Royal Red Cross Second Class GV (Associate), Territorial Force Nursing Service Badge, Heat of Oak Benefits Society Badge, State Registered Nurse (SRN) named and dated Silver Nursing Badge and original photograph to Nursing Sister Jane Townsend, Territorial Force Nursing Service born in Kingsland, Middlesex in 1878. In 1901 she was employed as a “nurse” at the Paddington Children’s Hospital, London and undertook formal nurse training between 1902 and 1905 at the Royal Surrey County Hospital at Guildford. In 1911 she was employed as a nurse at the Royal Hospital Portsmouth and just prior to the outbreak of war at the South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth. Joining TFNS in August 1914 as Nursing Sister she was posted to No 5 Southern General Hospital, Southsea, Portsmouth. Awarded the RRC 2nd Class (Associate) in 1917, this presented to her at Buckingham Palace by HM The King 17th March 1917. Demobilized in April 1919, she registered formally as a State Registered Nurse in London 19th May 1922 when Registration was introduced. In 1922 she was residing / teaching at Margate College, Kent.

Royal Red Cross 2nd Class GV in fitted presentation case

Unnamed as awarded

Territorial Force Nursing Service Sisters Badge

Unnamed

General Nursing Council for England and Wales State Registered Nurses Badge officially named and dated reverse complete

Hallmark reverse Birmingham 1923

J Townsend SRN 4313 19-5-22

Heart of Oak Benefit Society Badge top clasp “Delegate”

Maker Tomas Fattorini Birmingham reverse

With copy TFNS service record, General Nursing Council for England and Wales Nursing Register entries, census entries, an original postcard photo of Miss Townsend the reverse “Photo of my Great Aunt Jane Townsend ARRC, Territorial Force Nursing Service 13th August 1914 to 26th April 1919, Patricia Chambers 14th November 2017”.

The ARRC in Gerrard and Co fitted presentation case, her TFNS Nursing badge in velvet lined box.

Jane Townsend was born in 1878 in Kingsland, Shoreditch, Middlesex, the 1901 census records she is a 22 year old nurse employed at the Paddington Green Children’s Hospital, she trained as a Registered Nurse at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guidford between 1902 and 1905, registering for the General part of the Register (SRN) in London 19th May 1922. The 1911 census records she is a nurse employed at the Royal Hospital, Commercial Road Portsmouth.  Employed as night nursing sister, South Devon and East Cornwall Hospital, Plymouth, resigning in July 1914. Joining the Territorial Force Nursing Service as nursing sister 13th August 1914, she joined No 5 Southern General Hospital, Fawcett Road, Southsea Portsmouth where in 1916, she was in charge on an Annexe of 160 beds, also employed as night sister at HQ Fawcett Road. Awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd Class (Associate) London Gazette 23rd February 1917 page 1954 for her services at No 5 Southern General Hospital she was decorated by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 17th March 1917. Demobilized 26th April 1919 address Fern Villa, Bowden Road, Sunninghill, Ascot, she resigned from TFNS 8th November 1921, from 1922 she gives her permanent address as Margate College, Kent. Miss Townsend never served overseas in the First World War, a letter to the Marton in Chief asks if she can apply for the British War Medal which is denied because of her home only service. Membership of the Heart of Oak Benefit Society recorded in her service record.

First time on the market.

NEF £450 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Chief Petty Officer William Miller, Royal Navy a former Labourer born in Modbury, Devon in 1871, he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Lion 23rd November 1886. Advanced to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) aboard HMS Pandora in 1908, he was discharged to pension in May 1911 and joined Devonport RFR. Mobilized on 2nd August 1914, he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic and the Merchant Fleet Auxiliary Ship Wildrake two months later. Posted to small craft bases at Wallington and Lavatera 1915 to 1918 he was demobilized 3rd February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

139269 W Miller CPO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

Wm Miller PO 1 CL HMS Ocean

With copy Royal Navy service record.

