India General Service Medal (1895) clasp Samana 1897, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Quartermaster and Captain Frederick Tadd, Royal Scots Fusiliers (RSF) a former Coal Miner born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire in 1874. Attesting for the RSF at Pontypridd 12th December 1892, serving in India with the 1st Battalion  from 24th September 1896 to 28th February 1907. Awarded the LSGC Medal in 1911, he was discharged to pension 11th December 1913. Volunteering his services on the outbreak of war he re-joined his Regiment 8th September 1914 and was commissioned Lieutenant & Quartermaster 6th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers 27th January 1915 serving in France from 9th May 1915, he was later appointed to II Corps Cyclist Battalion 17th June 1916. Promoted Quartermaster and Captain 4th February 1918, he was appointed to 14th Battalion Machine Gun Corps 6th July 1918 and was demobilized 28th February 1920. He died in Leith, Scotland in 1936.

 

India General Service Medal (1895) clasps Samana 1897, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

3980 Lce Corpl F Tadd 1st Royl Scots Fusrs

1914/15 Star

QM & Lieut F Tadd R Sc Fus

British War and Victory Medals

QM & Capt F Tadd

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

3980 C SJT F Tadd R Scots Fus

With copy service papers, Medal rolls, Medal Index Card.

Frederick Tadd was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire 10th October 1874 a 18 year 2 month old Collier, he attested for the Royal Scots Fusiliers at Pontypridd 12th December 1892 and joined the 1st Battalion at Glasgow. Appointed Lance Corporal 30th November 1896, promoted Corporal 10th May 1899, appointed Lance Sergeant 26th April 1902 and promoted Sergeant 29th November 1902 and to Colour Sergeant 5th March 1909. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 1st March 1907, to the 5th Battalion 1st March 1910, 2nd Battalion 8th March 1912, discharged at Gosport to pension 11th December 1913. Serving in India from 24th September 1896 to 28th February 1907. Awarded the India General Service Medal (1895) with three clasps and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order dated 1st April 1911. Home address on discharge 69 Mellish Street, Millwall, Popular, London.

Volunteering his services on the outbreak of war he re-joined his Regiment 8th September 1914 and was commissioned Lieutenant & Quartermaster 6th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers 27th January 1915 serving in France from 9th May 1915. Appointed to II Corps Cyclist Battalion Army Cyclist Corps 17th June 1916 and to 14th Battalion Machine Gun Corps 6th July 1918 as Captain and Quartermaster with seniority 4th February 1918. Relinquishing his commission on demobilization 28th February 1920 he retained the rank of Captain and Quartermaster, home address recorded as 57 Albany Street, Leith, Scotland. He died on 28th February 1936.

GVF and better £595 Available


India General Service Medal (1895) clasp Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902, India General Service Medal EVII clasp North West Frontier 1908 British War and Victory Medals to Warrant Officer Class 2 (Company Sergeant Major) William J Jennings, Royal Sussex Regiment late The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment and Royal Warwickshire Regiment a former Carman born in Warfield, Bracknell Berkshire he enlisted on 22nd November 1889. Serving in India 1892 to 1898 with a period in Malta in 1894 with the 1st Battalion Royal West Surrey Regiment, he transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 28th March 1898. Serving in South Africa 14th December 1901 to 13th October 1902 with the 1st Battalion attached 28th Company Mounted Infantry. Returning to India he took part in the operations in the Mohmand Country in 1908. Discharged to pension 15th February 1911. Attesting for the Army Special Reserve 22nd September 1914, he was posted to several Home Service Battalions, finally being sent to France in early 1918. Discharged to the Army Reserve 18th February 1919, his intended place of residence recorded as Fulham, London.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasp Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98

2850 Lce Corpl W Jennings 1st R W Surr Regt

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902

5569 SERJT W Jennings Rl War Regt

India General Service Medal EVII clasp North West Frontier 1908

5569 Cr Sergt W Jennings 1st R War R

British War and Victory Medals

22573 WO CL 2 W J Jennings R Suss R

With copy service papers, Medal rolls, Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War and Victory Medals only etc.

William J Jennings was born in Warfield, Bracknel, Berkshire an 18 year 4 month old Carman and serving member of the 3rd (Militia) Battalion The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment he enlisted for the Regular Army at Guildford 22nd November 1889 joining The Queen’s Regiment Depot. Posted to the 1st Battalion he was appointed Lance Corporal 12th March 1891, he reverted to Private 5th January 1892, appointed Lance Corporal 27th March 1895. Transferring to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 5th March 1898 at his request, he was posted to the 2nd Battalion as Private. Posted to the 3rd Battalion 1st April 1898 and appointed Lance Corporal 4th April 1898. Promoted Corporal 1st June 1898, appointed Lance Sergeant 15th February 1900, promoted Sergeant 29th November 1900. Serving in South Africa 14th December 1901 to 13th October 1902 attached 28th Company Mounted Infantry.

Posted 1st Battalion 13th October 1902, appointed Permanent Staff 5th (Volunteer) Battalion 21st October 1904, 2nd Battalion 19th January 1906, 3rd Battalion 15th March 1906 and 1st Battalion 15th October 1907 taking part in the operations in the Mohmand Country in 1908. Discharged to pension after 21 years 86 days service of which almost 11 years were spent in India, 4 years in Malta and 18 months in South Africa, serving there for a second time in 1906. Attesting for the Army Special Reserve 22nd September 1914 (aged 42 years), posted 11th Battalion Royal Fusiliers as Company Quarter Master Sergeant 24th September 1914, his subsequent postings were 6th (Reserve) Battalion 10th March 1915, 1st Garrison Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment as Colour Sergeant 17th December 1915, 6th Battalion Royal Fusiliers 25th January 1916, 2nd Infantry Works Company 17th June 1916, 343rd Home Service Works Company as Company Sergeant Major 28th April 1917, 15th (Home Service) Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment 21st September 1917, 4th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment as Company Sergeant Major 31st January 1918, Base Depot BEF as Company Sergeant Major 21st March 1918, Chinese Labour Corps Base Depot 25th March 1918 (on France), 30th Company Chinese Labour Corps 28th June 1918 (in France). Transferred to Class Z Army Reserve 18th February 1919, home address recorded as 3 Munster Road, Fulham, London SW6.

An unusual combination to a soldier who following 21 years Regular Army service volunteered again for the First World War.

Not awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

GVF and better £595 SOLD


India General Service Medal (1895) clasp Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type, Army Annuity Meritorious Service Medal GVI 2nd type to Sergeant Charles George Clarke, Military Foot Police late Devon Regiment a former Groom born in Aylesbear, Exeter, Devon in 1873. Attesting for the Devon Regiment at Exeter 17th July 1895. Serving in India from 9th September 1896 to 17th April 1899, South Africa 20th October 1899 to 21st May 1903. Transferred to the Military Foot Police 17th November 1903, he served in France from 21st June 1915 to 17th January 1920. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1914 and the Meritorious Service Medal in 1953, one of 12 such awarded to the Corps. Discharged to pension 14th February 1920, he retired to Torquay.

India General Service Medal (1895) clasp Punjab Frontier 1897-98

4299 Pte C G Clarke 1st Bn Devon Regt

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill,

4299 Pte G Clarke Devon Regt

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

4299 Pte C Clarke Devon Regt

1914/15 Star

775 L Cpl C G Clarke MFP

British War and Victory Medals

775 T SJT C G Clarke MFP

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

775 Cpl C G Clarke MFP

Annuity Meritorious Service Medal Army GVI 2nd type

775 SJT C G Clarke MFP

With copy service papers, Medal rolls etc.

Provenance: Dix Noonan Webb December 2007 Lot 223.

Charles George Clarke was born in Aylesbear, Exeter, Devon in 1873, a Groom and serving member of the 4th (Militia) Battalion Devon Regiment he attested for the Regular Army at Exeter 17th July 1895. Posted to the 2nd Battalion from the Depot 23rd September 1895, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd July 1899, he reverted to Private 14th August 1899. Serving in India from 9th September 1896 to 17th April 1899, South Africa 20th October 1899 to 21st May 1903. Transferred to the Military Foot Police 17th November 1903, appointed Lance Corporal 17th November 1903, promoted Corporal 28th November 1913 and appointed acting Sergeant 30th March 1916. Serving in France from 21st June 1915 to 17th January 1920. Promoted substantive Sergeant 13th February 1919, discharged to pension 14th February 1920 address recorded as 24 Dunmere Road, Ellacombe, Torquay, Devon.

Qualified as a Mounted Infantryman, he possessed a Second Class Army Education Certificate, awarded Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 99 of April 1914, he married Alica Jane Cooper in Kildare 5th September 1905 and they had five children. Meritorious Service Medal awarded Army Order 98 of 1953.

A fine combination, a rare Annuity MSM to the Military Foot Police on of 12 awarded.

GVF and better £1,250 Reserved


Father and son

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV clasp The Great War 1914-18, Imperial Service Medal GV Coinage Head to Mr Harry Jarvis born in North Kensington, London in 1869 residing in East Dulwich, London in 1911 he was employed by the London General Post Office as Assistant Inspector of Tracing at the Accountant General’s Department. Awarded the Imperial Service Medal in March 1929. He died in Kensington, London in 1938.

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV clasp The Great War 1914-18

Harry Jarvis

Imperial Service Medal GV Coinage Head

Harry Jarvis

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV to Sergeant Frederick Harry Jarvis, Royal Engineers TF born in Paddington, London in 1889. A Telegraphist with the General Post Office, he attested for the RE TF in November 1910. Serving in Egypt from 9th July 1915 and later Palestine, he returned to England in May 1919 and returned to East Dulwich, London, he died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1979 aged 80 years.

1914/15 Star

70748 L Cpl F H Jarvis RE

British War and Victory Medals

70748 A SJT F H Jarvis RE

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal (TFEM) GV

70748  2nd Cpl – A Cpl F H Jarvis RE

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from on line records. With identity tags for Sergeant F H Jarvis (2)

Harry Jarvis was born in North Kensington, London in 1869, the 1911 census records he is a 42 year old Tracer (Civil Servant) employed by the General Post Office residing with his wife Georgina Caroline born in Boulogne, France and four sons residing at 22 Jennings Road, East Dulwich, London. Awarded the Imperial Service Medal London Gazette 12th March 1929 page 1747 “Harry Jarvis, Assistant Inspector of Tracing, Accountant General’s Department, Post Office”. He died in Kensington, London in 1938. Both Medals mounted for wear, pin brooches reverse.

Ferderick Harry Jarvis was born in Paddington, London in 1889, the 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Telegraphist residing with his family at 22 Jennings Road, East Dulwich. Attesting for the Royal Engineers Territorial Force 16th November 1910 at Westminster he was mobilized 5th August 1914. Promoted 2nd Corporal 21st September 1915, Corporal 1st December 1915, he served in Egypt from 19th July 1915 and later Palestine with 9th Army Corps Signal Company. Admitted to 27 General Hospital 1st April 1916 with Typhus, he rejoined his unit 25th May 1916. Posted to “W” Corps Signal Company 15th May 1917, he received trade pay as a skilled Telegraphist 6th June 1917 and promoted acting Sergeant. Embarked Port Said for England 21st May 1919, home address recorded as 255 Lordship Lane, East Dulwich, London. Discharged from the Royal Engineers Territorial Army 20th August 1919, he eventually retired to Eastbourne, Sussex and died there in 1979 aged 80 years.

With original silk ribbons, the War and Victory ribbons the wrong war around but each medal with safety pin reverse as originally worn.

First time on the market.

EF £225 Available


1914/15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal to Private Herbert John Norris, Somerset Light Infantry born in Warminster, Wiltshire in 1899, the 1911 census records he is a General Labourer out of work. Serving in France from 8th September 1915 with the 8th Battalion, this Battalion took part in the attack on Fricourt 1st July 1916. Although the German lines were entered and consolidated by midnight, the Battalion was down to just 100 men, between 1st and 4th July casualties recorded as 443 killed and wounded. Admitted to 14th Field Ambulance whilst still serving with the 8th Battalion 7th February 1917 with a head injury, he was evacuated to hospital two days later. Later serving with the 6th Battalion he was discharged to the Reserve 5th May 1919. He returned to Warminster where he was employed as an Iron Foundry Labourer, he died there in 1969 aged 80 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

14778 Pte H J Norris Som LI

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from on line records.

Herbert John Norris was born in Warminster, Wiltshire 18th August 1889, the 1911 census records his is 21 years old an unemployed General Labourer residing at 12 Fore Street, Warminster with his wife Lily. Serving in France with the 8th Battalion Somerset Light Infantry from 8th September 1915, this Battalion took part in the attack on Fricourt 1st July 1916. Moving forward into No Man’s Land just before Zero Hour at this point almost half the officers had become casualties, German lines were entered and consolidated by the surviving 100 men at the west end of Lozenge Wood, casualties 1st to 4th July 1916 recorded as 443 killed and wounded. During 16th to 17th November 1916 they were action again during the battle of the Ancre.

Private Norris was admitted to 14th Field Ambulance with a head injury 7th February 1917, he is recorded as still serving with the 8th Battalion and aged 27 years. Evacuated to hospital 9th February. It appears from his British War and Victory Medal roll entry that he joined the 6th Battalion probably after recovering from his head wound. Discharged to Class Z Army Reserve 5th May 1919 he returned to Warminster. The 1939 Register records he is a Labourer at an Iron Foundry residing with his wife, 2 sons and 1 daughter at 10 Pinecroft Lane, Warminster. He died in Warminster in 1969 aged 80 years

Some superficial staining to Victory Medal therefore

First time on the market.

