Groups with First World War Medals


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal for Saving Life (Successful) to Captain Edward John Kidby, Merchant Navy, born in Ipswich, Suffolk 18th February 1856, he first went to sea as a Boy 3rd April 1869 aboard the sailing ship Jessie Amandale.  Awarded his Master’s Certificate 17th August 1881, this was suspended by the Board of Trade for six months in 1882 when he ran aground the Steam Yacht Griffin off Corfu during a chartered holiday for Sir Charles Strickland and his family. The Board found him guilty of careless navigation. Awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal for the rescue of a 7 year old boy swept out to sea off Southsea Castle near Portsmouth. The boy was unconscious when landed but Captain Kidby’s attempts at resuscitation were successful and he recovered. Commissioned into the Royal Naval Reserve in November 1914 aged 58 years, he joined the  Armed Yacht Verona on commissioning, his commission was terminated 7th August 1916, Captain Kidby died in Southampton on 31st May 1927 aged 71 years.

1914/15 Star

S Lt E J Kidby RNR

British War and Victory Medals

Lieut E J Kidby RNR

Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal (Successful)

Edward John Kidby 7th June 1882

With copy newspaper articles and details extracted from on line sources including his RNR record, copies from The Royal Humane Society regarding his award.

Edward John Kidby was born in Ipswich, Suffolk 18th February 1856, he first went to sea as a Boy 3rd April 1869 aboard the sailing ship Jessie Amandale, rated Ordinary Seaman 6th September 1870 and Able Seaman 24th February 1873. Qualified as Second Mate, London 14th January 1877, Appointed First Mate aboard the Agmare based at Swansea 9th July 1879 and the Yacht Francesca based at Cowes, Isle of Wight 14th June 1880. Awarded his Master’s Certificate number 02091 on 17th August 1881. Residing in Southsea, Hampshire, he married at St Bartholomew’s Church, Southsea in 1882. On 25th December 1881 he was appointed Master of the Steam Yacht Griffin, chartered for a Mediterranean holiday by Sir Charles Strickland and his family, the vessel struck a shoal sailing around the south of the Island of Corfu and grounded. The 11 passengers were evacuated to Corfu by boat and the crew of 18 including Captain Kidby eventually had to abandon the vessel.

At a Board of Trade enquiry held at Liverpool on 2nd and 3rd June 1882, a detailed account of which appears in the Mercantile Gazette 12th July 1882 page 6 (copy with group) of what happened and the judge’s findings. Captain Kidby was found guilty of careless navigation and as a result had his Master’s Certificate of Competency suspended for 6 months.

Awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal (Successful) 18th July 1882 Case Number 21680 for the rescue from drowning of William Redman a  7 year old boy on Southsea seafront near Southsea Castle.

The Portsmouth Evening News 17th June 1882 page 3 reports on the events –

Rescue from Drowning at Southsea

“About noon today a boy about ten years old while playing near Southsea Castle slipped down the incline and fell into the water. The tide was high at the time, and the boy seen drifted out a considerable distance, none of the spectators seeming to have sufficient courage or presence of mind to attempt a rescue. At this time Captain Edward Kidby of Tregantle Villa, Victoria Road South, was crossing the (Southsea) Common on his way home when he was apprised of the incident, and he at once rushed to the beach and without waiting to divest himself of any of his clothing, jumped into the water and swam out to the lad, who was lying unconscious about 80 yards from shore. With considerable difficulty he brought him to land and at once proceeded to restore animation by the proper methods which he was well acquainted with. After about ten minutes exertion he was rewarded by seeing symptoms of returning life, and he then had the unfortunate boy conveyed to his own house in order that he might completely recover”.

William Redman was born in Southsea in 1875 the son of James Redman, Boatswain, Royal Navy and his wife Ellen, he was one of six children, the family in 1881 were residing at 219 Somers Road, Portsea, Portsmouth. The 1891 census records he is a 16 year old Upholsterer’s Apprentice residing with his family at 17 Lawson Road, Southsea.

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Steam Yacht Verona

Commissioned Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve 7th November 1914 with seniority to date 16th December 1912, Temporary Lieutenant 7th March 1915 appointed to the Armed Yacht Verona on commissioning, his commission was terminated 7th August 1916, home address recorded as 53 High Street, Itchen, Southampton. Edward John Kidby died at the Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton 31st May 1927 aged 71 years.

NEF £395 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence Medal to Leading Mechanic Harold Edward Albert Ardiss, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force. Born under the surname Stone (changed to Ardiss) in Paddington in 1887, he was a Chauffeur and Mechanic when he entered the Royal Navy 6th December 1915 and served in France as a Driver from 15th December 1915 to 16th January 1916 and again from 16th March 1917 to 19th November 1917. Promoted to Sergeant Mechanic RAF in August 1918 he was discharged to the Reserve in April 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Clacton, Essex and employed with his wife as a Boarding House Assistant, he was also an Air Raid Precautions Warden. He died in Stamford, Suffolk in 1967.

