India General Service Medal 1895 clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Warrant Officer Class II (Company Sergeant Major) John Hall, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment from Southwell, Nottingham born in 1870. Attesting for the Derbyshire Regiment in May 1887 he served with the 2nd Battalion in India, the Battalion taking part in the assault on the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897 and was later the Battalion’s Band Sergeant. Discharged in May 1908, he re-enlisted on the outbreak of War and served with the 11th Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment in France from 27th August 1915 and later Italy. Discharged to the Reserve in February 1919 he was employed by the Customs and Excise service in London, he died in Poplar, London in January 1931 after a long illness aged 61 years.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

1924 Lce Corpl J Hall 2nd Bn Derby Regt

1914/15 Star

7250 C S MJR J Hall Notts & Derby R

British War and Victory Medals

7250 WO CL 2 J Hall Notts & Derby R

With copy obituary from The Regimental Annual, research listed here from on line sources.

The IGS (1895) mounted as originally worn.

John Hall was born in Southwell, Nottinghamshire in 1870, he attested for the Derbyshire Regiment 26th May 1887 and served with the 2nd Battalion in India taking part in the Frontier operations of 1897-98, the Battalion taking part in the famous storming of the Dargai Heights 20th October 1897. Later serving as the Battalion’s Band Sergeant, he retired from the Army with that rank 25th May 1908 (no Long Service & Good Conduct Medal awarded). The 1911 census records he is a 41 year old Army Pensioner and Railway Constable residing with his wife Mary and daughter at 8 Gillies Street, Kentish Town, St Pancras, London. Re-enlisting into his old Regiment on the outbreak of war he served as Company Sergeant Major with the 11th Battalion in France from 27th August 1915. In November 1917 the 11th Battalion transferred to Italy and returned to France in September 1918 ending the War near Landrecies, France. Discharged to Class Z Army Reserve 27th February 1919, his obituary records he was invalided from the service through effects of the Great War. Employed by the Customs and Excise Department in London until December 1930, he had to leave his employment due to ill health and died in Poplar, London 4th January 1931.

GVF to EF £350 Reserved 


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free Stare, South Africa 1902, 1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Private (Lance Corporal) William Harold Hookey, Royal Army Medical Corps born in Shanklin, Isle of Wight in 1882. Serving with 11 General Hospital in South Africa he was discharged to the Reserve prior to the outbreak of the First World War and returned to Shanklin where he was a Gas Stoker for the Shanklin Gas Company. Mobilized on the outbreak of hostilities he served in France from 24th August 1914 with No 12 General Hospital. Demobilized in 1919 he returned to the Isle of Wight and died there in 1968 aged 86 years.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902

15310 Pte W Hookey RAMC

1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals

15310 Pte W H Hookey RAMC

With copy Medal Index Card and QSA Medal roll entries by email, research extracted from on line sources. Original ribbons.

William Harold Hookey was born in Shanklin, Isle of Wight in 1882, the 1901 census records he is a Private soldier serving at the RAMC Depot at Aldershot and later served in South Africa with No 11 General Hospital, Medal roll states “To England”. Discharged to the Reserve, the 1911 census records he is a 29 year old Gas Stoker at the Shanklin Gas Works residing with his wife Frances, son and daughter at 1 Grove Ground Cottages, Hyde Road, Shanklin. Mobilized on the outbreak of hostilities he served in France with No 12 General Hospital from 24th August 1914. Returning to the Isle of Wight on demobilization he died there in 1968 aged 86 years.

First time on the market.

VF £245 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Commissioned Chief Officer Griffith Thomas Cadwallader, HM Coast Guard late Royal Navy born in Tenby, Pembroke, Wales in March 1877. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in April 1892, by April 1906 he had been promoted to Chief Petty Officer. Promoted to Second Mate (Warrant Officer Class 2) in December 1908 he transferred to HM Coast Guard. Appointed to HM Coast Guard Cruiser Watchfull 1st September 1914, he was promoted to Senior Mate (Warrant Officer Class 1) the same day. Serving throughout the First World War aboard this ship he was Court Martialled in June 1919 for drunkenness on board, rendering him unfit to perform his duties.  Dismissed his ship, he lost one year’s seniority and received a severe reprimand. He married in Lambeth, London in 1919. Retiring in December 1921 with the rank of Commissioned Chief Officer (Sub Lieutenant), he eventually returned to Tenby from London and died there in 1963 aged 86 years.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

SENR MTE G T Cadwallader RN

With copy Rating’s service record and details extracted from the Navy List etc. The Trio mounted as originally worn.

