From left to right –

Victory Medal to Captain Charles Hamilton Russell Grant 2/22nd London Regiment a Dental Surgeon from Cricklewood, London born in Singapore in 1882. Serving in France, Salonica and Palestine he was Mentioned in Despatches by General Allenby in 1919. He died in Willesden General Hospital following an operation in 1931.

Victory Medal

Capt C H R Grant

British War Medal to Captain Wilfred Hardinge Heinig, 54th Sikhs, Indian Army attached 51st Sikhs born in 1887 in India, he was educated at King’s College School. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant from the RMC Sandhurst in August 1907, he joined the 54th Sikhs, Indian Army and was promoted to Captain in September 1915. Killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years when leading his company of the 51st Sikhs in an attack on the Turkish trenches. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial. 

British War Medal

Capt W H Heinig

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge 4th Battalion London Regiment born in Barnet, London in 1896. Educated at Barnet Grammar School, he was a banker before volunteering in September 1914. Serving as a Private soldier in the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli he was commissioned into the 4th Battalion London Regiment in October 1916. Serving in France attached to the 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W K E Mansbridge

Charles Hamilton Russell Grant was born in Singapore in 1882, the 1911 census records he is a Dental Surgeon residing with his wife, son and daughter in Cricklewood, London NW2.

Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 2nd Battalion 22nd London Regiment 1st October 1914 (London Gazette 17th October 1914 page 8335). Mentioned in Despatches (General Allenby) for distinguished services in Egypt during the period 19th September 1918 to 31st January 1919 London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7182. From The Willesden Chronicle 12th June 1931 page 9

“The death occurred at Willesden General Hospital following an operation yesterday (Monday) of Mr Russell Grant LDS, RCS of 92 Walm Lane, Cricklewood. Mr Grant had been Hon Dental Surgeon to Willesden hospital for the last 10 years and at the annual general meeting of the hospital last night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the bereaved family”.

Mr Grant was a student at the National Dental Hospital (now the Dental Department of the University College Hospital) where he obtained the Gold Medal for 1902 and qualified in 1903. With the exception of the War years, he practiced mainly in Willesden Green since that date and his skill and ability brought him a considerable practice. He was for over 10 years a much valued member of the Honorary Staff of the Willesden Hospital, and his loss is keenly felt by his colleagues there. One of the earliest volunteers for the War he took a combatant commission in the 2/22nd London Regiment (The Queen’s) in September 1914 and served throughout, first on the Somme, then in Salonika and finally Palestine where he took part in the capture of Jerusalem. He had by then reached the rank of Captain and been Mentioned in Despatches and appointed to the Staff of General (now Lord) Allenby.

In Jerusalem he contracted Typhoid Fever and was invalided back to Egypt where he apparently recovered, but his death was probably due to a sequel of that disease. Latterly Mr Grant had lived in Eastcote, where he took an active part in local affairs, and also in the neighbouring district of Northwood, where he had been a Churchwarden of Emmanuel Church. In all these circles, as well as among his many friends and relations, he will be very sadly missed”. With copy Medal Index Card (awarded British War and Victory Medals only), copy obituary, newspaper article, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, census entry 1911.

GVF £95 Reserved 

Wilfred Hardinge Heinig was killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years in Mesopotamia. Born in 1887, he entered King’s College School in 1899. He was in the second XV in 1904 and in the first XV in 1905-6, and a School Prefect in 1906. From school he entered Sandhurst from which he passed out in a high position in August 1907. He joined the 54th Sikhs Indian Army and spent his military life in India. He was ordered to Mesopotamia in January last . Letters received from his fellow officers show he always retained his very high sense of duty and at the same time overflowed with high spirits and joy in life generally. His Commanding Officer, Colonel Magrath wrote of him –

“It was with rather a heavy heart that I detailed him to proceed with a draft as, apart from the fact he was my Quartermaster and a very hard working and useful officer at that, he was always so cheery and of such a bright disposition, that he was the life and soul of the Mess during the dull times we spent at Fort Lockhart and Hangu. I have just heard from Captain O’Neill that his same cheery disposition made him most popular with the 51st in the Field, and he did a lot to keep their spirits up in the trenches. But most important to you of all will be the news that he died like a very gallant soldier, at the head of his company in an assault on the Turkish trenches on 6th April. He was killed instantaneously, shot through the head and heart, and thus met with a glorious death. His loss to the Regiment is a heavy one, but we all feel proud of him and he has well upheld the name of the 54th”.