1914/15 Star

F.10003 H E A Ardiss AM 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

F.10003 H E A Ardiss LM RN

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

With copy service records RN and RAF a Sweetheart Brooch, the Defence Medal in card box of issue with Home Office award certificate addressed –

“Mr H E Ardiss, “Starpoint”, 14 Roseberry Road, Felixstowe, Suffolk”

The Trio mounted as originally worn.

Harold Edward Albert Ardiss (born Stone) was born in Paddington, London 30th June 1887. A Chauffeur and Mechanic he entered the Royal Navy as a Driver 6th December 1915 and served in France from 15th December 1915 to 16th January 1916. Serving at Dover and Felixstowe, he returned to France serving at Dunkirk from 16th March 1917 to 19th November 1917, when he was posted to Crystal Palace and finally Daedalus (Lee on Solent). Advanced to Leading Mechanic 1st August 1916, he transferred to the Royal Air Force 1st April 1918 as Corporal Mechanic. Promoted Sergeant Mechanic 1st August 1918, he was transferred to the RAF Reserve in April 1919. In 1939 he is employed with his wife Mary as Boarding House Assistants, residing at 11 Russell Road, Clacton, Essex, he is also an ARM Warden. He died in Stamford, Suffolk in 1967, death registered under the surname Ardiss.

NEF £175 Available


Egypt and Sudan Medal undated reverse clasp Suakin 1885, British War Medal, Royal Victorian Medal Silver Queen Victoria, Coronation Medal 1902 King Edward VII Bronze, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria, Khedives Star 1884-6 to Painter 1st Class Samuel Abrahams, Royal Navy a Painter born in Portsmouth in 1861. Entering the Royal Navy as painter 2nd Class aboard HMS Asia 16th January 1884, he served aboard HMS Dolphin 16th May 1884 to 31st July 1887 including the Suakin operations of 1885. Advanced to Painter 1st Class 1st July 1888, he was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard HMS Royal Sovereign 11th May 1894. Joining the Royal Yacht Victoria and Albert 8th May 1894, he was awarded the RVM in silver for his part in the Osborne House party of Queen Victoria’s funeral. Discharged to pension 27th January 1904, he was recalled 2nd August 1914 but was discharged 19th September 1914, he died in Portsmouth in 1939.

Egypt and Sudan Medal undated reverse clasp Suakin 1885

S Abrahams Paintr 2 CL HMS Dolphin

British War Medal

125441 S Abrahams PTR 1 RN

Royal Victorian Medal in Silver Victoria

Presented to S Abraham by Edward VII HMY V&A Feb 1, 1901

Coronation Medal 1902 King Edward VII Bronze reverse engraved

Presented to S Abraham by HM King Edward VII

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy Victoria

Saml Amrahams Painter 1st CL HMS Royal Sovereign

Khedives Star dated 1884-6

Unnamed as issued

With copy service record, Medal roll entry for Egypt and Sudan Medal and clasp, 1WW Medal roll entry confirming British War Medal only awarded, Medal roll entry for Coronation Medal 1902 and Royal Victorian Medal in Silver.

Provenance : Dix, Noonan Webb (N I Brooks collection) 15th December 2000

Samuel Abrahams was born in Portsmouth 23rd October 1861, a Painter he entered the Royal Navy as painter 2nd Class aboard HMS Asia 16th January 1884, he subsequently joined HMS Dolphin 16th May 1884, HMS Hibernia 1st August 1887, Pembroke 26th November 1887 where he was advanced to Painter 1st Class 1st July 1888, HMS Rover 7th November 1888, HMS Ruby 22nd May 1889, HMS Asia 21st November 1890, St Vincent 13th January 1891, Victory II 10th March 1892, HMS Royal Sovereign 31st May 1893, HMY Victoria and Albert 8th May 1894 from where he was discharged shore to pension 27th January 1904. Re-joining at Victory II 2nd August 1914 he was discharged 19th September 1914. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 11th May 1894, he died in Portsmouth in 1939.

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Queen Victoria’s funeral party leaving Osborne House, Isle of Wight 1st February 1901

Royal Victorian Medal awarded for his services as a member of HM Queen Victoria’s funeral party, Osborne House.

RVM Victoria in silver rare, mainly awarded for services in connection with her funeral.

GVF & better £1,595 Reserved


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, South Africa 1901, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Sergeant Trumpeter John Thompson McIver, 1/1st Lovats Scouts late Royal Field Artillery, born in Leith, Midlothian in 1875. Enlisting at Stornoway for the Royal Field Artillery 3rd December 1889 aged 14 years 2 months. Appointed Trumpeter 12th November 1889, he served in India 12th November 1892 to 24th November 1899 and South Africa with 11th Brigade RFA from 18th January 1900 to 20th December 1901. Discharged 12th February 1909 at his own request after 18 years service. Attesting for the 1/1st Lovat’s Scouts at Huntingdon 17th September 1914, he was appointed Sergeant Trumpeter the same day. Serving in Gallipoli and Egypt from 7th September 1915 to 2nd February 1919, he was slightly wounded in Gallipoli gun shot wound to head, 12th November 1915. Demobilised 25th March 1915.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, South Africa 1901

76658 Sgt TPTR J T McIver RFA

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2302 SJT J T McIver 1-Lovat’s Scouts

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

76658 SJT TPTR J T McIver RFA

With details extracted from his on line service records.

