Groups with First World War Medals


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Belfast, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII, Meritorious Service Medal GV Immediate to Company Sergeant Major Charles Blackburn, Royal Engineers a Musician born in Bloomsbury, London in 1868. Attesting 4th October 1883 as a Boy he was appointed Trumpeter in March 1884 and Driver in August 1886. Serving in the Bechuanaland 1884-85, he qualified as an Army Signaller (Telegraph Field Lines) in June 1891. Serving on Mounted Duties from 1898, he served in South Africa from October 1899 with 1st Division Telegraph Battalion. Invalided home with debility and Enteric Feverin May 1901, he returned to South Africa in December 1901 and finally left for England in October 1902. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1907, he was permitted to extend his service beyond 21 years. Serving at Home as an instructor during the First World War, he was sent to North Russia in 1918 during the Allied intervention in that country’s Civil War. Awarded the MSM for his services with the Archangel Command he was finally discharged in February 1920 after almost 37 years service.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Belfast

17625 TQM SJT C Blackburn RE

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

17625 T Qr Mr SERJT H Blackburn RE

British War and Victory Medals

17625 WO CL 2 H Blackburn RE

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

17625 C S MJR H Blackburn RE

Meritorious Service Medal GV Immediate

17625 C S MJR H Blackburn RE

With details extracted from on line records and original ID tag.

Charles Blackburn was born in Bloomsbury, London, a 15 year 3 month old Musician, he attested for the Royal Engineers at Aldershot 4th October 1883 as a Boy. Appointed Trumpeter 31st March 1884 and Driver 15th August 1886, he was appointed Lance Corporal 18th August 1886. Seving in Bechuanaland, South Africa 25th November 1885 to 23rd December 1885, appointed 2nd Corporal 22nd May 1888, promoted Corporal 26th September 1890, he qualified as an Army Signaller (Telegraph Field Line) 5th June 1891. Promoted Sergeant 23rd September 1893, he served in South Africa from 21st October 1899 to 18th May 1901 with 1st Division Telegraph Battalion. Promoted to Troop Quartermaster Sergeant 1st April 1900, having been employed on Mounted Duties, he was returned to England 18th May 1901 suffering from Debility and Enteric Fever. 

On recovery Blackburn left for South Africa 30th December 1901 and re-joined his unit resuming Mounted Duties, returning to England 28th October 1902. Promoted Company Sergeant Major 4th October 1904, appointed as Permanent Staff 2nd West Yorkshire RE Volunteers 27th July 1904, to Northern Command RE 6th December 1912, awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 242 of 1907. Permitted to remain in the Army beyond 21 years service he was promoted acing Warrant Officer Class 1 1st March 1915 and remained in the UK during the First World War as an Instructor. Sent to North Russia, embarking at Newcastle 16th June 1918 as part of the allied intervention in the Russian Civil War, he embarked in North Russia for England 25th July 1919.

The North Russian intervention, also known as the Archangel Campaign was part of the Allied intervention in Russia after the October Revolution. The intervention brought about the involvement of foreign troops in the Russian Civil War on the side of the White Movement. While the movement was ultimately defeated, the Allied forces fought notable ending defensive actions against the Bolsheviks in the battles of Bolshie Ozerki, allowing them to withdraw from Russia in good order. The campaign lasted from 1918, during the final months of World War I to 1920.

Awarded the Meritorious Service Medal London Gazette 12th August 1919 page 10319 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with British Forces in North Russia (Archangel Command). Discharged 2nd February 1920 after almost 37 years service. Home address recorded as 89 Newport Road, Charlton, Manchester.

Scarce combination of awards to the Royal Engineers.

First time on the market.

Average GVF £995 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Charles Henry Twaits, 23rd (1st Sportsman’s) Battalion Royal Fusiliers born in St Pancras, London in 1889. Serving in France from 16th November 1915, the Battalion was in action at Delville Wood, Somme sector in July 1916 and suffered 288 casualties in their successful attack on 27th July. Serving in France until 28th January 1919, he returned to St Pancras following discharge and was employed as a Clerk at Somerset House, he died in St Pancras in 1937 aged 47 years.

1914/15 Star

373 Pte C H Twaits R Fus

British War and Victory Medals

SPTS-373 Pte C H Twaits R Fus

With details extracted from on line records and original ID tag.