GVF £80 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal to Private Arthur Frank Holford, Royal Sussex Regiment a Gardener born in Framfied, Sussex in 1894. Attesting for the 1/5th (Cinque Ports) Battalion 6th December 1912, he served in France from 18th February 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps (648497) he was discharged 24th April 1919 the result of sickness contracted on active service. Residing in Harvey Common, Uckfield, Sussex where he was employed as a Builder’s Labourer he died in Hailsham, Sussex in 1975 aged 81 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

1576 Pte A F Holford R Suss R

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from on line records.

Arthur Frank Holford was born in Framfield, Sussex 30th Mach 1894, the 1911 census records he is a 17 year old Gardener residing with his stepfather and family at Pale House Common, Framfield, Sussex. Attesting for the 5th (Cinque Ports) Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment 6th December 1912, he served in France from 8th February 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps (no 648497) he was discharged 24th April 1919 the result of sickness contracted on active service. The 1939 Register records he is employed as a Builder’s Labourer, heavy work, residing with his wife Mable at Little Clayland Cottage, Harvey Commin, Uckfield, Sussex. He died in Hailsham, Sussex i n 1975 aged 81 years.

Virtually as issued.

First time on the market.

NEF £85 Available


1914/15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal to Sergeant George Watson Palmer, 1/20th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment a Plasterer born in Camberwell, London in 1892. Enlisting at Blackheath 27th October 1914, he served in France from 9th March 1915. The Battalion arrived on the Somme 6th August 1916 and took part in the attack on High Wood 15th September 1916 suffering 263 casualties and the assault on the Flers Line 4th October entering the village. Leaving for the Ypres sector 17th October 1916, they took part in the Second Battle of Ypres. Severely wounded in action 30th August 1918, shrapnel wound right arm, he was evacuated to England from No 12 General Hospital Rouen 2nd September 1918 spending 121 days in hospital. Discharged 6th February 1919, he died in Wandsworth, London in 1959.

1914/15 Star

3059 Pte G W Palmer 20/Lond R

British War and Victory Medals

3059 SJT G W Palmer 20-Lond R

With copy Medal Index Card and details extracted from his on line service record.

George Watson Palmer (his Medal Index Card erroneously records George William Palmer) was born in Camberwell in 1892, a Plasterer employed by Dura Plast Lt of Camden Town, he attested for the 1/20th Battalion London Regiment at Blackheath 27th October 1914 and arrived in France 9th March 1915. Synovitis of his left knee resulted in his admission to No 13 General Hospital 18th April 1915, re-joining “C” Company of his Battalion 25th June 1915. Admitted to No 6 London Field Ambulance 21st July 1915, he rejoined his Company two days later. Admitted to No 1 General Hospital with a kidney infection 26th August 1915, he was evacuated to England three days later for hospital treatment.

Re-joining his Battalion in France 8th September 1916, he was appointed Lance Corporal 10th October 1916, promoted Corporal 14th March 1917 and to Sergeant 26th June 1917. The 1/20th Battalion arrived on the Somme 6th August 1916 and took part in the attack on High Wood 15th September 1916 suffering 263 casualties, later taking part in the attack on the Flers Line 4th October, the attack was held up until the arrival of tanks, entering the village and on to Le Barque Road where they held their positions.

Severely wounded in action 30th August 1918, shrapnel right arm, he was first treated at 55 Field Ambulance, to 37 Casualty Clearing Station 31st August, No 12 General Hospital Rouen 1st September and evacuated to England the following day. After spending 121 days in hospital at both the Grove Military Hospital, Tooting and Paddington Military Hospital he was disembodied 6th February 1919, he died in Wandsworth, London in 1959.

First time on the market.

NEF £145 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British war Medal, Victory Medal and Meritorious Service Medal (immediate) GV to The Reverend Father Eldred Thomas Tipper, Vicar of St John’s, Kensal Green, London W10. Born in Bedfont, Middlesex in 1887 and a Lay Preacher Church of England, he attested for the Army Service Corps 24th Divisional Train at Lancing 15th May 1915. Serving in France from 24th September 1915, he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in June 1918 in recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in France. Discharged in May 1919, in 1939 he is recorded as Clerk in Holy Orders residing at St John’s Vicarage, Kensal Green, Paddington, London. He died in Paddington in 1960 aged 73 years.

1914/15 Star

S4-109382 Pte E T Tipper ASC

British War and Victory Medals

S4-109382 SJT E T Tipper ASC

Meritorious Service Medal (Immediate) GV

S4-109382SJT E T Tipper 24/DT ASC

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry and headers for MSM, details extracted from his on line service record and other on line records. 

Mounted as originally worn.

Eldred Thomas Tipper was born Bedfont, Middlesex 25th January 1887, the son of John Tipper a Domestic Gardener and his wife Miriam. The 1901 census records Eldred is a 14 year old Stable Helper residing with his parents, three brothers and two sisters. The 1911 census records he is a 24 year old Lay Preacher (Church of England) residing as a boarder at 76 Middleton Road, St John, Hackney, London. Eldred attested for the Army Service Corps, 24th Divisional Train at Lancing, Sussex where he may have been undertaking Bible studies. He gave his occupation as Lay (Bible) Reader and his home address as 24 Horton Road, Hackney, London, E8. He married on 31st July 1915 before he embarked for France arriving at Le Havre 24th September 1915.Image result for st johns kensal green pics

St John’s Church Kensal Green today

Promoted Acting Corporal 14th January 1916, Corporal 16th October 1916, acting Sergeant 1st August 1917 and Sergeant 1st September 1917. Awarded the Meritorious Service Medal London Gazette 17th June 1918 page 7171 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in France during the present war”. Discharged 16th May 1919, the 1939 census records he is a Clerk in Holy Orders residing at St John’s Vicarage Kensal Green London with his wife and others, he died in Paddington in 1960 aged 73 years.

GVF & better £350 Available


1914/15 Star, British war Medal, Victory Medal 1939/45 Defence Medal to Private Edward Sutton, Rifle Brigade late 13th (Kensington) Battalion London Regiment with group photo, identity tags Field Medical Card and Hospital Ship evacuation label. Serving in France with the 13th Londons from 2nd September 1915, he returned to England 4th July 1916, almost certainly wounded during his Battalion’s attack 1st July 1916, the first day of the Somme offensive. The 13th Battalion suffered 17 officers and 310 other rank casualties out of an attacking force of 24 officers and 510 other ranks. Returning to France 5th January 1917, he was evacuated a second time on 2nd July 1917 having suffered a severe shell wound to his left thigh and slight wound to right thigh. Returning to France 1st April 1918, he was attached to 11th Battalion Rifle Brigade until the Armistice.

1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals

4273 Pte E Sutton 13-Lond R

With copy Medal Index Card and British War and Victory Medal roll entry which record Edward Sutton served in France from 2nd September 1915 with 1/13th Battalion London Regiment (Kensington). Original group post card size original photo containing the recipient, Field Medical Card, Hospital Ship evacuation label, note from CCS Surgeon “Operation on 23rd June 1917 at 4:20 pm by Captain Birbeck – through and through wound left thigh, opened up (cleaned and packed), two small through and through wounds base of right thigh”. Certificate from Medical Officer 11th Battalion Rifle Brigade declaring Rifleman E Sutton free of vermin. Named card box of issue for British War and Victory Medals.

Private Edward Sutton centre of photo (enlargement from part of post card size group photo)

Evacuated to England 4th July 1916, almost certainly wounded during his Battalion’s attack on Gommecourt 1st July 1916. Elements of the Battalion entered the German front line and experienced heavy fighting around Nameless Farm. Relieved that evening by 8th Battalion Middlesex Regiment, the Kensingtons suffered 17 officers and 310 other rank casualties out of an attacking force of 24 officers and 510 other ranks.

Returning to his Battalion in France 5th May 1917, he was severely wounded in action, shell wound left thigh 22nd June 1917, he was initially treated at 56 Division Advanced Dressing Station then to 41 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. Admitted to No 8 Red Cross Hospital, he was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship 2nd July 1917, his Ship Casualty Label marked “Helpless”. Returning to France on recovery 1st April 1918, he was attached 11th Battalion Rifle Brigade and served with his Battalion in France until 26th January 1919.

In 1944 Edward Sutton was residing at 17 Sandown Road, Lade, Sandown, Isle of Wight when the Air Ministry wrote to him advising him that his son Pilot Officer (Pilot) John Sutton, RAFVR was missing from operations on the night of 30th/31st March 1944. Later confirmed as killed in action, this was his 15th sortie with 622 Squadron.

First time on the market, dark toned

EF £195 SOLD


Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp, British War and Victory Medals, Imperial Service Medal GVI 1st type to William Henry Notton born in St Paul’s, Bristol 27th November 1877 a Currier (Leather industry), he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Northampton 21st January 1895. Serving aboard HMS Powerful 5th July 1897 to 9th June 1902 including the operations in South Africa.  Rated Sailmaker’s Mate aboard HMS Euryalus 19th May 1905, joining HMS Gladiator 29th May 1906, he was discharged shore from this ship 26th November 1907 on expiry of engagement. The 1911 census records he is residing in Bristol and employed as a Postman. Joining the Army probably as a conscript, he served with the 16th (3rd Birmingham Pals) Battalion in France and Italy. Returning to his former employment post War, he was awarded the Imperial Service Medal on his retirement in 1938 he died in 1941 aged 64 years.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

W H Notton AB HMS Powerful

British War and Victory Medals

21263 Pte W H Notton R War R

Imperial Service Medal GVI 1st type

William Henry Notton

With copy Royal Navy Rating’s service record, Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War and Victory Medals only and London Gazette entry for ISM and other research from on line records.

Original silk ribbons, the ISM mounted for wear and contained in fitted presentation case.

William Henry Notton was born in St Paul’s, Bristol 27th November 1877, a Currier (Leather industry), he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Northampton 21st January 1895. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Volage 27th November 1895, he joined HMS Powerful 5th July 1897 and rated Able Seaman aboard this ship 20th October 1898 and taking part in the operations in South Africa 1899 to 1900. Joining Duke of Wellington I 9th June 1902, he continued to serve ashore and afloat and was rated Sailmaker’s Mate aboard HMS Euryalus 19th May 1905, joining HMS Gladiator 29th May 1906, he was discharged shore from this ship 26th November 1907 on expiry of engagement.

The 1911 census records William Henry Notton is a 34 year old Postman residing at 18 Bouveric Street, Bristol with his wife Elizabeth and daughter Lillian. Attesting for the Army, he was posted to the 16th (3rd Birmingham Pals) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment which served in France and Italy. Returning to Bristol at the end of hostilities and his former employment as Postman, The Western Daily Press dated 15th June 1938 page 7 records William Henry Notton awarded the Imperial Service Medal in last nights London Gazette for his services as Postman, Bristol region on his retirement. His retirement was short, he died in Weston Super Mare, Somerset in 1941 aged 64 years.

A most unusual combination.

First time on the market, dark toned

EF £275 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Okaleaf, India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24, Delhi Durbar King George V 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII to Major Henry John Wogan, Royal Engineers, Sappers and Miners and Military Works Service an Electrical Engineer born in Gosport, Hampshire in 1876, he attested for the Royal Engineers in 1891 aged 15 years. A Quarter Master Sergeant serving with the Calcutta Section, 1st King George’s Own Sappers and Miners for the Delhi Durbar of 1911, he served in Mesopotamia from August 1915 and was commissioned in November the same year. Three times Mentioned in Despatches for his services in Mesopotamia, post War he served in the Third Afghan War and the Waziristan operations 1919-24. Retiring from the Army in 1930 after 39 years service.

1914/15 Star

26764 ME Q M S H J Wogan RE

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Capt H J Wogan

India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24

Maj H J Wogan MWS

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army EVII

25764 Mech S SJT H J Wogan RE

With copy other ranks service papers and medal roll entries.

Henry John Wogan was born in Gosport, Hampshire  in 1876 and attested for the Royal Engineers at Chatham aged 15 years 7 months on 8th June 1891 and ranked as Boy. Ranked as Sapper 8th November 1893, appointed Lance Corporal 24th June 1898, promoted 2nd Corporal 1st August 1899, promoted Corporal 30th January 1902, Sergeant 30th July 1903, Mechanical Electrical Staff Sergeant 13th September 1906, Mechanical Electrical QM Sergeant 7th October 1910. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Royal Engineers 20th November 1915. Awarded Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army Order 270 of 1909, he appears on the Delhi Durbar 1911 roll as Quarter Master Sergeant Calcutta Section 1st Sappers and Miners. Promoted Tempory Captain in may 1916, Captain Royal Engineers (Indian Army) seniority backdated to 20th November 1915 (London Gazette 2nd February 1923 page 810), served in Mesopotamia from 8th August 1915, temporary Major 1st October 1919.

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 12th March 1918 page 3114 Mesopotamia

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 21st February 1919 page 2590 Mesopotamia

Mentioned in Despatches London Gazette 21st January 1920 page 514 Mesopotamia

Retiring on 8th November 1930 (London Gazette 5th December 1930 page 7769). Two clasps verified on the Medal rolls as Major Royal Engineers Military Works Department for Afghanistan NWF 1919, and Royal Engineers for Waziristan 1921-24, probably entitled to Waziristan 1919-21 too as his Medal Index Card records “Chief Engineer Waziristan Force forwards nominal roll of claims 3rd November 1919”.