Original ribbons.

John Thompson McIver born in Leith, Edinburgh and attested for the Royal Field Artillery at Stornoway 3rd December 1889 aged 14 years 2 months. Joining 2nd Division Depot as a Boy he joined 51st Battery as a Trumpeter 12th November 1889 and “E” Battery Royal Hose Artillery as Trumpeter 11th November 1894. Imprisoned (offence not recorded) 26th November 1895, he was released to duty 6th December 1895. Serving in India 12th November 1892 to 24th November 1899, he joined 11th Brigade Royal Artillery as Sergeant Trumpeter 18th December 1899. Serving in South Africa from 18th January 1900 to 20th December 1901 with 11th Brigade Royal Field Artillery. Absent without leave 15th January 1909, he returned to duty 23rd January 1909 with no punishment awarded. Discharged 12th February 1909 at his own request after 18 years service, awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 77 of 1908 with a £5 Gratuity, he received a pension of 17d a day for life.

As a 38 year old Army pensioner attested for Lovats Scouts at Huntingdon 17th September 1914 as a Private. Recording his next of kin as hs mother Mrs McIver, Green Park, Baybles, Stornoway. Appointed Sergeant Trumpeter 17th September 1914, he served in Egypt and Gallipoli with the 1/1st Lovat’s Scouts from 7th September 1915. Arriving at Alexandria 18th September, to Lemos on 20th they landed at Sulva Bay on 26th September and to Salt Lake Line attached to 2nd Mounted Division. Suffered a slight gunshot wound to the head 12th November 1915, the Regiment was evacuated on 20th December 1915 and to Imbros. The 1/Lovat’s Scouts became 10th Battalion Cameron Highlanders 17th November 1916 and remained in Egypt until 2nd February 1919. Joining the Depot 3rd February 1919, he was demobilised 25th March 1919.

First time on the market.

GVF £550 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Vivtory Medals to Private Joseph George Parrott, Middlesex Regiment born in Edmonon, Middlesex in 1893. The 1911 census records he is employed as a Clerk. Serving with the 2/7th Battalion in Egypt from 24th August 1915, he later served in France with the 1/7th Battalion, the 2/7th being disbanded 15th June 1916 in France. In 1939 he was employed as a Builder’s Foreman and later with the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA). He died in Syria on 14th February 1945.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2755 Pte J G Parrott Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, Commonwealth War Graves details and other research 

Joseph George Parrott was born in Edmonton, Middlesex 16th September 1893, the 1911 census records he is a 17 year old  Clerk residing with his family at 9 Stanhope Road, New South Gate, Middlesex. Serving in Egypt with the 2/7th Battalion 24th August 1915 and later the 1/7th Battalion in France, he was demobilised at the end of hostilities. The 1939 Register records he is a Builder’s Foreman residing at 7 Russell Lane, Frien Barnett, Middlesex with his wife Ethel and children. Serving with the Entertainments National Service Association he died on 14th February 1945 and is buried in Aleppo War Cemetery, Syria. One of seven ENSA personnel listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as having died in the Second World War.

The Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA) was an organisation set up in 1939 by Basil Dean and Leslie Henson to provide entertainment for British armed forces personnel during World War 2. ENSA operated as part of the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes. It was superseded by Combines Services Entertainment (CSE) which now operates as part of the Services Sound and Vision Corporation (SSVC).

Contact wear, a rare Second World War casualty.

VF £350 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Vivtory Medals to Private (Lance Corporal) Charles Porter, Highland Light Infantry, born in Liverpool in 1892. Serving in France from 30th November 1914, he was taken prisoner of war at La Bassee 19th December 1914 during the attack and capture of German trenches near Givenchy. Despite their success, the 1st Battalion were unable to hold their gains against repeated counter attacks and were forced to withdraw, their casualties recorded as 9 officers killed, 54 other ranks killed with 63 wounded and 266 missing. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918. 

1914/15 Star

11359 L Cpl C Porter High LI

British War and Victory Medals

11359 Pte C Porter High LI

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries and other research from the International Red Cross.

Original silk ribbons.

Charles Porter born 21st December 1892 in Liverpool, next of kin recorded as Mrs Porter, 56 Oakfield Road, Liverpool, he served in France from 30th November 1914 with 1st Battalion Highland Light Infantry, captured at La Bassee 19th December 1914, he was also wounded in the right arm. On 19th December 1914 “B” and “C” companies took part in the attack on German trenches near Givenchy, the first wave moving forward at 0534 and gaining their objective. The gains were gallantly held throughout the rest of the day, but repeated counter attacks forced a withdrawal. Casualties recorded in the War Diary for the period 19th to 20th December as 9 officers killed, 54 other ranks killed with 63 wounded and 266 missing.

