Gallantry and Distinguished Service


British Empire Medal For Gallantry E2 Civil Division, 1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals to Mr Edward Alfred Quigley, Driver and Attendant, London Ambulance Service born in Camberwell, London in 1921. Awarded the BEM For Gallantry in 1969 when, responding to an emergency call, he lowered himself into a sewer filled with poisonous fumes to rescue two men. Giving one man oxygen he tied a rope around him and he was hauled to safety. The second unconscious man was also hauled to safety but was dead on arrival at hospital. Mr Quigley also started to loose consciousness and had to be pulled out by a rope he attached around himself. He retired to Bournemouth and died there in 1995. He is believed to have served in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the Second World War.

British Empire Medal For Gallantry E2 (Civil Division)

Edward Alfred Quigley

1939/45 Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medal

Unnamed as issued

With copy London Gazette entry and headers, corresponding miniatures, letter from The Central Chancery dated 25th October 1993, addressed to “Mr Edward E Quigley, 121 Church Road, Ferndown, Dorset, BH22 9ET”, thanking him for his donation to the Order of the British Empire 75th Anniversary Appeal Fund.

Edward Alfred Quigley was born in Camberwell, London 13th July 1921, he died in Bournemouth, Dorset in 1995.

BEM For Gallantry (Civil Division) London Gazette 8th August 1969 page 8213

Edward Alfred Quigley, Ambulance Driver / Attendant, London Ambulance Service

Joint citation with Thomas Edward Peter Smith, Descaling Engineer, London SE5

“Mr Smith and two other men were engaged in clearing out the interceptor in a drain. It was decided to clear the blockage by using a chemical and about 4 gallons of the acid were poured into the drain. The three men then went to the manhole over the council sewer and one man went down to clear the blockage in the interceptor from behind. He started to push rods back up the sewer, came up to the surface for more rods and then collapsed down into the manhole apparently the result of fumes. Smith’s colleague immediately jumped into the manhole and managed to lift the man up so that Smith was able to get hold of his hands and lift him out of the manhole and lay him on the road.

The man in the manhole now collapsed. Smith, after calling for help took off his jacket and jumped into the manhole. A rope was passed down to Smith and he was told to tie it around the other man. Smith by now was seriously affected by the fumes and although he tied the rope it kept slipping. Smith was too affected to retie the rope but refused to leave his colleague and he eventually became unconscious himself. By this time Mr Quigley arrived following an emergency call to his (ambulance) depot. On being told two men were in the sewer, he looked down the manhole where he saw one man apparently unconscious and the other fighting for breath. Realising there was no time to wait for assistance, he took an oxygen mask and went into the manhole, where he could small what appeared to be acid fumes.

As Smith was the least affected of the two men, he placed the oxygen mask on him and then pulled the head of the other man clear of the sewer. He tied the rope which had been passed down to him around Smith, who was then pulled out of the manhole. The rope was again passed down and Quigley tied it around the other man who was again pulled out. He was found to be dead on arrival at hospital. By this time Quigley was almost unconscious and he too had to be pulled out”.

A rare gallantry award for saving life to the London Ambulance Service.

GVF £895 Available


Military Medal GV, 1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals with Bronze Memorial Plaque to Private (Lance Corporal) Alexander Sime, Cameron Highlanders born Barony, Glasgow, Lanarkshire 21st December 1896. Enlisting at Glasgow  on 13th February 1914, he served in France from 14th August 1914 with the 1st Battalion. Wounded in action 14th September 1914 during the battle of the Aisne gun shot wound left forearm, he recovered and re-joined his Battalion in France. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry on 18th April 1918 in what became known as the battle of Bethune, he was mortally wounded by shell fire on 2nd September 1918 when his Battalion was supporting a Canadian attack towards Cambrai, he died of wounds  4th September 1918 at No 20 General Hospital, Camiers and now rests in an identified grave at Etaples, his name also appears on the Inverness War Memorial.

Military Medal GV

9657 Pte A Sime 1/Cam’n Highrs

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

9657 Pte A Sime Cam’n Highrs

British War and Victory Medals

9657 Pte A Sime Cam’n Highrs

Bronze Memorial Plaque

Alexander Sime

With copy Newspaper articles, copies from Regimental History, Regimental Journal, Regimental enlistment register, London Gazette entry and headers for MM, MM Card, Medal Index Card and other research from on line sources.

Original silk ribbons on all four Medals.

Alexander Sime was born in Barony, Glasgow, Lanarkshire 21st December 1896 the son of Alexander Sime a Master Slater (died 1909) and his wife Mary (re-married 1910), he enlisted at Glasgow  on 13th February 1914 and gave his address as 28 North Portland Street, Glasgow. Serving in France from 14th August 1914 with the 1st Battalion, he was wounded, gun shot would left forearm, probably on 14th September 1914 during the battle of the Aisne when the 1st Battalion suffered heavy casualties around Vendresse and the Chemin des Dames. Whilst on leave from France he married Mary Young a Domestic Servant aged 19 years in Inverness (she re-married in 1920 Roderick McKay and died in Inverness in 1964). He died of wounds received in action 4th September 1918 at No 20 General Hospital, Camiers and now rests in an identified grave at Etaples, his name also appears on the Inverness War Memorial.

From: The Highland Leader and Northern Weekly 12th November 1914 page 3 

“Casualties reported from the Base (BEF) 23rd September 1914 – Wounded – 9657 Sime, Pte A, Camerons”

From: The Highland Times 29th August 1918 page 4

Bravery in The Field – Military Medal Award

“Lance Corporal Alexander Sime, Cameron Highlanders son in law of Mr James Young, fish salesman, 15 Upper Kessock Street, and with whom Lance Corporal Sime’s wife at present resides, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. He was in France very early in the war, and was wounded at Mons. Two of his brothers have given their lives in the cause of freedom”.