William Miller was born in Modbury, Devon 30th May 1871, a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Lion 23rd November 1886. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Cleopatra 3oth May 1889 and Able Seaman (Seaman Gunner) aboard the same ship 1st June 1890.Advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Pelican 6th April 1897, to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class 1st January 1898 and Petty Officer of the 1st Class 1st April 1898 aboard the same ship. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal aboard HMS Ocean 5th August 1904, he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer aboard HMS Pandora 1st November 1911. Discharged to pension 31st May 1911 he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914, he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic the same day and subsequently joined the Merchant Fleet Auxiliary Ship Wildrake 14th October 1914, Vivid 30th April 1915, Wallington 7th December 1915 and Lavatera 23rd April 1918. Demobilized 3rd February 1919.

New ribbons will be supplied for the 1914/15 Star Trio.

NEF £150 Reserved 


British Empire Medal GVI (Civil), 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve GV to Mr Charles Thomas Wright, Foreman of Trades, No 6 Maintenance Unit, Royal Air Force Brize Norton late Leading Seaman Royal Navy. Born in St Giles, London in 1888 and a former Draper’s Assistant he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in July 1905. Serving aboard HMS Vigilant on the outbreak of the First World War, he joined HMS Strongbow in November 1916. Wounded in action 17th October 1917 when Strongbow was sunk in action with two German Light Cruisers about 70 miles east of Lerwick, HMS Mary Rose and nine Merchantmen were also sunk in the same action. Joining Pembroke I he was drafted to HMS Ophir in February 1918 and was demobilized in March 1919. Awarded the BEM in 1946 for his wartime service as Foreman of Tradesmen, Royal Air Force Maintenance units, he retired in September 1951 to his home in Witney, Oxfordshire.

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil)

Charles T Weight

1914/15 Star

234114 C T Weight AB RN

British War and Victory Medals

234114 C T Weight LS RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve GV

234114 (CH.B.15526) C T Weight LS RFR

With copy Royal Navy service record and London Gazette entry and header for BEM, four original letters, three congratulating him on the award of the BEM and one thanking him for his services on his retirement. The BEM contained in its wartime economy cardboard presentation box with Buckingham Place letter forwarding the Decoration.

Charles Thomas Weight was born in St Giles, London 22nd January 1888 a Draper’s Assistant he entered the Royal Navy at Boscawen III as Boy 2nd Class 11th July 1905. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Albemarle 30th January 1906 and Able Seaman (Seaman Gunner) 20th August 1907 aboard the same ship, he was serving aboard HMS Vigilant on the outbreak of the First World War. Joining HMS Strongbow 3rd November 1916, he was wounded and survived the sinking of this ship in action with two German light cruisers on 17th October 1917.

Image result for hms strongbow pictures

HMS Strongbow under fire 17th October 1917 by Montague Dawson

On 16th October 1917, HMS Strongbow joined a westbound convoy of 12 merchant ships from Norway. The escort consisted of Strongbow, the Destroyer HMS Mary Rose and two Naval Trawlers. On the morning of 17th October, the convoy was attacked  by two German light cruisers, Bremse and Brummer about 70 miles (110 km) east of Lerwick. Strongbow sighted two unknown ships at 06:00, in poor visibility, and believing them to be Royal Navy cruisers and challenged them with recognition signals. Strongbow, receiving inadequate responses, and had not yet cleared for action when the two German cruisers opened fire at a range of about 3,000 yards (2,700 m). Strongbow quickly received heavy damage and was immobilised, and after ensuring that all confidential papers had been destroyed, the Captain ordered the surviving crew to abandon ship. Mary Rose, which had been ahead of the convoy, and only realised that the convoy was under attack when her crew heard gunfire, was also quickly sunk, as were nine of the merchant vessels. Neither destroyer managed to make a radio report of the attack, and the two German cruisers escaped unscathed. Forty-six of Strongbow’s crew were killed in the attack. Leading Seaman Weight was slightly wounded in the attack before abandoning ship.

Joining Pembroke I 18th October 1917 and HMS Ophir 10th February 1918 he was discharged 20th March 1919 and joined Chatham Royal Fleet Reserve.

