GV Military Medal, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Flying Cadet Oscar Alec Holliday, Royal Air Force late Private, Royal Fusiliers born in Hackney, London and a former Warehouse Receiving Clerk for a Glove Manufacturer. Serving in France from 30th July 1915 with the 10th (Stockbroker’s) Battalion, the Battalion arrived on the Somme 6th July 1916. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry during the battle of Arras in April 1917. Transferring to the Royal Air Force 22nd July 1918 as a trainee pilot, he saw no further active service and was discharged to the RAF Reserve 1st March 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Southport, Lancashire employed as a Commercial Traveller for the glove trade. He died in Southport in 1980 aged 86 years.

Military Medal GV

STK-121 Pte O A Holliday 10/R Fus

1914/15 Star

121 Pte O Holliday R Fus

British War and Victory Medals

121 Pte O A Holliday R Fus

With Royal Fusiliers Cap badge (Pin reverse) and catch missing, made into a sweetheart brooch. Identity bracelet and Identity metal tag, copy Medal Index Card, Medal Rolls, Census entry, London Gazette entry for his Military Medal, copies from the Battalion War Diary.

Oscar Alec Holliday, born 1894, Hackney, London, the 1911 census records he is a 17 year old Warehouse Receiving Room Clerk for a Glove Manufacturer residing with his father Richard Percy an Accountant and Director of a Silk Manufacturing Company, mother Clara, 1 brother and 2 sisters at Farwell Road, Sidcup, Kent. Serving with the 10th (Stockbroker’s) Battalion Royal Fusiliers in France from 30th July 1915. Arriving on the Somme 6th July 1916 the Battalion took part in the attack on Pozieres 15th July, fighting its way through to the orchard on the south west of the village. Completing tours of duty in the trenches at Mametz Wood and High Wood, they moved to Hamel and took part in the attack on Munich and Frankfort trenches and Leave Avenue on 16th November, the following day attacked and captured The Triangle.

Awarded the Military Medal, London Gazette Tuesday 17th July 1917 page 7209 for gallantry during the battle of Arras in April 1917, the award recorded in the Battalion war diary, award of the Military Medal approved VI Corps Order dated 24th May 1917.

On 9th April 1917 the 10th Battalion found itself south of Arras Railway Bridge which was blown up by the detonation of a British ammunition dump hit by a German shell. Moving forward to the Brown Line the Battalion came under heavy artillery and machine gun fire preventing further progress, withdrawing to Feuchy Chapel they awaited further orders. The following day the advance continued under slight enemy artillery and machine gun fire until checked by intense machine gun fire about 600 yards west of Monchy-Le-Preux. Suffering heavy casualties including the Battalion’s Commanding Officer Lt Colonel Rice, badly wounded in the right arm by shrapnel, Battalion dug in for the night.

At 0530 on 11th April the Battalion attacked Monty-Le-Preux the village was entered and occupied the enemy putting down a heavy artillery barrage. By 1500 the Battalion was entrenched on the western end of the village and at 2300 were relieved by 11th Battalion The Queen’s Regiment. On 23rd April the 10th Battalion Royal Fusiliers went on the attack again capturing the German second line and occupied Cuba trench now clear of the enemy. The following day the Germans attempted several counter attacks but none were successful, Lewis guns being brought to bear on the attacking parties causing a number of casualties. The advance continued on 28th April but little progress from Cuba trench could be made. Relieved on 29th April the Battalion had suffered 4 officers killed and 6 wounded, 42 other ranks killed, 192 wounded and 22 missing.

Transferring to the Royal Air Force as a trainee Pilot 22nd July 1918, he saw no further active service and was discharged 1st March 1919 to the RAF Reserve. In July 1919 he married Isabelle May Stratton at St Pauls Church, Mill Hill, Middlesex. He appears on the 1939 Registration Roll his wife and son Richard on the Electorial Roll residing at 20 Cambridge Avenue, Southport, Lancashire and working as a Commercial Traveller, Glove trade, he died in Southport in 1980 aged 86 years.

GVF £650 Reserved


 

Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private Henry George Price, Gloucestershire Regiment a former Hatter’s Shop Porter born in Bristol in 1896. Serving in France from 31st March 1915 with the 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion TF, the Battalion fought on the Somme in 1916. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry during the battle of Arras in April 1917, when he succeeded in carrying a message to forward HQ despite being practically surrounded by the enemy. Disembodied in February 1919, he returned to the Bristol area and died in Warmley in 1956

Military Medal GV

200753 Pte H G Price 1/4 Glouc R-TF

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2819 Pte H G Price Glouc R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal Rolls, Census entry, London Gazette entry for his Military Medal, copies from the Battalion War Diary, copy newspaper articles (2).

The 1911 census records Henry George Price is a 14 year old Hatter’s Shop Porter residing with his father Francis a Baker, mother Ellen Eliza one sister and one brother at 4 Berkeley Villas, Warwick Road, Bristol. Serving in France with the 1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion – TF from 31st March 1915, the Battalion was part of 144th Brigade 48th South Midland Division and fought on The Somme in 1916 before moving to the Arras sector. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 18th June 1917 page 6028, the Battalion War Diary mentions his award on 8th May 1917 for gallantry in April 1917 at Arras. On 13th April ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies attacked enemy lines and captured all its objectives by 0400hrs, ‘C’ company was immediately counter attacked but drove the enemy back. On 14th April the Battalion attacked the Knoll at 2300hrs, by early morning ‘C’ company had gained their objective and finally on 30th April the Battalion attacked St Emilie suffering heavy casualties they captured prisoners and four Machine Guns. At the same time Pleasant House was attacked and captured.

The Western Daily Express 9th June 1917 records –

“At St Simon’s School yesterday afternoon, all available flags were flown to celebrate the fact that two medals had during the week been gained by two old scholars – Sergeant H Coles 1st Gloucesters has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, and Private H G Price, 4th Gloucesters the Military Medal. The latter with Sergeant H A Bailey succeeded in taking a message to forward Battalion HQ when practically surrounded by the enemy. The children were massed to hear the reports and loud cheers were accorded the heroes”.

Disembodied on 20th March 1919, he returned to the Bristol area and died in Warmley in 1956.

GVF & better £650 SOLD


 

Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence Medal to Sergeant George Leslie Brown, 15th Battalion London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles). Born in |Cape Town, South Africa in 1894, a former Shipping Merchant Clerk, he attested for the 15th Londons at Somerset House on 29th August 1914. Serving in France from 17th March 1915 he returned to England 27th September 1915. Returning to France 23rd July 1916, he returned to England 29th January 1919 for demobilization. Awarded the Military Medal in March 1919 for actions in October 1918, he was discharged on the 28th February 1919. Post War he resided in Sevenoaks, Kent where he was employed as a Cashier with a Marine Insurance Company, during the Second World War he served as Company Sergeant Major of ‘D’ Company, 20th Battalion Kent Home Guard from May 1940 to December 1944.

Military Medal GV

530500 SJT G L BROWN 15/LOND R

1914/15 Star

2210 Pte G L BROWN 15-LOND R

British War & Victory Medals

2210 SJT G L  BROWN 15-LOND R

Defence Medal

Unnamed as Issued

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal Rolls, Census entry for his Military Medal, original notification of his MM award from The Adjutant 15th London Regiment dated 10th October 1918, original letter forwarding him the MM dated 2nd October 1919 to his home address 41 Blythe Vale, Catford, SE London, original Army Order Fourth Army dated 12th December 1918 listing his immediate award of the MM, original certificate from HQ Fourth Army awarding him the MM.