NEF £595 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Okaleaf, Army Meritorious Service Medal GV (Immediate) to Chief Master Mechanic (Warrant Officer) Harold Isted Hooper, Royal Air Force late Royal Flying Corps a Carpenter born in Portsmouth in 1891. Enlisting into the Royal Flying Corps 20th February 1915, he served in France from 3rd April 1915. Rising steadily through the ranks, by May 1917 he had been promoted to Sergeant Major (Technical) and was awarded the MSM in January 1917 for his work at No 2 Aircraft Depot in ensuring aeroplanes required for work during the Somme offensive were kept  supplied with the necessary replacement parts. Mentioned in Despatches by Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig in November 1918, he transferred to the RAF Reserve in April 1919 and was discharged from the Reserve in February 1923. Returning to live and work in Portsmouth he died there in 1975 aged 83 years.

1914/15 Star

3892 2AM H J Hooper RFC

British War and Victory Medals

3892 SM1 H I Hooper RAF

Meritorious Service Medal GV Army (Immediate)

3892 FL Sgt H I Hooper RFC

With details extracted from his RAF service record, copy London Gazette entries and headers for MSM and MID, copy photos in uniform and copy MSM recommendation.

Note second initial “J” on 1914/15 Star.

Harold Isted Hooper was born in Portsmouth 22nd October 1891, a Carpenter he enlisted into the Royal Flying Corps as Air Mechanic 2nd Class 20th February 1915 and served in France from 3rd April 1915. Promoted Air Mechanic 1st Class 1st July 1915, Corporal 11th December 1915, Sergeant 1st January 1916, Flight Sergeant 1st March 1916, Acting Warrant Officer 1st February 1917, Sergeant Major (Technical) 2nd May 1917. Hooper married at Portsea, Portsmouth whilst home on leave in 1916, his next of kin recorded as his wife Gladys Amy Hooper, 19 Dudley Road, Copnor, Portsmouth.

“No 2 Aircraft Depot (France) from February 1916 until the present date he has been employed as NCO in charge of aeroplane stores. He has shown great energy and devotion to duty during a time of high pressure. The prompt way in which demands have been met has enabled machines required for work on the Somme to be supplied with the necessary replacements”.
Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig in his Despatch dated 8th November 1918 London Gazette 31st December 1918 page 15234.

Discharged to the RAF Reserve 28th April 1919, at the time he was serving with HQ 2nd Brigade, discharged from the RAF Reserve 19th February 1923. Returning to live and work in Portsmouth, he died there in 1975 aged 83 years.

Rare Army MSM to the Royal Flying Corps approximately 140 awarded of which less than 30 are known.

NEF £,1295 SOLD


Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911 to Lieutenant Commander William Henry John Parkin, Royal Navy a former Greenwich Hospital Scholar born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire in 1878,  he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class as St Vincent 10th July 1894. Serving aboard HMS Gibraltar during the operations in South Africa 1901-1902, promoted to Gunner (Warrant Officer) from Petty Officer 1st Class he accompanied HM The King and Queen aboard the Royal Yacht Medina for the Delhi Durbar of 1911. Commanding two Motor Torpedo Boats 1912-1913, he was appointed to HMS St Vincent in 1914 and served aboard this ship for the entire war including the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Commissioned Lieutenant in 1922, he retired in 1928 after 34 years service, promoted to Lt Commander on the retired list in 1930.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

W H J Parkin PO 1CL HMS Gibraltar

1914/15 Star,

Gnr W H J Parkin RN

British War and Victory Medals

Ch Gnr W H J Parkin RN

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

With copy service records, Medal rolls, article regarding HMS Medina etc.

William Henry John Parkin was born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire 31st December 1878 a former Greenwich Hospital Scholar he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class as St Vincent 10th July 1894. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Imperieuse 3rd March 1896, Able Seaman aboard HMS Comus 1st December 1897, he was advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Trafalgar 24th August 1899, Petty Officer of the Second Class at Excellent 7th June 1900 and First Class at Duke of Wellington I 17th June 1900. Joining HMS Gibraltar 5th March 1901, he served in South Africa (Medal no clasp). Joining Excellent 14th May 1902, he was promoted to Gunner (Warrant Officer) at Excellent 28th May 1903.

Appointed to HMS Medina 10th November 1910 to 15th February 1912, he received the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 for his services on this ship, converted to a Royal Yacht to convey the King, Queen and Royal party to India.

Image result for hms medina 1911 delhi durbar pictures
The Royal Yacht HMS Medina in her Royal Livery 1911
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The P & O liner Medina (1911) was fitted out as a Royal Yacht to take HM King George V and Queen Mary to India, for the Delhi Durbar. The ship was launched on 14th March 1911 and completed on 3rd September. Before entering commercial service she was requisitioned for use as Royal Yacht for the state visit to India, and was painted white with royal blue and gold hull bands, and buff funnels and masts. She was also given an additional mast abaft the bridge and partially refurnished, and commissioned at Portsmouth on 10th October 1911 as HMS Medina under the command of Rear-Admiral Sir Colin Keppel, whose flag is shown flying here. She sailed from Portsmouth with the royal party on 11th November 1911, escorted by the Armoured Cruisers Argyll, Cochrane, Defence and Natal. On arrival back in the UK on 5th February 1912, the ship was decommissioned and refitted for commercial service.
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Continuing to serve ashore and afloat on 1st March 1912 he was appointed to Torpedo Boat 57 (in command) and on 28th January 1913 to Torpedo Boat 78 (in command). Appointed to HMS St Vincent 14th April 1914, he served aboard this ship throughout the war being present at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. From 1910 on 31st May St Vincent began firing at what was initially identified as a German Battleship, but proved to be the Battle Cruiser SMS Moltke hitting her twice before she disappeared into the mist. On 4th August 1916 Parkin is noted as being admitted to Haslar Naval Hospital with Neurasthenia (Shell shock), probably the result of his experiences at Jutland having suffered the condition for 4 weeks, he was discharged to duty on 15th August 1916. Promoted Chief Gunner 29th May 1918, he was commissioned Lieutenant 12th August 1922 and placed on the retired list 31st December 1928 (London Gazette 4th January 1929 page 151). Promoted Lt Commander on the retired list 12th August 1930 (London Gazette 15th August 1930 page 5091).
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A rare Delhi Durbar to a Royal Navy Warrant Officer who accompanied the Royal Party on the Royal Yacht Medina.

NEF £700 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Petty Officer John Simpson Furmark was born in Durham 11th April 1895, an Apprentice (Shipyard) Plater residing at 27 Norfolk Street, North Shields he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 24th April 1913. Advanced to Leading Seaman 9th March 1915 and to Petty Officer 5th August 1915. Drafted to Nelson Battalion 5th December 1915, arriving too late to serve at Gallipoli he joined his Battalion at Mudros 9th January 1916. Embarked aboard HMT Ionian at Mudros 16th May 1916, he disembarked as Marseilles, France 22nd May 1916. Severely wounded in action 13th November 1916 during the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaucourt, Somme sector, gun shot wound right leg. Heavy casualties were sustained by the leading waves of Nelson Battalion during the advance on Station Road, the Divisional history by Douglas Jerrold notes the third and fourth waves fell almost to a man in the first and second German lines, withdrawn two days later the Battalion suffered 342 killed and wounded. Evacuated to hospital in England, he was eventually discharged 31st January 1919. The 1939 Register records he is a Ship’s Plater residing at 16 Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, he died in Tynemouth, Northumberland in 1947 aged 51 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

T2-182 J S Furmark PO RNVR

With copy service records.

John Simpson Furmark was born in Durham 11th April 1895, an Apprentice (Shipyard) Plater residing at 27 Norfolk Street, North Shields he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 24th April 1913. Advanced to Leading Seaman 9th March 1915 and to Petty Officer 5th August 1915. Drafted to Nelson Battalion 5th December 1915, arriving too late to serve at Gallipoli he joined his Battalion at Mudros 9th January 1916. Embarked aboard HMT Ionian at Mudros 16th May 1916, he disembarked as Marseilles, France 22nd May 1916.

Severely wounded in action 13th November 1916 during the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaucourt, Somme sector, gun shot wound right leg. Heavy casualties were sustained by the leading waves of Nelson Battalion during the advance on Station Road, the Divisional history by Douglas Jerrold notes the third and fourth waves fell almost to a man in the first and second German lines, withdrawn two days later the Battalion suffered 342 killed and wounded. Admitted to No 6 British Red Cross Hospital Etaples following evacuation from Field Ambulance and casualty clearing station 14th November, he was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel 5th December 1916 and admitted to No 3 Northern General Hospital at Sheffield the following day. Joining Victory IV 1st December 1917 having completed hospital treatment, he remained unfit for sea or RND service and was discharged 31st January 1919. The 1939 Register records he is a Ship’s Plater residing at 16 Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, he died in Tynemouth, Northumberland in 1947 aged 51 years.

Assault and capture of Beaucourt 13th to 14th November 1916 (Battle of the Ancre)

At 0545 hours under the cover of the artillery barrage the leading battalions made good progress but at the cost of severe casualties from enfilading fire. Lt Colonel Tetley the CO of the Drake Battalion was mortally wounded and the CO of the Hood Battalion: Lt Colonel Freyberg found himself leading not only his own men but those of Drake Battalion as well. To their left the 188th Brigade were having an equally difficult time with 1st RMLI on the extreme left losing every Company Commander in the opening charge.

The Germans had been far from idle during their long stay in the area and they had constructed a well connected system of tunnels using medieval tunnels and catacombs.In the valley Freyberg advanced again at 0745 with his two battalions and part of the 1st HAC. Within an hour and a half he was confident enough that he could take the village of Beaucourt. However, with the left flank of the Division still hanging in the air, General Shute told Freyberg to hold fast whilst the artillery continued with the bombardment and the 188th Brigade attempted further attacks across its front. The following day Freyberg and his men stormed the village. Despite the strong resistance in the trenches to the west of the village, Beaucourt fell remarkably easily with the gain of 500 prisoners. By 1030 hours Freyberg could report that he was in control of Beaucourt.

New ribbons will be supplied.

GVF & better £195 Reserved


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve to Stoker 1st Class Joseph Clase, Royal Navy born in Brighton, Sussex in 1866. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Lion as a Band Boy 22nd August 1881, he transferred to the Stoker Branch aboard HMS Iron Duke 1st February 1887. Joining HMS Porpoise 22nd April 1903 he took part in the operations off Somaliland during 1903. Discharged to pension 26th September 1904, he did not qualify for the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having three breaks in Very Good Conduct. Re-joining HMS Revenge in December 1906 as a Domestic he was discharged the following year back to the Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined Victory II and served at Vernon from 1st September 1914 until demobilized 29th May 1919. The British War Medal being his only 1WW entitlement.

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

J Clase Sto HMS Porpoise

British War Medal

117156 J Clase Sto 1 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve GV

117156 (PO.A.1360) J Clase Sto 1 RFR

 With copy RN service record, Medal rolls  AGS with clasp, copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry confirming BWM only awarded for his First World War service.

Joseph Clase was born 4th August 1866 in Brighton, Sussex and entered the Royal Navy as Band Boy aboard HMS Lion 22nd August 1881. Rated Bandsman 2nd Class aboard Lion 29th September 1894 and Bandsman 1st June 1885 aboard the same ship. Joining HMS Iron Duke 7th May 1886, he changed branch and was rated Stoker 2nd Class from 1st February 1887 and Stoker from 1st August 1887 aboard this ship. Continuing to serve ashore and afloat, he was advanced to Leading Stoker 1st Class at Vivid II 16th May 1893 but was dis rated to Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Superb 30th January 1894 for incompetency. Joining HMS Australia 9th February 1894, he transferred to HM Coast Guard from this ship 2nd March 1894 as Boatman and joined the Coast Guard Station at Newhaven.

Returned to the Royal Navy and service afloat for misconduct 15th December 1897, he joined Victory II before going back to sea aboard HMS Marathon 2nd June 1898. Joining HMS Porpoise 23rd April 1903 he took part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, joining Firequeen II 18th August 1903, he was discharged to pension and the Royal Fleet Reserve 26th September 1904. Permitted to join HMS Revenge as Domestic 2nd Class 11th December 1906, he served aboard this ship until 24th June 1907. Mobilized from the Royal Fleet Reserve 2nd August 1914 he joined Victory II and served at Vernon from 1st September 1914 until discharged 22nd May 1919. The British War Medal being his only 1WW entitlement. 

Unusual combination.

GVF & better £325 Available 


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Natal, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) Thomas Charles Burton, Royal Navy a former Van Driver born in St Thomas, South Shields, Durham in 1876. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 20th February 1891, he served in the Boer War aboard HMS Thetis taking part in the operations ashore in Natal. Serving aboard HMS Merlin during the operations off Somaliland 1903 to 1904, he was still serving on the outbreak of the First World War. Serving ashore at Pembroke I and Vulcan, he was demobilized 20th October 1919 after over 28 years service.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Natal

T C Burton PO 1st CL HMS Thetis

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

T C Burton PO 1 CL HMS Merlin

British War Medal

159828 T C Burton CPO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

159828 T C Burton CPO HMS Pembroke

 With copy RN service record, Medal rolls confirming QSA and AGS with clasps, copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry confirming BWM only awarded for his First World War service.