The only son of Robert Lawrence and Mary Heinig of “Deanurst”, Barton Road, Montpellier, Torquay, Devon. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

With copy Medal Index Card which records the award of the British War and Victory Medals, newspaper articles, copy photo in The Sphere dated 20th May 1916 etc.

GVF £145 Available

Kenneth William Elliott Mansbridge was born in Barnet, London in 1896, he served with the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli. Commissioned 25th October 1916 he served in France attached 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years.

From The Hendon Times 19th October 1917 page 5

“The death in action on 4th October 1917 is announced of 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth William Elliott Lovell (sic) Mansbridge, the elder son of Mr E Lovell Mansbridge of the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House and of “Elleborn”, Lichfield Grove, Church End Finchley. Lieutenant Lovell Mansbridge was educated at Barnet Grammar School, after which he took up Banking as a career. He enlisted within three weeks of the outbreak of War in the Royal Fusiliers (4th London Regiment). He saw varied service in Malta, Egypt (from 24th August 1915) and Gallipoli where he experienced 4 months of severe campaigning. He was invalided to Malta seven days before the evacuation of the Peninsula. He returned to England and in May 1916 was nominated for a commission. His Cadet training took place at Lichfield and on 25th October 1916, he was Gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the (4th Battalion) London Regiment. In January this year he was attached to the (13th Battalion) King’s Royal Rifle Corps and saw service in France till the great advance of 4th October when he met his death on the field of honour, This gallant young officer was only 20 years old”.

Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. With copy census details, Medal Index Card, Newspaper article, London Gazette announcing his commission, casualty details. Not sure where “Lovell Mansbridge” came from all official documents give his name as William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge.

GVF £95 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type to Chief Engine Room Artificer 1st Class William George Watts, Royal Navy a former Greenwich Hospital Scholar born in Portsmouth in 1889. Entering the Royal Navy at Firequeen II as a Boy Artificer, he was rated Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 5th Class in January 1909. Serving aboard HMS Monarch on the outbreak of the First World War, he served aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. In September 1919 whilst still aboard Monarch he suffered a compound (open) fracture of his right leg and was admitted to Osborne House, Isle  of Wight for treatment and convalescence. Advanced to Chief ERA 1st Class in October 1924, he was discharged to pension in October 1929. Re-entering the Royal Navy in December 1938, he served until December 1944 when released, upper age limit.

1914/15 Star

271884 W G Watts ERA 3 RN

British War and Victory Medals

271884 W G Watts Act CERA 2 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type

271884 W G Watts CERA 2 HMS King George V

With copy service record.

Mounted as originally worn.

William George Watts was born in Portsmouth 15th October 1889, a Greenwich Hospital School Scholar he entered the Royal Navy at Firequeen II 17th February 1905 as a Boy Artificer. Rated Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 5th Class at Fisgard 1st January 1909, advanced to ERA 4th Class aboard HMS King Edward VII 23rd February 1911, ERA 3rd Class aboard HMS Racer 31st December 1912, he joined HMS Monarch 7th April 1914 and was serving aboard this ship on the outbreak of the First World War. Advanced to Acting CERA 2nd Class 1st October 1915 he served aboard HMS Monarch at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 and in September 1919 whilst still aboard Monarch he suffered a compound (open) fracture of the right tibia. Treated at Osborne House Isle of Wight, on recovery he joined Victory II 1st May 1920, joining HMS King George V 222nd January 1921 he was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 3rd November 1922. Advanced to Chief ERA 1st Class at Victory II 1st October 1924, he joined Fisgard 22nd October 1924, HMS Revenge 3rd January 1925 and Victory II 14th October 1929 from where he was discharged to pension.

Re-entering the Royal Navy he joined HMS Effingham 12th December 1938 whilst undergoing a major refit, Victory IV 29th July 1939, HMS Enterprise 25th August 1939, Victory II 7th October 1939 from where he was released from Naval service 15th December 1944 (Age limit). He died in Hastings, Sussex in 1967 aged 78 years.

