British War Medal, Victory Medal, Mercantile Marine War Medal to Mr Henry James Bean, Mate and later Master Mariner, Merchant Navy and Merchant Fleet Auxiliary. Born in Lambeth, London in 1877, he was serving aboard the Admiralty Tug Musquash during the First World War. On 6th December 1917 in Halifax Harbour a collision took place between French and Norwegian ships resulting in the French Steamer bursting into flames. A tremendous explosion took place which set on fire the Tug Musquash which had a gun and ammunition on board, an explosion could occur at any moment. Two ratings from HMS Highflyer boarded the burning adrift tug and fixed tow lines, they threw overboard the ammunition and forced open doors to allow the Pumping Lighter Lee to bring her hoses to bear and extinguish the fire. Both ratings were awarded the Albert Medal for saving life at sea. Mr Bean continued to serve in the Merchant Navy post War and resided in Whitstable, Kent. In 1970 he moved to Sunderland and died there two years later.

British War and Victory Medals

Mte H J Bean MFA

Mercantile Marine War Medal

Henry Bean

With copy Mercantile Marine Medal card, 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry, copies from the London Gazette and other research taken from on line records.

Henry James Bean was born in Lambeth, London 28th September 1878 (his Mercantile Marine Medal Card erroneously records his year of birth as 1876). On the outbreak of War Mr Bean was serving as a Mate in the Merchant Navy, his 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry records he was serving aboard the Admiralty Tug Musquash.

From : The London Gazette 26th March 1918 pages 3754 to 3755

The King has been graciously pleased to approve the award of the Albert Medal for gallantry in saving life at sea to

Leading Seaman Thomas N Davis ON J.18334 (Devonport) and

Able Seaman Robert Stones ON J.29998 (Devonport)

“On 6th December 1917, the French Steamer Mont Blanc, and the Norwegian Steamer Imo were in collision on Halifax Harbour. Fire broke out in the Mont Blanc immediately after the collision and the flames very quickly rose to a height of over 100 feet. The crew abandoned their ship and pulled to the shore. A few minutes later a tremendous explosion took place and the Tug Musquash was seen to be on fire forward. The fire was increasing and there appeared to be a great danger of her getting adrift, and being carried down onto another vessel. As the Musquash had a gun and ammunition on board there was danger of a further explosion and consequent loss of life. The Captain of HMS Highflyer hailed a private tug and asked her to take the Musquash in tow, but as they were unwilling to board the Musquash to get her in tow, the tug was brought alongside Highflyer.

Leading Seaman Davis and Able Seaman Stones immediately volunteered, and having been transferred by the tug to the burning Musquash, which by this time had broken adrift, they secured a line from her stern, by means of which she was towed into midstream. The line then parted, Davis and Stones passed another line from Musquash to the Pumping Lighter Lee which had now arrived. They then both went forward to the burning part, and succeeded in getting to the ammunition, which by this time was badly scorched, pulled it away from the flames and threw it overboard. They then broke open the door of the galley which was on fire inside to enable the Lee to ply her hoses into it. They repeated the same thing with the cabin. By their work they made it possible to subdue the fire and save further damage and loss of life. At any moment whilst they were on board Musquash the ammunition might have exploded”.

Henry James Bean continued to serve in the Merchant Navy post War, the 1939 Register records he is residing in Whitstable, Kent, his home address 65 Albert Street, Whitstable. The Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 19th November 1949 page 2 records the death of Mr Bean in hospital in Sunderland aged 72 years. A former Master Mariner who had travelled the world extensively, had moved to Sunderland two years previously and was residing in Perth Road.

GVF & better £225 SOLD


Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp, Kings South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War and Victory Medals, France Third Republic Medal of the Society of Aid to Military Wounded in Silver to Baroness Annie Elizabeth Bentinck wife of the 14th Baron Bentinck. Born Annie Elizabeth Burnett –  Ramsay, daughter of an Army officer she served as a civilian Nursing Sister at the Portland Hospital, Bloemfontein and at No 10 General Hospital, Norvals Pont and Cape Town. The KSA Medal is a self award to which she is not entitled. She married the 14th Baron in 1904, a serving Lt Colonel in the Rifle Brigade. Serving with the British Committee of the French Red Cross in France in 1914 and 1917, she was also involved in various committees and fund raising events during the war, she died in January 1934.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

Miss A Burnett – Ramsay Nursing Sister

King’s South  Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

Nursing Sister A Burnett Ramsay

British War and Victory Medals

Baroness A E Bentinck

France Third Republic Silver Medal of the Society of Aid to Military Wounded

Unnamed as issued

The group mounted as originally worn.

The KSA Medal very neatly re-named in upright engraved naming, the Baroness not entitled to this medal, an example of a self award.

With research listed here from on line sources and copy obituary from The Deeside Courier and Advertiser 20th January 1934 page 5.