Military Medal London Gazette 6th August 1918 page 9250

On the evening of 16th April 1918, the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders moved forward into support trenches at Givenchy. The next day a German prisoner was taken who confessed the Germans were to launch an attack on 18th April. This proved to be correct and at 0430 hours the Germans commenced a heavy artillery bombardment on the British front line and rear areas which lasted about four hours. At 0810 hours they attacked and at 1100 orders were received for the Camerons to advance and support units holding the line. Although the Germans failed to make a break through, they did manage to capture parts of the front line and support trenches, a bombing attack was organised to eject the enemy with little success. Awarded the Military Medal for his gallantry that day in what became known as the battle of Bethune.

From: The Highland Times 26th September 1918 page 4

He has won enduring Laurels

“Lance Corporal Alex Sime, only a few weeks ago we recorded with pleasure the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the field to Lance Corporal Alexander Sime, Cameron Highlanders. With regret we have today to chronicle his death in action on 4th September. He was son in law of Mr James Young fish salesman of 15 Upper Kessock street, with whom corporal Simes wife resides. As early in the war as Mons, he was wounded. He is the third of his family to give his life in the Great War, his superior officer writes to Mrs Sime –

It is with much regret that I have to inform you of the death of your husband through wounds received in action. On 2nd September Alex was severely wounded by shell fire during the advance. I had him attended to and sent down to the Casualty Clearing Station, I heard this morning that he had succumbed to his wounds at a base hospital. I may say since I joined this Regiment, Alex had been in my platoon, and I have always found him a good soldier and a fearless, brave man, and it is a great blow to me to have to part with such a comrade. I hope you will accept my deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement, he is badly missed by his comrades.”

2nd September 1918

The Canadians attacked towards Cambrai at 0500 hours on 2nd September 1918 and took the Drocourt-Queant Line between Dury and Cagincourt, the 1st British Division moving up in support. The Camerons moved from Guemappe at 0930 hours through Vis-en-Artois and Havcourt to Dury, coming under a German barrage 1,000 yards west of Dury. The Battalion pushed on up to Dury Ridge to take up position there, and found that the Canadians of 12th Brigade had not advanced beyond that point. The Camerons therefore withdrew and organised in depth to support the Canadians, leaving two platoons of “A” company in action at Dury Coppice. The two platoons re-joined the Battalion after dark. Heavy shelling was experienced all day with 4 killed and 22 wounded”.

GVF & better £950 SOLD


Military Medal GV, British War and Victory Medals to Private Alfred Herbert Gibbs, Essex Regiment born in West ham, Essex in 1898. In 1911 he was residing in Canning Town, London and enlisted at West Ham. Serving in France after January 1916 with the 9th Battalion, he was awarded the Military Medal in April 1918 and was killed in action whilst holding the front line at Henencourt near Albert on 4th April 1918 aged 20 years, he now rests in an identified grave in the Ribemont Communal Cemetery, France.

Military Medal GV

43553 Pte A Gibbs 9/Essex R

British War and Victory Medals

43553 Pte A Gibbs Essex R

With copy Medal Index Card confirming British War and Victory Medals only awarded, casualty details, London gazette entry and header for MM, census details.

Alfred Gibbs was born Alfred Herbert Gibbs was born in West Ham, Essex in 1898, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old school boy residing with his father Alfred, mother Ada two brothers and two sisters at 12 Addington Road, Canning Town, London. Enlisting in West Ham, probably a conscript, he served with the 9th Battalion Essex Regiment in France after January 1916. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 25th April 1918 page 5033, the awards listed in this Gazette are for gallantry during March 1918, minor actions and trench raids up to but not including the German Spring Offensive. Killed in action in the front line at Henencourt, near Albert (W.26), the War Diary records positions subject to shell fire and trench mortar fire. Aged 20 years, he now rests in an identified grave in the Ribemont Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.

EF £595 Available


Commander of the British Empire (CBE) Military 2nd type, Distinguished Service Order GV, Military Cross GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, 1939/45 Star, War Medal with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Brigadier Arthur Gordon Barry, Staff late Lancashire Fusiliers, Machine Gun Corps and Royal Tank Corps. Born in St Germans, Cornwall in 1885, he was educated at Edinburgh, Cambridge and Oxford Universities and at the age of 19 years was the England Amateur Golf Champion in 1905. Commissioned into the 9th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers in September 1914, he landed with his Battalion at Sulva Bay on 6th August 1915 and wrote an account of the first days of fighting to a friend. Later awarded the Military Cross for his gallantry during the first six days of heavy fighting at Gallipoli, such were the casualties, particularly amongst officers, as a Lieutenant he was soon to be in command of the Battalion survivors. Also Mentioned in General Munro’s Despatch for distinguished services at Gallipoli. Following a short period in Egypt, he arrived in France in July 1916 and in January 1917 took over command of 34th Company Machine Gun Corps. Appointed to command 11th Battalion MGC in February 1918 on its formation, it was for his leadership and offensive spirit during the last major actions of the War that he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and twice Mentioned in Despatches. Appointed to the Royal Tank Corps in 1923, he was a graduate of the Staff College the same year and moved steadily up the promotion ladder. Promoted Brigadier shortly after the outbreak of War, it was for his leadership and organisational skills during the withdrawal of British units to Cherbourg for evacuation, once German forces had crossed the Somme, that he received the CBE from the hands of the King. In addition he was Mentioned in Despatches on two occasions. Appointed Assistant Adjutant General and Quartermaster General, Scottish Command he died on 21st August 1942 aged 56 years whilst still serving and now rests in the St Andrews Western Cemetery, Fife.