With a HM (London HM) silver presentation cigarette box measuring 17.5cms x 9cms x 6.5cms the lid engraved –

“Presented to CSM G L Brown MM by the members of ‘D’ Company 20th Battalion Kent Home Guard in grateful appreciation of his outstanding services to his company from its inception as Bn mobile reserve (HQ Company) May 1940 to December 1944”

 

George Leslie Brown was born 8th July 1894 in Cape Town, South Africa. Son of Mrs Eliza Brown of 12 Blythe Hill, Catford. The 1911 Census records he is 16 years old and employed as Shipping Merchants Clerk. Attesting for the 15th Battalion London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles) at Somerset House 16th September 1914, he served in France from 17th March 1915 to 27th September 1915 and again from 23rd July 1916 to 29th January 1919. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 13th March 1919 page 3438  for his gallantry in action in October 1918. Discharged 28th February 1919. Brown served during the 2WW with ‘D’ Company, 20th Battalion Kent Home Guard from May 1940 to December 1944. In January 1949 records show he was living at 43 Camden Road, Sevenoaks with his wife Iris and their daughter Pamela. George Brown was employed as a Cashier for a Marine Insurance company.

 

 

GVF & better £725 SOLD


 

A Rare Coventry Blitz British Empire Medal (Civil) GVI to Mr Jenkyn Shanklyn born in Pontypridd, Glamorgan in 1903, a Grinder with the Coventry Gauge and Tool Company and a member of their Rescue Squad. Originally recommended for the GEORGE MEDAL he was awarded the BEM for his gallantry during the most severe air raid on Coventry during the night of 14th / 15th November 1940. A total of 515 German Bombers took part intent on destroying Coventry’s factories and industrial infrastructure. About 600 people were killed and about 1,000 injured in the raid. Shanklyn worked to remove persons trapped in demolished houses. Recovering two male bodies, he continued to dig until he recovered a lady, unconscious. He continued to participate in rescue efforts during raids on 16th, 17th and 20th November, exhausted following the final raid he had to receive medical attention.

British Empire Medal (Civil) GVI

Jenkyn Shanklyn

With original faded named Buckingham Palace award letter forwarding the BEM, a wartime economy card BEM presentation box, copy London Gazette entry and header for BEM, copy recommendation from the Home Office file TNA HO250/9.

Jenkyn Shanklyn was born in Pontypridd, Glamorgan in 1903. In 1940 he was a Grinder employed by the Coventry Tool and Gauge Company and was a member of the Works Rescue Squad, aged 37 years at the time of the award he resided at 22 Lime Grove, Tile Hill Lane, Coventry.

Image result for pictures coventry blitz 1940

Image result for pictures coventry blitz 1940

The ruins of Coventry Cathedral and the city centre following the 14th / 15th November 1940 raid

BEM London Gazette 7th February 1941 page 741

“When Coventry experienced a heavy enemy air attack Shanklyn’s party was sent to where a large bomb had exploded and caused heavy devastation to private dwelling houses. Shanklyn was the outstanding figure of the rescue party. He dug his way through the debris of two houses near the big bomb crater, and after an arduous task found two bodies, which he dragged out and carried to ambulances. He searched further, removing bricks from the stairway, and rescued a female alive. She was conveyed to hospital in an ambulance. Shanklyn continued his work in other parts of the town and throughout showed no regard for his own well being or safety”.

Report by the Chief Constable and ARP Rescue Controller, City of Coventry dated 7th December 1940 – recommendation for the GEORGE MEDAL.

“Jenkyn Shanklyn is a member of the Coventry Tool and Gauge Company Works Rescue Squad. On the night of 14th / 15th November 1940 when Coventry experienced a very heavy enemy air attack. The Rescue Squad was sent to Beanfield Avenue where a large bomb had exploded and caused heavy devastation to private dwelling houses. Shanklyn was the outstanding figure of the Rescue Party. He dug his was through the debris of two houses near the big bomb crater and after an arduous task found two male bodies, which he dragged out and carried to ambulances. He searched further, removing bricks from the stairway, and he rescued a female alive, who was conveyed to hospital by ambulance.

Shanklyn continued his work on the 16th, 17th and 20th November at other portions of the town and all through showed no regard for his own well being or safety., going without food for considerable periods. Owing to his efforts and inspiration, whilst working at an incident, a female was found unconscious in the wreckage and conveyed to hospital. Shanklyn showed great unselfishness, taking no food from his start of work in the early morning until late afternoon, and was an example to all who worked with him. He had to receive Medical attention afterwards”.

NEF £1,295 SOLD


 

Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Corporal Charles Ralph Vass, 1/6th Battalion Gloucester Regiment (Territorial Force). Born Lewes, Sussex in 1886 and a former Butler to Sir George White, 1st Baronet. Serving in France from 30th March 1915, he was twice wounded. Awarded the MM for Bravery during the battles of the Somme in November 1916, the Battalion taking part in the attack on Poziers 23rd July suffering heavy casualties, and in a failed attack on south western end of Skyline Trench 14th to15th August. Discharged in February 1919, he died in Compton Greenfield, Gloucestershire in May 1963 aged 77 years.

Military Medal GV

3445 PTE C. R. VASS 1/6 GLOUC.R. – T.F.

1914/15 Star

3445 PTE C.R. VASS. GLOUC. R.

British War & Victory Medals

3445 CPL. C.R. VASS. GLOUC. R.

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal rolls, census entries, newspaper article London Gazette entry & header for MM.

Charles Ralph Vass, born 1886, Lewes, Sussex. Son of Eliza Vass, of 72 Maidenburgh Street, Colchester. The 1901 Census records Charles Vass aged 15, living at 8, North Hill, Colchester working as a Domestic. In 1911 Charles is recorded as working as a Butler (Private Service), for Sir George White, 1st Baronet in Cotham House, Bristol.

Serving with the 1/6th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment in France from 31st March 1915. Part of 48th Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division the Battalion took part in the battles of the Somme. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 11th November 1916 page 10932, the Battalion took part in the attack on Pozieres 23rd July 1916 suffering heavy casualties from Machine Gun fire, a small party of Battalion bombers entered the German line near the railway but were soon beaten back. Taking part in the failed attack on the South Western end of Skline Trench 14th to 15th August 1916, they were withdrawn from the front line. The Essex County Chronicle dated Friday 24th November 1916 records “Private (now Lance Corporal) C B Vass, Gloucestershire Regiment, who’s home is at Colchester has been awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field, he has been twice wounded”.

Discharged in February 1919. After the war he returned to Colchester and is listed on the Electorial Roll as living at 1, Short Cut Road, Colchester, with his brother Walter Totham Vass. In 1921 he married Bertha B Whettingsteel in Basingstoke, Hampshire. Charles Frederick Vass died on 3rd May 1963 in Compton, Greenfield Gloucestershire aged 77 years.

NEF £650 SOLD


 

Member of the British Empire (MBE) Civil 1st type, Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem Lady of Grace, Coronation Medal King George V 1911 St John’s Ambulance Brigade reverse to The Honourable Florence Maria Daly, born in 1852 she was the sister of the Fourth Baron Dunsdale of Dunsdale, Galloway and daughter of The Honourable Robert Daly (1818 to 1892) son of the First Baron Dunsdale. Elected Guardian of the Poor for Folkestone in 1904, she was appointed Lady of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusalem in 1912. During the First World War she was Commandant of the Manor House (VAD) Auxiliary Hospital, Folkestone, Kent, her services being rewarded with the MBE in June 1918. Post War she was appointed Visitor of Institutions for Defectives in the Borough of Folkestone where she lived in 1918 and re-appointed in 1927. Elected a Trustee of the Folkestone Charity Committee in April 1918. A respected local Philanthropist, she was organist at St Peter’s Church, Folkestone for 60 years and funded the building of the St Peter’s Men’s Club in Radnor Street in 1895, she died in Folkestone in 1940 aged 88 years.