Repatriated at the end of hostilities, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918.

An unusual instance of a 1914/15 Star Trio to a 1914 prisoner of war.

GVF £145 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Natal, Belfast, Orange Free Statel, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919,  Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Private Edward Hunter South Lancashire Regiment late Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers born in Glendermott, Londonderry, Ireland in 1879. Serving in the Boer War with the 5th (Militia) Battalion attached 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, he transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment, the 1911 census records he is serving with the 1st Battalion. Serving in India during the First World War and in the Third Afghan War of 1919, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded in October 1920.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Natal, Belfast, Orange Free State

1624 Pte E Hunter Rl Innis Fus

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

1624 Pte E Hunter Innis Fus

British War Medal

6792 Pte E Hunter S Lan R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

6792 ARMR SGT E Hunter S Lan R

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

6792 Pte E Hunter S Lan R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries and other research from on line sources. 

Edward Hunter was born in Glendermott, Londonderry, Ireland in 1879, a member of the 5th (Militia) Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, he served in South Africa attached 1st Battalion. He transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment, the 1911 census records he is a 32 year old Private soldier serving with the 1st Battalion. Serving in India during the First World War and in the Third Afghan War, he was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in October 1920. The Medal roll entries record his Medals were returned an re-issued, the reason for this is unclear as there are no alterations to any of the naming. The QSA was originally issued with 4 clasps in error (not entitled to Cape Colony) and this was returned for amendment, top clasp has unofficial silver bar attaching but verified correct.

A couple of small eK’s to LSGC otherwise

GVF £475 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force War Medal, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919,  to Richard Henry Hoskins, Dorset Regiment a former Provision’s Dealer’s Errand Boy born in Bangalore India in 1897. His father Joseph had joined the Dorset Regiment in 1886 and was promoted RSM in 1912, commissioned into the 4th Battalion he died at home in 1918. Reichard Henry served with the 1/4th Battalion in India and Mesopotamia. Attached 1/4th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment for the Third Afghan War of 1919. Discharged 13th November 1919 the result of sickness contracted on active service, he died in Dorchester in 1925 aged 28 years.

British War and Victory Medals and Territorial Force War Medal

1787 Pte R H Hoskins Dorset R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

0592 Pte R H Hoskins Dorset R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries and other research from on line sources. The India General Service Medal roll confirms his rather odd service number.

Richard Henry Hoskins was born in Bangalore, India in 1897. His father Joseph Hoskins had enlisted into the Dorset Regiment in 1886 and served in India with the 1st Battalion, promoted to Regimental Sergeant Major in 1912, he was discharged 30th September 1914 but was commissioned into the 1/4th Battalion, he held the rank of Captain when he died in Dorchester 6th October 1918. The 1911 census records Richard Henry is a 14 year old Provision’s Dealer’s Errand Boy residing at East Street, Wareham, Dorset with his mother Ellen (father absent), four sisters and one brother. Serving in the 1/4th Battalion in India and Mesopotamia, he served in the Third Afghan War attached 1/4th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, his rather odd service number confirmed correct on the Medal roll. Discharged 13th November 1919, no longer fit for Military service, the result of sickness contracted on active service, he died in Dorchester in 1925 at the early age of 28 years.

A total of 161 India General Service Medals Afghan NWF 1919 to the Dorset Regiment, one to the 2nd Battalion, one to the 3rd Battalion and one hundred and fifty nine to the 1/4th Battalion.

EF £525 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Gunner George Lewis, Canadian Field Artillery a Fireman born in Manchester in 1887. Attesting for the Canadian Expeditionary Force 22nd September 1914, he joined 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery (CFA) which left for England 3rd October 1914 and landed in France with the 1st Canadian Division 8th February 1915. Taking part in the Second Battle of Ypres, the 1st Brigade CFA were moved forward on 25th April 1915, to halt the German advance following the first gas attack and witnessed the horrors of the new weapon. Serving with No 1 Battery 1st Brigade CFA until 7th August 1917 when he transferred to HQ 4th Canadian Division Artillery. Marrying whilst on leave in England in 1917, he returned to France and in 1919 was in hospital with Influenza, discharged in England 16th May 1919, he became Landlord of The Lamb Inn, Rowde, Devizes, Wiltshire.

1914/15 Star

40204 Gnr G Lewis Can Fd Art

British War & Victory Medals

40204 Gnr G Lewis CFA

With details extracted from his on line service record.

George Lewis was born in Manchester 24th June 1887, a Fireman, he attested for the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Valcartier 22nd September 1914 and joined No 1 Battery, 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery (CFA). Sailing for England 22nd September 1914, the 1st Brigade CFA were part of 1st Canadian Division and landed in France 8th February 1915, taking part in the Second Battle of Ypres.

22 April 1915: 17.30

About half an hour before the German attack was launched the 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery (CFA) was ordered to move forward towards Ypres from its position in reserve at Vlamertinghe. The Brigade would wait near Ypres until it received further orders to move into a position near the Brielen Bridge No. 4 on the Yser Canal in the early hours of the following morning, 23rd April.