Charles Henry Twaits was born in St Pancras, London in 1889, he served in France with the 23rd (1st Sportsman’s) Battalion Royal Fusiliers from 16th November 1915. The Battalion arrived on the Somme as part of 99th Brigade, 2nd Division and was in action at Delville Wood 27th July 1916, passing through Princess Street and on to final objective inside northern edge of Delville suffering 288 casualties. Serving in France continually until 28th January 1919, he returned to St Pancras on discharge and was employed as a Clerk at Somerset House. He married at St Likes Church, West Holloway 8th August 1920 and resided at 116 Berrington Road, Crouch End St Pancras. He died on 16th May 1937 aged 47 years.

First time on the market.

EF £145 Available


1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Sidney George Roberts, 1/1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment. Enlisting 3rd September 1914, he served in France from 6th November 1914. Transferring to 573 Employment Company, Labour Corps, he was discharged medically unfit for further service 8th March 1919 the result of wounds received in action.

1914 Star

2693 Pte S G Roberts 1/1 Herts R

British War and Victory Medals

2693 Pte S G Roberts Herts R

With details extracted from on line records.

Sidney George Roberts attested for the Hertfordshire Regiment 3rd September 1914 and served in France with the 1/1st Battalion from 6th November 1914. Transferring to 573 Employment Company, Labour Corps, he was discharged unfit for Military service 8th March 1919, the result of wounds received in action.

Original silk ribbons and safety pins as originally worn.

First time on the market.

GVF £250 Available


British War and Victory Medals to Private Thomas Oscar Alexander Godbold, Royal Warwickshire Regiment a Surgical Appliance Maker born in Clapton, London in 1894. Serving with the 1/5th Battalion in France from 6th July 1917, he was admitted to 1/2nd South Midlands Field Ambulance 18th October 1917 suffering from Epilepsy. A pre-enlistment condition which he did not declare, the fits became more frequent after being in action. Evacuated to England he was discharged 18th February 1918. In 1939 he was employed as a Butcher’s Assistant and Van Driver residing in Chingford, Essex. He died in Worthing, Sussex in 1980 aged 86 years.

British War and Victory Medals

29018 Pte T O A Godbold R War R

Silver War Badge reverse numbered

329993

With details extracted from his on line service record and other on line records, the Silver War Badge the correct one for this soldier, replacement pin reverse.

Thomas Oscar Alexander Godbold was born in Clapton, London 8th December 1894. The 1911 census records he is a Tin Washer at a Brawn Factory aged 16 years residing with his widowed mother and two elder brothers at 62 Trehunt Street, Clapton Park, NE London. By 1915 he was a Surgical Appliance Maker residing at 130 Dunlace Road, Clapton. Attesting at Hackney 17th November 1915, he was discharged to the Army Reserve the next day. Mobilised 20th March 1917, he joined 43 Training Reserve Battalion and joined the 1/5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in France 13th June 1917. Admitted to 1/2nd South Midland Field Ambulance with Epilepsy 18th October 1917 and transferred to 22 Casualty Clearing Station two days later, he was evacuated to England 2nd November 1917 and admitted to 2/1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham.

At his Medical Board Godbold admitted having about 12 fits a year prior to joining the Army, the frequency of these had increased since being in action. Discharged permanently unfit 18th February 1918. He married in Hackney in 1931, the 1939 Register records he is a Butcher’s Assistant and Van Driver residing with his wife at 5 Balliol Avenue, Chingford, Essex. He died in Worthing, Sussex in 1980 aged 86 years.

GVF £75 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Corporal Herbert Edward Rohlf, 13th (Kensington) Battalion London Regiment a Railway Carriage Cleaner born in North Kensington, London in 1881. Serving in France from 6th January 1915, he later served with the Hertfordshire Regiment and The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment. Discharged 3rd April 1918, he resided in Hayes, Middlesex and died in Uxbridge, Middlesex in 1951.

1914/15 Star

1703 Pte H E Rholf R Fus

British War and Victory Medals

1703 Cpl H E Rohlf 13-Lond R

With recipient’s aluminium ID tag and details extracted from on line records.

Herbert Edward Rohlf was born in North Kensington, London in 1881. The 1911 census records he is a 30 year old Railway Carriage Cleaner residing with his wife Gertrude, whom he married in Kensington in 1906, daughter and son at 102 Wormington Road, North Kensington. Serving in France from 6th January 1915, his British War and Victory Medal roll entry record he served with the 13th London Regiment attached from Royal Fusiliers, 2/1st Hertfordshire Regiment and 2nd Battalion The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment. Discharged 3rd April 1918, probably at the end of his Territorial Army service engagement, he resided post war in Hayes Middlesex (1939 Register refers) and died in Uxbridge, Middlesex in 1951.