Griffith Thomas Cadwallader was born in Tenby, Pembroke, Wales 3rd March 1877, a school boy he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 5th April 1892. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Barham 3rd March 1895 and Able Seaman aboard the same ship 1st May 1896. Advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Hazard 7th September 1898, Petty Officer of the 2nd Class 2nd April 1899 and of the 1st Class 1st April 1900 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Chief Petty Officer aboard HMS Halcyon 1st March 1906, promoted to Second Mate (Warrant Officer Class 2) 14th December 1908 he transferred to HM Coast Guard. Promoted Senior Mate (Warrant Officer Class 1) and appointed to HM Coast Guard Cruiser Watchfull, a position he held until his Court Martial in 1919.

“Sentenced by Court Martial held on 12th June 1919, to forfeit 12 months seniority, to be dismissed his ship and to be severely reprimanded. He did drink intoxicating liquor to such excess to produce illness by which he was unfit for the discharge of his duties between 16th and 27th May 1919”.

He married in Lambeth, London in 1919 and retired from HM Coast Guard 30th December 1921 with the rank of Commissioned Chief Officer (Sub Lieutenant). From The Western Telegraph Newspaper 25th April 1963

“The death occurred at Temple House, Lower Frog Street, Tenby on Saturday of Mr Griffith Thomas Cadwallader. Mr Cadwallader who was 86, had served a number of years in the Royal Navy and had retired with commissioned rank. He had lived in Tenby for some years and leaves two sisters at Temple House. Mr Cadwallader is being cremated at Swansea Crematorium”.

A rare rank to the Royal Navy, the Navy List of 1914 lists 8 men with the rank of Senior Mate and the Navy List of 1918 lists 7.

GVF £295 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Warrant Officer Class 2 (Company Sergeant Major) Edward Francis Osborne, 11th Battalion London Regiment (Finsbury Rifles) a former Drapery Messenger originally from St Likes. London born in 1895. Serving in Gallipoli from 10th August 1915, Egypt from December 1915 to March 1916 and  Palestine from March 1916 to June 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Orpington, Kent employed as a Gravel Pit Watchman, he died in Bromley in 1975 aged 79 years.

1914/15 Star

2145 Cpl E F Osborne 11-Lond R

British War & Victory Medals

2145 WO CL 2 E F Osborne 11-Lond R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal rolls, census entry, birth and death register entry, 1939 Registration entry.

Edward Francis Osborne was born in St Luke’s, London 1st October 1895, educated at Haggerston School, London the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Draper’s Messenger residing at 15 Coombs Street, Islington, North London with his father Edward Charles Osborne a Copper Plate Engraver, mother Elizabeth Sarah and sister. Serving with the 11th Battalion London Regiment (Finsbury Rifles) in Gallipoli from 10th August 1915 to 15th December 1915, Egypt from 18th December 1915 to 18th March 1916 and Palestine from 19th March 1916 to 4th June 1919. The 1939 Register records he is residing at 10 Chelsfield Road, Orpington Kent with his wife and son, employed as a Gravel Pit Watchman. Mr Osborne died in Bromley in 1975 aged 79 years.

Nice Trio to a Finsbury Rifles Company Sergeant Major.

EF £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Sergeant Harry Dixon 10th (1st Hull Pals) or Hull Commercial Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment a former Clerk for Hull Corporation born in Newcastle on Tyne  born in 1891. First serving in Egypt from 22nd December 1915, the Battalion arrived in France in March 1916 and were in Reserve during the attack on Serre, Somme sector 1st July 1916. In Reserve in the attack on Serre on 13th November 1916, they were forced to withdraw after counter attacks. and later suffered heavy casualties in the assault on Oppy Wood, Arras sector 3rd May 1917. Discharged to a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1917, he later served with 4th Battalion Essex Regiment but saw no further active service and was discharged in October 1918. Returning to Hull and his former occupation,  he died in Scunthorpe in 1957 aged 66 years.

1914/15 Star

10-247 Pte H Dixon E York R

British War & Victory Medals

10-247 A SJT H Dixon E York R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal rolls, census entry, birth and death register entry etc.

Original silk ribbons and Identity Disc.