Major John McCrae, a doctor, was second in command of this Artillery Brigade. In his capacity as a military doctor he was also the brigade surgeon. John McCrae became famous as the author of the poem “In Flanders Fields”. It is believed that he wrote the poem ten days later on 2nd May during the battle in which he was about to become involved: the Second Battle of Ypres. As the 1st Brigade CFA moved along the road towards Ypres French troops and refugees were streaming past them, away from the fighting line, all of them talking and shouting. According to the Brigade Commander, Lieutenant-Colonel E W B Morrison, at one point a massive crowd of French Moroccan soldiers of the 45th Algerian Division was heading towards the Canadians, who tried to cut them off; the Moroccans fell off their horses and wagons and lay writhing on the ground, foaming at the mouth.

Serving with 1st Brigade CFA until 7th August 1917 when he transferred to HQ 4th Canadian Division Artillery, he married in England whilst on leave in England Mary of the Lamb Inn, Rowde, Devizes, Wiltshire. Returning to France, he was admitted in early 1919 to hospital with Influenza and on recovery was discharged from the Canadian Army in England 16th May 1919, his address on discharge in The Lamb Inn which presumably he managed with his wife.

GVF £125 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV to Corporal Joseph Jackson, 33rd Battalion London Regiment late Denbigh Yeomanry a Railway Signalman born in Macclesfeld, Cheshire in 1874. In 1914 he was residing in Old Colwyn, North Wales when he attested for the Denbighshire Yeomanry 2nd September 1914. Serving at home until transferring to the 33rd Battalion London Regiment, he served in France from 3rd July 1918 until the end of hostilities. Discharged 4th April 1919 suffering from Myalgia attributed to his active service and awarded a 20% disability pension.

British War & Victory Medals

860708 Cpl J Jackson 33-Lond R

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV Coinage Head

Joseph Jackson

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entry and details from what survives of his on line service record.

Original ribbons.

Joseph Jackson was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire in 1874, the 1911 census records he is a 37 year old Railway Signalman residing with his wife Jane (whom he married in Bury, Lancashire 23rd May 1903) and 3 sons at Ballin Grove, Butley, Macclesfield. In 1914 he was residing at “Ingledene”, Penmaen Park, Old Colwyn, North Wales when he attested for the 2/1 Denbighshire Yeomanry 2nd September 1914 (Regimental numbers 558 and 215011). Serving in France from 3rd July 1918, on this day the Battalion arrived in France at Boulogne. It was not until 28th August that the Battalion took over a section of the front line at Ypres. Jackson remained with the Battalion until the Armistice and returning to England was disembodied 4th April 1919. He had contracted Myalgia as a result of his active service at home and abroad and was awarded a 20% disability pension.

Rare British War and Victory Medals to the 33rd Battalion London Regiment.

NEF £175 Available


East and West Africa Medal clasp Benin 1897, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) Joseph Davies Davies, Royal Navy a former Gardener born in Newport, Monmouthshire in 1876. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 23rd September 1891, he served as an Able Seaman aboard the 1st Class Screw Gun Boat HMS Widgeon during the Benin operations of 1897, one of only 75 clasps to the ship. Serving as Petty Officer 1st Class aboard HMS Essex on the outbreak of the First World War, he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) 1st August 1914. Serving aboard Essex until 23rd August 1916, and after a brief period ashore, he joined HMS Suffolk 17th May 1917 and was demobilised from this ship 31st July 1918 after completing almost 27 years service.

East and West Africa Medal clasp Benin 1897

J D Davies AB HMS Widgeon

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

162887 J D Davies CPO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

162887 J D Davies PO 1 CL HMS Impregnable

With copy service record and Medal roll entries.

Joseph Davies Davies was born in Newport, Monmouthshire 19th April 1876 a Gardener, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 23rd September 1891. rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Immortalite 18th April 1894 and Able Seaman aboard HMS Blenheim 13th May 1895, he subsequently joined Vivid I 25th May 1895, Cambridge 29th May 1895, Vivid I 7th December 1895, HMS Hermione 14th January 1896, Vivid I 11th September 1896, HMS Melpomene 3rd October 1896, HMS Widgeon 24th November 1896, HMS Penelope 14th April 1897, HMS Widgeon 7th May 1897, HMS Penelope 2nd June 1897, HMS Monarch 1st July 1897, HMS Fox 23rd January 1898, Vivid I 8th July 1899 where he was advanced to Leading Seaman 21st August 1899, Cambridge 15th November 1899, Vivid I 12th February 1900, HMS Collingwood 11th April 1900 where he was advanced to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class 1st July 1900, HMS Hood 1st February 1901 where he was advanced to Petty Officer of the 1st Class 21st September 1902, Vivid I 6th December 1902, Cambridge 18th January 1903, HMS Commonwealth 10th May 1905, Vivid 28th May 1907.