Virtually as issued.

EF £110 Available


India General Service Medal (1908) GV clasp Abor 1911-12, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Harry Watkins, Indian Army Reserve of Officers and 3rd Sappers and Miners late Executive Engineer Public Works Department Assam born in 1882. 

India General Service Medal GV clasp Abor 1911-12

Mr H Watkins PWD

1914/15 Star

2/Lt H Watkins IARO

British War and Victory Medals

Lt H Watkins

With copy entries in PWD Registers, IARO Register and details of the expedition.

Harry Watkins was born 11th March 1882 and educated at the T C E College. Joining the Public Works Department, Assam, India 24th September 1905, having completed a year’s practical training in Eastern Bengal and Assam from 24th September 1905, he was appointed Assistant Engineer 3rd Grade 24th September 1906 in the Provincial Engineering Service Eastern Bengal and Assam and Dacca Special Works Division. Appointed to the Naga Hills Division 19th December 1908. Promoted to Assistant Engineer 2nd Grade Naga Hills Division 24th September 1909, he was appointed to the Office of the Executive Engineer Cachar Division in August 1910, to the Lakhimpur Division 3rd October 1910, to Lakhimpur for Special Duty 16th September 1911 and the Central Assam Division 10th August 1912 and as Executive Engineer from 24th September 1914.

Commissioned into the Indian Army Reserve of Officers 2nd Lieutenant 19th March 1915 serving with the 3rd Sappers and Miners. Mentioned in In Abor Jungles by Angus Hamilton page 162.

NEF £450 Reserved


British War and Victory Medals, India General service Medal (1908) GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 to Private Leslie Dowse, Hertfordshire Yeomanry a Clerk born in Abbot’s Langley, Hertfordshire in 1898. Enlisting 10th October 1915, he arrived in Mesopotamia 6th November 1916. Evacuated to India 23rd July 1917 aboard a Hospital Ship with sickness, on recovery he was transferred to the 21st Lancers. Sent as a re-enforcement to 22 Machine Gun Squadron for operations in Afghanistan in 1919, he returned to the UK in November 1919 and was demobilized. The India General Service Medal and clasp one of only 16 named to the Regiment.

British War and Victory Medals

2620 Pte L Dowse Herts Yeo

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

105858 Pte L Dowse Herts Yeo

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, service papers.

Leslie Dowse was born in Abbots Langley, Hertfordshire in 1898, a Clerk, residing at 14 Marling Square Abbots Langley, he attested for the Hertfordshire Yeomanry 10th October 1915. Arriving at Basra, Mesopotamia 6th November 1916, he was in Hospital on two occasions with enteritis and was invalided to India aboard the Hospital Ship Erinpura 23rd July 1917. Compulsory transferred to the 21st Lancers 22nd May 1919, he was posted as a re-enforcement to 22 Machine Gun Squadron 5th July 1919 serving in the Third Afghan War of 1919. Embarked at Bombay 18th October 1919 for England, he was demobilized 5th November 1919.

Appears on the Afghanistan NWF Medal roll as Hertfordshire Yeomanry attached 21st Lancers attached 22 Machine Gun Squadron, his IGS and clasp being one of only 16 named to the Hertfordshire Yeomanry. Taming The Tiger, The Story of the India General Service Medal 1908-35 by Richard G M L Stiles, Savannah, 2012 refers.

GVF & better £425 Available


India General service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, China Medal 1900 clasp Relief of Pekin, 1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug-22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals to Gunner William Smart, Royal Field Artillery a former Labourer born in Thornbury, Bristol, he attested for the Royal Artillery at Bristol 27th December 1895. Posted to 57th Field Battery 5th February 1896, he served in India from 21st October 1896 to 30th June 1900 including the operations on the Punjab Frontier and Tirah 1897-98. Posted to 12th Battery Royal Field Artillery 25th June 1900, he served in China from 1st July 1900 to 2nd November 1901 including the Relief of Pekin operations.  Transferred to the Army Reserve 16th January 1904, discharged from the Reserve 26th December 1910. The 1911 census records he is a 34 year old Carman employed by Bristol Council residing with his wife Elizabeth Ann son and daughter at 3 Napier Street, Barton Hill, Bristol. Attesting for Section “D” Army Reserve at Bristol 24th January 1908, he was mobilized at Hilsea 5th August 1914 joining 30th Brigade Royal Field Artillery and subsequently 3rd Reserve Brigade 13th August 1914, he was posted to France 16th August 1914 joining 44th Brigade in the field. Demobilized 20th January 1919, he returned to Bristol and died there in 1931 aged 55 years.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