Order of St John of Jerusalem Lady of Grace

Unnamed as awarded

Member of the British Empire (Civil) 1st type HM reverse London, 1918

Unnamed as awarded

King George V Coronation Medal St John’s Ambulance Brigade reverse

Lady Supt Hon F Daly

With copy London Gazette entries and headers for her two awards and research from on line sources and newspaper archive. The National Portrait Gallery in London possesses a portrait photograph of this Lady.

Florence Maria Daly was born on 6th August 1852 the daughter of The Honourable Robert Daly (1818 – 1892) fifth son of James Daly, First Baron Dunsdale and Clan Conal and The Honourable Maria A’Court, daughter of the first Lord Heytesbury. Brother of James Frederick Daly who succeeded as Fourth Baron in 1894, Florence being granted precedence as a Baron’s daughter by HM Queen Victoria in 1895. The 1901 census records Florence is residing at 9 Lennard Road, Folkestone, described as living on her own means also at the residence are a domestic cook, housemaid and horse boy. Elected Guardian of the Poor of Folkestone in 1904, the position announced in The Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate and Cheriton Herald 17th September 1904. In November 1911 Florence’s brother died and she inherited £20,000 from his Estate. Appointed to The Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem as Lady of Grace London Gazette 9th August 1912 page 5917, during the First World War she was Commandant, Manor House Auxiliary Hospital, Folkestone (108 beds) awarded the MBE for these Services London Gazette 7th June 1918 page 6724. Post War Florence continued with her charitable work, in 1918 she was appointed Visitor of Institutions for Defectives under the Lunacy Act of 1890 for the Borough of Folkestone announced in The Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate and Cheriton Herald 23rd November 1918 page 4 and re-appointed in 1927, the appointment announced in the The Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate and Cheriton Herald 29th October 1927 page 8. Elected Trustee of the Folkestone Charity Committee in 1918 announced in The Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate and Cheriton Herald 20th April 1918 page 3. A Great Western Railway Shareholder since 1895, she died in Folkestone in 1940.

From the Records of St Peter’s Church, Folkestone –

The Honourable Florence Daly MBE, a respected local philanthropist, who was also organist at St Peter’s for 60 years, financed the building of the St Peter’s Men’s Club in Radnor Street, by local builders – Messrs William Dunk. At the end of December 1895 the local newspaper reported that, “sixty young fishermen sat down to a roast dinner followed by plum pudding at the opening of the new working men’s club in Radnor Street.” Before the First World War she helped to organise those who assisted many hundreds of pilgrims passing through Folkestone on their way to Lourdes.

From Records of Kent VAD Detachments –

Kent VAD Detachment 24, Folkestone, was formed in 1910, and has charge of the Manor House Hospital at Folkestone, one of the largest of Kent’s voluntary hospitals, and has been doing splendid work from the outset of hostilities. Commandant — Honourable Florence Daly.

Slight edge knock to Coronation Medal therefore

GVF £450 Reserved


 

Member of the British Empire (MBE) Military 1st type, British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII, Khedives Sudan Medal 1896-1908 no clasp, Greece Order of the Redeemer 5th Class Breast Badge (silver, gold & enamels), Greece Order of George I 5th Class Breast Badge (silver and enamels), Greece 4th Class Medal of Military Merit 1916, Greco-Turkish war Medal 1912-13 no clasp, Greco-Bulgarian War Medal 1913 no clasp, Greece Victory Medal 1918 official type with corresponding miniatures (Excluding Greece Order of George I) to Warrant Armourer Frederick James Carter, Royal Navy a former Blacksmith born in Newton Abbot, Devon in 1870. Entering the Royal Navy as Armourer’s Crew in January 1889. Serving aboard HMS Eragia 1889 to 1893, the ship was employed in survey work off Australia. In 1895 he joined the Gun Vessel HMS Melita and participated in the Dongola Expedition of 1896. Transferring as Sub Lieutenant to the Royal Hellenic Navy in 1911, he was awarded the MBE in July 1919 for valuable services with the British Naval Mission to Greece and several Greek Decorations and Medals. ill serving in 1920, he died on 26th June 1942 aged 72 years.

Member of the British Empire (Military) 1st type HM reverse London, 1919

Unnamed as awarded

British War Medal

Wt Arm F J Carter RN)

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

147655 F J Carter Ch Armourer HMS Vivid

Khedives Sudan Medal 1896-1908 no clasp

F J Carter HMS Melita 1896

Greece Order of the Redeemer 5th Class Breast Badge (silver, gold & enamels), Greece Order of George I 5th Class Breast Badge (silver and enamels), Greece 4th Class Medal of Military Merit 1916, Greco-Turkish war Medal 1912-13 no clasp, Greco-Bulgarian War Medal 1913 no clasp, Greece Victory Medal 1918 official type

All unnamed as awarded / issued

With copy service record, London gazette entry & headers for MBE, Foreign Office, copy Medal roll for Khedives Sudan Medal, copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry confirming single BWM only. Corresponding Miniature Medal group less the Order of George I 5th Class.

Ex Dix Noonan Webb Auction Lot 602 date 25th March 2015.

Frederick James Carter was born in Newton Abbot, Devon 3rd September 1870 a Blacksmith he entered the Royal Navy at Cambridge 10th January 1889 as Armourer’s Crew. Joining HMS Egeria 22nd October 1889 the ship was employed until 1893 in survey work off the coast of Australia. Advanced to Armourer’s Mate at Cambridge 27th August 1895, he joined the Gun Boat HMS Melita 1st October 1895 and took part aboard this ship in the Dongola Expedition March to September 1896, one of only 288 medals awarded to the Royal Navy & Royal Marines. Advanced to Chief Armourer at Cambridge 10th January 1907, awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 4th February 1908, he was discharged shore to pension 5th January 1911.

With the approval of the Admiralty Carter transferred to the Royal Hellenic Navy and joined HHMS Averof at Devonport 23rd August 1911. With the advent of the First Balkan Wars Averof  was Flagship of Admiral Kountouriotis, taking part in the invasion of the Northern and Eastern Islands of the Aegean. In the battles off Elli on 3rd December 1912 and off Lemnos on 5th January 1913, Averof almost single-handedly secured victory and the undisputed control of the Aegean for Greece. On both occasions Admiral Koutouriotis acted independently steaming in persuit of the Turksih Fleet at 20 knots and inflicting significant damage to the enemy. Averof was slightly damaged in action, today the Cruiser survives a floating museum at Palaio Faliro, (awarded Medal for Greco-Turkish War 1912-13 and the Medal for the Greco-Bulgarian War of 1913).

Further operations in the Greco-Bulgarian War having followed, Carter was appointed to the Salonika Dockyards in which capacity he was awarded  the Greek Order of the Redeemer 5th Class in 1917. On the outbreak of the First World War he was specially exempted from mobilization by the Admiralty on account of his position in the Royal Hellenic Navy. The Naval Intelligence Department agreeing to his on going employment in Greece in 1917 at the British Naval Mission in Athens in an intelligence gathering role. MBE London Gazette 17th July 1919 page 9110 “For valuable services with the British Naval Mission to Greece”. The Western Times dated 26th April 1918 records –

“Warrant Officer F J Carter son of Mr Carter of Wail Lane, Newton Abbot has been awarded the Cross and Order of the Chevalier of the Redeemer by King Alexander of Greece in recognition of his services with the British Navy in the East”. He was still serving with the Royal Hellenic Navy in 1920. he died in 1942 aged 72 years.