Thomas Charles Barton was born 11th February 1876 in St Thomas, South Shields, Durham a Van Driver he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 20th February 1891. Rated Ordinary Seaman 11th February 1894 and Able Seaman 8th November 1894 aboard HMS Swallow. Advanced to Leading Seaman at Pembroke I 25th September 1896, he joined HMS Thetis 14th February 1898 taking part in the land operations in Natal during the Boer War. Advanced to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class 19th September 1898 and to the 1st Class 10th July 1900 aboard Thetis. Joining HMS Merlin 1st May 1903, he took part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, joining HMS Fox 17th April 1904. Advanced to acting Chief Petty Officer aboard HMS Swiftsure 17th July 1906 and confirmed in this rate at Pembroke 7th February 1909. Serving at  Vulcan 21st July 1914, he remained at this establishment for the duration of the War being demobilized to pension 20th October 1919. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 5th March 1909.

Nice combination to the Royal Navy, contact wear over first initial on AGS otherwise

GVF & better £650 SOLD


1914 Star with old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914,  British War & Victory Medals named to Private John Shergold, Wiltshire Regiment a former Farm Shepherd born in West Harnham, Wiltshire in 1891. Enlisting into the Wiltshire Regiment at Devizes 14th January 1913, he served in France from 21st September 1914 with the 1st Battalion. Severely wounded in action 24th October 1914 at Neuve Chapelle, shell fragment wounds right and left thighs, evacuated to England he arrived at No 2 Southern General Hospital, Bristol five days later. Recovering he joined the 2nd Battalion in France 24th February 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps 5th August 1917 in France, he transferred to the Army Reserve 8th March 1919. Returning to his former employment as a Shepherd, he was employed as such in 1939 when residing in South Newton, Wiltshire. He died at his home in Salisbury 30th March 1960 aged 69 years. 

1914 Star and old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

3-9853 Pte J Shergold 1/Wilts R

British War and Victory Medals

9863 Pte J Shergold Wilts R

 With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, service papers, 1911 census entry, 1939 Registration roll entry etc.

Original long silk ribbons.

John Shergold was born Henry John Shergold in West Harnham, Wiltshire in 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Under Shepherd on a Farm residing with his father Henry a Shepherd, mother Edith Emma 3 brothers and an adopted sister at South Mill, Amesbury, Wiltshire. Attesting for the Wiltshire Regiment 14th January 1913 at Devizes, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 21st September 1914. Severely wounded in action at Neuve Chapelle 24th October 1914, shell fragment wounds both thighs. The fighting at Neuve Chapelle cost the 1st Battalion 2 officers killed, 5 wounded and 7 missing, with 45 other ranks killed, 150 wounded and 350 missing.

Evacuated to the Clearing Hospital at Bethune 25th October 1914 from No 7 Field Ambulance RAMC he was admitted to No 2 Southern General Hospital at Bristol 29th October 1914. Recovering, he arrived back in France on 24th February 1915 and joined the 2nd Battalion in the Field 28th February 1915. From June 1915 he appears to be attached to various Corps HQ’s, on 6th June 1916 whilst serving with IV Corps HQ a question is raised about his physical fitness due to “old wounds to legs”. Granted leave to England in December 1916, he returned to France and transferred to the Labour Corps 5th August 1917 being no longer fit for Infantry service. Returning to England 6th February 1919, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 8th March 1919.

The 1939 Register records he is employed as a Shepherd residing with his wife Elsie, son and daughter at South Newton, Wiltshire. Henry John Shergold died at his home 13 Clifton Road, Salisbury on 30th March 1960.

GVF £165 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Ernest Full, Sailmaker, Royal Navy born in Tamar, near Plymouth, Devon in 1879 and a former Greenwich Hospital School Boy, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 12th May 1895. Rated Sailmaker’s Mate 11th November 1910, he served aboard HMS Penguin on the Australia station 1911 to 1913 being rated Sailmaker aboard this ship in April 1913. Serving aboard HMS Erin on the outbreak of war and served aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Ending the war aboard HMS Suffolk, he was discharged shore to pension in December 1919 and served in HM Coast Guard from June 1920 to March 1923.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

183923 E Full SLMR RN

 Includes (modern embroidered) Sailmaker’s Trade Badge and folder of research. The Trio mounted as originally worn.

 Ernest Full, born 2nd November 1879 in Tamar near Plymouth Devon. Son of Samuel (a Naval Pensioner) and Elizabeth Full. Ernest entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 12th May 1895 aboard HMS Impregnable. Rated Boy 1st Class 30th January 1896, Ordinary Seaman 2nd November 1897 aboard HMS Intrepid, and Able Seaman 1st January 1899 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Sailmaker’s Mate 11th November 1910 aboard HMS Forth, he joined HMS Penguin 16th September 1911 on the Australia Station. Advanced to Sailmaker aboard Penguin 17th April 1913, on the outbreak of war he was serving aboard HMS Erin.

Serving aboard Erin at the Battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he joining Vivid I 7th October 1916, HMS Suffolk 17th May 1917, Vivid I 6th June 1919, HMS Snapdragon 2nd September 1919 and Vivid I 20th October 1919, he was discharged shore to pension 26th December 1919. On 15th June 1920 Full joined HM Coastguard and was stationed on the south coast of Ireland before returning to Stonehouse, Plymouth 20th July 1922, discharged 31st March 1923 on reduction of HM Coastguard.

Not awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, in May 1900 he was found guilty of being drunk on duty and sentenced to 28 days imprisonment with hard labour, his Conduct assessment was assessed as “Fair”. In 1904 he had a further break in “Very Good” conduct being downgraded to “Good” and another in 1910, disqualifying him from the Medal.

Scarce 1914/15 Trio named to a Sailmaker, his only Medal entitlement.

GVF £165 SOLD


Member of the British Empire (MBE) 2nd type Military, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type  to Commissioned Warrant Writer Kenneth Haseltine Summers, Royal Navy a former Railway Goods Office Junior Clerk born in Southsea, Portsmouth in 1892. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory I as Writer 3rd Class 10th June 1912, by January 1924 he had been advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer. Serving at Fordtitude the Royal Naval Base at Ardrosson, north Ayrshire on the outbreak of war, he was promoted to Temporary Warrant Writer 3rd July 1940 and appointed to the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Titania. Awarded the MBE for his services at Lynx, the Royal Naval Base at Dover. Retiring at the end of hostilities, he resided in Southsea, Portsmouth and died there in 1963. His brother Lance Sergeant Edwin Herbert Summers, 12th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment a Portsmouth School Teacher was killed in action Arras 8th May 1917.

Member of the British Empire (MBE) 2nd type Military

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

M.4647 K H Summers WTR 3 RN

British War and Victory Medals

M.4647 K H Summers WR 2 RN

1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy 2nd type

M.4647 K H Summers CPO WR HMS Curacoa

Mounted as originally worn with copy rating’s service record 1912 to 1940, London Gazette entry and header for MBE and other research from on line records.

Kenneth Haseltine Summers was born in Southsea, Portsmouth 28th April 1892. The 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Railway Goods Office Junior Clerk residing with his mother Mary Adela Summers a 46 year old Elementary School Head Teacher (father Captain Edwin Herbert Summers Merchant Marine absent) at 21 Pelham Road, Southsea. Entering the Royal Navy 10th June 1912 at Victory I as Writer 3rd Class, he subsequently joined HMS Ariadne 18th August 1912, HMS Superb 20th August 1913, Victory I 24th September 1915 where he was advanced to Writer 2nd Class 9th June 1916, Vernon 3rd January 1918, Royal Fleet Auxiliary Berbice 9th July 1918, Victory III 1st January 1922 where he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer 10th June 1922, HMS Curacoa 21st April 1925 and awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal aboard this ship 20th July 1927.

Joining Victory II 27th August 1927, Egmont 1st January 1931, Victory II 21st June 1932, he was discharged shore to pension 9th June 1934. Mobilized 27th April 1938 he re-joined Victory and was demobilized 25th November 1938. Re-entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 21st August 1939 as Pensioned Chief Petty Officer Writer, he joined Fortitude 27th August 1939 and promoted Temporary Warrant Writer 3rd July 1940, and appointed to the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Titania. Appointed to Lynx the Royal Navy Base at Dover 5th February 1942, he was awarded the MBE for his services during the War London Gazette 14th June 1945 page 2941. Promoted Commissioned Warrant Officer Writer 18th June 1945. Demobilized at the end of hostilities with the rank of Lieutenant (Supply), he returned to his home in Southsea, Portsmouth and died there on 24th March 1963.

His elder brother Lance Sergeant Edwin Herbert Summers, 12th Battalion Gloucester Regiment was killed in action Arras 8th May 1917 aged 27 years and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, educated at St Luke College, Exeter he was a Portsmouth School Teacher and left a widow and son.

GVF & better £450 Available


British War Medal and Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal EVII to Ernest Mondon, Petty Officer 1st Class, Royal Navy, a former Stone Mason born in Brixham, Devon in 1873. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906, Argyll was wrecked in a storm 28th October 1915. Discharged shore to pension 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, he spend the rest of the war ashore. Demobilized 28th April 1920, he returned to Brixham and died there in 1948.

British War Medal

150660 E Mondon PO1 R.N

EDVII Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

150660 Ernest Mondon PO 1 CL HMS Argyll

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Ernest Mondon was born in Brixham, Devon 1st September 1873, a Stone Mason, he came from a well-known fishing family in Brixham. He entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, rated Ordinary Seaman aboard 1st September 1891, Able Seaman 4th March 1893 aboard  HMS Shannon. Advanced to Leading Seaman 14th August 1899 and Petty Officer of the 2nd class 1st April 1900 aboard HMS Devastation. Advanced to Petty Officer 1st Class aboard HMS Lion 4th November 1903, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906. Discharged shore to pension from Defiance 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve.

Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, Defiance 25th November 1914 and Pomone 20th April 1915 he was demobilized 28th April 1920. Returning to Brixham, he died there 24th June 1948. HMS Argyll ran aground on Bell Rock, Dundee during a storm on 28th October 1915 and was a total loss.

Awarded the 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals reference Admiralty Medal roll TNA ADM171/110 page 321.

Toned

NEF £115 Available


Order of the British Empire (OBE), 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Lieutenant Richard Charles Clavell, Royal Navy born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire in 1891 and the son of a RMLI Major. Commencing his Naval training as Cadet in May 1904 aged 13 years. Appointed Midshipman in January 1909, he joined his first ship HMS Agamemnon. Appointed to HMS Fame in August 1914, to Torpedo Boat 38 (in command) in November 1914, running his ship aground in April 1915 he was court martialled and received a severe reprimand. Appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in September 1915 which was deployed to the Dardanelles. Appointed to HMS Queen in August 1916, HMS Southampton in February 1917 and Vernon in March 1918 for Mine Clearing duties awarded the OBE London Gazette 17 October 1919, ‘For valuable services in the Mine Clearance Force’, his OBE being awarded by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919. Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). He retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth on 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years. His son born in Australia in 1921 became a famous author and film script writer, a former Japanese POW, he moved to Hollywood in 1953.

Order of the British Empire (OBE) 1st Type Military reverse HM London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

Lieut R C Clavell RN

British War & Victory Medals

Lieut R C Clavell RN

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Clavell was born in 1891 in West Bromwich, the son of a Major, RMLI he began his Naval career at the age of 13 as Naval Cadet. Appointed Midshipman 15th January 1909, he served first in the Battleship HMS Agamemnon, then the Battlecruiser Invincible and the Destroyer Scorpion. Acting Sub Lieutenant 21st February 1912, Sub Lieutenant 15th April 1912, Lieutenant 15th April 1914. In 1913 he was appointed to the Destroyer HMS Kennet on the China station. In August 1914 she took part in operations off Tsingtau, the German colony in China. He then took command of Torpedo Boat 38 in Hong Kong on 20th November 1914. Court Martialled on 28th April 1915 for grounding his vessel, he pleaded guilty and received a severe reprimand. Returning to the UK in 1915, he  was appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in the eastern Mediterranean 9th September 1915. Appointed to HMS Queen 2nd August 1916, HMS Southampton 28th February 1917 and to Vernon 26th March 1918 to be trained as a Mine Warfare Specialist. Following the armistice he took part in the enormous operation to clear the minefields. Clavell’s team was allocated a particularly dangerous task – instead of simply blowing up the mines in situ, they had to recover the mines intact so that their effectiveness after months in the sea could be assessed. He was awarded the OBE London Gazette 17th October 1919 page 12778 “For valuable service with the Mine Clearance Force”.

The official recommendation TNA ADM171/84 page 184 states –

“Lieutenant Clavell was detailed by the Mining School for this duty during mine clearance operations in order to obtain information as to the endurance of British mining material when laid under service conditions. All work was carried out in an area of the Yorkshire Minefield between 28th April and 14th August 1919. In all 61 mines were salved and examined, of these, 46 were laid 8 feet deep, 14 were laid 65 feet deep and 1 laid 95 feet deep, the greatest number on mines salved in one day was on 11th June 1919. 8 were recovered the following day, 7 on 3rd June and 6 on 6th June and 22nd July. The remainder were recovered on average 4 a day. The fact that this work has been successfully carried out without mishap of any kind reflects great credit on all concerned and especially on Lieutenant Clavell”.

Presented with the OBE by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919.

Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). Promoted Lieutenant Commander 15th April 1922, he retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years following a heart attack.