12776 Gunr W Smart 57th Fd Bty RA

China 1900 Medal clasp Relief of Pekin

12276 Guner W Smart 12th Batry Rl Fd Arty

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug-22nd Nov 1914

12276 Gnr W Smart RFA

British War and Victory Medals

12276 Gnr W Smart RA

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, service papers.

Provenance: Dix Noonan Webb December 2009 Lot 289.

William Smart was born in Thornbury, Bristol a 19 year 9 month old Labourer he attested for the Royal Artillery at Bristol 27th December 1895. Posted to 57th Field Battery 5th February 1896, he served in India from 21st October 1896 to 30th June 1900 including the operations on the Punjab Frontier and Tirah 1897-98. Posted to 12th Battery Royal Field Artillery 25th June 1900, he served in China from 1st July 1900 to 2nd November 1901 including the Relief of Pekin operartions. Returning to India 3rd November 1901, he returned to England 14th January 1904 and transferred to the Army Reserve 16th January 1904, discharged from the Reserve 26th December 1910. The 1911 census records he is a 34 year old Carman employed by Bristol Council residing with his wife Elizabeth Ann son and daughter at 3 Napier Street, Barton Hill, Bristol.

Attesting for Section “D” Army Reserve at Bristol 24th January 1908, he was mobilized at Hilsea 5th August 1914 joining 30th Brigade Royal Field Artillery and subsequently 3rd Reserve Brigade 13th August 1914, he was posted to France 16th August 1914 joining 44th Brigade in the field. Posted to 56th Battery 7th April 1915, 41st Brigade 21st January 1916, 2nd Division Trench Mortar Battery 19th March 1916, 47th Battery 28th July 1916 and to Base details (France) n15th January 1917. Posted 24th Divisional Artillery 4th August 1917 and “D” Battery 106th Brigade 23rd September 1917, he arrived home on leave 27th July 1918. Returning to France 10th August 1918, he joined 67th Division Artillery but returned to England 8th September 1918. Demobilized 20th January 1919, he returned to Bristol and died there in 1931.

A rare combination.

GVF & better £1,200 Reserved


British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force War Medal, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, 1939/45 Defence Medal, Territorial Force Efficiency Medal (TFEM) GV to Sergeant Sydney Charles Smith, Kent Cyclist Battalion a Borough Council Gas Works Clerk born in Faversham, Kent in 1894. The Battalion as Infantry departed for India in February 1916 and in December 1916 moved to Burhan Camp near Rawalpindi, Northern India. In action against the Mahsuds at Tank and Jatta in March 1917 on the North West Frontier. After moving to Ferozepore the Battalion was in action again against the Marri and Khetran tribes in March and April 1917. Post War they took part in the Third Afghan War of 1919. Discharged 31st March 1920 in 1939 Smith is residing with his family in Farnborough, Hampshire where he is employed as Chief Financial Officer for the District Council. He died in Bournemouth in 1995 aged 101 years. The combination UNIQUE to the Regiment, with only 5 Territorial Force War Medals named to the Kent Cyclist Battalion.

British War and Victory Medals

TF-697 Cpl S C Smith Kent Cyc Bn

Territorial Force War Medal

697 Cpl S C Smith Kent Cyc Bn

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

265130 A/Sgt S C Smith Kent Cyc Bn

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV

265130 Pte L Cpl S C Smith Kent Cyc Bn

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, census entry and other research from on line records.

Sydney Charles Smith was born in Faversham, Kent 26th May 1894, the 1911 census records he is a 17 year old Council Gas Works Clerk residing with his father William Thomas Smith a Borough Council Sanitary Inspector, mother Fanny Elizabeth and two sisters at 20 Picton Road, Ramsgate Kent. A pre War Territorial soldier, the Battalion was in camp at Broadstairs when war was declared on 4th August 1914 and was immediately mobilized. Remaining in the UK in November 1915 it was re-formed as an infantry Battalion and departed for India in February 1916.