Joining HMS Majestic 21st August 1908, HMS Impregnable 12th December 1908, he was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal aboard this ship 28th April 1909, HMS New Zealand 10th August 1909, HMS Theseus 1st August 1911, Vivid I 1st October 1911, HMS Euryalus 10th August 1912, Vivid I 15th April 1912, HMS Impregnable 26th September 1912, HMS Powerful 23rd September 1913, HMS Essex 1st January where he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) 1st August 1914, Vivid I 24th August 1916, HMS Suffolk 17th May 1917, demobilised 31st July 1919 after almost 27 years service.

Nice combination, 75 Benin 1897 clasps to the 1st Class Screw Gun Boat HMS Widgeon.

GVF & better £495 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to PrivateEdwin Smith, Shropshire Light Infantry a former Labourer born in Stottesdon, Budgnorth, Shropshire in 1892. Enlisting on 7th September 1914, he served in France with the 6th Battalion from 23rd July 1915. Wounded in October 1915, gun shot wound left hand, he returned to England for treatment 18th October 1915. Returning to France 9th February 1916, he joined the 1st Battalion, wounded a second time in April 1917, gun shot wound to back (slight), he was treated in France and returned to his unit in June 1917. Wounded a third time in July 1917, gun shot wound left thigh with fractured femur and gun shot wounds right buttock, he was listed as dangerously ill whilst a patient in No 7 General Hospital, St Omer. Evacuated to Scotland he was admitted to the Edinburgh War Hospital and recovered. Discharged no longer fit for Military service 15th August 1918.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

13139 Pte E Smith Shrop LI

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Edwin Smith was born in Stottesdon, Budgnorth, Salop in 1892, a Labourer residing at 8 Station Road, Stottesdon, he attested for the Shropshire Light Infantry at Budgnorth 7th September 1914 and joined the 6th Battalion 15th September 1914. Serving in France from 24th July 1915, he was admitted to No 5 British Red Cross Hospital, Wimereux 21st October 1915 with gun shot wound left hand. Evacuated to England he was admitted to No 2 Western General Hospital and recovered sufficiently to be granted leave 11th November 1915 to 20th November 1915 when he was posted to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion. Returning to France 9th February 1916, he joined the 1st Battalion 9th February 1916 and was wounded in action for a second time 17th April 1917 gun shot wound back, slight. Admitted to No 24 General Hospital, Etaples 20th July 1917 he recovered sufficiently to be discharged to the Base Depot at Rouen 9th June 1917 and from there re-joined the 1st Battalion. On 7th July 1917 he was admitted to No 7 Casualty Clearing Station dangerously wounded, gun shot wound left thigh with fractured femur and gun shot wounds right buttock. Transferred to No 31 Ambulance Train 17th September 1917 for evacuation to England aboard HMAT St Dennis, his condition was reported to his next of kin by telegram as “Dangerously ill”. Admitted to the Edinburgh War Hospital 19th September 1917, he recovered and was discharged medically unfit for further service 15th August 1918.

First time on t he market.

GVF & better £125 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private James Logan, Gordon Highlanders born in 1878 who served with the 2nd and 8th / 10th Battalions in France from 16th February 1915. The 2nd Battalion took part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916 and captured their objectives suffering 461 casualties they were relieved from the front line on 3rd July. Private Logan is recorded as admitted to No 34 Casualty Clearing Station on 2nd July 1916 with a gun shot wound left hand and evacuated by Ambulance Train to hospital 5th July 1916. Almost certainly wounded during his Battalions attack on 1st July. Later serving with the 8th/10th Battalion he was taken prisoner of war at Monchy 28th March 1918 during the German Spring offensive. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, he arrived in Dover 29th November 1918 and was discharged to the Reserve 28th March 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

S-7784 Pte J Logan Gord Highrs

With details extracted from his on line service record.

WithServed with “C” Company 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders on the Somme, the Battalion was part of 20th Brigade, 7th Division and took part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916. Assaulting the western side of the village on the right of the railway, the German first line was reached and the Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from The Shrine, advancing past Mametz Station and on to Shrine Alley, Cemetery Trench and to its final objectives of Bunny Alley and Orchard Alley. Withdrawn from the front line on 3rd July having suffered 461 casualties. Admitted to 34 Casualty Clearing Station on 2nd July 1916 with gun shot wound left hand, he was evacuated further by Ambulance Train (to hospital) 5th July 1916.

Later serving with the 8th/10th Battalion, he was taken prisoner of war during the German Spring offensive (probably at Monchy 28th March 1918) when other members of this Battalion are recorded as captured and repatriated, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918 and sent to POW Reception Camp, Canterbury (Ref: Red Cross Archive). Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 28th March 1919.

GVF & better £175 Available 


British War and Victory Medals toPrivate John Arthur Lange, 1st King Edward’s Horse an Accountant born in Lambeth, Surrey in 1899. Enlisting in London 29th November 1915 aged 16 years 10 months, he served in France after January 1916. On 19th October 1917 he was admitted to hospital in Warrington suffering from debility and pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and following discharge in December 1917 he was posted to Dublin. Demobilised at the end of hostilities, in 1939 he was a Commercial Traveller residing with his wife in Harrow, Middlesex, he died in Poole, Dorset in 1985 aged 86 years.