Annie Elizabeth Burnett – Ramsay was the daughter of Lt Colonel William Burnett – Ramsay, Rifle Brigade and his wife Ann. Serving as a Civilian Nursing Sister in the Boer War, she appears on the QSA Medal roll TNA WO100/229 page 64 serving with the Portland Hospital, Bloemfontein and No 10 General Hospital Norvals Pont and Cape Town, the roll dated Norvals Pont 15th July 1901. On 1st March 1904 she married Lt Colonel Walter Guy Bentinck, DSO, Rifle Brigade and 14th Baron Bentinck who was at the time Resident Magistrate at Wakkerstroom, Transvaal, he had served with distinction in the Boer War awarded DSO, wounded and mentioned in despatches, he was later to be awarded the CMG and CBE.

Serving in France with the British Committee of the French Red Cross from November 1914 to January 1915 (not entitled to 1914 Star), and again from May 1917 to July 1917. Prominent in various committees and fund raising events during the war, they had one son. Baroness Bentinck died 19th January 1934, he husband died in 1957.

GVF & better £750 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Captain Harry Noel Dawe, Royal Army Medical Corps and Special List late 18th (1st Public Schools) Battalion Royal Fusiliers born in Chester in 1881. Initially working as a Dental Mechanic (Technician) he studied to be a Dental Surgeon at Glasgow University and graduated LDS, RFPS in 1912. On the outbreak of War he was residing and practicing in Ilfracome, Devon and enlisted as a Private soldier, serving in France from 15th November 1915. Commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps in August 1916, he remained in France and was Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig, published in the London Gazette in July 1919. Residing and practicing in Market Drayton, Shropshire post War he remained there and died in Shrewsbury in 1971 aged 90 years.

1914/15 Star

3758 Pte H N Dawe R Fus

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Capt H N Dawe

With research details extracted from on line sources.

Harry Noel Dawe was born on Christmas day 1881 in Chester, the son of The Reverend William Dawe and his wife Emma. The 1901 census records he is a 19 year old Dental Mechanic (Now Technician) residing as a boarder at 47 Clarendon Road, Leeds. Finally securing a place to train as a Dental Surgeon at Glasgow University he graduated LDS, RFPS in 1912, registering as a Dental Surgeon 8th February 1913. On the outbreak of the First World War he was residing at 1 Bath Place, Ilfracombe, Devon and practicing there. Enlisting as a Private soldier into the 18th (1st Public Schools) Battalion Royal Fusiliers he served in France from 15th November 1915. Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps 23rd August 1916, promoted Captain 22nd August 1917 onto the Special List (Dental Surgeon). He married Mabel Alice Fife at St Matthews Church, Bayswater, London 8th February 1917 whilst on leave. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig for distinguished services in France London Gazette 10th July 1919 page 8755. Residing at 101 The Terrace, Market Drayton, Shropshire, he practiced there for many years and died in Shrewsbury in 1971 aged 90 years.

Unusual instance of a Dental Surgeon enlisting as a Private soldier in an Infantry Regiment.

First time on the market.

NEF £195 Reserved


1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to warrant Officer Class 1 John Rowland Morfitt, Royal Army Medical Corps born in Hull in 1884. Enlisting in London 16th April 1902, he was a qualified Pharmacy Dispenser and Clerk, he served in France from 17th August 1914 and in Egypt from 11th December 1915. Rising rapidly through the ranks he was promoted Warrant Officer Class 1 in June 1918 from Staff Sergeant and was awarded the MSM in June 1919 for his distinguished services in Egypt. Discharged at his own request 22nd April 1920. He died in Bradford, Yorkshire in 1935.

1914 Star

17553 L SJT J R Morfitt RAMC

British War and Victory Medals

17553 T WO CL 1 J R Morfitt RAMC

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

17553 T WO CL 1 J R Morfitt RAMC

With details extracted from his on line service record.

John Rowland Morfitt was born in Hull in 1884, unemployed he attested for the RAMC in London16th April 1902. Appointed Lance Corporal 1st October 1908, appointed lance Sergeant 11th August 1914 (Clerk) he had also qualified as a Pharmacy Dispenser 15th October 1912. Promoted Sergeant 20th August 1914, Staff Sergeant 16th September 1915 and Temporary Warrant Officer Class 1 22nd June 1918, later confirmed in this rank. Serving in France from 17th August 1914 to 10th November 1915 with GHQ RAMC, he embarked for service in Egypt returning home 27th February 1920. Awarded the Meritorious Service Medal London Gazette 3rd June 1919 for services in Egypt, he was discharged at his own request 22nd April 1920. He died in Bradford, Yorkshire in 1935.

NEF £175 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £250 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Albert Thomas, Labour Corps late Army Service Corps and Volunteer Service Company Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry a printer from Helston, Cornwall. A serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion DCLI he volunteered for service in South Africa in April 1900 and returned home in December 1900. In hospital at Wynberg from September to October 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, discharged in December 1900. In 1911 he was a General Labourer residing in Godolphin Road, Helston and on the outbreak of war volunteered to serve in the Army Service Corps arriving in France 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps, he served with 17th Company and was discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

6401 Corpl A Thomas 2 D of C Lt Infy

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

SS-14190 Pte A Thomas ASC

With details extracted from his on line Boer War service record, Medal Index Card and Medal rolls.