Harry Dixon was born in Newcastle on Tyne 13th December 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Clerk with Hull Corporation residing with his father John Henry Dixon a Tramway Inspector for Hull Corporation, mother Elizabeth and one brother at 134 Westcott Street, Hull. Enlisting at Hull he joined the 10th (1st Hull Pals) or Hull Commercial Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment  and fist served in Egypt from 22nd December 1915. The 10th were transferred to France and landed on 7th March 1916 as part of 92nd Brigade, 31st Division. In Reserve during the attack on Serre, Somme sector 1st July 1916, they were during the attack on the town on  13th November when they were forced to retire due to heavy counter attacks, later to suffer heavy casualties during the attack on Oppy Wood, Arras sector 3rd May 1917.  Discharged to a commission in the East Yorkshire Regiment 24th September 1917 he later served with 4th Battalion Essex Regiment but saw no more active service as an officer. Discharged 17th October 1918 he returned to Hull and his former employment residing at 14 Seafield Avenue Hull with his wife Flora. He died in Scunthorpe in 1957 aged 66 years.

EF £125 Reserved


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medal with Silver War Badge to Private Alfred Stonham, Labour Corps late 1/5th (Cinque Ports) Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment a Builder’s Labourer born in Hastings in 1881. Enlisting in November 1914 he served in France from 12th November 1915 and later transferred to the Labour Corps. Discharged in April 1919 unfit for further Military service, the result of sickness contracted on active service. He died in Lyminge, Kent in 1931 aged 50 years.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

3090 Pte A Stonham R Suss R

Silver war Badge the reverse numbered

472918

With copy Medal Index Card and SWB roll and details from on line records. The Silver War Badge is the correct one for this soldier and is complete with pin and catch reverse. The 1914/15 Star Medal roll records service with the 1/5th (Cinque Ports) battalion.

Alfred Stonham was born in Hastings, Sussex, the 1911 census records he is a 30 year old Builder’s Labourer residing with his widowed mother Jane, two sisters and one brother at 24 Red Lake Terrace, Ore, Hastings. Attesting for the 1/5th (Cinque Ports) Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment 28th November 1914 he served in France from 12th November 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps he was discharged 27th April 1919 the result of sickness contracted on active service. Stonham died at Hill House, Lyminge, Kent on 17th March 1931, his occupation was Labourer and his home address 33 Radnor Street, Folkestone, Kent. Hill House appears to have been a Work House and Sanitorium.

New ribbons will be supplied at no extra cost.

GVF £125 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve to Able Seaman Frederick Gilbert, Royal Navy a former Labourer from West Ashling, Sussex. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at St Vincent in August 1899, he purchased his discharge in January 1906 and joined Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve. Recalled 2nd August 1914 he served aboard HMS Donegal 1914 to 1916 and was demobilized in February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

205591 F Gilbert AB RN

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve

205591 (PO.B.1646) F Gilbert AB RFR

With copy service record born in West Ashling, Sussex 2nd June 1883 a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at St Vincent 2nd August 1899. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Revenge 2nd June 1901 and Able Seaman at Firequeen 15th February 1904, he was aboard HMS King Edward VII when he purchased his discharge leaving from Victory Barracks 13th January 1906. Joining Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve he was mobilized 2nd August 1914. Joining an undecipherable ship 2nd August 1914 he subsequently joined HMS Donegal 7th October 1914, Victory I 28th March 1916, Vernon 21st July 1916 for duty in the Paravane Department and finally Victory I 1st January 1917 from where he was demobilized 26th February 1919.

GVF £135 Available


1914/15 Star to 2/Lieutenant Walter Gordon Cope, Yorkshire Regiment later Captain, Royal Air Force a former Warehouse man born in Islington, London in 1889. Working in Hong Kong from December 1912 to October 1914 he was also a member of the Hong Kong Volunteer Artillery. Returning to England and joined the Inns of Court Officer’s Training Corps and was commissioned into the Yorkshire Regiment 25th March 1915 serving in France with the 2nd Battalion from 12th August 1915. Transferring to the Royal Flying Corps in May 1916, he qualified as a pilot in August the same year and joined 42 Squadron in France 23rd August 1916, remaining with the Squadron until evacuated to the UK 19th January 1917 with a medical problem. In June 1918 he was a flying instructor with 103 Squadron at RAF Beaulieu in the New Forest, he was killed on 6th September 1918 aged 28 years in a mid air collision which also killed his pupil.