British War & Victory Medals

1352 Pte J A Lange K Edw H

With details extracted from his on line service record.

John Arthur Lange was born in Lambeth, Surrey 21st February 1899, the 1911 census records he is a scholar residing with his father Arthur a Restaurant Carver, mother Alice and three sisters at 10 Pawsons Road, West Croydon, Surrey. Attesting for the 1st King Edward’s Horse in London 29th November 1915 he stated his occupation as Accountant and age as 16 years 10 months. Serving in France after January 1916, he was admitted to the Lord Derby War Hospital, Warrington 19th October 1917 suffering from debility and pyrexia of unknown origin, the result of service in France. In December 1917 he is recorded as serving Dublin and does not appear to have returned to active service. Demobilised at the end of hostilities, the 1939 Register records he is a Commercial Traveller residing with his wife Winifred at 243 Rayners Lane, Harrow, Middlesex, he died in Poole, Dorset in 1985 aged 86 years.

First time on the market and relatively scarce to the Regiment.

GVF & better £125 Available 


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Signaller Vivian Edward Clack, Royal Navy a former Bricklayer’s Labourer born in Wallingford, Oxfordshire in 1898. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 11th July 1913, he was rated Signal Boy 1st January 1914. Serving aboard HM Ships Crescent, Castor, BlakeSuperb and Nizam during the First World War, he was discharged shore on reduction of the Royal Navy 24th December 1919. He married in Hackney, London in 1922 and in 1939 was employed as a Chauffeur and Mechanic residing in Paddington, London, he died in Paddington in 1971.

1914/15 Star

J.25766 V E Clack Sig Boy RN

British War and Victory Medals

J.25766 V E Clack Sig RN

With copy service record, old original ribbons.

Vivian Edward Clack was born in Wallingford, Oxfordshire 1st May 1898, a Bricklayer’s Labourer he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 11th July 1913 at Ganges. He was subsequently rated Signal Boy 1st January 1914 and subsequently joined Victory I 10th May 1914, HMS Crescent 4th December 1914, rated Ordinary Signalman 1st May 1916, Victory I 3rd May 1916, HMS Castor 5th June 1916, HMS Blake 16th June 1916, rated Signalman 1st October 1916, HMS Superb 15th October 1917, HMS Nizam 19th March 1918, Victory I 18th August 1918, AMC Michael Sing 27th January 1919, Victory I 1st July 1919. Discharged shore on reduction of the Royal Navy 24th December 1919. Clack married in Paddington in 1922, the 1939 Register records he is a Chauffeur and Mechanic residing at 23 Polygon Mews South, Paddington, he died in Paddington in 1971.

First time on the market, unusual rate on 1914/15 Star.

GVF & better £70 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Petty Officer 1st Class John Fitzgerald, Royal Navy a former Caretaker born in Peckham, Surrey in 1868. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable, he served until 3rd October 1906 when discharged to pension. Disrated several times, he was not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having five breaks in “Very Good” Conduct. Joining Chatham Royal Fleet Reserve, he was mobilised 2nd August 1914 and served aboard the Armed Merchant Cruisers Palma, Ophir and Mikado. Joining Pembroke 31st December 1916, he was demobilised from there 14th February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

128122 J Fitzgerald PO 1 RN

With copy service record.

John Fitzgerald was born in Peckham, Surrey 10th August 1868, a Caretaker, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable 24th July 1884 as Boy 2nd Class. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Agincourt 10th August 1886 and Able Seaman aboard HMS Rover 20th October 1887. Advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Canada 25th August 1892, he was reduced to Able Seaman at Excellent 7th April 1893. Advanced to Leading Seaman at Excellent 24th June 1895, to Petty Officer 2nd Class aboard HMS Ramillies 25th November 1896 and to the 1st Class 2nd April 1897, he was reduced to Leading Seaman 16th October 1897. Advanced to Petty Officer 1st Class again 19th September 1899, he continued to serve ashore and afloat in this rate until discharged to pension from Pembroke 3rd October 1906. Not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal as five breaks in “Very Good” Conduct recorded. Joining Chatham Royal Fleet Reserve, he was mobilised 2nd August 1914 and joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Palma. He subsequently joined Pembroke 10th February 1915, Armed Merchant Cruiser Ophir 2nd March 1915, Pembroke I 14th May 1916, Armed Merchant Cruiser Mikado 10th June 1916, Pembroke I 31st December 1916 from where he was demobilised 14th February 1919.

First time on the market.