Commander of the British Empire (CBE) Military 2nd type

Unnamed as awarded

Distinguished Service Order GV

Unnamed as awarded

Military Cross GV

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

Lieut A G Barry Lanc Fus

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Lt Col A G Barry

1939/45 Star, War Medal with MID Oakleaf

Unnamed as issued

With a quantity of original photographs, research listed here, Second World War Medal Condolence Slip, original Mentioned in Despatches Certificates for General Munro (Gallipoli) March 1916 in envelope, FM Haig March 1919 in envelope, 26th July 1940 in envelope, 20th December 1940 in envelope, original award certificates for CBE and DSO, wife’s Red Cross training certificates, photo of his wife with Queen Elizabeth (later Queen Mother), Queen Mary during War Committee work etc etc. Photos and newspaper cuttings carefully extracted from a rotting scrap album.

Arthur Gordon Barry born 6th September 1885 in St Germans, Cornwall son of Commander Arthur Barry, Royal Navy, and his wife Emmeline Maria nee Hodgkinson. Educated St Andrews University, Edinburgh, Pembroke College, Cambridge and Oriel College Oxford (matriculated 1913), MA (2nd Class Honours in Mathematics), BSc (Physics and Chemistry). Temporary 2nd Lieutenant 6th September 1914 9th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, Temporary Lieutenant 28th January 1915 (and as Battalion Machine Gun Officer), temporary Captain 22nd August 1915 to Machine Gun Corps (MGC) 22nd March 1916 and Temporary Captain Manchester Regiment 7th May 1916. Temporary Major 1st January 1917 MGC, commanding 34th Company, Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 27th December 1917 MGC. Captain Royal Tank Corps 26th September 1923, graduate of the Royal Staff College 1923. Admitted to the Institute of Mechanical Engineers  17th September 1924 whilst serving with 3rd Battalion Royal Tank Corps. Major Royal Tank Corps 11th October 1927. He married Doreen Barbour Turnbull in 1925 in Edinburgh.

Served France and Belgium 7th July 1916 to 11th November 1918, Greek Macedonia, Serbia, Bulgaria, European Turkey and Islands of the Aegean Sea 21st December 1915 to 26th January 1916, Gallipoli 6th August 1915 to 20th December 1915, Egypt 28th January 1916 to 18th March 1916, Egypt Expeditionary Force 19th March 1916 to 1st July 1916. Instructor Small Arms School, Machine Gun Corps, France 1st June 1917 to 5th February 1918. GSO3 Southern Command 1st February 1925 to 29th June 1926, Brigade Major Northern Command 30th June 1926 to 31st January 1929, GSO2 War Office 19th January 1931, Instructor at the Royal Staff College 1st August 1935 to 31st July 1938.

Brevet Colonel 5th September 1938, General Staff Officer 1st Grade War Office 16th December 1938 (London Gazette 31st January 1939 page 678), to a Special Appointment 26th January 1939 (London Gazette 10th February 1939 page 946), Colonel 27th September 1938, Retired 6th September 1940 but employed as Temporary Brigadier. Died 21st August 1942 aged 56 years whilst serving as Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General Scottish Command, he now rests in the St Andrews Western Cemetery, Fife

English Amateur Golf Champion 1905 at the age of 19 years, he had been nominated to play in the tournament by St Andrews University, Edinburgh, Army Golf Champion 1922 and 1925.

First World War

Captain A G Barry, MC, Machine Gun Corps, France 1916

Citations from St Andrew’s University Edinburgh  Roll of War Services 1914-1919 extracted from official sources –

Military Cross London Gazette 3rd June 1916 page 5571 (For Gallipoli)

“Was present at the landing at Sulva Bay in August 1915. Has shown continual good work as Adjutant and Battalion Commander. Received a Regular Commission for services at Sulva”.

His own account of the landing typed and dated 23rd August 1915 included and records –

“Dear Ralph,

We left Imbros on the evening of August 6th, our Brigade landed first on “W” beach and the Manchester and Lancashire Fusiliers got ashore first. We left in the Lighters and were towed to the entrance of the bay by Destroyers, than cast off and made for the shore. As soon as we got well inside, the Turks opened on us, showing we had not caught them napping……..after nearly an hour someone got ashore with a line and we had to land as best we could , starting in about 4 feet of water. I was inside, packed like sardines, pitch dark, with my section at rear of Hold and got fed up with the delay, so I eventually got up the gangway and with the help of my sergeant and two other men, launched the Lighter bat and got my guns out on board  and so to the shore where the rest of the section joined into one and we dug ourselves in on the beach until daylight, as the orders were no firing only the bayonet.

The delay caused by the grounding of the Lighter and the finding of the Turks in great force on the shore (where we hoped to find little resistance) hitched all plans and the only thing to do was to form up in the darkness as soon as the Company could be got together, and bring off into the dark after the enemy. The result was we drove them back and got them on the run, but lost 14 officers and 300 men killed and wounded. Their shrapnel did great execution and they had the range to perfection……we were 48 hours hard at it, a regular mix up and open fighting, no trenches and only one water bottle all the time, and on the middle of the third day we had about 200 men who could not move until we got up some water. Some of the Irish Brigade who were on our left broke badly and came back through me until I finally threatened to turn Machine Guns on them and so got them back into the firing line, entirely want of water did it. That night we spent on a ridge, we had a days rest then off to a line of trenches on the right where we were shelled at odd times every day.