BEM London Gazette 9th January 1946 page 336 “Charles Thomas Weight Foreman of Trades, No 6 Maintenance Unit, Royal Air Force”.

During the Second World War Weight was a Foreman of Tradesmen, No 6 Maintenance Unit, Royal Air Force Brize Norton. There are three original letters of congratulations 1) From Air Vice Marshall J Whitford, CB, CBE HQ Maintenance Command RAF Andover dated 9th January 1946, 2) From Air Vice Marshall G D Daly, CBE, DFC No 41 Group RAF Andover dated 15th January 1946, 3) From the Permanent Under Secretary of State, Air Ministry dated 5th January 1946. Letter from The Air Ministry dated 26th September 1951 thanking him for his services on his retirement, home address 47 Springfield Oval, Witney, Oxon.

NEF £495 Available


British Empire Medal GVI (Civil), 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Mr Frederick William Liley, Civilian Pensioner employed at the Royal Naval Barracks, Chatham late Able Seaman Royal Navy born in Islington, London in 1879. A French Polisher he entered the Royal Navy in 1896 as a Boy 2nd Class. Serving aboard HMS Lowestoft from November 1914, he served aboard this ship during the battle of the Dogger Bank 24th January 1915. Joining the Convoy Escort Ship HMS Lepanto in July 1918, he came ashore in January 1919 and was discharged to pension in February 1920. Taking up employment as a civilian in the Royal Naval Barracks, Chatham he was awarded the BEM in January 1945 for his services during the Second World War. Mr Liley died in Chatham in 1956.

British Empire Medal GVI (Civil)

Frederick W Liley

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

187688 F W Liley AB RN

With copy Royal Navy service record and London Gazette entry and header for BEM.

Frederick William Liley was born 15th December 1879 in Islington, London. A French Polisher he entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 28th February 1896. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Jupiter 15th December 1897 and Able Seaman aboard the same ship 20th September 1900, he joined HMS Lowestoft 10th November 1914, serving aboard this ship during the battle of the Dogger Bank 24th January 1915. Advanced to Leading Seaman 4th February 1916, he was reduced to Able Seaman 5th October 1916. Joining Pembroke I from Lowestoft 1st January 1918, he subsequently joined the convoy escort vessel HMS Lepanto 19th July 1918. Joining Pembroke 9th January 1919 he was demobilized to pension 28th February 1920. Liley was not awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having four breaks in “Very Good” Conduct during his service. Remaining in the Chatham area following discharge, he was employed as a Civilian Pensioner at the Royal Naval Barracks, Chatham. Awarded the British Empire Medal London Gazette 3rd January 1945 page 135 for his services at the Barracks during the War. Mr Liley died in Chatham in 1956.

NEF £250 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, to Private James Cope, Royal Irish Fusiliers from Strandtown, Belfast, Ireland born in 1892. Serving with the 1st and 6th Battalions in France from 23rd December 1914, the 1st Battalion taking part in the attack and capture of the Quadrilateral on 1st July 1916 only to be withdrawn that evening. Taken prisoner of war at Trescault, France whilst serving with the 1st Battalion 18th November 1917 during an enemy trench raid. Repatriated at the end of hostilities he was discharged to Class ‘Z’ Army Reserve 24th March 1919. In 1928 he applied for the POW Helpers Medal.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2581 Pte J Cope R IR Fus

With copy Medal Index Card and copy War Diary for the day he was captured, details from The Red Cross at Geneva POW web site.

James Cope was born in Belfast, Ireland 7th October 1892 and attested for the Royal Irish Fusiliers on the outbreak of war, he gave his next of kin as Mrs Mary Cope, 13 Dundela Street, Strandtown, Belfast, serving in France from 23rd December 1915 with the 1st Battalion. on 1st July 1916 the 1st Battalion were in their assembly positions in the sunken Beaumont – Sere Road north of Auchonvellers and at 0910 hrs moved forward with 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Heavy fire soon brought the advance to a standstill, both Battalions holding out in the British front line. An attempt by ‘C’ Company to relieve 2nd Seaforth Highlanders at the Quadrilateral was driven back, ‘D’ company reached the Quadrilateral after dark but was ordered to withdraw the next morning.