Albert Thomas was born in Helston, Cornwall in 1873, a Printer and serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he volunteered to serve in South Africa at Helston on 21st April 1900 with the Volunteer Service Company, which joined the 2nd Battalion DCLI in South Africa. Admitted to Hospital at Wynberg 24th September 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, he made a good recovery and was discharged 20th October 1900. Leaving South Africa 9th November 1900 he was discharged at his own request at home 12th December 1900. The 1911 census records he is a 37 year old General Labourer residing with his wife Ada and three children in Godolphin Road, Helston. Attesting for the Army Service Corps on the outbreak of War he served in France from 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps he served with 17th Company until discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

GVF £275 Available


Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Stoker Petty Officer John Foott, Royal Navy a former Agricultural Labourer born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland in June 1885. Entering the Royal Navy in July 1903 as Stoker 2nd Class, his six breaks in “Very Good” conduct prevented him from receiving the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. Serving aboard HMS Suffolk 1914 to 1916 and HMS Blake 1917 to 1919 he was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer in October 1918 and discharged in September 1922.

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914

304460 J Foott Sto 1 CL HMS Fox

1914/15 Star

304460 J Foott Sto 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

304460 J Foott SPO RN

With copy service record and Medal roll entries.

John Foott was born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland 24th June 1885 and entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Vivid 10th July 1903. His character in 1905 was assessed as “Fair” and the following year as “Indifferent”, with two periods in cells amounting to 21 days, his character remained up and down with four further assessments below “Very Good”. Rated Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Cornwall 1st July 1906, he served aboard HMS Fox from 1st June 1910 to 31st December 1910. Advanced to Leading Stoker 21st May 1914 aboard HMS Indus, he was reduced to Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Suffolk 19th October 1915. Advanced to Leading Stoker for the second time aboard HMS Suffolk 14th August 1916, he joined HMS Blake 1st March 1917 and was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer 1st October 1918. Discharged Shore 19th September 1922 from Vivid II with reduced pension.

GVF £250 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Nursing Sister Frances Florence Tarleton, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service. Born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire in 1881 the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton, she trained as a Nurse for six years as a at Edinburgh Hospital for Children and St Georges Hospital London. Appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910, she served at the Royal Naval Hospitals Haslar, Plymouth, Chatham, Queensferry, Malta and aboard the Hospital Ships Carrisbroke Castle and Rewa, the latter taking casualties from the Gallipoli invasion beaches and later France. Miss Tarleton left QARNNS in June 1921 unfit for further service having undergone an appendicectomy and suffering from debility.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

N Sister F F Tarleton QARNNS

With folder of research including copy service papers, copies from her pension application folder etc. With A Scottish Territorial Red Cross Brigade Badge complete with pin and catch reverse.

Frances Florence Tarleton was born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire, Scotland 29th December 1881, the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton and his wife Helen, the 1891 census records the family are residing in Edinburgh, Frances one of five daughters. Training as a Nurse at the Edinburgh Hospital for Children for three years and St George’s Hospital, London for three years she was appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910 and appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar. She was subsequently appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th August 1911, Hospital Ship Carrisbroke Castle 3rd August 1914, Hospital Ship Rewa 28th August 1914, Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th June 1915, Royal Naval Hospital Chatham as Sister in Charge 3rd July 1915 reverting to Nursing Sister 29th February 1916, Royal Naval Hospital Malta 12th August 1916, Queensferry Naval Hospital 15th July 1920 and finally Royal Naval Hospital Plymouth 15th October 1920 from where she was discharged 2nd June 1921. In 1920 Miss Tarleton was admitted to hospital for an appendicectomy, she was also suffering from debility which made her unfit for further service, there is much correspondence concerning this in her pension file.

The Hospital Ship Rawa began her duties on 29th January 1915 and left Gallipoli with her last load of patients on 29th April 1915 bound for England. During this period 7,424 patients were taken on board of whom 3,647 were discharged to the Advanced Base, 3,628 were taken by the ship to Hospitals at Malta, Alexandria and Plymouth, 149 patients died on board.

A rare 1914/15 Star Trio to QARNNS.

GVF £695 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medal, Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve to Able Seaman Frederick Gilbert, Royal Navy a former Labourer from West Ashling, Sussex. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class at St Vincent in August 1899, he purchased his discharge in January 1906 and joined Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve. Recalled 2nd August 1914 he served aboard HMS Donegal 1914 to 1916 and was demobilized in February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

205591 F Gilbert AB RN

Long Service & Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Fleet Reserve

205591 (PO.B.1646) F Gilbert AB RFR

With copy service record born in West Ashling, Sussex 2nd June 1883 a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy at St Vincent 2nd August 1899. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Revenge 2nd June 1901 and Able Seaman at Firequeen 15th February 1904, he was aboard HMS King Edward VII when he purchased his discharge leaving from Victory Barracks 13th January 1906. Joining Portsmouth Royal Fleet Reserve he was mobilized 2nd August 1914. Joining an undecipherable ship 2nd August 1914 he subsequently joined HMS Donegal 7th October 1914, Victory I 28th March 1916, Vernon 21st July 1916 for duty in the Paravane Department and finally Victory I 1st January 1917 from where he was demobilized 26th February 1919.

GVF £120 SOLD