Last Saturday our Division were in for it again. After a bombardment by the guns, we were ordered to take the Turkish Trenches across open country 450 yards away. Well, the men went across in fine style and shifted them out alright. They waited until they were 80 yards off then went, a lot couldn’t get out quick enough, they were quickly stuck (with the bayonet). Not a sole came up to reinforce us and eventually, after using all our ammunition , had to retire in the early morning when they started bombing us. We were now 1 officer (myself), not counting the Doctor and Quartermaster, 240 men, rather sickening to think of, the loss due entirely through lack of support after doing our job in such gallant style. It is a dead country to attack in and we now hold nearly all the plain with the Turks up in the hills, and I think it will eventually become another Atchi-Baba. I am very fit and had some lucky escapes so far – had a tiff on the head with a bit of shell, but my (sun) helmet saved me entirely.

Yours Gordon Barry (sic) at present Commanding 9th Lancashire Fusiliers.

Distinguished Service Order London Gazette 3rd June 1919 page 6817 (For France)

“Has commanded 11th Battalion Machine Gun Corps (11th Northern Division) since its formation (on 28th February 1918). His personal character and energy have had much to do with the successful welding of four different companies (32nd, 33rd, 34th and 250th) into an excellent Battalion with a good fighting spirit. His work in command of the Battalion, both in trench warfare and subsequently in open warfare, has been thoroughly good, and has materially assisted in the success of operations”.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 13th July 1916 page 6948 (General Sir Charles Munro, Gallipoli)

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 21st December 1917 page 13368 (Haig, France)

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 10th July 1919 page 8740 (Haig, France)

The 11th (Northern) Division was part of XXII Corps, First Army and took part in the Second Battle of Arras in 1918, Battle of the Scarpe 30th August, Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line 2nd to 3rd September, Battle of the Canal Du Nord 27th September to 1st October, Battle of Cambrai 8th to 9th September, pursuit to the Selle 9th to 12th October, the final advance in Picardy including the Battle of the Sambre 4th November and passage of the Grande Honnelle 5th to 7th November.

Major A G Barry, DSO, MC, Royal Tank Corps 1927

Second World War

Commander of the British Empire London Gazette 31st January 1941 page 613 “For distinguished services rendered in the Field”.

Recommendation submitted by Major General A B Beauman, commanding Beauman Division.

Brigadier Arthur Gordon Barry, DSO, MC, HQ Lines of Communication

“Throughout the period under review this officer had very heavy responsibilities as a great number of GHQ Installations were situated in his sub area. During the critical period when the enemy had seized the bridgeheads over the river Somme, he was responsible for evacuating both the personnel and material from these installations. Owing to the energy, good judgement and powers of organisation of this officer, a great proportion of the valuable stores and all the personnel were safely evacuated. Throughout he showed himself a determined and cool headed commander”.

The fragmented remains of the Beauman Division that had escaped across the Seine were withdrawn to re-organise. On 16 June 1940, the Tenth Army ordered a general retirement with the eventual aim of establishing a defensive position on the Brittany peninsula; a policy opposed by both Brooke and the British Government. The Beauman Division was therefore ordered to fall back on Cherbourg for evacuation conducted as Operation Ariel. This was a relatively straightforward task as, unlike some other British formations they were not in contact with the Germans but involved crossing the line of retreat of part of Tenth Army. Arriving at Cherbourg, the Division embarked on to the waiting ships with whatever equipment they had; the whole formation had been evacuated by 17 June. On arrival in England, the Division was dispersed.

Brigadier A G Barry, CBE, DSO, MC inspects Home Guard units in Dumfries, Scotland in May 1942 three months before his death

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 26th July 1940 page 4579 “For distinguished services in the field”.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 20th December 1940 page 7175 “In recognition of distinguished service in connection with military operations in the field March to June 1940”.

The Medals at one time lacquered, NO damage to DSO

GVF & better £4,500 SOLD


British Empire Medal GVI (Civil Division) to John Cheesman, a civilian Lorry Driver from Lincoln. On 3rd July 1945, Mosquito XXV KB416 of 627 Squadron, piloted by 133387 Flight Lieutenant Douglas Norman Johnson, RAFVR and Navigator 198190 Pilot Officer Joseph Duthae Finlayson, RAFVR, crashed in a field when on an overshoot, after attempting to land at RAF Station Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, on one engine. John Cheesman, who was working near by, assisted with the rescue of the Pilot and Navigator from the burning aircraft. The NCO in charge of the Fire Party Corporal Coggar was awarded the George Medal for the same incident.

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil Division)

John Cheesman

With copy London Gazette entries and headers, newspaper article.

The BEM on its original investiture pin.

On 3rd July 1945, Mosquito XXV KB416 of 627 Squadron, piloted by 133387 Flight Lieutenant Douglas Norman Johnson, RAFVR and Navigator 198190 Pilot Officer Joseph Duthae Finlayson, RAFVR, crashed in a field when on an overshoot after attempting to land at RAF Station Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, on one engine. John Cheesman had been working nearby and went to assist the Fire Party.

British Empire Medal London Gazette 5th February 1946 page 806

 ‘An aircraft crashed in a field adjoining the runway on which it was endeavouring to land. A Fire Party from the aerodrome went immediately to the scene. Cheesman, who was working nearby, went to the assistance of the Fire Party to help to release the navigator from the burning wreckage. Cheesman tried with a hacksaw to cut through the cables by which the airman was held, whilst a fire extinguisher was played on the navigator. The fire had by this time gained a good hold and it was necessary for the rescuers to withdraw. A fire tender was then able to subdue the flames sufficiently in the area where the Navigator was lying, to enable the rescuers to make a further attempt, and Cheesman was successful in cutting the cables and freeing the man. Cheesman showed courage without thought for his own safety.’