1914/15 Star

2 Lieut W G Cope York R

With copy Newspaper articles, copy photo of grave, copies from Flight Magazine, casualty details.

Walter Gordon Cope was born in Islington 21st August 1889, an only son he had two sisters. From December 1912 to October 1914 Walter worked as a Warehouseman for Lane Crawford and Company, Hong Kong where he also served with the Hong Kong Volunteer Artillery. On 16th October 1914 he boarded the SS Suwa Maru for passage to London, England. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Yorkshire Regiment 25th March 1915 he served in France with the 2nd Battalion from 12th August 1915. Transferring to the Royal Flying Corps 25th May 1916 he joined 3 Reserve Squadron and trained as a pilot gaining his Royal Aero Club Certificate 4th August 1916. On 23rd August 1916 he joined 42 Squadron flying two seater BE2c’s. On 25th September 1916 he survived a crash, due to engine failure,  shortly after take off for a bombing mission. Evacuated to the UK 19th January 1917 suffering from joint disease in his right elbow. By June 1918 he was based at RAF Beaulieu in the New Forest serving with 103 Squadron training pilots. He was killed in a crash following a mid air collision on 6th September 1918 along with his pupil Flight Cadet Edward Lydale Caldwell.

From The Hendon & Finchley Times 13th September 1918 page 8

“We regret to announce the death, which took place at Salisbury on Saturday morning of Captain Gordon Hope, RAF, the only son of County Councillor W C Cope and Mrs Cope of Carson House, Regents Park Road, Finchley. Captain Cope, who only returned from France a few weeks previously, was engaged in instruction, when a collision occurred in mid air and the aeroplane crashed to the ground, the young officer and his observer (Flight Cadet Caldwell) were both killed instantaneously. He was in business in Hong Kong when war broke out, returning immediately to England he joined the Inns of Court OTC. Receiving his commission in the Artillery  (sic) actually Yorkshire Regiment in December 1914. He had seen much service in France and some months ago was severely wounded. In the Spring of 1916 Captain Cope joined the Royal Flying Corps. In May 1918 he was married at All Saints Church Child’s Hill to Miss Doris L Shepheard, daughter of Mr J E Shepheard  of Westerman, West Heath Drive, Hampstead and his young widow is now left to mourn his loss. He was only 27 (sic) years of age. At the meeting of Finchley Education Committee on Monday the Chairman Mr W E Martin expressed his sympathy that Mr Cope had lost his only son in a flying accident. Captain Cope’s funeral took place at Marylebone Cemetery, East End Road, Finchley on Wednesday a wreath was, amongst others sent by the Commanding Officer No 14 Training Depot and another from the Warrant Officers, NCO’s and men.

NEF £145 SOLD


Victory Medal with GENUINE Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Lieutenant Colonel John Norman Taylor, CIE, OBE, Royal Engineers and Public Works Department India Irrigation Service. A Civil Engineer from Kenmare, County Kerry, Ireland born in 1869 he entered the Indian Irrigation Service in 1891 and served in the Miranzai Expedition the same year (IGS clasp Samana 1891). Employed on famine relief work in the Punjab in 1900 he received the Kaise-i-Hind Medal. Rising to Superintending Engineer of the Upper Jhelum Canal area in 1913 he was awarded the CIE in 1916 for his work as Officiating Superintending Engineer in the Punjab. Commissioned into the Royal Engineers he gained rapid promotion to Lieutenant Colonel first serving in France from 4th February 1917. Awarded the OBE for valuable services in Bushire, Persia in February 1920 he was also Mentioned in Despatches in February 1920 for valuable services in Persia from April 1918 to March 1919. Retiring in 1924 he died in 1945.

Victory Medal with GENUINE MID Oakleaf

Lt Col J N Taylor

With copy Who was Who’s entry, copy death certificate, copy Medal Index Card and details from the London Gazette etc.

Copy photographs (colour) of his grave and headstone which record his details, his wife Ethel Florence (died 10th December 1944) and two of his sons killed in action in the Second World War (details below).