Clavell ‘s son James was born in Sydney in 1921. In 1940 he was commissioned into the Royal Artillery and posted in Singapore where he was captured by the Japanese and imprisoned in Changi. Sadly, his father died in 1945 just a few months before his liberation. James Clavell emigrated to the US where he became a successful scriptwriter for Hollywood (The Fly, The Great Escape, To Sir With Love). In 1960 he wrote a novel based on his experiences as a POW – ‘King Rat’. Thereafter James Clavell wrote a series of bestsellers and became one of the most widely-read authors of the 1960s-80s; Tai-Pan, Gai-Jin, Noble House and many others. Most of his novels featured westerners in the Far East. According to his obituary, this fascination with the Orient came from listening to his father’s tales of adventure on the China coast.

A rare post War award for mine recovery and disposal.

GVF £675 Available


1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Able Seaman Thomas Clarke Hare, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a Solicitor’s Clerk from Lambeth South East London born in 1896. Entering the RNVR in March 1912, he was mobilized on the outbreak of War and served with Collingwood Battalion, Royal Naval Division during the defence of Antwerp. Interned in Holland, he was twice sent on leave in 1916 and 1918, returning to Holland on both occasions. Repatriated in November 1918 and demobilized in January 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Kingston on Thames and employed as a Civil Servant, he died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

1914 Star

L8/2648 T Hare Ord Sea RNVR Collinwood Bttn RND

British War & Victory Medals

L8/2648 T Hare AB RNVR

With copy service record.

Thomas Clarke Hare was born in Lambeth, SE London 20th July 1896, the 1911 census records he is a Solicitor’s Office Boy residing with his father Thomas, mother Minnie and two sisters at 5 Howley Street, York Road, Lambeth SE. Joining the RNVR as Ordinary Seaman 28th March 1912, he joined Collingwood Battalion RND 22nd August 1914 and landed for the defence of Antwerp, Belgium, those that could get away embarked for Dover on 11th October 1914, only 20 men from Collingwood Battalion escaped the remainder were interned in Holland. Reported as interned in Holland 8th October 1914, he was sent home on leave 11th October 1916 and returned to Holland 8th November 1916, his next leave home was 17th June 1918 and he returned to Holland 14th July 1918. Repatriated 19th November 1918, he was sent on leave joining the 1st Reserve Battalion RND 18th January 1919 on his return. Demobilized at Crystal Palace 30th January 1919, he married in 1921 Florence Elizabeth, the 1939 Register records he is a Civil Servant residing at 111 Barnfield Avenue, Kingston on Thames with his wife. He died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

GVF & better £295 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, Silver Medal 2nd Army Signalling School France 1918 to Signal Sergeant Joseph Reginald Marsh, 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment a Chemist born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892. Residing in Sheffield in 1913 when he joined the Territorial Army, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion seeing action during the battle of Auber’s Ridge in May 1915, The Somme offensive in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Serving in France until 9th December 1918, he returned home and was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

1914/15 Star

200222 Pte J R Marsh York & Lanc R

British War & Victory Medals

200222 SJT J R Marsh Y & L R

2nd Army Signal School France Sept – Oct 1918 Silver Medal the reverse engraved

“Football Comp Sgt J Marsh” hallmarks for Birmingham 1917

With details of service extracted from his on line service record.

Joseph Reginald Marsh was born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892, a Chemist residing with his family at 1 Swaledale Road, Sheffield, he attested for the 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment TF on 13th March 1913. Appointed Lance Corporal, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion taking part in the fighting at Auber’s Ridge in May 1915. Later to see action on the Somme in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Promoted Corporal 1st August 1917 and Sergeant 28th May 1918 he was an Army Signaller. Returning home 9th December 1918, he was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

GVF & better £125 Available


British War & Victory Medals to Gunner Alfred Milner Anderson, South African Heavy Artillery a Fitter from Belgravia, Johannesburg born in 1898. Enlisting at Cape Town in July 1917, he arrived in England in September 1917 and in France in January 1918 where he joined 73rd Siege Battery the following month. In June 1918 he was treated in hospital in France with shell shock, he had previously been subject to bombardments of high explosive and gas shells on 9th and 12th April 1918. Re-joining his battery in September 1918, he returned to England in March 1919 and was discharged in South Africa in June 1919. He died in Johannesburg in April 1966.

British War and Victory Medals (Bi-lingual reverse Victory Medal)

Gnr A M Anderson SAHA

With copy service papers and a photo of the recipient in later life.

Alfred Milner Anderson was born in Durban, Natal, South Africa in 1898, a Fitter residing in Belgravia, Johannesburg, he attested for the South African Heavy Artillery at Cape Town 11th July 1917. Arriving in England 14th September 1917 and in France 29th January 1918. Posted to 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery in the field 18th February 1918, he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance 5th June 1918 with shell shock (Neurasthenia) and transferred to No 18 General Hospital, France 19th July 1918. Re-joining his Battery on recovery in the field 1st September 1918, he returned to England 20th March 1919 for onward travel to South Africa arriving home, he was discharged 6th June 1919.

His Medical Card records whilst serving with 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery on 5th June 1918 at Verquin at 2100, he went sick because he was very shaky and could not stand the noise of the guns. He had previously been subject to a bombardment of high explosive and gas shells on 9th April 1918 and a bombardment of high explosive 8 inch shells on 12th April 1918.

Alfred Milner Anderson died in Johannesburg 7th April 1966.

EF £55 Available


From left to right –

Victory Medal to Captain Charles Hamilton Russell Grant 2/22nd London Regiment a Dental Surgeon from Cricklewood, London born in Singapore in 1882. Serving in France, Salonica and Palestine he was Mentioned in Despatches by General Allenby in 1919. He died in Willesden General Hospital following an operation in 1931.

Victory Medal

Capt C H R Grant

British War Medal to Captain Wilfred Hardinge Heinig, 54th Sikhs, Indian Army attached 51st Sikhs born in 1887 in India, he was educated at King’s College School. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant from the RMC Sandhurst in August 1907, he joined the 54th Sikhs, Indian Army and was promoted to Captain in September 1915. Killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years when leading his company of the 51st Sikhs in an attack on the Turkish trenches. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial. 

British War Medal

Capt W H Heinig

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge 4th Battalion London Regiment born in Barnet, London in 1896. Educated at Barnet Grammar School, he was a banker before volunteering in September 1914. Serving as a Private soldier in the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli he was commissioned into the 4th Battalion London Regiment in October 1916. Serving in France attached to the 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W K E Mansbridge

Charles Hamilton Russell Grant was born in Singapore in 1882, the 1911 census records he is a Dental Surgeon residing with his wife, son and daughter in Cricklewood, London NW2.

Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 2nd Battalion 22nd London Regiment 1st October 1914 (London Gazette 17th October 1914 page 8335). Mentioned in Despatches (General Allenby) for distinguished services in Egypt during the period 19th September 1918 to 31st January 1919 London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7182. From The Willesden Chronicle 12th June 1931 page 9

“The death occurred at Willesden General Hospital following an operation yesterday (Monday) of Mr Russell Grant LDS, RCS of 92 Walm Lane, Cricklewood. Mr Grant had been Hon Dental Surgeon to Willesden hospital for the last 10 years and at the annual general meeting of the hospital last night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the bereaved family”.

Mr Grant was a student at the National Dental Hospital (now the Dental Department of the University College Hospital) where he obtained the Gold Medal for 1902 and qualified in 1903. With the exception of the War years, he practiced mainly in Willesden Green since that date and his skill and ability brought him a considerable practice. He was for over 10 years a much valued member of the Honorary Staff of the Willesden Hospital, and his loss is keenly felt by his colleagues there. One of the earliest volunteers for the War he took a combatant commission in the 2/22nd London Regiment (The Queen’s) in September 1914 and served throughout, first on the Somme, then in Salonika and finally Palestine where he took part in the capture of Jerusalem. He had by then reached the rank of Captain and been Mentioned in Despatches and appointed to the Staff of General (now Lord) Allenby.

In Jerusalem he contracted Typhoid Fever and was invalided back to Egypt where he apparently recovered, but his death was probably due to a sequel of that disease. Latterly Mr Grant had lived in Eastcote, where he took an active part in local affairs, and also in the neighbouring district of Northwood, where he had been a Churchwarden of Emmanuel Church. In all these circles, as well as among his many friends and relations, he will be very sadly missed”. With copy Medal Index Card (awarded British War and Victory Medals only), copy obituary, newspaper article, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, census entry 1911.

GVF £95 SOLD

Wilfred Hardinge Heinig was killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years in Mesopotamia. Born in 1887, he entered King’s College School in 1899. He was in the second XV in 1904 and in the first XV in 1905-6, and a School Prefect in 1906. From school he entered Sandhurst from which he passed out in a high position in August 1907. He joined the 54th Sikhs Indian Army and spent his military life in India. He was ordered to Mesopotamia in January last . Letters received from his fellow officers show he always retained his very high sense of duty and at the same time overflowed with high spirits and joy in life generally. His Commanding Officer, Colonel Magrath wrote of him –

“It was with rather a heavy heart that I detailed him to proceed with a draft as, apart from the fact he was my Quartermaster and a very hard working and useful officer at that, he was always so cheery and of such a bright disposition, that he was the life and soul of the Mess during the dull times we spent at Fort Lockhart and Hangu. I have just heard from Captain O’Neill that his same cheery disposition made him most popular with the 51st in the Field, and he did a lot to keep their spirits up in the trenches. But most important to you of all will be the news that he died like a very gallant soldier, at the head of his company in an assault on the Turkish trenches on 6th April. He was killed instantaneously, shot through the head and heart, and thus met with a glorious death. His loss to the Regiment is a heavy one, but we all feel proud of him and he has well upheld the name of the 54th”.

The only son of Robert Lawrence and Mary Heinig of “Deanurst”, Barton Road, Montpellier, Torquay, Devon. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

With copy Medal Index Card which records the award of the British War and Victory Medals, newspaper articles, copy photo in The Sphere dated 20th May 1916 etc.

GVF £145 SOLD

Kenneth William Elliott Mansbridge was born in Barnet, London in 1896, he served with the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli. Commissioned 25th October 1916 he served in France attached 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years.

From The Hendon Times 19th October 1917 page 5

“The death in action on 4th October 1917 is announced of 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth William Elliott Lovell (sic) Mansbridge, the elder son of Mr E Lovell Mansbridge of the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House and of “Elleborn”, Lichfield Grove, Church End Finchley. Lieutenant Lovell Mansbridge was educated at Barnet Grammar School, after which he took up Banking as a career. He enlisted within three weeks of the outbreak of War in the Royal Fusiliers (4th London Regiment). He saw varied service in Malta, Egypt (from 24th August 1915) and Gallipoli where he experienced 4 months of severe campaigning. He was invalided to Malta seven days before the evacuation of the Peninsula. He returned to England and in May 1916 was nominated for a commission. His Cadet training took place at Lichfield and on 25th October 1916, he was Gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the (4th Battalion) London Regiment. In January this year he was attached to the (13th Battalion) King’s Royal Rifle Corps and saw service in France till the great advance of 4th October when he met his death on the field of honour, This gallant young officer was only 20 years old”.

Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. With copy census details, Medal Index Card, Newspaper article, London Gazette announcing his commission, casualty details. Not sure where “Lovell Mansbridge” came from all official documents give his name as William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge.

GVF £85 Available


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £195 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £195 SOLD



Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911 to Lieutenant Commander William Henry John Parkin, Royal Navy a former Greenwich Hospital Scholar born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire in 1878,  he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class as St Vincent 10th July 1894. Serving aboard HMS Gibraltar during the operations in South Africa 1901-1902, promoted to Gunner (Warrant Officer) from Petty Officer 1st Class he accompanied HM The King and Queen aboard the Royal Yacht Medina for the Delhi Durbar of 1911. Commanding two Motor Torpedo Boats 1912-1913, he was appointed to HMS St Vincent in 1914 and served aboard this ship for the entire war including the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Commissioned Lieutenant in 1922, he retired in 1928 after 34 years service, promoted to Lt Commander on the retired list in 1930.

Queen’s South Africa Medal no clasp

W H J Parkin PO 1CL HMS Gibraltar

1914/15 Star,

Gnr W H J Parkin RN

British War and Victory Medals

Ch Gnr W H J Parkin RN

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

With copy service records, Medal rolls, article regarding HMS Medina etc.

William Henry John Parkin was born in Alverstoke, Gosport, Hampshire 31st December 1878 a former Greenwich Hospital Scholar he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class as St Vincent 10th July 1894. Rated Ordinary Seaman aboard HMS Imperieuse 3rd March 1896, Able Seaman aboard HMS Comus 1st December 1897, he was advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Trafalgar 24th August 1899, Petty Officer of the Second Class at Excellent 7th June 1900 and First Class at Duke of Wellington I 17th June 1900. Joining HMS Gibraltar 5th March 1901, he served in South Africa (Medal no clasp). Joining Excellent 14th May 1902, he was promoted to Gunner (Warrant Officer) at Excellent 28th May 1903.

Appointed to HMS Medina 10th November 1910 to 15th February 1912, he received the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 for his services on this ship, converted to a Royal Yacht to convey the King, Queen and Royal party to India.