1585300 Corporal Stephen James Coggar, RAFVR was in charge of the Fire Party and was awarded the George Medal for his gallantry in the rescue of the pilot and navigator London Gazette 26th February 1946 page 1134.

1585300 Corporal Stephen James Cogger, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Royal Air Force Station, Woodhall Spa.

‘On the afternoon of 3rd July, 1945, a Mosquito aircraft crashed in a field (adjoining the runway) when attempting to land. Corporal Cogger, who was in charge of the fire party, observed the aircraft to be in difficulty. He ordered the fire tender to stand by and himself started up the section’s Jeep. By this time the aircraft had crashed, so Corporal Cogger immediately proceeded to the scene. On arrival he found the aircraft on fire, the flames rapidly spreading along the leading edge of the wings and the fuselage. The nose of the aircraft had completely broken away from the remainder of the fuselage. The navigator was lying in the wreckage by the leading edge of the wing. Corporal Cogger immediately entered the flames and tried to pull the navigator clear but found him to be held fast by some cables around his legs. Corporal Cogger then went to the Jeep to get a hacksaw and hand fire extinguisher. By this time the Duty Orderly and Ambulance Driver and also a civilian had arrived. All four entered the burning area, the civilian using the hacksaw to cut the cables holding the navigators legs, whilst Corporal Cogger played the extinguisher on him. By this time the fire had gained a good hold and the four men were forced to retire. The fire tender had now arrived and was able to subdue the flames enough to permit the four rescuers to cut the navigator free. Corporal Cogger, in spite of burns sustained earlier, again entered the burning area, accompanied by the Ambulance Driver, to look for the pilot but he could not be seen. Corporal Cogger was ultimately taken to hospital suffering from major burns of the forehead, cheeks, arms and hands. He had displayed great gallantry in circumstances when, at any moment, the aircraft might have exploded. He has attended some 14 crashes as NCO in charge of the fire party and in 10 of these he has shown resource and determination in dealing with fires.’

EF £550 Available


British Empire Medal E2 (Military Division) to Sergeant Malcolm New, 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers from Llandudno. Awarded the BEM in 1990 for his outstanding intelligence work in searching for terrorist hides and weapons caches, described by his superiors as possessing “outstanding leadership and “really gets to grips with the terrorists”. By the time of his fifth tour he was beginning to show the strain and was returned home after two months with what was later diagnosed as post traumatic stress. A fine operational BEM to a truly exceptional soldier.

British Empire Medal E2 (Military Division)

24400077 Sgt Malcolm New RWF

With copy London Gazette entry and headers, copy of BBC News Channel article regarding his High Court action against the Ministry of Defence for compensation (2005).

BEM London Gazette 15th May 1990 page 9154 “In recognition of meritorious service in Northern Ireland”.

“Malcolm New (45) from Llandudno, was sent on a fifth tour of Northern Ireland in 1993 despite telling Doctors of stress related headaches. He is seeking damages from the Ministry of Defence following its failure to refer him for medical treatment. Mr New rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant in the Royal Welch Fusiliers during his 18 year Army career. He excelled in intelligence work in Northern Ireland searching for terrorist “hides” and weapons caches, the court heard. On receiving the British Empire Medal in 1990, he was praised for “outstanding leadership” and his Commanding Officer said “he really gets to grips with the terrorists”. But on his fourth tour in 1989, a colleague described him as “being pushed very hard” and showing “significant strain” despite performing to a high standard. In 1993 Mr New applied for redundancy short before a fifth tour but was refused. Mr New told his superiors he did not want to return to Northern Ireland but he was despatched and, within two months, was complaining to a friend of severe headaches. Soon after he was transferred back to England after fellow soldiers speculated he was “loosing it”.It was not until 1997 that he saw a Psychiatrist and was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder.”

NEF £795 Available


Distinguished Conduct Medal GVI, 1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp 8th Army, Italy Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals to Private James Hudson, Durham Light Infantry from Bradford. Recommended for the Military Medal for his gallantry in leading an attack on an enemy Machine Gun post on the night of 21st / 22nd March 1943 located in the Mareth Line (Southern Tunisia) of defences whilst serving in the 6th Battalion. His Company Commander seriously wounded beside him, he fixed bayonets and captured the position accounting for many of the enemy himself. The award upgraded to a Distinguished Conduct Medal. Landing with the 8th Battalion on “D” Day 6th June 1944 in Normandy, he went missing during an offensive patrol on 17th June 1944 with two other soldiers of his Battalion, they later re-joined their Battalion having encountered strong enemy positions in the Parc de la Mere and Chateau du Coridillon areas.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GVI

3660867 Pte J Hudson Durh LI

1939/45 Star, Africa Star clasp 8th Army, Italy Star, France and Germany Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

With copy London Gazette entry and headers, copy DCM recommendation, copies from the Regimental History and a copy photo of Private (Lance Corporal) Hudson.

Mounted as originally worn.

3660867 Pte James Hudson 6th Battalion Durham Light Infantry from Bradford.

Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 17th June 1943 page 2761 “For gallant and distinguished services in North Africa”.

“On the night of 21st / 22nd March 1943 during the 151st Brigade’s attack on the Mareth defences Private Hudson was with “C” Company 6th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. On seeing an enemy Machine Gun Post, he immediately led a group of men forward with fixed bayonets and charged the position. His rifle bolt was damaged and his rifle could not be fired, but he still led on his party relying solely on the use of his bayonet. He succeeded in capturing the Post, killing many of the enemy personally. This action of Private Hudson’s enabled the rest of his company to move forward onto the position. Before leading the charge, his Company Commander had been seriously wounded beside him. He showed outstanding courage and complete disregard for his own safety”.