John Norman Taylor was born in Kenmare, County Kerry, Ireland in 1869. He joined the India Irrigation Service as a Civil Engineer in 1891 and took part in the Miranzai Expedition of 1891 (IGS Medal clasp Samana 1891). Appointed Executive Engineer in 1905 and Under Secretary to the Government, Punjab Irrigation Branch 1910 to 1913. Appointed Superintending Engineer, Irrigation Branch, Public Works Department Upper Jhelum Canal 1913. Served as part of the famine relief force in the Punjab in 1900 (Kaiser-I-Hind Medal). Awarded CIE London Gazette 1st January 1916 page 84 for his services was Officiating Engineer, Public Works Department, Irrigation Branch, Upper Jhelum Canal, Punjab. Commissioned into the Royal Engineers as Lieutenant, he first served in France from 4th February 1917. Awarded OBE London Gazette 3rd February 1920 “On the recommendation of the Government of India in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with Military operations in Bushire, Persia to date 3rd June 1919”. Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 3rd February 1920 page 1386 as Lt Colonel, Royal Engineers “For valuable services rendered with the Bushire Force in Persia during the period 1st April 1918 to 31st March 1919” (General Service Medal clasp S Persia) . Demobilised in July 1919 he was permitted to retain the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Appointed Chief Engineer and Secretary of the Local Administration, Assam 1922-24, retired 1924 and died 26th January 1945. Two of his three sons were killed in the Second World War – Squadron Leader John Cornelius Taylor, 50 Squadron RAF 29th September 1940 aged 29 years and Flying Officer (Pilot) Brian Anthony Taylor, 144 Squadron RAF 23rd June 1940.

GVF £150 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, Meritorious Service Medal GV to Corporal Arthur Gordon Fieldwick, Army Cyclist Corps a Plumber’s Mate from Eastbourne, Sussex born in 1892. Serving in France from 26th July 1915 with 18th (Eastern) Division Cyclist Company, the Division tanking part in the battles of The Somme and Third Battle of Ypres. He later served with XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion in 1918 and was awarded the MSM in June 1919. Returning to Eastbourne to live and work, he died there in 1957 aged 65 years.

1914/15 Star

779 L Cpl A G Fieldwick A Cyc Corps

British War & Victory Medals

779 Cpl A G Fieldwick A Cyc Corps

Meritorious Service Medal GV Immediate

779 Cpl A G Fieldwick ACC

With copy Medal Index Card, MSM award Card, all Medal roll entries and census etc details listed here.

Arthur Gordon Fieldwick was born in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1892, the 1911 census records he is a 19 year old Plumber’s Mate residing at 11 Selwyn Road, Eastbourne with his widowed mother Eliza and four sisters. Serving in France with 18th (Eastern) Division Cyclist Company from 26th July 1915, the Division fought on the Somme in 1916 including the Battle of Albert, in which the Division captured its objectives near Montauban,  battle of Bazentin Ridge, in which the Division captured Trones Wood, battles of Delville Wood,  Thiepval Ridge and Ancre Heights in which the Division played a part in the capture of the Schwaben Redoubt and in the capture of Regina Trench.

In 1917 the Division took part in the operations on the Ancre (notably Miraumont and the capture of Irles), the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, Third battle of the Scarpe in the Arras offensive, battles of Pilkem Ridge and Langemarck, first and second battles of Passchendaele during the Third battle of Ypres. Transferring in 1918 to XIII Corps Cyclist Battalion he was awarded the MSM London Gazette 30th May 1919 page 6893 ‘For valuable services rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders’.

Discharged to Class ‘Z’ Army Reserve 10th September 1919 he returned to Eastbourne and died there in 1957 aged 65 years.

GVF & better £375 SOLD

 


1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals, General Service Medal GV clasp IRAQ to Warrant Officer 1st Class Arthur L Jennings, Royal Army Ordnance Corps from Southampton. Serving in France from 15th August 1914 he remained in France for the entire War. Serving during the operations in IRAQ post War he was discharged in August 1922 and in 1923 was residing in Foundry Lane, Southampton.

1914 Star

S-4751 2.Cpl A L Jennings AOC

British War & Victory Medals

S-4751 A SJT A L Jennings AOC

General Service Medal GV clasp IRAQ

S-4751 A WOCL 1 A L Jennings RAOC

With copy Medal Index Card, all Medal roll entries.

Arthur L Jennings married in Southampton in 1912, he served in France from 15th August 1914 until the Armistice. Post War he served in IRAQ as an acting Warrant Officer 1st Class and was discharged 13th August 1922. In 1923 when his Medals were sent to him he was residing at 181 Foundry Road, Southampton.

GVF & better £225 Available