A unique group.

GVF & better £3,750 Available


 

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI reverse officially dated 1944, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Italy Star, War Medal, Air Efficiency Award GVI 1st type to Squadron Leader Harold Valentine Ellis, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve born in Chepstow, Monmouthshire in 1915, he entered the Royal Air Force as a Sergeant (qualified) pilot in August 1939. A Beaufighter and later Mosquito Night Fighter pilot, he commencing operational flying with 600 Squadron in December 1940. He destroyed an He111 NW off the Scillies on the night of 8th / 9th September 1941, damaged a JU88 over Colerne 1st June 1941 and damaged a Do17 off Falmouth on the night of 18th / 19th December 1941. Joining 219 Squadron in April 1943 he became a Flight Commander in October the same year and destroyed a JU88 on 28th March 1944 which crashed at Ilminster, destroyed a JU88 on 30th July 1944 over the north bank of the Seine, SE of Le Havre, and probably destroyed a JU88 on 16th July 1944, 25 miles west of Le Havre. By August 1944 he had completed 157 operational patrols in 370 hours operational flying, his last patrol was on 12th September 1944. Total score three destroyed, one probably destroyed, two damaged.

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI

Unnamed as awarded the reverse officially dated 1944

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Air Efficiency Award GVI 1st type

Act Sqn Ldr H V Ellis RAFVR

With copy London Gazette entry & headers for DFC, copy original recommendation, copy surviving combat reports and other research from on line sources.

The Group previously auctioned by Spink Lot 73, sale date 19th November 2015 with a Battle of Britain clasp (not stated if genuine) to which he is not entitled, having commenced operational flying in December 1940.

Harold Valentine ELLIS was born 25th October 1915 at Chepstow, Monmouthshire, educated at The King’s School, Gloucester, he enlisted as a Sergeant pilot (754961) in August 1939 and completed his initial training at 1 EFTS and 10 SFTS. Commissioned Pilot Officer 7th September 1940 (London Gazette 8th October 1940 page 5906), War Substantive Flying Officer 7th September 1941 (London Gazette 28th October 1941 page 6256), War Substantive Flight Lieutenant 7th February 1942 (London Gazette 7th February 1942 page 5512) and acting Squadron Leader in October 1943.

From The Gloucester Citizen Newspaper 13th November 1944 page 1

Air Efficiency Award awarded 9th May 1946

DFC London Gazette 3rd November 1944 page 5034

Acting Squadron Leader Harold Valentine ELLIS (84968) RAFVR

“Squadron Leader ELLIS has completed many sorties by night and by day, often in most adverse weather. His determination and keenness throughout have been most commendable and have set an excellent example. He has destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged several others”.

The official recommendation states –

Number of operational patrols 157, number of operational flying hours 370.

This officer has been flying operationally, in a night fighter squadron since December 1940. During his first tour in No 600 Squadron he destroyed one enemy aircraft and damaged two others (Destroyed an He111 NW off the Scillies on the night of 8th / 9th September 1941, damaged a JU88 over Colerne 1st June 1941 and damaged a Do17 off Falmouth on the night of 18th / 19th December 1941). He joined this unit (219 Squadron) in April 1943 and became a Flight Commander in October 1943 whilst the unit was overseas. He has so far destroyed two enemy aircraft (JU88 north bank of the Seine SE of Le Havre 20th / 31st July 1944) and probably destroyed a third on his second tour.

Squadron Leader Ellis has, at all times, shown himself to be extremely proficient as a pilot in any type of weather both by day and night. During a period of two years when he never had the opportunity of chasing an enemy aircraft, he carried out many sorties by day and night in the worst possible weather. His determination and keenness to destroy the enemy together with his high standard of pilotage have, during the three and a half years I have known this officer, been of the highest order. I recommend him strongly for the award of the DFC”.

His Air Officer Commanding 11 Group added –

“This officer has completed two operational tours comprising 370 operational hours, during which he has destroyed three enemy aircraft and probably destroyed a fourth. I consider his devotion to duty and achievements over a very long period of active operational flying well merits the award of the DFC”.

600 Squadron RAF

No.600 was allocated to night defence in December 1939. In September 1940 the first Beaufighter was received, conversion being completed early in 1941. In October 1940 the squadron moved to Yorkshire and in March 1941 to south-west England, where it remained until September 1942.

Combat report 600 Squadron 8th September 1941

Beaufighter 600 Squadron patrol near Lizard Head

“At 2115 was in persuit of raid 137 when at 11,000 feet flying NW over Scillies on steady course 6 miles ahead. Raid faded on GCI plots before any contact was established. Controller gave location of target. A good blip was obtained at 2127 hours at 10,000 feet showing enemy aircraft about 40 degrees to port at 10,000 feet and loosing height. A silhouette was obtained at 7,000 feet at 500 yards ahead. Closed to within 50 yards, 100 feet below the enemy aircraft identified as an He111. Enemy aircraft took no evasive action, no return fire experienced, fired a two second burst seeing flashes from port engine and fuselage. The aim was direct. Enemy aircraft immediately went down in a vertical dive to port and a large blue flash was seen several thousand feet below. Haze over the sea prevented the pilot seeing enemy aircraft strike the sea. No further blip obtained. This enemy aircraft claimed as destroyed”.

219 Squadron

In March 1943 219 Squadron was equipped with the latest night fighter version of the Beaufighter and was ready to depart for overseas service by May. Eighteen aircraft headed for an airfield in Cornwall before leaving at 5 minute intervals for the long flight across the Bay of Biscay for Gibraltar. Operating from Bone in Algeria, the squadron was operational by the end of June 1943. Moving to Tunisia after the surrender of the Axis forces, 219 provided escorts for convoys supporting the invasion of Sicily. The squadron later covered the landings at Salerno and was in constant readiness to meet German intruders attacking rear areas.

219 returned to England in January 1944 and re-equipped with Mosquitos. Moved to Essex to cover the D-Day landings they remained in England in a night fighter role.

Combat report 219 Squadron 30th / 31st July 1944

Mosquito 5 miles in land North bank of River Seine, SE of Le Havre.

“Squadron Leader ELLIS and Flight Lieutenant CRAIG of 219 Squadron took off from Bradwell Bay at 2320 hours and proceeded to Pool 1 under Legion control and landed at Ford at 0230 hours due to bad weather. Patrolling 30 miles SW of Le Havre under Legion Control at about 0035 hours I was told there was a bogey flying SW at 10,000 feet. A few minuites later the N/R obtained a contact on an aircraft at 4 miles range to port and slightly above. I began to close range, I obtained a visual on an aircraft at range 2,000 feet and slightly above, this was held as we tried to identify the aircraft  using ROSS night glasses, at this range we could not identify so I closed to 50 yards keeping well below in the slight ground haze. I identified the target as a JU88 by typical silhouette and external bomb racks.

We dropped back to 80 yards and height 11,000 feet and opened fire giving a 3 second burst, there were many strikes on the fuselage and main plane, which was followed immediately by an explosion in the centre of the fuselage, the enemy aircraft then broke into flames and after flying on straight and level for several seconds dived straight down still burning and struck the ground on the north bank of the Seine, 5 miles SE of Le Havre where it burned for 15 minutes or more. Claim JU88 destroyed”.