The Regimental History records –

“The attack was timed to take place at full moon during the night of 21st / 22nd March. After careful reconnaissances made under the very noses of the enemy during the night of 18th, the Durham assault Battalions advanced from the Chet Meskine at 2300 hours on 20th. Against a heavy but not very accurate fire of all arms “C” and “D” Companies of the 9th Battalion succeeded in crossing the anti tank ditch, and wading across the Wadi and scrambling up the far bank by forming a human ladder, fought their way with the bayonet into the thick of the position. “B” Company finally overcoming Ksiba Ouest. The 8th Battalion had a similar experience in overrunning Ouerzi, where the Italians fought stubbornly. Lt Colonel Jackson was killed, but by morning both Battalions had reached their objectives with very severe fighting but without undue loss. On the other hand the 6th Battalion was unable to launch its attack until dark fell again, and the supply of reinforcements remained precarious throughout the 21st. When it did advance, however, the 6th secured its objectives, Ouerzi Ouest and Zarat Sudest, with comparative ease.”

Private James Hudson landed with the 8th Battalion Durham Light Infantry on “D” Day at La Riviere. On 17th June 1944 he was reported missing in the War Office Casualty List TNA WO417/78. On this day active patrolling south and south east took place in an endeavour to come into contact with enemy units. Enemy positions in some strength were located in the Parc de la Mere and Chateau du Coridillon areas. Hudson went missing with Pte J F Robinson and Private E Swann of his Battalion, likely they were cut off or had to go to ground for a period of a few days in order to rejoin allied lines when safe to do so. War Office Casualty List TNA WO417/79 records he is no longer missing.

GVF £4,500 Available


Member of the British Empire (MBE) Civil Division 2nd type 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal with a quantity of original documentation to Chief Engineer Francis William James Benham, Merchant Navy born in Southampton in 1912. Joining the SS Windsor Castle 18th May 1941, he was awarded the MBE for his gallantry in trying to save the Troopship SS Windsor Castle when she was hit by an aerial torpedo off Algiers whilst sailing in convoy on 23rd March 1943. Despite the crews best efforts the ship sank, one Junior Officer lost his life, all other crew and passengers including 300 troops were rescued. Post War Mr Benham continued to serve in the Merchant Navy and retired in October 1970 as Chief Engineer, he died in Southampton in 1989.

Member of the British Empire (OBE) 1st Type Military reverse HM London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star clasp North Africa 1942-43, Italy Star, War Medal

Unnamed as issued

Mounted as originally worn.

With original award certificate (Warrant) for MBE to “Francis William James Benham, Esquire” dated 21st December 1943, original Buckingham Palace award letter “Francis W J Benham, ESQ, MBE, 10th April 1946”, origianl award letter for Africa Star and clasp North Africa, Atlantic Star, Italy Star dated 6th November 1944, original letter of congratulations from The Ministry of War Transport dated 20th December 1943 and signed in ink by Cyril Harcomb, Director General, original letter dated 18th December 1945 stating he will be unable to attend an investiture, original letter inviting him to an investiture at Edinburgh on 27th September 1945 dated 12th September 1945, original letter forwarding the Warrant for his MBE from The Central Chancery dated 10th April 1946.

Copy Merchant Navy records covering his service from 1941 to 1972, copy Merchant Navy 2WW Medal roll entry confirming all 2WW Stars and Medal and clasp to Africa Star.

Francis William James Benham was born in Southampton 18th May 1912 and joined SS Windsor Castle (Union castle Mail Steamship Company Limited) as Third Engineer 18th May 1941. Landed at Gibraltar following the sinking of SS Windsor Castle 23rd March 1943, he was back to sea on 29th September 1943. Serving almost continually at Sea post war, his last trip as Chief Engineer was aboard the SS Clan McClay which he left on 30th October 1970. He died in Southampton 30th November 1989.

SS Windsor Castle

Image result for SS Windsor Castle pics

Commissioned as a Troop Ship in the Second World war Windsor Castle was sunk on 23rd March 1943 by a torpedo launched from a German aircraft while in the Mediterranean sea, at the time she was part of  convoy KMF-11. Hit by the torpedo at 0200 she did not sink until 1725, stern first, 110 miles (180 km) WNW of Algiers, Algeria. One crewman, Junior Engineer Officer William Ogilvie Mann, died. 2,699 troops and 289 crew were removed by the Destroyers HMS Whaddon, Eggesford and Douglas.

MBE London Gazette 21st December 1943 page 5523 “For gallantry and initiative in hazardous circumstances”.

The official recommendation TNA Reference T335/78 states –

“The ship, sailing in convoy, was attacked by enemy aircraft (on 23rd March 1943). Severe damage was caused, including the flooding of the engine room. As the ship was helpless and sinking, the disembarkation of the passengers and non essential members of the crew was begun. This operation was carried out smoothly and efficiently and the survivors were put on board other vessels. The Master, with a number of officers and men remained on board to save the ship but before she could be taken in tow the flooding increased rapidly and the nucleus crew were taken on board another vessel standing by.

First Officer Dickinson (awarded MBE), Intermediate Third Engineering Officer Benham (awarded MBE) and Carpenter’s Mate McNeil (awarded BEM) showed courage and devotion to duty. When the ship was hit they went below to investigate the damage and remained there carrying out repairs and continually checking the condition of the damaged bulkheads and machinery. They carried out this dangerous work in the full knowledge that the bulkhead might give way and the ship suddenly sink without any chance of their escape”.