First time on the market.

GVF £175 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 1st type to Shipwright 1st Class Ernest Sidney Bracken, Royal Navy a Carpenter born in Plymouth, Devon in 1880. Entering the Royal Navy in June 1901 as Carpenter’s Crew he was serving aboard HMS Ajax on the outbreak of the First World War, serving aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916 and until October 1918 when he came ashore at Vivid II. Advanced to Shipwright 1st Class in January 1914, he was reverted to Shipwright 2nd Class  in October 1918 discharged to pension in June 1923, he died in Surrey in 1944.

1914/15 Star

344247 E S Bracken Shipt 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

344247 E S Bracken Shipt 2 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 1st type

344247 E S Bracken Shipt 1 CL HMS Ajax

With copy service record.

Mounted as originally worn.

Ernest Sidney Bracken was born in Plymouth 23rd February 1880, a Carpenter he entered the Royal Navy at Vivid 24th June 1901 as Carpenter’s Crew. Advanced to Leading Carpenter’s Crew aboard HMS Cornwallis 1st October 1906 and Shipwright aboard the same ship 1st April 1907. Advanced to Shipwright 2nd Class aboard HMS Lancaster 3rd November 1912, he joined HMS Ajax 16th October 1913 and was advanced to Shipwright 1st Class aboard this ship 1st January 1914. Serving aboard HMS Ajax at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he reverted to Shipwright 2nd Class 10th October 1918 and joined Vivid II 12th October 1918. Advanced to Shipwright 1st Class again 21st September 1919, he joined HMS Hood 4th February 1920, HMS Alexandra 2nd March 1920 and Victory II 10th June 1922 from where he was discharged to pension 23rd June 1923. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 2nd August 1916. He died in Surrey in 1944 aged 64 years.

First time on the market.

GVF £175 SOLD


British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Chief Armourer Thomas William Bradley, Royal Navy a Blacksmith born in Portsmouth in 1872. Entering the Royal Navy in October 1890 aboard HMS Asia as Blacksmith’s Crew, he was advanced to acting Chief Armourer in May 1899. Awarded the LSGC Medal in November 1905 aboard HMS Vindictive, he was invalided with disease of the eyes in November 1911. Re entering the Royal Navy in June 1913, he served ashore at Vernon and Victory II during the First World War. Demobilized in November 1919 he died in East Preston, Sussex in 1932.

British War Medal

157721 T W Bradley CH ARM RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

T W Bradley CH Armr HMS Vindictive

With details of service extracted from his on line service record. The 1WW Admiralty Medal roll confirms the British War Medal his sole entitlement.

Thomas William Bradley was born in Portsmouth 21st July 1872 a Blacksmith he entered the Royal Navy as Blacksmith’s Crew aboard HMS Asia 21st October 1890. Rated Armourer’s Crew at Excellent 8th February 1891. Armourer’s Mate at Pembroke I 11th July 1895, Armourer at Victory 2nd October 1897, acting Chief Armourer at Pembroke II 30th May 1899 and Chief Armourer aboard HMS Mildura 30th May 1900. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 6th November 1905 aboard HMS Vindictive, he was invalided with disease of the eyes from HMS Lord Nelson 9th November 1911.

Re-entering the Royal Navy at Vernon 26th June 1913, he joined Victory II 20th June 1917 and was demobilised 22nd November 1919. The British War Medal his sole entitlement for the First World War. He died in East Preston, Sussex in 1932.

HMS Vindictive immortalised by her part in the raid on Zeebrugge 23rd April 1918, she was sunk as a blockship in the second raid on Ostend 10th May 1918.

First time on the market.

GVF £145 SOLD


British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal, India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21 and a quantity of original documentation and photos to Sergeant Frederick William Walker, Norfolk Regiment late Merchant Navy a former Woodman born in Markham, Norfolk in 1900. Serving aboard the Steam Cargo Ship Abaris 1915 to 1916 he attested for the Norfolk Regiment Volunteer Force in April 1917 and the Regular Army in May 1918. Serving with the 2nd Battalion in India, a year of which on active service on the Indian Frontier. Discharged in March 1922, he attested for the 5th (Territorial) Battalion being discharged from the TA in January 1925. 