Combat report 27th / 28th March 1944

Mosquito Yeovil – Ilminster area

“Scrambled from Colerne base at 2323 hours, landing Honiley 0045 hours, to intercept hostiles coming in from the south. Under sector control was ordered to 12,000 feet and increased height to 14,000 feet after 15 minutes controller advised bandit 15 miles to port. Eventually secured contact at 3 miles range, height 16,000 feet, chased this contact to the west and closed to 1,500 feet, visual obtained on a twin engine enemy aircraft believed to be a JU88, speed approximately 220 mph. Pilot (Ellis) closed in from astern and below to within 150 yards and opened fire with 4 cannons, giving a burst of 5 seconds. Many strikes were seen on the port wing and engine causing a tremendous flash and fire broke out on port wing and engine. Return fire was experienced from upper gun position, mostly passing below and starboard, upon later inspection it was found one round had pierced the persex nose and an electric cable causing the AI to become unserviceable. The enemy aircraft was last seen to roll over to starboard and go down in a vertical dive with flames pouring from it for some 6 to 7,000 feet and disappear in cloud.

The sector controller took a fix at the time of combat which was in the Yeovil area, it was later established the JU88 crashed near Ilminster. The JU88 loaded with 2 AB 1000’s took-off at 21.30 hrs and was shot down en-route for Bristol by S/Ldr H V Ellis and F/Lt J M Craig in Mosquito XVII, HK260, of 219 Squadron.(Colerne). Crashed at 23.57 hrs at Hestercombe Manor House, Upper Cheddon, near Taunton 27/28.03.44: Target Bristol: I/KG 54. Ju 88A-4, Wnr.144551, B3+BL of 3/KG 54 crew were Ofw. Hans Brautigam (F) POW Ogefr. Kurt Chalon (B) POW Ogefr. Alfred Maleztki (Bm) POW Uffz. Robert Belz (Bf) killed. Claim JU88 destroyed

Combat report 15th / 16th July 1944

Mosquito 25 miles west of Le Havre

“Squadron Leader H V Ellis and Flight Lieutenant J M Craig took off from Bradwell Bay at 205 hours and proceeded to Poole 1 under Radox Control and landed base at 0140 hours. Whilst patrolling Radox 1  and at approximately 0015 hours was vectored to a position one and a half miles north east of Le Havre height 4,000 feet and told activity expected from the east. At 1,500 feet distance and height 7,000 feet I closed on an aircraft identified as a JU88. At 200 yards range I commenced to fire, strikes seen on the starboard wing, engine and fuselage, a large explosion in the cockpit and a portion of the wing flew off. The enemy aircraft rolled over to port and went down steeply, I followed it down , it was obviously out of control and at 3,000 feet the enemy aircraft began to climb at a steeper and steeper angle and at 5,000 feet was positively almost vertically upwards, at this poit it was seen to stall and dive away to port. I would imagine that the pilot was wounded and had lost control of the aircraft. In an attempt to follow the enemy aircraft I stalled my own aircraft and began an incipient spin to starboard, I over corrected and flicked to port, in pulling up I lost sight of the enemy aircraft which was somewhere below me, my height was then 1,500 feet. Up to then the enemy aircraft was behaving in such a manner that I think the pilot had lost control of his aircraft and was probably badly wounded. No return fire. Claim JU88 probably destroyed”.

GVF & better £3,950 Available


 

Military Medal GV with Bar for SECOND AWARD, 1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals with GENUINE Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, 1939/45 Defence Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Army 1st type to Colour Sergeant Harold Dodd, 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment a former Tailor born in Burton on Trent in 1889. A resident at the Nottingham Training Institution for pauper children, he attested for the Leicestershire Regiment in December 1904 aged 14 years. Serving in France from 9th September 1914, he was awarded the MM for the attack on the Quadrilateral feature, Somme sector in September 1916 and the Bar to the MM for the battle of Cambrai 8th October 1918. Twice wounded he was Mentioned in Despatches by FM Haig in January 1917. Returning to Nottingham following discharge from the Army he was employed as a Mental Patient Attendant at Nottingham General Hospital. He died in Leicester in 1960.

Military Medal GV and BAR for Second Award

7563 A SJT H Dodd 1/Leic R

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

7563 L Cpl H Dodd 1/Leic R

British War and Victory Medals

7563 C SJT H Dodd Leic R

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Army 1st type

4848306 S SJT H Dodd Leic R

With copy London Gazette entries & headers for MM & Bar and Mentioned in Despatches, copy Medal Index Card and other research taken from on line records.

Harold Dodd was born in Burton on Trent 13th July 1889, the 1891 census records he is residing with his family at 25 Napier Street, Burton on Trent, his father William a Joiner (died 1908) and mother Mary Ann and four older siblings. The 1901 census records he is 11 yeas old and a resident at the Nottingham Training Institution for pauper children, Hartley Road, Nottingham. Enlisting for the Leicestershire Regiment in December 1904 as a Boy, the 1911 census records he is a Private soldier aged 21 years a former Tailor serving with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment stationed at Talavera Barracks, Aldershot. The Regimental Journal records he was appointed Lance Corporal in May 1914 when the Battalion were stationed in Fermoy, Ireland.

Serving in France from 9th September 1914, admitted No 13 General Hospital 17th May 1915, reason not established. The Sheffield Daily Telegraph dated 10th November 1916 page 5 lists Dodd as wounded and his next of kin residing in Nottingham. He married Rose Oldham on 13th December 1917 at St Margaret’s Church, Leicester, their address is recorded as 34 Church Gate, Leicester. Listed as wounded for a second time in The Times Daily List 8th January 1918.

Military Medal London Gazette 27th October 1916 page 10478

Awarded for the 1st Battalion’s attack on the Quadrilateral feature on the Somme on 15 September 1916, the opening day of the battle of Flers-Courcelette (15th to 22nd September 1916),  the battalion advanced against Straight Trench but met with uncut wire and Machine Gun fire, forcing them to take cover in shell holes. Suffering 14 officers and 410 other ranks killed or wounded during the two days’ fighting, the Battalion withdrew on 17th September to Maltz Horn farm. The War Diary for 1st November 1916 when Dodd’s award of the MM is announced notes him as being absent from the Battalion (wounded).

Bar to Military Medal London Gazette 13th May 1919 page 6005

Awarded for the battle of Cambrai 8th October 1918, the award recorded in the Battalion War Diary Sergeant Dodd of ‘B’ Company awarded Bar to MM by Authority of Officer Commanding IX Corps dated 28th October 1918.

Mentioned in Despatches (FM Haig) London Gazette 4th January 1917 page 225

Returning to Nottingham following discharge from the Army the 1939 Register records he is a Mental Patient Attendant at Nottingham General Hospital residing with his wife at 30 Park Row, Nottingham. A Member of the Leicestershire Regiment Old Comrades Association 1938 to 1948, he died in Leicester in 1960.

A fine combination.

GVF & better £2,250 Available


 

An exceptional 31st July 1917 Battle of Pilckem Ridge Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, 1914 Star and GENUINE bar 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Acting Warrant Officer Class 2 (Company Sergeant Major) Alfred Woods, 8th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment late 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (Loyals) a former Mineral Works Labourer born in Everton, Liverpool in 1895. Enlisting in March 1912, he served in France from 12th August 1914 and was severely wounded in the attack on German positions in Troyon, Gheluvelt 14th September 1914 during the battle of the Aisne, in which the 1st Battalion Loyals were practically wiped out, mustering 1 officer and 8 unwounded men after the attack. Evacuated to England he was admitted to hospital in Manchester on 27th September 1914. On recovery he was posted to the Army Cyclist Corps in France and transferred to the 8th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, at one time holding the rank of acting Company Sergeant Major. Awarded the DCM for the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) 31st July 1917, when his company reached its objective under very trying conditions, encountering large groups of the enemy and loosing three officers. Forced to withdraw under a severe barrage and an enemy counter attack, Sergeant Woods successfully commanded the covering party enabling his company to be withdrawn to allied lines. Attached to 15th Entrenching Battalion he was killed in action 22nd March 1918, the second day of the German Spring offensive aged 23 years he is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

10327 SJT A Woods 8/E Lanc R

1914 Star and GENUINE bar 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

10327 Pte A Woods LN Lan R

British War and Victory Medals

10327 A WOCL 2 A Woods LN Lan R

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Alfred Woods

With copy London Gazette entry & headers for DCM, casualty details, annotated (date and place) citation for DCM, copies from the War Diary covering 31st July 1917, copy Medal Index Card and other research from on line sources.