At some point Cope transferred to the 6th Battalion but in November 1917 was serving with the 1st Battalion again. On 18th November 1917 Cope was serving in the front line at Trescault, France when he was taken prisoner of war, the Battalion war diary records –

“Weather fine. at 0539 hrs the enemy, after a night in which persistent efforts had been made to cut our wire around “E” Sap succeeded in rushing one post. Six of our men are missing. The enemy’s previous attempts had been driven off by our bombers but on this occasion he put down a box barrage of trench mortars etc and succeeded in entering the Sap under cover of the noise and rushing the right hand post”.

The Red Cross record his address in 1917 as 80 Dendela Street, Strandtown, Belfast. Released at the end of hostilities he was discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 24th March 1919. His Medal Index Card records he applied for the POW Helpers Medal on 10th July 1928. Not heard of this before. First time on the market.

GVF and better £195 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908 – 10, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type to Chief Petty Officer Stoker Stephen Homer, Royal Navy a former Labourer from Chichester, Sussex who entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class 21st August 1900. Serving aboard HMS Gibraltar from March 1901 to June 1904 including the South Africa operations in 1901, HMS Proserpine from April to December 1908, including the operations off Somaliland. Serving aboard HMS Neptune from January 1911 to March 1917 including the Battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 in which Neptune crippled the Light Cruiser SMS Wiesbaden and claimed hits on the SMS Derfflinger, she narrowly escaped being hit by three torpedoes. Joining HMS Tristram in June 1917, he was advanced to Chief Stoker in July 1918 aboard HMS Umpire. Awarded the LSGC Medal in January 1922, he was discharged to pension in September the same year. He died in Sidcup, Kent in 1956.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

S Homer Sto HMS Gibraltar

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908 -10

295840 S Homer LG STO HMS Proserpine

1914/15 Star

295840 S Homer SPO RN

British War and Victory Medals

295840 S Homer Ch Sto RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type

295840 S Homer Ch Sto HMS Victory

With copy service record.

Stephen Homer was born in Chichester, Sussex 13th March 1882 a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Duke of Wellington II. A series of minor offences resulting in brief periods in cells meant he did not commence “Very Good” Conduct until 1906. Joining HMS Gibraltar 5th March 1901 he served aboard this ship until 17th June 1904 including the South Africa operations in 1901. Rated Stoker 1st Class 1st July 1906 aboard HMS Pandora, he was advanced to Leading Stoker aboard HMS Proserpine 1st April 1908 during the operations off Somaliland. Advanced to Stoker Petty Officer aboard HMS Hampshire 21st April 1909, he joined HMS Neptune 11th January 1911 serving aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916.

At Jutland, Neptune was part of the 5th Division, 1st Battle Squadron and at 1855 on 31st May 1916 fired a salvo at the SMS Wiesbaden which crippled her. At 1910 she fired four salvos at the SMS Derfflinger claiming two hits. Shortly after engaging Derfflinger, Neptune fired her main and secondary armament at enemy Destroyers without result, and had to turn away to avoid three torpedoes fired at her. Homer left Neptune 27th March 1917 and subsequently joined HMS Tristram 22nd June 1917 where he was advanced to Chief Stoker 1st July 1917, HMS Umpire 1st July 1918 and finally HMS Victory II where he was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 16th January 1922, he was discharged to pension 10th September 1922. Stephen Homer died in Sidcup, Kent in 1956.

Nice combination to the Royal Navy.