On arrival in India they were known as the 1/1st Kent Battalion and following training around Bangalore were Brigaded with three other Cyclist Battalions 1/25th London Regiment, 1/9th Battalion Hampshire Regiment and 2/6th Royal Sussex Regiment. In December 1916 they moved to Burhan Camp in Northern India near Rawalpindi and from there saw active service against the Mahsuds at Tank and Jatta in March 1917. After moving to Ferozepore the Battalion was again in action in Baluchistan against the Marri and Khetran tribes at Fort Monro and at Barkhan in March and April 1918.

Called out to suppress the civil unrest and rioting in the Punjab, Martial Law was declared there in April 1919. Taking part in the Third Afghan War of 1919, the Battalion was in action around Peshawar near the Khyber Pass in the summer of 1919 followed by several months of Garrison duties. Returning to England Smith was discharged 31st March 1920, his medals were sent to his home address in June 1924 “62 Upper Grosvenor Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent”. He married Ivy Josling (1896 to 1978) at Ramsgate, Kent in 1925. The 1939 Register records he is residing at Berwyn Court, Farnborough, Hampshire with his wife and son and is employed as Accountant and Chief Financial Officer for Farnborough Council. He died in Bournemouth in 1995 aged 101 years.

A unique combination to the Regiment.

NEF  £1,450 Reserved


Father and son

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV clasp The Great War 1914-18, Imperial Service Medal GV Coinage Head to Mr Harry Jarvis born in North Kensington, London in 1869 residing in East Dulwich, London in 1911 he was employed by the London General Post Office as Assistant Inspector of Tracing at the Accountant General’s Department. Awarded the Imperial Service Medal in March 1929. He died in Kensington, London in 1938.

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV clasp The Great War 1914-18

Harry Jarvis

Imperial Service Medal GV Coinage Head

Harry Jarvis

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV to Sergeant Frederick Harry Jarvis, Royal Engineers TF born in Paddington, London in 1889. A Telegraphist with the General Post Office, he attested for the RE TF in November 1910. Serving in Egypt from 9th July 1915 and later Palestine, he returned to England in May 1919 and returned to East Dulwich, London, he died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1979 aged 80 years.

1914/15 Star

70748 L Cpl F H Jarvis RE

British War and Victory Medals

70748 A SJT F H Jarvis RE

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal (TFEM) GV

70748  2nd Cpl – A Cpl F H Jarvis RE

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from on line records. With identity tags for Sergeant F H Jarvis (2)

Harry Jarvis was born in North Kensington, London in 1869, the 1911 census records he is a 42 year old Tracer (Civil Servant) employed by the General Post Office residing with his wife Georgina Caroline born in Boulogne, France and four sons residing at 22 Jennings Road, East Dulwich, London. Awarded the Imperial Service Medal London Gazette 12th March 1929 page 1747 “Harry Jarvis, Assistant Inspector of Tracing, Accountant General’s Department, Post Office”. He died in Kensington, London in 1938. Both Medals mounted for wear, pin brooches reverse.

Ferderick Harry Jarvis was born in Paddington, London in 1889, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Telegraphist residing with his family at 22 Jennings Road, East Dulwich. Attesting for the Royal Engineers Territorial Force 16th November 1910 at Westminster he was mobilized 5th August 1914. Promoted 2nd Corporal 21st September 1915, Corporal 1st December 1915, he served in Egypt from 19th July 1915 and later Palestine with 9th Army Corps Signal Company. Admitted to 27 General Hospital 1st April 1916 with Typhus, he rejoined his unit 25th May 1916. Posted to “W” Corps Signal Company 15th May 1917, he received trade pay as a skilled Telegraphist 6th June 1917 and promoted acting Sergeant. Embarked Port Said for England 21st May 1919, home address recorded as 255 Lordship Lane, East Dulwich, London. Discharged from the Royal Engineers Territorial Army 20th August 1919, he eventually retired to Eastbourne, Sussex and died there in 1979 aged 80 years.

With original silk ribbons, the War and Victory ribbons the wrong war around but each medal with safety pin reverse as originally worn.

First time on the market.

EF £195 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Okaleaf, India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24, Delhi Durbar King George V 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Major Henry John Wogan, Royal Engineers, Sappers and Miners and Military Works Service an Electrical Engineer born in Gosport, Hampshire in 1876, he attested for the Royal Engineers in 1891 aged 15 years. A Quarter Master Sergeant serving with the Calcutta Section, 1st King George’s Own Sappers and Miners for the Delhi Durbar of 1911, he served in Mesopotamia from August 1915 and was commissioned in November the same year. Three times Mentioned in Despatches for his services in Mesopotamia, post War he served in the Third Afghan War and the Waziristan operations 1919-24. Retiring from the Army in 1930 after 39 years service.