The Bronze Memorial Plaque in card and paper envelopes with Buckingham Palace letter.

Alfred Woods was born in Everton, Liverpool in 1895, the 1911 census records he is a 16 year old Cart Lad in the local Mineral Works residing with his widowed father John a Customs Officer and Police Pensioner, three sisters and one brother at 27 City Road, Walton, Liverpool. Enlisting at Liverpool for the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 14th March 1912, he served in France with the 1st Battalion from 12th August 1914 and was severely wounded in the attack on German positions in Troyon, Gheluvelt 14th September 1914 during the battle of the Aisne. The Battalion suffered 9 officers killed and 5 wounded with over 500 other ranks killed, wounded and missing, mustering 1 officer and 8 unwounded men after the attack. The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer dated 27th September 1914 records Private Woods as admitted to No 2 Western General Hospital, Manchester on 27th September 1914 wounded.

On recovery Woods joined the Army Cyclist Corps (number 191), gaining rapid promotion at one point he was acting Warrant Officer Class 2. Transferring to the 8th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 22nd October 1917 Page 10868, the citation being published in the London Gazette 26th January 1918 page 1287.

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty (East of Ypres on 31st July 1917). By his personal example of energy and cheerfulness he rendered invaluable service to his company Commander in consolidating a position which had been gained in very trying circumstances. When it was found necessary to withdraw he took charge of the covering party, and successfully covered the retirement in the face of fresh hostile troops, who were endeavouring to envelope his flank”.

The citation suggests he was a member of ‘C’ company which lost three officers and was then commanded by 2/Lieutenant R A Chaddocks.

An award for the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres, the battle of Pilckem Ridge 31st July to 2nd August 1917.

31st July 1917 from 8th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment War Diary

On the morning of 31st July 1917, 8th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment were in the Reserve Line north of Gun Farm, zero hour was at 0350hrs. ‘B’ company were ordered forward at 1315hrs. At 1355hrs ‘A’ and ‘D’ companies were ordered forward and at 1500hrs ‘B’ and ‘C’ companies were ordered up to the old front line. ‘C’ company pushed out patrols to establish contact with 56th Brigade who were reported to be in the vicinity of Fork Roads, ‘A’ company pushed out patrols to establish contact with 8th Lincolns reported to be at June Farm. At 1700hrs orders were received to send out strong patrols along the whole front to discover the strength and locality of the enemy’s positions.

The Commanding Officer 8th East Lancashires along with the Commanding Officer 4th Middlesex agreed the orders would cause severe casualties as the enemy were shelling our immediate front very heavily. An orderly arrived at 1745hrs with written orders for an attack by 8th East Lancashires at 1900hrs, this was postponed until 2000hrs at the request of the Commanding Officer. The Battalion would attack in three waves ‘C’ on the left, ‘B’ in the centre and ‘A’ on the right, the supporting artillery barrage was to be a standing one 150 yards in front of the final objective. At 2000hrs the barrage opened and the three companies went over the top. Within ten minutes prisoners came back, captured at May Farm. ‘B’ company was now held up by Machine Gun fire in a copse south of May Farm which was eventually silenced.

Between 2100hrs and 2130hrs messages were received from all companies stating the objective had been gained and that they were digging in but the extreme right and left flanks were in the air. At 1145hrs the Lancashires were forced to retire back to their old position. ‘C’ company had reached its objective but had lost three officers and was now commanded by 2/Lt R S Chaddocks. Many parties of the enemy had been encountered, all had been beaten off with rifle and lewis gun fire. Chaddocks had dug in on the objective but was forced to retire 100 yards due to a heavy enemy artillery barrage. ‘A’ and ‘B’ companies reached their objective despite meeting with a considerable number of the enemy on the way who were driven back. ‘A’ company met with a party of 20 of the enemy who ran away and were cut down by lewis gun fire. Both these companies were forced to retire under a heavy artillery barrage. By 2245hrs survivors of the Battalion were back in the old line, casualties recorded as 1 officer killed and 4 wounded, 17 other ranks killed, 69 wounded and 11 missing.

Killed in action 22nd March 1918 (reported as missing, death accepted to have taken place on this date) whilst attached 15th Entrenching Battalion, the second day of the German Spring offensive, aged 23 years he is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.

EF £3,125 SOLD


 

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, War Medal with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Minesweeping, France Croix De Guerre undated reverse to Lieutenant Edward Arthur Parsons, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve late Royal Naval Reserve, a Surveyor originally from St Albans, Oxfordshire born in 1916. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant RNVR in November 1939 he joined Vernon for Minesweeping duties. Promoted Lieutenant in April 1941, he transferred to the Royal Naval Reserve, remaining with them until 1948 when he was placed on the RNVR Supplementary Reserve. Mentioned in Despatches for his services in command of British Yard Minesweeper 2210 “For his gallantry and undaunted devotion to duty during the landing of Allied Forces on the coast of Normandy”,  also awarded the French Croix De Guerre for the same operation. Removed from the RNVR Supplementary Reserve in 1958, he died in Winchester, Hampshire in 2007.

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star clasp France and Germany, War Medal with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as awarded

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Minesweeping 1945-51

Lieut E A Parsons RNR

France Croix De Guerre

Unnamed as awarded

With original Admiralty Medal award certificate (5 items) and original letter from the Admiralty dated 29th September 1945 which reads –

“Sir, I am commanded by My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to inform you that they are glad to learn that the President of the Provisional Government of France has approved the award to you of the Croix de Guerre, for gallantry and devotion to duty in the operations which led to the successful Allied landings in Normandy, and that you have the King’s unrestricted permission to wear the decoration, subject to confirmation at the end of the War. Confirmation, when approved, will be promulgated in Fleet Orders and in the Press.”

Copy London Gazette entry & headers for MID, copy Croix de Guerre recommendation from Admiralty file, copy of entry in Seedies Naval Honours & Awards 1939 to 1959 and other research listed here from on line sources.

Edward Alfred Parsons was born in St Albans, Oxfordshire 10th March 1916. A Surveyor by trade he was commissioned temporary Sub Lieutenant RNVR 20th November 1939 and joined Vernon for Minesweeping training and service. Promoted Lieutenant 5th April 1941 he transferred to the Royal Naval Reserve the same day (London Gazette 19th December 1941 page 7183). In 1944 Parsons was in command of British Yard Minesweeper (BYMS) 2210, part of 167 Minesweeping Flotilla which cleared entrance channels to the landing beaches.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 28th November 1944 page 5454 “For gallantry, skill, determination and undaunted devotion to duty during the landing of Allied Forces on the coast of Normandy”.

The brief citation for his French Croix de Guerre TNA reference ADM1/16697 records –

“For untiring devotion to duty during preparations and execution of mine sweeping operations off the Normandy beaches”.