GVF and better £525 SOLD


Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908 – 10, Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909 – 1914, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Able Seaman (Seaman Gunner) Alfred Edward Woodhouse, Royal Navy a former Agricultural Labourer from Long Sutton, Lincolnshire born in 1892. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in February 1908 he served aboard HMS Hyacinth during the operations off Somaliland 1909 to 1910 and aboard the 153 ton Armed Steam Launch HMS Mashona during the operations in the Persian Gulf in 1910, only 44 Medals awarded to Mashona. Serving aboard HMS Lord Nelson on the outbreak of the First World War and was aboard this ship during the Gallipoli operations of 1915 where she suffered significant damage from Turkish shore artillery fire. Joining HMS Indomitable in October 1917, Dolphin in June 1918 and Pembroke in August 1918, he was discharged shore, time expired 14th February 1922.

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1908 -10

J.829 A E Woodhouse Boy 1 CL HMS Hyacinth

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909 – 1914

J.829 A E Woodhouse Ord Sean HMS Mashona

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

J.829 A E Woodhouse AB RN

With copy service record and Medal roll entries. Alfred Edward Woodhouse was born 13th February 1892 in Long Sutton, Lincolnshire an Agricultural Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class at Ganges 12th February 1908. Joining HMS Hyacinth 27th March 1909 he participated in the operations off Somaliland, rated Ordinary Seaman aboard this ship 13th February 1910, he subsequently joined HMS Philomel 15th March 1910 and HMS Fox 16th May 1910 in the Persian Gulf being sent aboard the Armed Steam Launch HMS Mashona which mustered a crew of 44 officers and ratings. Rated Able Seaman (Seaman Gunner) aboard HMS Africa 7th May 1912, when the First World War broke out he was serving aboard HMS Lord Nelson.

In February 1915, Lord Nelson was ordered to the Dardanelles to participate in the planned offensive campaign there. She left Portland on 18 February and joined the British Dardanelles Squadron at Mudros  eight days later. She took part in the bombardment of the inner forts and supported the initial landings in early March. The Turkish forts engaged her heavily on 7th March and scored several hits, including by a stone cannonball which landed on the deck and was kept as a souvenir by the Flag Officer, Arthur Baker, at Longcross Church; she suffered damage to her superstructure and rigging and was holed by one hit below the waterline which flooded two coal bunkers. After repairs at Malta the ship returned to take part in the main attack on the Narrows forts on 18 March. Later she bombarded Ottoman field batteries on 6 May prior to the Second battle of Krithia.

Joining HMS Indomitable 26th October 1917, Dolphin 7th June 1918, Pembroke I 2nd August 1918, HMS Ceres 6th February 1919, HMS Royal Oak 7th September 1920 and finally Pembroke I 7th January 1922, where he was discharged shore time expired 14th February 1922.

GVF £575 Available


Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-14, 1914/15 Star, British War Medal & Victory Medal to Able Seaman Arthur Hatley, Royal Navy a former Servant born in Southampton in 1885. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Northampton 6th October 1902, he was rated Ordinary Seaman in September 1903 and Able Seaman (Seaman Gunner) in November 1905. Qualifying as a DIVER in April 1908, he continued to be a Diver throughout his service re-qualifying in May 1912, January 1916 and as Diver First Class in October 1924. During the First World War he served aboard HMS Venus 1914 to 1917 and HMS Euryalus 1917 to 1918, demobilized in February 1919 he joined the Royal Fleet Reserve. Returning to Royal Naval service in May 1924 he was finally discharged in April 1919.

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-14

223245 A Hatley AB HMS Perseus

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

223245 A Hatley AB RN

With copy service record.

Arthur Hatley was born in Southampton 22nd September 1885 a Servant he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 6th October 1902 aboard HMS Northampton. Rated Ordinary Seaman at Victory 22nd September 1903 and Able Seaman at Crescent 2nd November 1905, he qualified as Seaman Gunner. Hatley qualified as a Diver 15th April 1908 and re-qualified as a Diver 31st May 1912, 11th January 1916 and as Diver First Class 24th October 1924. Serving aboard HMS Perseus 29th September 1909 to 14th July 1911 including the Persian Gulf operations. Discharged time expired he joined the Royal Fleet Reserve 1st February 1913. Mobilized on the outbreak of War he joined HMS Venus 2nd August 1914 and HMS Euryalus 1st November 1917, discharged shore on demobilization 3rd February 1919. Re-entering the service 28th May 1924 he served ashore and afloat until finally discharged in April 1919. RFR Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 6th April 1922.

