ship was sailing in convoy when she was torpedoed in the darkness and sank within three or four minutes. Orders for abandonment were given at once but only two boats got away before the ship went down. Efforts to rescue members of the crew who were in the water were rendered extremely difficult owing to haze and heavy seas. Boatswain Daly, without assistance, managed to launch one of the boats. Although alone he succeeded, in spite of heavy seas, in picking up the Master. It was due to his initiative and courage that the Master and two other members of the crew were saved’.

Captain B F R Thomas, Master of SS Ramsay in his report –

‘We sailed from Loch Ewe on 3rd June 1942 and joined convoy ON-100. We proceeded without incident until the early morning of 9th June when HMS Mimosa was torpedoed. On 9th June the visibility was poor, with rain and mist with wind a force 5 or 6. At 2334 on my way to the wheelhouse to alter course more to starboard I heard an explosion as the SS Empire Gough was struck by a torpedo. At 2335 the first torpedo struck the Ramsay on the port side aft under the poop. I did not see any flash but arrived on deck in time to see the main mast crash overboard to starboard. I rushed to the bridge to fire rockets . One of the Gunners on watch told me he had seen two flashed and assumed we had been struck by two torpedoes simultaneously. The torpedoes had been fired by the U-Boat Ace Kapitänleutnant Otto Ites who sank 15 ships and damaged one, his Boat was sunk on 28th August 1942 and he was taken prisoner.

About one minute after the first explosion a third violent explosion shook the ship, this one was amidships starboard side. I saw flash from this explosion and had to crouch down behind the bridge to avoid falling debris. I ordered the Wireless Operator to send out a distress signal, the ship was sinking so rapidly that I gave the order to abandon at the same time. The ship finally sank at 2339. We carried 4 lifeboats………meanwhile I jumped overboard and swam to number 2 lifeboat (only two were launched) which was still alongside with one occupant the Boatswain (Daly), he had lowered it by himself and just managed to clear its lines when the ship sank. We pulled clear, I saw a Greaser on a raft and took him into the boat, a little later we saw the Third Mate swimming towards us with no lifejacket, we managed to pick him up…………The rescue ship did not know we had been torpedoed and therefore made no endeavour to pick us up and very soon the convoy passed out of sight. All day and following night we steered a course to eastward.

On 11th June at 0200 we found ourselves in the middle of a convoy so we burned red flares, the first ship steered away from us but the SS British Glory hailed us and signalled a Corvette HMS Vervein which came towards us. We boarded this vessel shortly after 0200 on 11th June after being 27 hours in the boat. I would like to bring to notice the initiative and splendid action of Boatswain Daly, who single handed lowered the number 1 boat which was responsible for saving 4 of the crew, including myself. With great coolness he lowered this boat one end at a time………he was of great assistance to me in the sailing of the boat before we were picked up and was always cheerful and hard working’.

GVF £595 Available