No such permission to wear the French Croix de Guerre was ever published in the London Gazette after the war, an oversight, perhaps. The National Archives file contains the names of Royal Navy personnel awarded the decoration for the Normandy invasion, none appear in the London Gazette. This award is also listed in Seedies Naval Honours and Awards 1939 to 1959. Parsons reverted to the RNVR Supplementary Reserve List, London Division in 1948 where he remained until 1958. Returning to his work as a surveyor in 1953 he was residing at 12 Eton Grove, Lewisham, London, SE13. He died in Winchester, Hampshire in 2007.

GVF & better £695 SOLD


 

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI the reverse dated 1945, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Defence & War Medals with five flying log books and two original commissioning certificated to Squadron Leader (Pilot) Harry William Howe, Royal Air Force. Born in Marylebone, London in 1923 and a member of the local Air Training Corps he enlisted into the RAFVR  in Mach 1941 as Aircraftsman 2nd Class. Completing his pilot training in Canada and the USA he was promoted Sergeant (pilot) in February 1943 and Flight Sergeant in February 1944. Commissioned Pilot Officer in August 1944 he joined 76 Squadron and completed his first operational sortie on 6th July 1944, at the time of being recommended for the DFC he had completed 39 operational sorties. Post War he obtained a Regular Commission and was employed mainly as a Pilot Instructor and was appointed to several Staff jobs. Promoted to Squadron Leader in October 1955 he joined HQ Flying Training Command in June 1965. Dismissed the Royal Air Force by sentence of Court Martial 29th June 1965, he died in 1991 at his home in Crowthorne, Berkshire.

Distinguished Flying Cross GVI the reverse officially dated 1945

Unnamed as awarded

1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France and Germany, Defence & War Medals

unnamed as awarded

Five Royal Air Force Flying Log Books

H W Howe

With Five Flying Log Books, four rebound in green buckram with “Royal Air Force Pilot’s Flying Log Book H W Howe” in gold lettering, the fifth standard cover, all excellent condition, two original commission scrolls, copy service record, London Gazette entries for DFC and Dismissal, original newspaper cutting regarding his DFC award. The group mounted court style for wear.

Harry William Howe was born 6th July 1923 in Kensal Rise, London, educated at St Marylebone Grammar School and  a member of the 98th St Marylebone Air Training Corps Squadron, he enlisted for the Royal Air Force 7th March 1941 and was mobilized for service 3rd November 1941. Howe commenced pilot training in Canada and USA 21st February 1942 and was promoted Sergeant on qualifying 27th February 1943 and Flight Sergeant 27th February 1944. Commissioned acting Pilot Officer 20th August 1944, Flying Officer 27th June 1946, Flight Lieutenant 21st February 1948, Squadron Leader 1st October 1955. Dismissed the Royal Air Force by sentence of Court Martial 29th June 1965 (London Gazette 24th August 1965 page 8073).

Howe commenced operations with 76 Squadron on 6th July 1944 as pilot and Captain of Aircraft flying Halifax Mark III bombers, his log book records the following sorties –

6th July 1944 V1 Rocket Launching sites at St Martin L’Hortier, 6th July Croixdalle Rocket supply depot, 9th July operations Chateau Bernapre, an early return due to severe icing, 15th July operations Nucourt, ME109 sighted did not engage, 18th July operations over Caen targeting troop concentrations, 19th July Acquet Rocket supply depot, 20th July Bottrop (Happy Valley) synthetic oil refinery, 25th July Foret Du Croc Rocket launching sites, 30th July Battle area troop concentrations, 3rd August Bois de Cassan ammunition depot, 5th August Foret de Nieppe Rocket launching sites, 1st September La Pourchinte Rocket supply depot, 3rd September Soesterburg Aerodrome, 10th September Le Havre Gun Emplacements, 13th September Nordstern synthetic oil plant, 26th September Calais gun emplacements, 7th October Kleve Town, 9th October Bochum (Rhur) early return with engine trouble bombs jettisoned in North Sea, 14th October Duisburg Town, 23rd October Essen landed at Stanton Harcourt with engine trouble, 28th October Cologne built up area, 30th October Cologne (Rhur) industrial area, 2nd November Dusseldorf Town, 18th November Munster Town, 29th November Essen Town, 2nd December Hagen Rhur Valley Town, 6th December Osnabruck early return navigational aids u/s, 17th December Duisburg Town, 26th December St Vith in Belgium troop concentrations, 16th January 1945 Magdeburg Town, 28th January Stuttgart martialling yards, 4th February Bonn martialling yards, 7th February Goch troop concentrations, 17th February Wesel bombs brought back adverse weather, 2nd March Koln Town, 3rd March Kamlen enemy intruder activity over base, 7th March Hemmingstedt natural oil refinery, 8th March Hamburg U-Boat and shipbuilding docks, 11th March Essen Town, 12th March Dortmund Town, 13th March Wippertal Town, 15th March Bottrop Bensol and Coke Plant.

Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross London Gazette 20th July 1945 page 3782

The actual recommendation not obtained by vendor but for his services as Pilot and Captain of aircraft having completed 39 operational sorties with 76 Squadron.

Post War Howe remained in the RAF and obtain a Regular Commission he was employed as a pilot instructor at various flying schools and was also rewarded with several Staff appointments. His last flight was in a Canberra at Central Flying School 22nd April 1959, he had by then accumulated 1,898 hours and 30 minutes flying time. On 29th June 1965 he joined HQ Flying Training Command and was dismissed the Royal Air Force by sentence of Court Martial 29th June 1965, his offence is not recorded. He died at his home 4 The Chase, Edgcumbe Park, Crowthorne, Berkshire 28th April 1991 his occupation recorded as Sales Manager (Retired).

GVF £2,400 SOLD


 

Military Cross GV, British War & Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria, Annuity Meritorious Service Medal Army GV, Belgium Chevalier of the Order of  Crown, Belgium Croix De Guerre (2) to Major Robert William Benjamin Sims, Hampshire Regiment late Northumberland Fusiliers and Royal Marine Artillery born in Portsmouth in 1865. Attesting for the Royal Marine Artillery in June 1881 he rose to QM Sergeant Instructor of Musketry and in June 1900 was promoted Regimental Sergeant Major on transfer to the 3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. A Marksman he represented both the Royal Marines and the Army at Bisley where he won numerous Medals and Trophies. Discharged to pension in June 1906. Volunteering his services on the outbreak of the First World War he was commissioned QM & Lieutenant in October 1914 of the newly formed 14th (1st Portsmouth) Battalion Hampshire Regiment, Lieutenant November 1914 he rose to Major by May 1918. Awarded the MC for distinguished services in Italy as Assistant Provost Marshall 41st Division, he was Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig in 1917, awarded three Belgian Decorations and an Annuity MSM in 1935. Relinquishing his commission in November 1920 he retired to his home city of Portsmouth and died there in 1955 aged 91 years. A UNIQUE combination of awards.

Military Cross GV

Unnamed as awarded

British War & Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Major R W B Simms

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

R W B Simms Sergt No 1981 RMA

Annuity Meritorious Service Medal Army GV

SJT MJR R W B Simms MC North’d Fus

Belgium Chevalier of The Crown and Croix De Guerre (2)

Unnamed as awarded

With a folder of research and copy photos, original Mentioned in Despatches Certificate (Haig’s Despatch of 7th November 1917), original Croix De Guerre award certificate dated 13th December 1918 and a second award letter dated 12th October 1921. The research was undertaken 25 years ago and can be enhanced, there is no RMA service record or 1WW officers record.