GVF £425 Reserved


Distinguished Sercice Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British war and Victory Medals to Petty Officer Telegrapher Albert Thomas Sibthorpe, Royal Navy a former Railway Porter born in Bethnal Green, London in 1893. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable, he was Rated Ordinary Telegrapher aboard HMS Neptune 3rd April 1911 and Telegrapher aboard the same ship 24th March 1912. Joining the Submarine Base Dolphin 29th September 1913 and his first Submarine E6 11th December 1913 which completed the first war patrol by a British Submarine commencing 5th August 1914. Sibthorpe was ashore at Maidstone as spare crew when E6 was sunk by a mine off Harwich 26th December 1915. Later joining HM Submarine G10, he was discharged 10th February 1923 on reduction of the Royal Navy, the rating electing for discharge under the terms of Admiralty Fleet Order 1359 of 1922. Post Naval service, he was employed as a Porter with the General Post Office and resided at 31 Cumming Street, Finsbury with his wife, he died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the London Fever Hospital, Liverpool Road, Islington, South East London on 30th August 1928 aged 35 years.

Distinguished Service Medal GV

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe LG TEL Oversea Submarines 1914-6

1914/15 Star

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe L Tel RN

British War and Victory Medals

J.7280 A T Sibthorpe PO Tel RN

With copy London Gazette entry and header for DSM, service record, death certificate and photo.

Albert Thomas Sibthorpe was born in Bethnal Green, London 8th August 1893 a Railway Porter he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 12th February 1910. Rated Ordinary Telegrapher aboard HMS Neptune 3rd April 1911 and Telegrapher aboard the same ship 24th March 1912. Joining the Submarine Base Dolphin 29th September 1913 and the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Maidstone 11th December 1913, he joined HM Submarine E6 the same day and was advanced to Leading Telegrapher aboard this Boat 21st November 1914.

Image result for Submarine E6

On the outbreak of War HM Submarine E6 was commanded by Lt Commander Cecil P Talbot, Royal Navy and completed the first war patrol by a British Submarine commencing 5th August 1914. Present at the battle of Heligoland Bight 24th August 1914, she was nearly rammed by a British Warship. On 25th September 1914 E6 encountered a new minefield 10 miles west of Heligoland, a mine caught in her forward hydrophone she surfaced and eventually the mine was freed by Lieutenant Williams-Freeman (awarded DSO) and Leading Seaman Cremer (awarded Conspicuous Gallantry Medal). On 29th September 1914 E6 attacked a German Destroyer at 500 yards but her torpedo missed, on 30th May 1915 E6 sighted the German High Seas Fleet, fired a torpedo at the leading Battle Squadron but missed. Awarded Distinguished Service Medal London Gazette 1st January 1917 page 9 “In recognition of services rendered by Petty Officers and men in Submarines in enemy waters during the period from the commencement of hostilities to 3rd August 1916”.

Albert Thomas Sibthorpe aboard HM Submarine G10 (3rd from left) an enlargement from a copy photo
of the crew of G10, all identified by name

E6 was mined on 26th December 1915 with the loss of all hands in the North Sea off Harwich. A trawler had been sunk by a mine in the same position shortly before, and a British Torpedo Boat signalled E6 to avoid the minefield, but E6 ignored the warning and was lost, at the time Sibthorpe was ashore at Maidstone, presumably as spare crew.

Sibthorpe subsequently joined Dolphin 1st July 1916, the Submarine depot Ship HMS Lucia 15th November 1916, advanced to Petty Officer Telegraphist 28th June 1917, the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Lucia 15th November 1916 and HM Submarine G10 10th August 1918. Post war he joined Victory I 29th November 1919, HMS Colombo 27th January 1922, HMS Vindictive 27th December 1922 and finally Victory I 29th January 1923 from where he was discharged shore 10th February 1923 on reduction of the Royal Navy and the rating electing for discharge under the terms of Admiralty Fleet Order 1359 of 1922. Sibthorpe married Maud Elizabeth Webb at St James’s Church, Pentonville in the Parish of Clerkenwell 14th September 1915, after leaving the Royal Navy, he was employed as a Porter with the General Post Office and resided at 31 Cumming Street, Finsbury with his wife, he died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the London Fever Hospital, Liverpool Road, Islington, South East London on 30th August 1928 aged 35 years.

A fine early DSM group to a Submariner participating in the first submarine war patrol of the First World War.

GVF & better £2,200 Available


Military Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence Medal, Meritorious Service Medal GV (Immediate) to Private Albert Edward Deverell, Army Cyclist Corps a former Chemist’s Errand Boy born in Penge, London in 1896. Serving in France from 26th July 1915 with 18th Division Cyclist Company and later XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion. Awarded the Military Medal in August 1919 and the Meritorious Service Medal in January 1919. Discharged to Class Z Army Reserve 11th March 1919 he returned to Penge where he was employed as a Railway Parcel Foreman, he died in Penge in 1953 aged 57 years.

Military Medal GV

2178 Pte A E Deverell ACC

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2178 Pte A E Deverell A Cyc Corps

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

Meritorious Service Medal GV (immediate)

2178 Pte A E Deverall 13/C Bn ACC

With copy research, including Medal Index Card, London Gazette entries for both awards, census entries, 1939 Register entry, Medal roll entries. Original letters forwarding his 1914/15 Star Trio, MM and MSM, original addressed Registered envelope for 1WW Medals, box of issue for Defence Medal addressed “Mr A E Deverell 66 Mosslea Road, Pinge, SE20”, awarded slip for Defence Medal.

Albert Edward Deverell was born in Penge, London 25th May 1895, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Chemist’s Errand Boy residing with his father Frederick a Cab Driver, mother Hannah a Charwoman, three sisters and two brothers in a four room house at 90 Station Road, Penge, SE20. Attesting for the Army Cyclist Corps he first served in France from 26th July 1915 with 18th Division Cyclist Company and later XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion. Awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 20th August 1919 page 10578, he had previously been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (immediate) London Gazette 18th January 1919 page 997 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders”. Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 11th March 1919 he returned to Penge. In 1939 he is recorded as residing in Penge and employed as a Railway Parcel Foreman, he died in Penge on 24th February 1953.