Image result for hms medina 1911 delhi durbar pictures
The Royal Yacht HMS Medina in her Royal Livery 1911
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The P & O liner Medina (1911) was fitted out as a Royal Yacht to take HM King George V and Queen Mary to India, for the Delhi Durbar. The ship was launched on 14th March 1911 and completed on 3rd September. Before entering commercial service she was requisitioned for use as Royal Yacht for the state visit to India, and was painted white with royal blue and gold hull bands, and buff funnels and masts. She was also given an additional mast abaft the bridge and partially refurnished, and commissioned at Portsmouth on 10th October 1911 as HMS Medina under the command of Rear-Admiral Sir Colin Keppel, whose flag is shown flying here. She sailed from Portsmouth with the royal party on 11th November 1911, escorted by the Armoured Cruisers Argyll, Cochrane, Defence and Natal. On arrival back in the UK on 5th February 1912, the ship was decommissioned and refitted for commercial service.
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Continuing to serve ashore and afloat on 1st March 1912 he was appointed to Torpedo Boat 57 (in command) and on 28th January 1913 to Torpedo Boat 78 (in command). Appointed to HMS St Vincent 14th April 1914, he served aboard this ship throughout the war being present at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. From 1910 on 31st May St Vincent began firing at what was initially identified as a German Battleship, but proved to be the Battle Cruiser SMS Moltke hitting her twice before she disappeared into the mist. On 4th August 1916 Parkin is noted as being admitted to Haslar Naval Hospital with Neurasthenia (Shell shock), probably the result of his experiences at Jutland having suffered the condition for 4 weeks, he was discharged to duty on 15th August 1916. Promoted Chief Gunner 29th May 1918, he was commissioned Lieutenant 12th August 1922 and placed on the retired list 31st December 1928 (London Gazette 4th January 1929 page 151). Promoted Lt Commander on the retired list 12th August 1930 (London Gazette 15th August 1930 page 5091).
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A rare Delhi Durbar to a Royal Navy Warrant Officer who accompanied the Royal Party on the Royal Yacht Medina.

NEF £750 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Petty Officer John Simpson Furmark was born in Durham 11th April 1895, an Apprentice (Shipyard) Plater residing at 27 Norfolk Street, North Shields he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 24th April 1913. Advanced to Leading Seaman 9th March 1915 and to Petty Officer 5th August 1915. Drafted to Nelson Battalion 5th December 1915, arriving too late to serve at Gallipoli he joined his Battalion at Mudros 9th January 1916. Embarked aboard HMT Ionian at Mudros 16th May 1916, he disembarked as Marseilles, France 22nd May 1916. Severely wounded in action 13th November 1916 during the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaucourt, Somme sector, gun shot wound right leg. Heavy casualties were sustained by the leading waves of Nelson Battalion during the advance on Station Road, the Divisional history by Douglas Jerrold notes the third and fourth waves fell almost to a man in the first and second German lines, withdrawn two days later the Battalion suffered 342 killed and wounded. Evacuated to hospital in England, he was eventually discharged 31st January 1919. The 1939 Register records he is a Ship’s Plater residing at 16 Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, he died in Tynemouth, Northumberland in 1947 aged 51 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

T2-182 J S Furmark PO RNVR

With copy service records.

John Simpson Furmark was born in Durham 11th April 1895, an Apprentice (Shipyard) Plater residing at 27 Norfolk Street, North Shields he attested for the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 24th April 1913. Advanced to Leading Seaman 9th March 1915 and to Petty Officer 5th August 1915. Drafted to Nelson Battalion 5th December 1915, arriving too late to serve at Gallipoli he joined his Battalion at Mudros 9th January 1916. Embarked aboard HMT Ionian at Mudros 16th May 1916, he disembarked as Marseilles, France 22nd May 1916.

Severely wounded in action 13th November 1916 during the Royal Naval Division’s attack on Beaucourt, Somme sector, gun shot wound right leg. Heavy casualties were sustained by the leading waves of Nelson Battalion during the advance on Station Road, the Divisional history by Douglas Jerrold notes the third and fourth waves fell almost to a man in the first and second German lines, withdrawn two days later the Battalion suffered 342 killed and wounded. Admitted to No 6 British Red Cross Hospital Etaples following evacuation from Field Ambulance and casualty clearing station 14th November, he was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel 5th December 1916 and admitted to No 3 Northern General Hospital at Sheffield the following day. Joining Victory IV 1st December 1917 having completed hospital treatment, he remained unfit for sea or RND service and was discharged 31st January 1919. The 1939 Register records he is a Ship’s Plater residing at 16 Dockwray Square, Tynemouth, he died in Tynemouth, Northumberland in 1947 aged 51 years.

Assault and capture of Beaucourt 13th to 14th November 1916 (Battle of the Ancre)

At 0545 hours under the cover of the artillery barrage the leading battalions made good progress but at the cost of severe casualties from enfilading fire. Lt Colonel Tetley the CO of the Drake Battalion was mortally wounded and the CO of the Hood Battalion: Lt Colonel Freyberg found himself leading not only his own men but those of Drake Battalion as well. To their left the 188th Brigade were having an equally difficult time with 1st RMLI on the extreme left losing every Company Commander in the opening charge.

The Germans had been far from idle during their long stay in the area and they had constructed a well connected system of tunnels using medieval tunnels and catacombs.In the valley Freyberg advanced again at 0745 with his two battalions and part of the 1st HAC. Within an hour and a half he was confident enough that he could take the village of Beaucourt. However, with the left flank of the Division still hanging in the air, General Shute told Freyberg to hold fast whilst the artillery continued with the bombardment and the 188th Brigade attempted further attacks across its front. The following day Freyberg and his men stormed the village. Despite the strong resistance in the trenches to the west of the village, Beaucourt fell remarkably easily with the gain of 500 prisoners. By 1030 hours Freyberg could report that he was in control of Beaucourt.

New ribbons will be supplied.

GVF & better £195 Reserved


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


British War Medal, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919, King George V Delhi Durbar 1911, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Lance Corporal Jervis Thorrington, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (DWR) a former Porter born on Southwark, London in 1881. Attesting for the DWR at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903, he served with the 1st Battalion in India from 1904 to 1920 including the Third Afghan War of 1919, he served in Palestine in 1920 including service on Gun Boats. Awarded the LSGC Medal in April 1922, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924, home address recorded as Peckham, London, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

British War Medal

7620 Pte J Thorrington W Rid R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

7620 Pte T Thorrington 1/Duke of Wellington’s Regt

Delhi Durbar Medal King George V 1911

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

4601908 Pte J Thorrington DWR

With copy Army service record, Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries etc.

Jervis Thorrington was born in Southwark, London in 1881, a 22 yaer 2 month old Porter he attested for the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment at Halifax, Yorkshire 14th October 1903 and joined the 1st Battalion from the Depot 23rd February 1904. Posted to the 2nd Battalion 23rd November 1904 and back to the 1st Battalion 4th November 1905, he re-engaged at Quetta, India to complete 21 years service 29th March 1919. Posted to the Depot 17th August 1920, appointed Lance Corporal 22nd December 1922, posted 1st Battalion 11th December 1923, he was discharged to pension 11th October 1924. Serving in India from 23rd November 1904 to 11th January 1920, Palestine 25th January 1920 to 16th August 1920 including service aboard Gun Boats. Leaving Palestine for England 17th August 1920.

Awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (recorded on his service record), British War Medal for services in India during the First World War, India General Service Medal clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 and the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Order dated April 1922. Home address on discharge recorded as 80 Clifton Crescent, Asylum Road, Peckham, London, SE15, he died in Camberwell, London in 1949.

GVF & better £395 Available 


Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve to Stoker 1st Class Joseph Clase, Royal Navy born in Brighton, Sussex in 1866. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Lion as a Band Boy 22nd August 1881, he transferred to the Stoker Branch aboard HMS Iron Duke 1st February 1887. Joining HMS Porpoise 22nd April 1903 he took part in the operations off Somaliland during 1903. Discharged to pension 26th September 1904, he did not qualify for the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal having three breaks in Very Good Conduct. Re-joining HMS Revenge in December 1906 as a Domestic he was discharged the following year back to the Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined Victory II and served at Vernon from 1st September 1914 until demobilized 29th May 1919. The British War Medal being his only 1WW entitlement.

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

J Clase Sto HMS Porpoise

British War Medal

117156 J Clase Sto 1 RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Fleet Reserve GV

117156 (PO.A.1360) J Clase Sto 1 RFR

 With copy RN service record, Medal rolls  AGS with clasp, copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry confirming BWM only awarded for his First World War service.

Joseph Clase was born 4th August 1866 in Brighton, Sussex and entered the Royal Navy as Band Boy aboard HMS Lion 22nd August 1881. Rated Bandsman 2nd Class aboard Lion 29th September 1894 and Bandsman 1st June 1885 aboard the same ship. Joining HMS Iron Duke 7th May 1886, he changed branch and was rated Stoker 2nd Class from 1st February 1887 and Stoker from 1st August 1887 aboard this ship. Continuing to serve ashore and afloat, he was advanced to Leading Stoker 1st Class at Vivid II 16th May 1893 but was dis rated to Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Superb 30th January 1894 for incompetency. Joining HMS Australia 9th February 1894, he transferred to HM Coast Guard from this ship 2nd March 1894 as Boatman and joined the Coast Guard Station at Newhaven.

Returned to the Royal Navy and service afloat for misconduct 15th December 1897, he joined Victory II before going back to sea aboard HMS Marathon 2nd June 1898. Joining HMS Porpoise 23rd April 1903 he took part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, joining Firequeen II 18th August 1903, he was discharged to pension and the Royal Fleet Reserve 26th September 1904. Permitted to join HMS Revenge as Domestic 2nd Class 11th December 1906, he served aboard this ship until 24th June 1907. Mobilized from the Royal Fleet Reserve 2nd August 1914 he joined Victory II and served at Vernon from 1st September 1914 until discharged 22nd May 1919. The British War Medal being his only 1WW entitlement. 

Unusual combination.

GVF & better £325 Available 


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Natal, Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, British War Medal, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Chief Petty Officer (Seaman Gunner) Thomas Charles Burton, Royal Navy a former Van Driver born in St Thomas, South Shields, Durham in 1876. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 20th February 1891, he served in the Boer War aboard HMS Thetis taking part in the operations ashore in Natal. Serving aboard HMS Merlin during the operations off Somaliland 1903 to 1904, he was still serving on the outbreak of the First World War. Serving ashore at Pembroke I and Vulcan, he was demobilized 20th October 1919 after over 28 years service.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Natal

T C Burton PO 1st CL HMS Thetis

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

T C Burton PO 1 CL HMS Merlin

British War Medal

159828 T C Burton CPO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

159828 T C Burton CPO HMS Pembroke

 With copy RN service record, Medal rolls confirming QSA and AGS with clasps, copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry confirming BWM only awarded for his First World War service.

Thomas Charles Barton was born 11th February 1876 in St Thomas, South Shields, Durham a Van Driver he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable 20th February 1891. Rated Ordinary Seaman 11th February 1894 and Able Seaman 8th November 1894 aboard HMS Swallow. Advanced to Leading Seaman at Pembroke I 25th September 1896, he joined HMS Thetis 14th February 1898 taking part in the land operations in Natal during the Boer War. Advanced to Petty Officer of the 2nd Class 19th September 1898 and to the 1st Class 10th July 1900 aboard Thetis. Joining HMS Merlin 1st May 1903, he took part in the operations off Somaliland aboard this ship, joining HMS Fox 17th April 1904. Advanced to acting Chief Petty Officer aboard HMS Swiftsure 17th July 1906 and confirmed in this rate at Pembroke 7th February 1909. Serving at  Vulcan 21st July 1914, he remained at this establishment for the duration of the War being demobilized to pension 20th October 1919. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 5th March 1909.

Nice combination to the Royal Navy, contact wear over first initial on AGS otherwise

GVF & better £650 Reserved


1914 Star with old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914,  British War & Victory Medals named to Private John Shergold, Wiltshire Regiment a former Farm Shepherd born in West Harnham, Wiltshire in 1891. Enlisting into the Wiltshire Regiment at Devizes 14th January 1913, he served in France from 21st September 1914 with the 1st Battalion. Severely wounded in action 24th October 1914 at Neuve Chapelle, shell fragment wounds right and left thighs, evacuated to England he arrived at No 2 Southern General Hospital, Bristol five days later. Recovering he joined the 2nd Battalion in France 24th February 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps 5th August 1917 in France, he transferred to the Army Reserve 8th March 1919. Returning to his former employment as a Shepherd, he was employed as such in 1939 when residing in South Newton, Wiltshire. He died at his home in Salisbury 30th March 1960 aged 69 years. 

1914 Star and old copy clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

3-9853 Pte J Shergold 1/Wilts R

British War and Victory Medals

9863 Pte J Shergold Wilts R

 With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, service papers, 1911 census entry, 1939 Registration roll entry etc.

Original long silk ribbons.

John Shergold was born Henry John Shergold in West Harnham, Wiltshire in 1891, the 1911 census records he is a 15 year old Under Shepherd on a Farm residing with his father Henry a Shepherd, mother Edith Emma 3 brothers and an adopted sister at South Mill, Amesbury, Wiltshire. Attesting for the Wiltshire Regiment 14th January 1913 at Devizes, he served with the 1st Battalion in France from 21st September 1914. Severely wounded in action at Neuve Chapelle 24th October 1914, shell fragment wounds both thighs. The fighting at Neuve Chapelle cost the 1st Battalion 2 officers killed, 5 wounded and 7 missing, with 45 other ranks killed, 150 wounded and 350 missing.