Robert William Benjamin Simms was born 11th August 1865 and attested for the Royal Marine Artillery 11th June 1881 (RMA.1981) serving with them until 5th June 1900 reaching the rank of QM Sergeant Instructor of Musketry, he transferred to the Army as Regimental Sergeant Major (6569) of the 3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers based at Strensall Camp, York. A marksman, Simms represented his Regiment at Bisley and won many medals and trophies, he was discharged to pension 11th June 1906.

Volunteering his services on the outbreak of the First World War he was commissioned Quartermaster & Lieutenant 28th October 1914 of the Portsmouth Battalion Hampshire Regiment, later designated 14th (1st Portsmouth) Battalion. Lieutenant 30th November 1914, Captain 11th March 1915, Major 1st May 1918. Transferring to the General List 21st April 1917 and appointed Assistant Provost Marshall (Graded as Staff Captain). Post Armistice he was appointed Camp Commandant 1st July 1920 and relinquished his commission 10th November 1920. He retired to Portsmouth and died there in 1955.

Military Cross London Gazette 3rd June 1918 ‘For distinguished service in connection with Military operations in Italy’. At the time he was serving as Assistant Provost Marshall with 41st Division which had been sent to the Italian front in November 1917, returning to France in March 1918.

Belgium Croix De Guerre (1) London Gazette 21st August 1919 page 10604

Belgium Croix De Guerre (2) London Gazette 4th September 1919 page 11213

Belgium Chevalier Order of The Crown London Gazette 21st August 1919 page 10604

Mentioned in Despatches FM Sir Douglas Haig (France) London Gazette 11th December 1917 page 12920

Meritorious Service Medal awarded Army Order 16 dated 31st January 1935

From The St George’s Gazette dated November 1955 –

Obituary Robert William Benjamin Simms, MC, 80 Wadham Road, North End, Portsmouth.

“Sergeant Major R W B Simms, who’s death took place at Portsmouth on Monday 17th December will be remembered by many old Fifth Fusiliers during the period he was Regimental Sergeant Major of the 3rd Battalion. He was 93 years of age. Simms was transferred from the Royal Marines to the Fifth on promotion to Sergeant Major on 5th June 1900. He joined the 3rd Battalion in Strensall Camp, York, with which he served until April 1906, when he was discharged to pension having served his country for 25 years. Besides being a keen soldier, he was a thorough sportsman, and one of the picked shots of the Army. He represented the Regiment at Bisley, receiving many medals and trophies. One has only to refer to back numbers of the St George’s Gazette to read his history as a marksman. He re-joined the forces on the outbreak of the First World War. Posted to the Hampshire Regiment, eventually receiving a commission in France, during which period he earned the Military Cross and the Croix De Guerre. He eventually reached the rank of Major, and for a while was Assistant Provost Martial…….he leaves a widow”.

Centre enamel missing on Order of The Crown otherwise

NEF £3,950 Available


aaa456

Distinguished Service Medal GVI, British Empire Medal GVI (Military), Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type to Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) Charles Stanley Carter, Royal Navy born in July 1905 in Penzance, Cornwall. Entering the Royal Navy in January 1921, he rose steadily through the ranks being advanced to Chief Engine Room Artificer in January 1937. Joining HMS Broke in July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire, France in June 1940. Awarded the BEM for his skill when Broke rescued 180 survivors from the Armed Merchant Cruiser Comorin  which caught fire on 6th April 1941 and eventually sank in mid Atlantic during severe weather conditions. Awarded the DSM for Operation Torch she landed US troops in Algiers, Broke came under a heavy fire from Vichy French shore batteries but landed troops despite being badly damaged. Disabled by further fire as she withdrew she sank two days later. Promoted to Warrant Engineer in September 1944, he retired in 1949 as a Commissioned Engineer and died in Plymouth in 1970.

Distinguished Service Medal GVI

M.36157 C S Carter CERA

British Empire Medal GVI (Military)

Chief ERA Charles Stanley Carter D/M.36157

Naval General Service Medal GVI clasp Palestine 1936-39

M.36157 C S Carter ERA2 RN

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Atlantic Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GVI 1st type

M.36157 C S Carter CERA 2 HMS Fearless

With copy service records, London Gazette entries and headers for BEM and DSM, copy recommendations for both awards. The group mounted for wear, not particularly well, in the wrong order.

Charles Stanley Carter was born in Penzance, Cornwall 2nd July 1905. A Scholar he entered the Royal Navy 29th January 1921 as an Artificer Apprentice, completing his Apprenticeship at Fisgard 1st July 1925 and rated ERA5, advanced to ERA3 at Vivid 1st July 1929, ERA2 aboard HMS Adventure 1st July 1933, acting CERA2 aboard HMS Fame 20th January 1937, he was confirmed in that rate aboard HMS Fearless 20th January 1938 and awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 7th June 1938. Joining HMS Broke 31st July 1939, the ship taking part in the evacuation of troops from St Nazaire in June 1940. Awarded both the BEM and DSM whist serving aboard this ship.

BEM London Gazette 8th July 1944 page 3915 ‘For courage and seamanship in rescuing survivors from a burning vessel’

‘One of HM Ships the SS Comorin caught fire at sea (on 6th April 1941). The fire spread quickly and it was decided to abandon ship. Heavy weather made the removal of the crew difficult. By fine seamanship a Destroyer was brought along side, and the greater part of the crew taken off. In this operation acting Leading Seaman Cook (awarded BEM) was conspicuous. He took the lead in helping survivors who were hurt as they jumped aboard. He worked untiringly, with no regard for his own safety. Chief Engine Room Artificer Carter did fine work during three and a half hours of delicate handling. 685 orders were transmitted to the Engine Room during this time. The names of these two men are put forward as representative of the skill, devotion and courage displayed throughout the action by the lower deck and Engine Room’.

HMS Broke recued 180 survivors, HMS Lincoln and HMS Glenarty also took survivors, 405 of the 426 on board were rescued. SS Comorin sank in mid Atlantic.

DSM London Gazette  6th April 1943 page 1583 ‘For outstanding gallantry and zeal in the Engine Room of HMS Broke throughout the hazardous operations when the Allied Forces were landed in North Africa in November 1942, Operation Terminal’.

Originally recommended for a Mention in Despatches but this upgraded to the DSM, the recommendation states –

‘This man’s bearing and leadership in action were of the highest order and had a most excellent steadying effect. He was also untiring in his efforts in after action damage control. The high state of effectiveness of the Engine Room Department was largely due to his zeal and energy’.

On 8 November 1942 Broke, together with the Destroyer Malcolm took part in Operation Terminal  part of Operation Torch , the Allied invasion of French North Africa. In “Terminal”, the two Destroyers were to attempt to land infantry directly onto the portside in Algiers in the hope of capturing the port facilities and preventing their destruction by the Vichy French. It was hoped that either complete surprise would be achieved or that the defenders would support the invasion to the extent at least of refusing to fire on the attackers. However, the Vichy forces opened fire on the ships, damaging them heavily. Malcolm was forced to withdraw, but Broke had better luck. On her third attempt, she sliced through the boom and succeeded in landing her troops under fire on the Quai de Fécamp, four hours after the operation started. Broke continued to receive heavy fire and was forced to withdraw at 1030, the unseasoned US troops she landed were quickly taken prisoner. roke was again hit by shore batteries when withdrawing which compounded on earlier damage. She was taken in tow by the Destroyer Zetland, but sank two days later on 10th November at position 36.50N 00.40E.

Promoted to Warrant Engineer 18th September 1944, and to Commissioned Engineer with the same seniority he retired in 1949 and died in Plymouth in 1970.

NEF £3,250 Available