British War Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal

Frederick W Walker

India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21

5764693 A-Cpl F W Walker Norf R

With  the following original documentation – Certificate of registry of birth, Board of Trade Account of Wages for the SS Abaris from 29th October 1915 to 29th May 1916, Board of Trade Authority to wear medals certificate for his British War Medal and Mercantile Marine War Medal, certificate of service in the Volunteer Force serving with 3rd Volunteer Battalion Norfolk Regiment from 23rd April 1917 to 17th May 1918 when he joined the Norfolk Regiment Regular Army, Soldier’s Pay Book for use on Active Service, three discharge certificates from the Army and TA, Norfolk Regiment Christmas and Happy New Year Card, two postcard photos containing the recipient on active service in India, one small creased photo of the recipient on active service in India, group photo Sergeants 5th Battalion Norfolk Regiment, Sergeant Walker identified.

Corporal Walker centre, back to camera turning to face camera, towel on back

Corporal Walker inset and back row left

Frederick William Walker was born in Markham, Norfolk 18th May 1900 a Woodsman he entered the Merchant Navy and served aboard the Steam Cargo Ship SS Abaris in 1915 and 1916, he joined the 3rd Volunteer Battalion Norfolk Regiment 23rd April 1917 and was discharged on joining the Regular Army 17th May 1918 serving with “B” Company 2nd Battalion Norfolk Regiment his Company Commander wrote –

“I have known Corporal Walker as a NCO in my Company for the past 18 months, nearly a year of which was on active service on the Indian Frontier. He is steady, reliable and thoroughly trustworthy. During the time I have known him I have never had any complaint to find with him and have always found him hardworking”.

Discharged from the Regular Army 31st March 1922, he joined the 5th (Territorial) Battalion and was promoted Sergeant. Discharged from the Territorials at his own request 7th January 1925.

A rare combination of awards.

EF £295 SOLD


1914 Star and copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Able Seaman Thomas Galtress, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a Fisherman born in Liverpool in 1893. Entering the RNVR in February 1913, he was mobilized at the outbreak of War and served with Anson Battalion Royal Naval Division in the defence of Antwerp 4th to 10th October 1914. Returning to England he was discharged medically unfit fir further service in February 1915. Returning to Fishing and residing in Birkenhead, he died there in 1961 aged 68 years.

1914 Star and copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

M6/167 T Galtress AB RNVR Anson Bttn RND

British War and Victory Medals

M6-167 T Galtress AB RNVR

With  copy service record and other research listed here, photo taken in later life.

Thomas Galtress

Thomas Galtress was born in Liverpool in 1893, the 1911 census records he is a Fisherman’s Mate aged 18 years residing at 60 Russell Road, Rock Ferry, Cheshire with his father Thomas a Fisherman, mother Margaret, two brothers and three sisters. Entering the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve as Ordinary Seaman 14th February 1913, he was rated Able Seaman 15th September 1914. Mobilized 2nd August 1914, he joined Anson Battalion 22nd August 1914 and took part in the defence of Antwerp, Belgium 4th to 10th October 1914. The clasp to his 1914 Star is confirmed on the Admiralty Medal roll TNA ADM171126 page 296. Discharged medically unfit for further service 17th February 1915, he returned to his former trade as Fisherman. Thomas married in December 1914, at the time he was residing at 4 Tower Road, Birkenhead, he died in Birkenhead in 1961 aged 68 years.

EF £350 SOLD


1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Stoker 2nd Class Alfred Rowland Meech, Royal Navy a Cook’s Assisant born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire in 1890. Entering the Royal Navy as Officer’s Cook 3rd Class in May 1908, he was discharged shore own request in May 1913. Re-entering the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class 30th March 1914 he joined Hawke Battalion 17th September 1914 for the defence of Antwerp. The majority of Hawke Battalion being captured by the Germans or interned in Holland, Meech was made a German POW and held at Doeberitz POW camp. Repatriated at the end of hostilities he was invalided with Neurasthenia 27th May 1920.