Evacuated to the Clearing Hospital at Bethune 25th October 1914 from No 7 Field Ambulance RAMC he was admitted to No 2 Southern General Hospital at Bristol 29th October 1914. Recovering, he arrived back in France on 24th February 1915 and joined the 2nd Battalion in the Field 28th February 1915. From June 1915 he appears to be attached to various Corps HQ’s, on 6th June 1916 whilst serving with IV Corps HQ a question is raised about his physical fitness due to “old wounds to legs”. Granted leave to England in December 1916, he returned to France and transferred to the Labour Corps 5th August 1917 being no longer fit for Infantry service. Returning to England 6th February 1919, he was discharged to the Army Reserve 8th March 1919.

The 1939 Register records he is employed as a Shepherd residing with his wife Elsie, son and daughter at South Newton, Wiltshire. Henry John Shergold died at his home 13 Clifton Road, Salisbury on 30th March 1960.

GVF £165 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Ernest Full, Sailmaker, Royal Navy born in Tamar, near Plymouth, Devon in 1879 and a former Greenwich Hospital School Boy, he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 12th May 1895. Rated Sailmaker’s Mate 11th November 1910, he served aboard HMS Penguin on the Australia station 1911 to 1913 being rated Sailmaker aboard this ship in April 1913. Serving aboard HMS Erin on the outbreak of war and served aboard this ship at the battle of Jutland 31st May 1916. Ending the war aboard HMS Suffolk, he was discharged shore to pension in December 1919 and served in HM Coast Guard from June 1920 to March 1923.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

183923 E Full SLMR RN

 Includes (modern embroidered) Sailmaker’s Trade Badge and folder of research. The Trio mounted as originally worn.

 Ernest Full, born 2nd November 1879 in Tamar near Plymouth Devon. Son of Samuel (a Naval Pensioner) and Elizabeth Full. Ernest entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 12th May 1895 aboard HMS Impregnable. Rated Boy 1st Class 30th January 1896, Ordinary Seaman 2nd November 1897 aboard HMS Intrepid, and Able Seaman 1st January 1899 aboard the same ship. Advanced to Sailmaker’s Mate 11th November 1910 aboard HMS Forth, he joined HMS Penguin 16th September 1911 on the Australia Station. Advanced to Sailmaker aboard Penguin 17th April 1913, on the outbreak of war he was serving aboard HMS Erin.

Serving aboard Erin at the Battle of Jutland 31st May 1916, he joining Vivid I 7th October 1916, HMS Suffolk 17th May 1917, Vivid I 6th June 1919, HMS Snapdragon 2nd September 1919 and Vivid I 20th October 1919, he was discharged shore to pension 26th December 1919. On 15th June 1920 Full joined HM Coastguard and was stationed on the south coast of Ireland before returning to Stonehouse, Plymouth 20th July 1922, discharged 31st March 1923 on reduction of HM Coastguard.

Not awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, in May 1900 he was found guilty of being drunk on duty and sentenced to 28 days imprisonment with hard labour, his Conduct assessment was assessed as “Fair”. In 1904 he had a further break in “Very Good” conduct being downgraded to “Good” and another in 1910, disqualifying him from the Medal.

Scarce 1914/15 Trio named to a Sailmaker, his only Medal entitlement.

GVF £165 SOLD


Member of the British Empire (MBE) 2nd type Military, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type  to Commissioned Warrant Writer Kenneth Haseltine Summers, Royal Navy a former Railway Goods Office Junior Clerk born in Southsea, Portsmouth in 1892. Entering the Royal Navy at Victory I as Writer 3rd Class 10th June 1912, by January 1924 he had been advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer. Serving at Fordtitude the Royal Naval Base at Ardrosson, north Ayrshire on the outbreak of war, he was promoted to Temporary Warrant Writer 3rd July 1940 and appointed to the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Titania. Awarded the MBE for his services at Lynx, the Royal Naval Base at Dover. Retiring at the end of hostilities, he resided in Southsea, Portsmouth and died there in 1963. His brother Lance Sergeant Edwin Herbert Summers, 12th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment a Portsmouth School Teacher was killed in action Arras 8th May 1917.

Member of the British Empire (MBE) 2nd type Military

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

M.4647 K H Summers WTR 3 RN

British War and Victory Medals

M.4647 K H Summers WR 2 RN

1939/45 Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Navy 2nd type

M.4647 K H Summers CPO WR HMS Curacoa

Mounted as originally worn with copy rating’s service record 1912 to 1940, London Gazette entry and header for MBE and other research from on line records.

Kenneth Haseltine Summers was born in Southsea, Portsmouth 28th April 1892. The 1911 census records he is an 18 year old Railway Goods Office Junior Clerk residing with his mother Mary Adela Summers a 46 year old Elementary School Head Teacher (father Captain Edwin Herbert Summers Merchant Marine absent) at 21 Pelham Road, Southsea. Entering the Royal Navy 10th June 1912 at Victory I as Writer 3rd Class, he subsequently joined HMS Ariadne 18th August 1912, HMS Superb 20th August 1913, Victory I 24th September 1915 where he was advanced to Writer 2nd Class 9th June 1916, Vernon 3rd January 1918, Royal Fleet Auxiliary Berbice 9th July 1918, Victory III 1st January 1922 where he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer 10th June 1922, HMS Curacoa 21st April 1925 and awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal aboard this ship 20th July 1927.

Joining Victory II 27th August 1927, Egmont 1st January 1931, Victory II 21st June 1932, he was discharged shore to pension 9th June 1934. Mobilized 27th April 1938 he re-joined Victory and was demobilized 25th November 1938. Re-entering the Royal Navy at Victory II 21st August 1939 as Pensioned Chief Petty Officer Writer, he joined Fortitude 27th August 1939 and promoted Temporary Warrant Writer 3rd July 1940, and appointed to the Submarine Depot Ship HMS Titania. Appointed to Lynx the Royal Navy Base at Dover 5th February 1942, he was awarded the MBE for his services during the War London Gazette 14th June 1945 page 2941. Promoted Commissioned Warrant Officer Writer 18th June 1945. Demobilized at the end of hostilities with the rank of Lieutenant (Supply), he returned to his home in Southsea, Portsmouth and died there on 24th March 1963.

His elder brother Lance Sergeant Edwin Herbert Summers, 12th Battalion Gloucester Regiment was killed in action Arras 8th May 1917 aged 27 years and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, educated at St Luke College, Exeter he was a Portsmouth School Teacher and left a widow and son.

GVF & better £450 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Warrant Officer Class 2 Bernard Jones, Royal Naval Air Service a Soap Manufacturer Motor Engineer born in Leyton, Essex in 1892. Attesting for the Royal Naval Air Service as a Driver at Pembroke III in September 1914, he was rated Crew (Air) 1st October 1915. Promoted Warrant Officer Class 2 in June 1916 he joined the RNAS Kingsnorth Engineer’s Airship Construction Party. Demobilized at the end of hostilities, the 1939 Register records he is a Freelance Technical Journalist residing in Cuckfield, Sussex, he died the following year in Hove.

1914/15 Star

F.458 B Jones LM RNAS

British War and Victory Medals

WO2 B Jones RNAS

Mounted as originally worn with original silk medal ribbons, with copy TN & RAF service records.

Bernard Jones was born Bernard Moncrieff Jones at Leyton, Essex 30th December 1892, the 1911 census records he is a Soaf Manufacturer Motor Engineer aged 18 years residing with his extended family at 8 Park Place, Leyton, Essex. Attesting for the Royal Naval Air Service 16th September 1914, he was first employed as a Driver and on 1st April 1915 as Crew (Air) as a 1st Class Air Mechanic. Advanced to Leading Mechanic 1st August 1915, he was promoted Warrant Officer 2nd Class 13th June 1916 and joined the RN Air Station Kingsnorth as a member of the Engineer’s construction team.

RNAS Kingsnorth was a First World War Royal Naval Air Station for Airships, initially operating as an experimental and training station, it later moved on to large scale production of airships. It also provided anti-submarine patrols. A number of experimental and prototype blimps (Barrage Balloons) were designed and constructed there. It was located at the south eastern coast of the Hoo Peninsula, Kent.

Image result for rnas kingsnorth

The Airship NS 9 constructed at RNAS Kingsnorth in 1917

Demobilized at the end of hostilities, the 1939 Register records he is residing at Chantry House, Cuckfield, Sussex, a Freelance Technical Journalist he died in 1940 in Hove, Sussex aged 47 years.

NEF £225 SOLD


British War Medal and Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal EVII to Ernest Mondon, Petty Officer 1st Class, Royal Navy, a former Stone Mason born in Brixham, Devon in 1873. Entering the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906, Argyll was wrecked in a storm 28th October 1915. Discharged shore to pension 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve. Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, he spend the rest of the war ashore. Demobilized 28th April 1920, he returned to Brixham and died there in 1948.

British War Medal

150660 E Mondon PO1 R.N

EDVII Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

150660 Ernest Mondon PO 1 CL HMS Argyll

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Ernest Mondon was born in Brixham, Devon 1st September 1873, a Stone Mason, he came from a well-known fishing family in Brixham. He entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Impregnable as Boy 2nd Class 22nd July 1889, rated Ordinary Seaman aboard 1st September 1891, Able Seaman 4th March 1893 aboard  HMS Shannon. Advanced to Leading Seaman 14th August 1899 and Petty Officer of the 2nd class 1st April 1900 aboard HMS Devastation. Advanced to Petty Officer 1st Class aboard HMS Lion 4th November 1903, he joined HMS Argyll 2nd January 1906 and was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship 2nd October 1906. Discharged shore to pension from Defiance 30th August 1913, he joined Devonport Royal Fleet Reserve.

Mobilized 2nd August 1914 he joined the Armed Merchant Cruiser Oceanic, which ran aground onto the Shaalds of Foula in the Shetland Islands 7th September 1914, the vessel being a total loss. Joining Vivid 7th October 1914, Defiance 25th November 1914 and Pomone 20th April 1915 he was demobilized 28th April 1920. Returning to Brixham, he died there 24th June 1948. HMS Argyll ran aground on Bell Rock, Dundee during a storm on 28th October 1915 and was a total loss.

Awarded the 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals reference Admiralty Medal roll TNA ADM171/110 page 321.

Toned

NEF £115 Available


Order of the British Empire (OBE), 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Lieutenant Richard Charles Clavell, Royal Navy born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire in 1891 and the son of a RMLI Major. Commencing his Naval training as Cadet in May 1904 aged 13 years. Appointed Midshipman in January 1909, he joined his first ship HMS Agamemnon. Appointed to HMS Fame in August 1914, to Torpedo Boat 38 (in command) in November 1914, running his ship aground in April 1915 he was court martialled and received a severe reprimand. Appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in September 1915 which was deployed to the Dardanelles. Appointed to HMS Queen in August 1916, HMS Southampton in February 1917 and Vernon in March 1918 for Mine Clearing duties awarded the OBE London Gazette 17 October 1919, ‘For valuable services in the Mine Clearance Force’, his OBE being awarded by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919. Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). He retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth on 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years. His son born in Australia in 1921 became a famous author and film script writer, a former Japanese POW, he moved to Hollywood in 1953.

Order of the British Empire (OBE) 1st Type Military reverse HM London 1919

Unnamed as awarded

1914/15 Star

Lieut R C Clavell RN

British War & Victory Medals

Lieut R C Clavell RN

With folder of research including copy service record, original silk ribbons, mounted for wear.

Clavell was born in 1891 in West Bromwich, the son of a Major, RMLI he began his Naval career at the age of 13 as Naval Cadet. Appointed Midshipman 15th January 1909, he served first in the Battleship HMS Agamemnon, then the Battlecruiser Invincible and the Destroyer Scorpion. Acting Sub Lieutenant 21st February 1912, Sub Lieutenant 15th April 1912, Lieutenant 15th April 1914. In 1913 he was appointed to the Destroyer HMS Kennet on the China station. In August 1914 she took part in operations off Tsingtau, the German colony in China. He then took command of Torpedo Boat 38 in Hong Kong on 20th November 1914. Court Martialled on 28th April 1915 for grounding his vessel, he pleaded guilty and received a severe reprimand. Returning to the UK in 1915, he  was appointed to the Monitor Earl of Peterborough in the eastern Mediterranean 9th September 1915. Appointed to HMS Queen 2nd August 1916, HMS Southampton 28th February 1917 and to Vernon 26th March 1918 to be trained as a Mine Warfare Specialist. Following the armistice he took part in the enormous operation to clear the minefields. Clavell’s team was allocated a particularly dangerous task – instead of simply blowing up the mines in situ, they had to recover the mines intact so that their effectiveness after months in the sea could be assessed. He was awarded the OBE London Gazette 17th October 1919 page 12778 “For valuable service with the Mine Clearance Force”.

The official recommendation TNA ADM171/84 page 184 states –

“Lieutenant Clavell was detailed by the Mining School for this duty during mine clearance operations in order to obtain information as to the endurance of British mining material when laid under service conditions. All work was carried out in an area of the Yorkshire Minefield between 28th April and 14th August 1919. In all 61 mines were salved and examined, of these, 46 were laid 8 feet deep, 14 were laid 65 feet deep and 1 laid 95 feet deep, the greatest number on mines salved in one day was on 11th June 1919. 8 were recovered the following day, 7 on 3rd June and 6 on 6th June and 22nd July. The remainder were recovered on average 4 a day. The fact that this work has been successfully carried out without mishap of any kind reflects great credit on all concerned and especially on Lieutenant Clavell”.