Scarce combination to the Army Cyclist Corps.

NEF £950 SOLD


 

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Temporary Corporal Walter George Burt, Dorset Regiment a former Gamekeeper born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889. Attesting for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907, he joined the 2nd Battalion for service in India in 1909 and landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, he was also Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon for distinguished service during the period April to September 1915. Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916. Recovering from his wounds he was deemed unfit to return to his Regiment now under siege at Kut al Amara and transferred to the Royal Engineers, discharged in October 1919 in April 1920 he was awarded a 20% disability pension.

Distinguished Conduct Medal GV

8328 Pte W G Burt 2/Dorset Regt

1914/15 Star

8328 Pte W G Burt Dorset R

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

8328 T Cpl W G Burt Dorset R

With copy Medal Index Card, service record, London Gazette entries for DCM and MID, copy photo and other research listed here.

Walter George Burt was born in Cerne Abbas, Dorchester, Dorset in 1889, an 18 year 6 month old Gamekeeper he attested for the Dorset Regiment at Dorchester 29th April 1907 joining the Depot the same day. Posted to the 1st Battalion 4th October 1907 and to the 2nd Battalion 1st February 1909 for service in India, he landed with his Battalion in Mesopotamia 6th November 1914. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 5th August 1915 page 7678-

“For gallantry and coolness at Barjisiyah (Turkey in Asia) on 14th April 1915, when he carried an urgent message along the firing line within 400 yards of the enemy’s position under very heavy fire and returned to report having delivered it”

Mentioned in Despatches by General Sir John Nixon, KCB, ADC General Commanding Indian Expeditionary Force for distinguished services during the period from the middle of April 1915 to the end of September 1915 London Gazette 5th April 1916 page 3669.

Picture from: Western Gazette Almanac 1917 page 209

Wounded in action 28th September 1915 Kut al Amara, gunshot wound left leg and again on 22nd November September 1915 at Ctesiphon, the latter wound to his left knee and a bullet wound left calf, the bullet having to be removed surgically. Following treatment in Mesopotamia he was evacuated to  India aboard the Hospital Ship Takada 9th December 1915 arriving in hospital at Poona  7th January 1916 and discharged 11th February 1916. Re-admitted with Malaria 2nd April 1916 and discharged 20th April 1916. Unfit for Infantry service he was transferred to the Royal Engineers (No 303511) and promoted to Corporal. Discharged 21st October 1919 he was awarded a 20% disability pension 30th April 1920, the Surgeon commenting “He has an inability to completely extend his left knee joint otherwise general health good”.

Although the Battalion’s landings in the Shatt-al-Arab on 6th November 1914 met little opposition, the Turks, backed by Arab levies, were quick to respond.  The Dorsets faced stiff fighting expelling the Turks from Saihan on 15th November and Saihil two days later.  In eleven days these actions and the diseases prevalent in the marshy conditions of the region cost the Battalion 25% of its fighting strength.  They reached Basra on the 23rd. After minor engagements, mostly against Arab insurgents, the 2nd Dorsets advanced to Shaiba (ancient Sheba).  In February 1915 they were forced to wade knee-deep through the annual flooding of the two rivers.  At Shaiba they endured very difficult conditions, including sand storms.  Mounting frequent offensive patrols, they fought major actions on 3rd March and 14th April in which the depleted Battalion showed great resilience, earning Shaiba (Barjisiyah) as a new Battle Honour.

From : History of the Dorsetshire Regiment 1914 – 1919 published by the Regimental History Committee, 1932.

As far as could be ascertained the Turks had fallen back to a position just east of Marjisiya Wood. General Melliss commenced his advance on Turkish positions at 0930 on 14th April 1915, the Dorsets on the left and the 24th Punjabis on the right leading 16th Brigade. South Mound Ridge was lightly defended and quickly taken, the two Battalions halted 500 yards beyond the Ridge while the enemy positions were reconnoitered.

Just before noon the Dorsets advanced on the left of the Brigade, the 117th Mahrattas now in support. The advance met strong opposition from machine gun and rifle fire as soon as it started, this partly enfiladed the Dorsets which swung half right to face it. Pushing onto about 900 yards in front of the Turkish trenches the advance was held up by a hail of bullets. Ammunition began to run short, but thanks to the gallantry of the Indian Mule Drivers bringing supplies right up to the front stocks were replenished in the nick of time. Casualties were mounting up fast, there were several acts of gallantry including Private Burt who again showed great coolness and determination in carrying a message under heavy fire.

At about 1430 Colonel Rosher the 2nd Battalion Commanding Officer was hit and killed and the Adjutant who went to his assistance was badly wounded. Orders for a retirement were actually issued when the day was saved by 16th Brigade getting up and charging. Lt Colonel Clarkson now in command of the 2nd Battalion jumped up at this point and shouted the order for the Dorsets to advance, he was soon hit but the Dorsets advanced the now 200 yards to the Turkish trenches, by 1615 the Turkish front line had been captured and those Turks who had not been bayoneted or surrendered fell back 150 yards to a new position. The Dorsets continued to advance capturing the second defensive line, Turkish resistance collapsed and they were now in full retreat.

The Dorsets had played a prominent part in the days fighting, losing a quarter of its strength, casualties amongst officers were high with one Commanding Officer killed and the second wounded, three companies were now commanded by 2/Lieutenants.

Scarce DCM to the Regiment, the Dorset Regiment received 101 DCM’s for the entire First World War.

NEF £2,250 Available


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