Polishing therefore Good Fine £275 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £250 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Albert Thomas, Labour Corps late Army Service Corps and Volunteer Service Company Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry a printer from Helston, Cornwall. A serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion DCLI he volunteered for service in South Africa in April 1900 and returned home in December 1900. In hospital at Wynberg from September to October 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, discharged in December 1900. In 1911 he was a General Labourer residing in Godolphin Road, Helston and on the outbreak of war volunteered to serve in the Army Service Corps arriving in France 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps, he served with 17th Company and was discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

6401 Corpl A Thomas 2 D of C Lt Infy

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

SS-14190 Pte A Thomas ASC

With details extracted from his on line Boer War service record, Medal Index Card and Medal rolls.

Albert Thomas was born in Helston, Cornwall in 1873, a Printer and serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he volunteered to serve in South Africa at Helston on 21st April 1900 with the Volunteer Service Company, which joined the 2nd Battalion DCLI in South Africa. Admitted to Hospital at Wynberg 24th September 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, he made a good recovery and was discharged 20th October 1900. Leaving South Africa 9th November 1900 he was discharged at his own request at home 12th December 1900. The 1911 census records he is a 37 year old General Labourer residing with his wife Ada and three children in Godolphin Road, Helston. Attesting for the Army Service Corps on the outbreak of War he served in France from 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps he served with 17th Company until discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

GVF £275 Available


Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Stoker Petty Officer John Foott, Royal Navy a former Agricultural Labourer born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland in June 1885. Entering the Royal Navy in July 1903 as Stoker 2nd Class, his six breaks in “Very Good” conduct prevented him from receiving the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. Serving aboard HMS Suffolk 1914 to 1916 and HMS Blake 1917 to 1919 he was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer in October 1918 and discharged in September 1922.

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914

304460 J Foott Sto 1 CL HMS Fox

1914/15 Star

304460 J Foott Sto 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

304460 J Foott SPO RN

With copy service record and Medal roll entries.

John Foott was born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland 24th June 1885 and entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Vivid 10th July 1903. His character in 1905 was assessed as “Fair” and the following year as “Indifferent”, with two periods in cells amounting to 21 days, his character remained up and down with four further assessments below “Very Good”. Rated Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Cornwall 1st July 1906, he served aboard HMS Fox from 1st June 1910 to 31st December 1910. Advanced to Leading Stoker 21st May 1914 aboard HMS Indus, he was reduced to Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Suffolk 19th October 1915. Advanced to Leading Stoker for the second time aboard HMS Suffolk 14th August 1916, he joined HMS Blake 1st March 1917 and was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer 1st October 1918. Discharged Shore 19th September 1922 from Vivid II with reduced pension.

GVF £275 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Nursing Sister Frances Florence Tarleton, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service. Born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire in 1881 the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton, she trained as a Nurse for six years as a at Edinburgh Hospital for Children and St Georges Hospital London. Appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910, she served at the Royal Naval Hospitals Haslar, Plymouth, Chatham, Queensferry, Malta and aboard the Hospital Ships Carrisbroke Castle and Rewa, the latter taking casualties from the Gallipoli invasion beaches and later France. Miss Tarleton left QARNNS in June 1921 unfit for further service having undergone an appendicectomy and suffering from debility.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

N Sister F F Tarleton QARNNS

With folder of research including copy service papers, copies from her pension application folder etc. With A Scottish Territorial Red Cross Brigade Badge complete with pin and catch reverse.