Presented with the OBE by HM The King at Buckingham Palace 13th November 1919.

Post war Clavell had two long attachments, first to the Royal Australian Navy (1919-23), then to the RAF, where he was granted the rank of Squadron Leader (1929-34). Promoted Lieutenant Commander 15th April 1922, he retired in 1935 as a Commander RN and took up a position with the NAAFI. He died in Portsmouth 23rd June 1945 aged 53 years following a heart attack.

Clavell ‘s son James was born in Sydney in 1921. In 1940 he was commissioned into the Royal Artillery and posted in Singapore where he was captured by the Japanese and imprisoned in Changi. Sadly, his father died in 1945 just a few months before his liberation. James Clavell emigrated to the US where he became a successful scriptwriter for Hollywood (The Fly, The Great Escape, To Sir With Love). In 1960 he wrote a novel based on his experiences as a POW – ‘King Rat’. Thereafter James Clavell wrote a series of bestsellers and became one of the most widely-read authors of the 1960s-80s; Tai-Pan, Gai-Jin, Noble House and many others. Most of his novels featured westerners in the Far East. According to his obituary, this fascination with the Orient came from listening to his father’s tales of adventure on the China coast.

A rare post War award for mine recovery and disposal.

GVF £675 Available


1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Able Seaman Thomas Clarke Hare, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a Solicitor’s Clerk from Lambeth South East London born in 1896. Entering the RNVR in March 1912, he was mobilized on the outbreak of War and served with Collingwood Battalion, Royal Naval Division during the defence of Antwerp. Interned in Holland, he was twice sent on leave in 1916 and 1918, returning to Holland on both occasions. Repatriated in November 1918 and demobilized in January 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Kingston on Thames and employed as a Civil Servant, he died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

1914 Star

L8/2648 T Hare Ord Sea RNVR Collinwood Bttn RND

British War & Victory Medals

L8/2648 T Hare AB RNVR

With copy service record.

Thomas Clarke Hare was born in Lambeth, SE London 20th July 1896, the 1911 census records he is a Solicitor’s Office Boy residing with his father Thomas, mother Minnie and two sisters at 5 Howley Street, York Road, Lambeth SE. Joining the RNVR as Ordinary Seaman 28th March 1912, he joined Collingwood Battalion RND 22nd August 1914 and landed for the defence of Antwerp, Belgium, those that could get away embarked for Dover on 11th October 1914, only 20 men from Collingwood Battalion escaped the remainder were interned in Holland. Reported as interned in Holland 8th October 1914, he was sent home on leave 11th October 1916 and returned to Holland 8th November 1916, his next leave home was 17th June 1918 and he returned to Holland 14th July 1918. Repatriated 19th November 1918, he was sent on leave joining the 1st Reserve Battalion RND 18th January 1919 on his return. Demobilized at Crystal Palace 30th January 1919, he married in 1921 Florence Elizabeth, the 1939 Register records he is a Civil Servant residing at 111 Barnfield Avenue, Kingston on Thames with his wife. He died in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1983 aged 87 years.

GVF & better £350 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, Silver Medal 2nd Army Signalling School France 1918 to Signal Sergeant Joseph Reginald Marsh, 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment a Chemist born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892. Residing in Sheffield in 1913 when he joined the Territorial Army, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion seeing action during the battle of Auber’s Ridge in May 1915, The Somme offensive in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Serving in France until 9th December 1918, he returned home and was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

1914/15 Star

200222 Pte J R Marsh York & Lanc R

British War & Victory Medals

200222 SJT J R Marsh Y & L R

2nd Army Signal School France Sept – Oct 1918 Silver Medal the reverse engraved

“Football Comp Sgt J Marsh” hallmarks for Birmingham 1917

With details of service extracted from his on line service record.

Joseph Reginald Marsh was born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892, a Chemist residing with his family at 1 Swaledale Road, Sheffield, he attested for the 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment TF on 13th March 1913. Appointed Lance Corporal, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion taking part in the fighting at Auber’s Ridge in May 1915. Later to see action on the Somme in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Promoted Corporal 1st August 1917 and Sergeant 28th May 1918 he was an Army Signaller. Returning home 9th December 1918, he was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

GVF & better £125 Available


British War & Victory Medals to Gunner Alfred Milner Anderson, South African Heavy Artillery a Fitter from Belgravia, Johannesburg born in 1898. Enlisting at Cape Town in July 1917, he arrived in England in September 1917 and in France in January 1918 where he joined 73rd Siege Battery the following month. In June 1918 he was treated in hospital in France with shell shock, he had previously been subject to bombardments of high explosive and gas shells on 9th and 12th April 1918. Re-joining his battery in September 1918, he returned to England in March 1919 and was discharged in South Africa in June 1919. He died in Johannesburg in April 1966.

British War and Victory Medals (Bi-lingual reverse Victory Medal)

Gnr A M Anderson SAHA

With copy service papers and a photo of the recipient in later life.

Alfred Milner Anderson was born in Durban, Natal, South Africa in 1898, a Fitter residing in Belgravia, Johannesburg, he attested for the South African Heavy Artillery at Cape Town 11th July 1917. Arriving in England 14th September 1917 and in France 29th January 1918. Posted to 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery in the field 18th February 1918, he was admitted to 34 Field Ambulance 5th June 1918 with shell shock (Neurasthenia) and transferred to No 18 General Hospital, France 19th July 1918. Re-joining his Battery on recovery in the field 1st September 1918, he returned to England 20th March 1919 for onward travel to South Africa arriving home, he was discharged 6th June 1919.

His Medical Card records whilst serving with 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery on 5th June 1918 at Verquin at 2100, he went sick because he was very shaky and could not stand the noise of the guns. He had previously been subject to a bombardment of high explosive and gas shells on 9th April 1918 and a bombardment of high explosive 8 inch shells on 12th April 1918.

Alfred Milner Anderson died in Johannesburg 7th April 1966.

EF £55 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Driver Peter Bachegalup, Royal Field Artillery with original boxes and envelopes of issue, a former Labourer from Manchester born in 1882. Enlisting in April 1915, he served in Egypt and France.

1914/15 Star

13624 Dvr P Bachegalup RFA

 British War & Victory Medals

13624 Dvr P Bachegalup RA

 

 

Peter Bachegalup, born 1882, in Manchester, Lancashire. Son of Frederick & Teresa Bachegalup of 46 Bridgewater Street, Bedford, Leigh. The 1911 Census records Peter Bachegalup aged 30 years working as a General Labourer. He married Annie Blackley of 4 Hayes Row, Sandy Lane, Lowton, Newton-Le-Willows on 21st September 1912 at St Georges Church, Farnworth. Peter Bachegalup enlisted as a Driver into Royal Field Artillery on 13th April 1915 at Leigh, Lancashire. His Medal Index Card records he entered the war on 25th December 1915. His record of service records he embarked from Devonport 20th December 1915 and disembarked Alexandria, Egypt on 1st January 1916 with the 165th Brigade RFA. Driver Bachegalup saw service in France from 6th March 1916 until he was admitted to the 94th Field Ambulance on the 5th May with Influenza and was transferred back to England on 10th May aboard SS Dieppe. In January 1917 he was posted back to France and served there until August 1917. Driver Bachegalup was discharged from service 31st March 1920.

Two sets of service records can be found for this soldier online.

 GVF £75 SOLD


From left to right –

Victory Medal to Captain Charles Hamilton Russell Grant 2/22nd London Regiment a Dental Surgeon from Cricklewood, London born in Singapore in 1882. Serving in France, Salonica and Palestine he was Mentioned in Despatches by General Allenby in 1919. He died in Willesden General Hospital following an operation in 1931.

Victory Medal

Capt C H R Grant

British War Medal to Captain Wilfred Hardinge Heinig, 54th Sikhs, Indian Army attached 51st Sikhs born in 1887 in India, he was educated at King’s College School. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant from the RMC Sandhurst in August 1907, he joined the 54th Sikhs, Indian Army and was promoted to Captain in September 1915. Killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years when leading his company of the 51st Sikhs in an attack on the Turkish trenches. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial. 

British War Medal

Capt W H Heinig

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge 4th Battalion London Regiment born in Barnet, London in 1896. Educated at Barnet Grammar School, he was a banker before volunteering in September 1914. Serving as a Private soldier in the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli he was commissioned into the 4th Battalion London Regiment in October 1916. Serving in France attached to the 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W K E Mansbridge

Charles Hamilton Russell Grant was born in Singapore in 1882, the 1911 census records he is a Dental Surgeon residing with his wife, son and daughter in Cricklewood, London NW2.

Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 2nd Battalion 22nd London Regiment 1st October 1914 (London Gazette 17th October 1914 page 8335). Mentioned in Despatches (General Allenby) for distinguished services in Egypt during the period 19th September 1918 to 31st January 1919 London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7182. From The Willesden Chronicle 12th June 1931 page 9

“The death occurred at Willesden General Hospital following an operation yesterday (Monday) of Mr Russell Grant LDS, RCS of 92 Walm Lane, Cricklewood. Mr Grant had been Hon Dental Surgeon to Willesden hospital for the last 10 years and at the annual general meeting of the hospital last night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the bereaved family”.

Mr Grant was a student at the National Dental Hospital (now the Dental Department of the University College Hospital) where he obtained the Gold Medal for 1902 and qualified in 1903. With the exception of the War years, he practiced mainly in Willesden Green since that date and his skill and ability brought him a considerable practice. He was for over 10 years a much valued member of the Honorary Staff of the Willesden Hospital, and his loss is keenly felt by his colleagues there. One of the earliest volunteers for the War he took a combatant commission in the 2/22nd London Regiment (The Queen’s) in September 1914 and served throughout, first on the Somme, then in Salonika and finally Palestine where he took part in the capture of Jerusalem. He had by then reached the rank of Captain and been Mentioned in Despatches and appointed to the Staff of General (now Lord) Allenby.

In Jerusalem he contracted Typhoid Fever and was invalided back to Egypt where he apparently recovered, but his death was probably due to a sequel of that disease. Latterly Mr Grant had lived in Eastcote, where he took an active part in local affairs, and also in the neighbouring district of Northwood, where he had been a Churchwarden of Emmanuel Church. In all these circles, as well as among his many friends and relations, he will be very sadly missed”. With copy Medal Index Card (awarded British War and Victory Medals only), copy obituary, newspaper article, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, census entry 1911.

GVF £95 SOLD

Wilfred Hardinge Heinig was killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years in Mesopotamia. Born in 1887, he entered King’s College School in 1899. He was in the second XV in 1904 and in the first XV in 1905-6, and a School Prefect in 1906. From school he entered Sandhurst from which he passed out in a high position in August 1907. He joined the 54th Sikhs Indian Army and spent his military life in India. He was ordered to Mesopotamia in January last . Letters received from his fellow officers show he always retained his very high sense of duty and at the same time overflowed with high spirits and joy in life generally. His Commanding Officer, Colonel Magrath wrote of him –

“It was with rather a heavy heart that I detailed him to proceed with a draft as, apart from the fact he was my Quartermaster and a very hard working and useful officer at that, he was always so cheery and of such a bright disposition, that he was the life and soul of the Mess during the dull times we spent at Fort Lockhart and Hangu. I have just heard from Captain O’Neill that his same cheery disposition made him most popular with the 51st in the Field, and he did a lot to keep their spirits up in the trenches. But most important to you of all will be the news that he died like a very gallant soldier, at the head of his company in an assault on the Turkish trenches on 6th April. He was killed instantaneously, shot through the head and heart, and thus met with a glorious death. His loss to the Regiment is a heavy one, but we all feel proud of him and he has well upheld the name of the 54th”.

The only son of Robert Lawrence and Mary Heinig of “Deanurst”, Barton Road, Montpellier, Torquay, Devon. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

With copy Medal Index Card which records the award of the British War and Victory Medals, newspaper articles, copy photo in The Sphere dated 20th May 1916 etc.

GVF £145 SOLD

Kenneth William Elliott Mansbridge was born in Barnet, London in 1896, he served with the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli. Commissioned 25th October 1916 he served in France attached 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years.

From The Hendon Times 19th October 1917 page 5

“The death in action on 4th October 1917 is announced of 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth William Elliott Lovell (sic) Mansbridge, the elder son of Mr E Lovell Mansbridge of the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House and of “Elleborn”, Lichfield Grove, Church End Finchley. Lieutenant Lovell Mansbridge was educated at Barnet Grammar School, after which he took up Banking as a career. He enlisted within three weeks of the outbreak of War in the Royal Fusiliers (4th London Regiment). He saw varied service in Malta, Egypt (from 24th August 1915) and Gallipoli where he experienced 4 months of severe campaigning. He was invalided to Malta seven days before the evacuation of the Peninsula. He returned to England and in May 1916 was nominated for a commission. His Cadet training took place at Lichfield and on 25th October 1916, he was Gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the (4th Battalion) London Regiment. In January this year he was attached to the (13th Battalion) King’s Royal Rifle Corps and saw service in France till the great advance of 4th October when he met his death on the field of honour, This gallant young officer was only 20 years old”.

Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. With copy census details, Medal Index Card, Newspaper article, London Gazette announcing his commission, casualty details. Not sure where “Lovell Mansbridge” came from all official documents give his name as William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge.

GVF £85 Available


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £195 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £195 Available