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

K.22178 A R Meech Sto 2 CL Hawke Bttn RND

British War and Victory Medals

K.22178 A R Meech Sto 2 RN

With  copy service records.

Alfred Rowland Meech was born in Alverstoke, Hampshire 21st January 1890, a Cook’s Assistant Merchant Navy, he entered the Royal Navy 1st May 1909 as Officer’s Cook 3rd Class, rated Officer’s Steward 3rd Class 10th August 1909, he was discharged shore at his own request 16th May 1913. Re-entering the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Victory II 30th March 1914 he was posted to Hawke Battalion Royal Naval Division 17th September 1914 and landed in Belgium for the defence of Antwerp 4th to 10th October 1914. Taken prisoner of war by the Germans he was held at Doeberitz POW camp at Brandenburg, Germany. Repatriated at the end of hostilities he joined Victory II 23rd February 1919, Osborne for convalescence 13th March 1919 and Victory II 26th April 1920 from where he was invalided with neurasthenia 27th May 1920.

GVF £350 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Thomas Oldham, 9th (Service) Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment who served in Gallipoli, Egypt and France. The Battalion landed at Sulva Bay Gallipoli 6th August 1915 and too part in heavy fighting on 9th and 21st August suffering heavy casualties. Evacuated to Egypt in December 1915, they arrived on the Somme in September 1916. Taking part in the successful attack on Schaben, Zollers and Joseph Trenches on 26th September they suffered over 300 casualties, later taking part in the Third Battle of Ypres, the Battle of Arras and the advances of 1918. Discharged to the Army Reserve in March 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

24625 Pte T Oldham Notts & Derby R

With  copy Medal Index Card and other research listed here, British War & Victory Medal roll entry records service with the 9th Battalion only.

Original silk ribbons.

Thomas Oldham served in Gallipoli prior to 31st December 1915 (as recorded on Medal Index Card) with the 9th Service Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment. The Battalion landed at Sulva Bay 6th August 1915 and took part in the attack Ismail Oglu Tepe on 9th August establishing a good defensive line at the cost of 8 officers and 150 other rank casualties, a Turkish counter attack at 1500 that afternoon was repulsed. Taking part in the attack on Hetman Chair 21st September the Battalion sustaining heavy casualties during the advance. Evacuated from Gallipoli 18th December 1915, in January 1916 they arrived in Egypt as part of the Suez Canal defences. Ordered to France in July 1916, they arrived on the Somme 2nd September 1916, taking part in the successful attack on Schaben, Zollers and Joseph Trenches on 26th September they suffered over 300 casualties, the Battalion’s total casualties for September 1916 being recorded as 492. Later taking part in the Third Battle of Ypres, the Battle of Arras and the advances of 1918. Discharged to the Army Reserve in March 1919.

GVF £75 SOLD


British War and Victory Medals named to Private Thomas Geoffery Goulty, Coldstream Guards. An Apprentice to Machinery born in Nottingham in 1898. Attesting for the Coldstream Guards in June 1916 aged 18 years, he served in France with the 1st Battalion. Wounded in Action on 23rd October 1918, shrapnel wounds left side he was treated in Hospitals in France. Re-joining the 1st Battalion in January 1919 he embarked for England in March 1919 and was demobilized in October 1919.

British War & Victory Medals

21705 Pte T G Goulty C GDS

Thomas Geoffery Goulty, born in Nottingham in 1898. Son of William Goulty of 18 Grove Road, Fenton, Nottingham. A former Apprentice to Machinery, enlisted with the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards on 2nd June 1916 aged 18 years. Embarked at Southampton for France on 23rd October 1917, disembarking at Le Harve on the 24th October 1917. He was hospitalised with boils in March 1918 and was wounded in Action on 23rd August 1918, shrapnel to left side. Admitted 43 Casualty Clearing Station 24th August, 7th Canadian General Hospital 24th August and 93 General Hospital 26th September, 14 Convalescent Depot 3rd October. Granted leave to the UK 28th November 1918 he re-joined his Battalion in France 2nd January 1919 and embarked for England 5th March 1919 Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 18th October 1919.

GVF £40 Available


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £195 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £195 Available