1914/15 Star

26764 ME Q M S H J Wogan RE

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Capt H J Wogan

India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24

Maj H J Wogan MWS

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

25764 Mech S SJT H J Wogan RE

With copy other ranks service papers and medal roll entries.

Henry John Wogan was born in Gosport, Hampshire  in 1876 and attested for the Royal Engineers at Chatham aged 15 years 7 months on 8th June 1891 and ranked as Boy. Ranked as Sapper 8th November 1893, appointed Lance Corporal 24th June 1898, promoted 2nd Corporal 1st August 1899, promoted Corporal 30th January 1902, Sergeant 30th July 1903, Mechanical Electrical Staff Sergeant 13th September 1906, Mechanical Electrical QM Sergeant 7th October 1910. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers 20th November 1915. Awarded Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 270 of 1909, he appears on the Delhi Durbar 1911 roll as Quarter Master Sergeant Calcutta Section 1st Sappers and Miners. Promoted Tempory Captain in may 1916, Captain Royal Engineers (Indian Army) seniority backdated to 20th November 1915 (London Gazette 2nd February 1923 page 810), served in Mesopotamia from 8th August 1915, temporary Major 1st October 1919.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 12th March 1918 page 3114 Mesopotamia

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 21st February 1919 page 2590 Mesopotamia

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 21st January 1920 page 514 Mesopotamia

Retiring on 8th November 1930 (London Gazette 5th December 1930 page 7769). Two clasps verified on the Medal rolls as Major Royal Engineers Military Works Department for Afghanistan NWF 1919, and Royal Engineers for Waziristan 1921-24, probably entitled to Waziristan 1919-21 too as his Medal Index Card records “Chief Engineer Waziristan Force forwards nominal roll of claims 3rd November 1919”.

NEF £595 Available


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


British War Medal and Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal EVII to Ernest Mondon, Petty Officer 1st Class, Royal Navy, a former Stone Mason born in Brixham, Devon in 1873. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906, Argyll was wrecked in a storm 28th October 1915. Discharged shore to pension 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, he spend the rest of the war ashore. Demobilized 28th April 1920, he returned to Brixham and died there in 1948.

British War Medal

150660 E Mondon PO1 R.N

EDVII Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

150660 Ernest Mondon PO 1 CL HMS Argyll

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Ernest Mondon was born in Brixham, Devon 1st September 1873, a Stone Mason, he came from a well-known fishing family in Brixham. He entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, rated Ordinary Seaman aboard 1st September 1891, Able Seaman 4th March 1893 aboard  HMS Shannon. Advanced to Leading Seaman 14th August 1899 and Petty Officer of the 2nd class 1st April 1900 aboard HMS Devastation. Advanced to Petty Officer 1st Class aboard HMS Lion 4th November 1903, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906. Discharged shore to pension from Defiance 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve.

Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, Defiance 25th November 1914 and Pomone 20th April 1915 he was demobilized 28th April 1920. Returning to Brixham, he died there 24th June 1948. HMS Argyll ran aground on Bell Rock, Dundee during a storm on 28th October 1915 and was a total loss.

Awarded the 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals reference Admiralty Medal roll TNA ADM171/110 page 321.

Toned

NEF £115 Available


1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Able Seaman Thomas Clarke Hare, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a Solicitor’s Clerk from Lambeth South East London born in 1896. Entering the RNVR in March 1912, he was mobilized on the outbreak of War and served with Collingwood Battalion, Royal Naval Division during the defence of Antwerp. Interned in Holland, he was twice sent on leave in 1916 and 1918, returning to Holland on both occasions. Repatriated in November 1918 and demobilized in January 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Kingston on Thames and employed as a Civil Servant, he died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

1914 Star

L8/2648 T Hare Ord Sea RNVR Collinwood Bttn RND

British War & Victory Medals

L8/2648 T Hare AB RNVR

With copy service record.