EF £70 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Belfast, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII, Meritorious Service Medal GV Immediate to Company Sergeant Major Charles Blackburn, Royal Engineers a Musician born in Bloomsbury, London in 1868. Attesting 4th October 1883 as a Boy he was appointed Trumpeter in March 1884 and Driver in August 1886. Serving in the Bechuanaland 1884-85, he qualified as an Army Signaller (Telegraph Field Lines) in June 1891. Serving on Mounted Duties from 1898, he served in South Africa from October 1899 with 1st Division Telegraph Battalion. Invalided home with debility and Enteric Feverin May 1901, he returned to South Africa in December 1901 and finally left for England in October 1902. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1907, he was permitted to extend his service beyond 21 years. Serving at Home as an instructor during the First World War, he was sent to North Russia in 1918 during the Allied intervention in that country’s Civil War. Awarded the MSM for his services with the Archangel Command he was finally discharged in February 1920 after almost 37 years service.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Belfast

17625 TQM SJT C Blackburn RE

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

17625 T Qr Mr SERJT H Blackburn RE

British War and Victory Medals

17625 WO CL 2 H Blackburn RE

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

17625 C S MJR H Blackburn RE

Meritorious Service Medal GV Immediate

17625 C S MJR H Blackburn RE

With details extracted from on line records and original ID tag.

Charles Blackburn was born in Bloomsbury, London, a 15 year 3 month old Musician, he attested for the Royal Engineers at Aldershot 4th October 1883 as a Boy. Appointed Trumpeter 31st March 1884 and Driver 15th August 1886, he was appointed Lance Corporal 18th August 1886. Seving in Bechuanaland, South Africa 25th November 1885 to 23rd December 1885, appointed 2nd Corporal 22nd May 1888, promoted Corporal 26th September 1890, he qualified as an Army Signaller (Telegraph Field Line) 5th June 1891. Promoted Sergeant 23rd September 1893, he served in South Africa from 21st October 1899 to 18th May 1901 with 1st Division Telegraph Battalion. Promoted to Troop Quartermaster Sergeant 1st April 1900, having been employed on Mounted Duties, he was returned to England 18th May 1901 suffering from Debility and Enteric Fever. 

On recovery Blackburn left for South Africa 30th December 1901 and re-joined his unit resuming Mounted Duties, returning to England 28th October 1902. Promoted Company Sergeant Major 4th October 1904, appointed as Permanent Staff 2nd West Yorkshire RE Volunteers 27th July 1904, to Northern Command RE 6th December 1912, awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 242 of 1907. Permitted to remain in the Army beyond 21 years service he was promoted acing Warrant Officer Class 1 1st March 1915 and remained in the UK during the First World War as an Instructor. Sent to North Russia, embarking at Newcastle 16th June 1918 as part of the allied intervention in the Russian Civil War, he embarked in North Russia for England 25th July 1919.

The North Russian intervention, also known as the Archangel Campaign was part of the Allied intervention in Russia after the October Revolution. The intervention brought about the involvement of foreign troops in the Russian Civil War on the side of the White Movement. While the movement was ultimately defeated, the Allied forces fought notable ending defensive actions against the Bolsheviks in the battles of Bolshie Ozerki, allowing them to withdraw from Russia in good order. The campaign lasted from 1918, during the final months of World War I to 1920.

Awarded the Meritorious Service Medal London Gazette 12th August 1919 page 10319 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with British Forces in North Russia (Archangel Command). Discharged 2nd February 1920 after almost 37 years service. Home address recorded as 89 Newport Road, Charlton, Manchester.

Scarce combination of awards to the Royal Engineers.

First time on the market.

Average GVF £950 SOLD


British War and Victory Medals, India General service Medal (1908) GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 to Private Leslie Dowse, Hertfordshire Yeomanry a Clerk born in Abbot’s Langley, Hertfordshire in 1898. Enlisting 10th October 1915, he arrived in Mesopotamia 6th November 1916. Evacuated to India 23rd July 1917 aboard a Hospital Ship with sickness, on recovery he was transferred to the 21st Lancers. Sent as a re-enforcement to 22 Machine Gun Squadron for operations in Afghanistan in 1919, he returned to the UK in November 1919 and was demobilized. The India General Service Medal and clasp one of only 16 named to the Regiment.

British War and Victory Medals

2620 Pte L Dowse Herts Yeo

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

105858 Pte L Dowse Herts Yeo

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, service papers.

Leslie Dowse was born in Abbots Langley, Hertfordshire in 1898, a Clerk, residing at 14 Marling Square Abbots Langley, he attested for the Hertfordshire Yeomanry 10th October 1915. Arriving at Basra, Mesopotamia 6th November 1916, he was in Hospital on two occasions with enteritis and was invalided to India aboard the Hospital Ship Erinpura 23rd July 1917. Compulsory transferred to the 21st Lancers 22nd May 1919, he was posted as a re-enforcement to 22 Machine Gun Squadron 5th July 1919 serving in the Third Afghan War of 1919. Embarked at Bombay 18th October 1919 for England, he was demobilised 5th November 1919.

Appears on the Afghanistan NWF Medal roll as Hertfordshire Yeomanry attached 21st Lancers attached 22 Machine Gun Squadron, his IGS and clasp being one of only 16 named to the Hertfordshire Yeomanry. Taming The Tiger, The Story of the India General Service Medal 1908-35 by Richard G M L Stiles, Savannah, 2012 refers.

GVF & better £395 SOLD


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £155 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


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