Frances Florence Tarleton was born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire, Scotland 29th December 1881, the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton and his wife Helen, the 1891 census records the family are residing in Edinburgh, Frances one of five daughters. Training as a Nurse at the Edinburgh Hospital for Children for three years and St George’s Hospital, London for three years she was appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910 and appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar. She was subsequently appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th August 1911, Hospital Ship Carrisbroke Castle 3rd August 1914, Hospital Ship Rewa 28th August 1914, Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th June 1915, Royal Naval Hospital Chatham as Sister in Charge 3rd July 1915 reverting to Nursing Sister 29th February 1916, Royal Naval Hospital Malta 12th August 1916, Queensferry Naval Hospital 15th July 1920 and finally Royal Naval Hospital Plymouth 15th October 1920 from where she was discharged 2nd June 1921. In 1920 Miss Tarleton was admitted to hospital for an appendicectomy, she was also suffering from debility which made her unfit for further service, there is much correspondence concerning this in her pension file.

The Hospital Ship Rawa began her duties on 29th January 1915 and left Gallipoli with her last load of patients on 29th April 1915 bound for England. During this period 7,424 patients were taken on board of whom 3,647 were discharged to the Advanced Base, 3,628 were taken by the ship to Hospitals at Malta, Alexandria and Plymouth, 149 patients died on board.

A rare 1914/15 Star Trio to QARNNS. GVF £750 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, original parchment certificate of service, photograph album etc to Signalman Douglas Charles Wyatt, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a Telegraphist born in Glasgow in June 1892. Enlisting into the Clyde Division  RNVR in January 1912, he was mobilized 2nd August 1914. Joining Pembroke he subsequently joined the Auxiliary Patrol Base St George on the Tyne and in November 1915 Wallington the Auxiliary Patrol Base at Immingham Docks, Lincolnshire for service in small ships. Discharged at his own request in February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

 C.5-1982 D C Wyatt Sig RNVR

Douglas Charles Wyatt

With original parchment certificate of service, Medal boxes of issue, three loose photographs, one of Signalman Wyatt depicted here with HMS St George cap tally, one in uniform as part of a group and an unidentified shipmate. The photograph album written inside in ink “D C Wyatt 25th Jan 1919 some wartime comrades period 4th Aug 1914 to 22nd Jan 1919”. Contains 12 photographs one on board ship album measures 16 cms  x 12.5 cms and is hardbound in excellent condition. One of his shipmates wears the cap tally for HMS Foyle. On 15 March 1917 Foyle struck a contact mine laid by German submarine UC-68 off Plymouth at position with the loss of 28 officers and men. Her bow was blown off and she foundered whilst under tow to Plymouth.

 Douglas Charles Wyatt, Born Glasgow, June 1892 a Telegraphist and the son of Kate Wyatt, of 34 Hopetown Place, Glasgow. A Telegraphist he enlisted for the Clyde Division RNVR 24th January 1912. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined HMS Forward, subsequently joining Pembroke 13th August 1914,the Auxiliary Patrol Craft bases (for service in small ships)  St George 25th August 1914, Wallington 6th November 1915 from where he was discharged at his own request 19th February 1919.

First time on the market.

NEF £150Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve to Able Seaman Frederick Gilbert, Royal Navy a former Labourer from West Ashling, Sussex. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at St Vincent in August 1899, he purchased his discharge in January 1906 and joined Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve. Recalled 2nd August 1914 he served aboard HMS Donegal 1914 to 1916 and was demobilized in February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

205591 F Gilbert AB RN

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve

205591 (PO.B.1646) F Gilbert AB RFR

With copy service record born in West Ashling, Sussex 2nd June 1883 a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at St Vincent 2nd August 1899. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Revenge 2nd June 1901 and Able Seaman at Firequeen 15th February 1904, he was aboard HMS King Edward VII when he purchased his discharge leaving from Victory Barracks 13th January 1906. Joining Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve he was mobilized 2nd August 1914. Joining an undecipherable ship 2nd August 1914 he subsequently joined HMS Donegal 7th October 1914, Victory I 28th March 1916, Vernon 21st July 1916 for duty in the Paravane Department and finally Victory I 1st January 1917 from where he was demobilized 26th February 1919.

GVF £125 Available