Thomas Clarke Hare was born in Lambeth, SE London 20th July 1896, the 1911 census records he is a Solicitor’s Office Boy residing with his father Thomas, mother Minnie and two sisters at 5 Howley Street, York Road, Lambeth SE. Joining the RNVR as Ordinary Seaman 28th March 1912, he joined Collingwood Battalion RND 22nd August 1914 and landed for the defence of Antwerp, Belgium, those that could get away embarked for Dover on 11th October 1914, only 20 men from Collingwood Battalion escaped the remainder were interned in Holland. Reported as interned in Holland 8th October 1914, he was sent home on leave 11th October 1916 and returned to Holland 8th November 1916, his next leave home was 17th June 1918 and he returned to Holland 14th July 1918. Repatriated 19th November 1918, he was sent on leave joining the 1st Reserve Battalion RND 18th January 1919 on his return. Demobilized at Crystal Palace 30th January 1919, he married in 1921 Florence Elizabeth, the 1939 Register records he is a Civil Servant residing at 111 Barnfield Avenue, Kingston on Thames with his wife. He died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

GVF & better £295 Available


British War & Victory Medals to Gunner Alfred Milner Anderson, South African Heavy Artillery a Fitter from Belgravia, Johannesburg born in 1898. Enlisting at Cape Town in July 1917, he arrived in England in September 1917 and in France in January 1918 where he joined 73rd Siege Battery the following month. In June 1918 he was treated in hospital in France with shell shock, he had previously been subject to bombardments of high explosive and gas shells on 9th and 12th April 1918. Re-joining his battery in September 1918, he returned to England in March 1919 and was discharged in South Africa in June 1919. He died in Johannesburg in April 1966.

British War and Victory Medals (Bi-lingual reverse Victory Medal)

Gnr A M Anderson SAHA

With copy service papers and a photo of the recipient in later life.

Alfred Milner Anderson was born in Durban, Natal, South Africa in 1898, a Fitter residing in Belgravia, Johannesburg, he attested for the South African Heavy Artillery at Cape Town 11th July 1917. Arriving in England 14th September 1917 and in France 29th January 1918. Posted to 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery in the field 18th February 1918, he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance 5th June 1918 with shell shock (Neurasthenia) and transferred to No 18 General Hospital, France 19th July 1918. Re-joining his Battery on recovery in the field 1st September 1918, he returned to England 20th March 1919 for onward travel to South Africa arriving home, he was discharged 6th June 1919.

His Medical Card records whilst serving with 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery on 5th June 1918 at Verquin at 2100, he went sick because he was very shaky and could not stand the noise of the guns. He had previously been subject to a bombardment of high explosive and gas shells on 9th April 1918 and a bombardment of high explosive 8 inch shells on 12th April 1918.

Alfred Milner Anderson died in Johannesburg 7th April 1966.

EF £55 Available


From left to right –

Victory Medal to Captain Charles Hamilton Russell Grant 2/22nd London Regiment a Dental Surgeon from Cricklewood, London born in Singapore in 1882. Serving in France, Salonica and Palestine he was Mentioned in Despatches by General Allenby in 1919. He died in Willesden General Hospital following an operation in 1931.

Victory Medal

Capt C H R Grant

British War Medal to Captain Wilfred Hardinge Heinig, 54th Sikhs, Indian Army attached 51st Sikhs born in 1887 in India, he was educated at King’s College School. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant from the RMC Sandhurst in August 1907, he joined the 54th Sikhs, Indian Army and was promoted to Captain in September 1915. Killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years when leading his company of the 51st Sikhs in an attack on the Turkish trenches. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial. 

British War Medal

Capt W H Heinig

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge 4th Battalion London Regiment born in Barnet, London in 1896. Educated at Barnet Grammar School, he was a banker before volunteering in September 1914. Serving as a Private soldier in the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli he was commissioned into the 4th Battalion London Regiment in October 1916. Serving in France attached to the 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W K E Mansbridge

Charles Hamilton Russell Grant was born in Singapore in 1882, the 1911 census records he is a Dental Surgeon residing with his wife, son and daughter in Cricklewood, London NW2.

Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 2nd Battalion 22nd London Regiment 1st October 1914 (London Gazette 17th October 1914 page 8335). Mentioned in Despatches (General Allenby) for distinguished services in Egypt during the period 19th September 1918 to 31st January 1919 London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7182. From The Willesden Chronicle 12th June 1931 page 9

“The death occurred at Willesden General Hospital following an operation yesterday (Monday) of Mr Russell Grant LDS, RCS of 92 Walm Lane, Cricklewood. Mr Grant had been Hon Dental Surgeon to Willesden hospital for the last 10 years and at the annual general meeting of the hospital last night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the bereaved family”.

Mr Grant was a student at the National Dental Hospital (now the Dental Department of the University College Hospital) where he obtained the Gold Medal for 1902 and qualified in 1903. With the exception of the War years, he practiced mainly in Willesden Green since that date and his skill and ability brought him a considerable practice. He was for over 10 years a much valued member of the Honorary Staff of the Willesden Hospital, and his loss is keenly felt by his colleagues there. One of the earliest volunteers for the War he took a combatant commission in the 2/22nd London Regiment (The Queen’s) in September 1914 and served throughout, first on the Somme, then in Salonika and finally Palestine where he took part in the capture of Jerusalem. He had by then reached the rank of Captain and been Mentioned in Despatches and appointed to the Staff of General (now Lord) Allenby.

In Jerusalem he contracted Typhoid Fever and was invalided back to Egypt where he apparently recovered, but his death was probably due to a sequel of that disease. Latterly Mr Grant had lived in Eastcote, where he took an active part in local affairs, and also in the neighbouring district of Northwood, where he had been a Churchwarden of Emmanuel Church. In all these circles, as well as among his many friends and relations, he will be very sadly missed”. With copy Medal Index Card (awarded British War and Victory Medals only), copy obituary, newspaper article, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, census entry 1911.

GVF £95 SOLD

Wilfred Hardinge Heinig was killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years in Mesopotamia. Born in 1887, he entered King’s College School in 1899. He was in the second XV in 1904 and in the first XV in 1905-6, and a School Prefect in 1906. From school he entered Sandhurst from which he passed out in a high position in August 1907. He joined the 54th Sikhs Indian Army and spent his military life in India. He was ordered to Mesopotamia in January last . Letters received from his fellow officers show he always retained his very high sense of duty and at the same time overflowed with high spirits and joy in life generally. His Commanding Officer, Colonel Magrath wrote of him –

“It was with rather a heavy heart that I detailed him to proceed with a draft as, apart from the fact he was my Quartermaster and a very hard working and useful officer at that, he was always so cheery and of such a bright disposition, that he was the life and soul of the Mess during the dull times we spent at Fort Lockhart and Hangu. I have just heard from Captain O’Neill that his same cheery disposition made him most popular with the 51st in the Field, and he did a lot to keep their spirits up in the trenches. But most important to you of all will be the news that he died like a very gallant soldier, at the head of his company in an assault on the Turkish trenches on 6th April. He was killed instantaneously, shot through the head and heart, and thus met with a glorious death. His loss to the Regiment is a heavy one, but we all feel proud of him and he has well upheld the name of the 54th”.

The only son of Robert Lawrence and Mary Heinig of “Deanurst”, Barton Road, Montpellier, Torquay, Devon. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

With copy Medal Index Card which records the award of the British War and Victory Medals, newspaper articles, copy photo in The Sphere dated 20th May 1916 etc.

GVF £145 SOLD

Kenneth William Elliott Mansbridge was born in Barnet, London in 1896, he served with the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli. Commissioned 25th October 1916 he served in France attached 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years.

From The Hendon Times 19th October 1917 page 5

“The death in action on 4th October 1917 is announced of 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth William Elliott Lovell (sic) Mansbridge, the elder son of Mr E Lovell Mansbridge of the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House and of “Elleborn”, Lichfield Grove, Church End Finchley. Lieutenant Lovell Mansbridge was educated at Barnet Grammar School, after which he took up Banking as a career. He enlisted within three weeks of the outbreak of War in the Royal Fusiliers (4th London Regiment). He saw varied service in Malta, Egypt (from 24th August 1915) and Gallipoli where he experienced 4 months of severe campaigning. He was invalided to Malta seven days before the evacuation of the Peninsula. He returned to England and in May 1916 was nominated for a commission. His Cadet training took place at Lichfield and on 25th October 1916, he was Gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the (4th Battalion) London Regiment. In January this year he was attached to the (13th Battalion) King’s Royal Rifle Corps and saw service in France till the great advance of 4th October when he met his death on the field of honour, This gallant young officer was only 20 years old”.

Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. With copy census details, Medal Index Card, Newspaper article, London Gazette announcing his commission, casualty details. Not sure where “Lovell Mansbridge” came from all official documents give his name as William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge.

GVF £85 Available


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £195 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


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