Groups with First World War Medals

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Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to acting Corporal Thomas Tonge, Yorkshire Light Infantry born in 1896 in Bolton, Lancashire, he enlisted on 22nd July 1914 and served in France with the 2nd Battalion from 28th November 1915. His letter describing his Battalion’s attack on Hill 60 on 18th April 1915 was published in the The Sheffield Daily Telegraph 15th May 1915 page 5.  He survived his Battalions attack on Thiepval, Somme sector 1st July 1916 in which the Battalion suffered 340 casualties. Wounded and taken prisoner of war during the battle of Serre 18th November 1916, he was held at Magdeburg POW Camp. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, he died in Derby in 1950.

1914/15 Star

11105 Pte T Tonge Yorks LI

British War and Victory Medals

11105 A Cpl T Tonge Yorks LI

With details extracted from his on line service record.

Thomas Tonge was born 29th March 1896 in Bolton, Lancashire and enlisted on 22nd July 1914. He served in France from 28th November 1915, appointed Lance Corporal 1st October 1915 and acting Corporal 2nd July 1916.

In a letter to his parents published in The Sheffield Daily Telegraph 15th May 1915 page 5 (Attack on Hill 60 on 18th April 1915)

“I thank god I am once again spared after a very hot and fierce battle which it was the lot of our Brigade to be in. It was for the possession of a very formidable position of a very important Hill which commanded a fine view of the country for miles around. It was about 0600 on March (sic) 18th our artillery opened a very heavy fore on the enemy’s position, which was immediately answered by theirs and it was hell on earth. The gasses which they use in the shells nearly blinded us. Our fire fire, however, was superior to ours, and the Huns had not much fight in them when our guns had finished, in fact they all ran away and left their trenches, and we had nothing to do but drop into their trenches. They were soon trying their tricks with grenades, trench mortars, and shells, which was the cause of most of the loss of life. Several attempts have been made to re-capture it, but all have failed. Well, they are a clever foe, all the same, and I think the war won’t be over yet. We have had Sir John French congratulate us on our behaviours, and also received congratulations from the King. Hope you are well, as I am at present.”

The 2nd Battalion were part of 32nd Division on 1st July 1916 and were in support of 16th and 17th Battalions Highland Light Infantry in their attack on Thiepval receiving many casualties from Machine Gun fire before reaching the British front line . Advancing through Leipzig Salient  and passed through positions at Fort Hindenburg. Close quarter fighting followed throughout subsequent attacks and counter attacks, the 2nd Battalion withdrew to Crucifix Corner 2nd July 1916 having sustained 340 casualties.

Wounded (left fore arm and thigh) and taken prisoner of war 18th November 1916 during the battle of Serre, Somme sector. On 17th November the 2nd Battalion took up positions at Beaumont Hamel and the next day took part in the attack on Munich and Frankfort Trenches. The right of their advance was held up by fire from a strong point in Munich Trench, reluctant to accept defeat, the men held on in shell holes until dusk. On the left the assault swept over Munich Trench and continued down the hill to Ten Tree Alley. Relieved on 19th November the 2nd Battalion suffered 365 casualties. Held at Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, he died in Derby in 1950.

GVF £175 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 2nd type to Chief Petty Officer Writer Cecil McAllister, Royal Navy born in Sidmouth, Devon 28th May 1895 a Storehouse Boy in HM Dockyard (Devonport), he entered the Royal Navy as Writer 3rd Class at Vivid I 22nd December 1913. Serving aboard HMS Blenheim 1917 to 1919, he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer 21st December 1923 aboard HMS Vulcan. Discharged to pension 15th February 1936, he was not recalled for the Second World War.

British War and Victory Medals

M.6965 C McAllister 2 WR RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy  GV 2nd type

M.6965 C McAllister CPO WR HMS Pembroke 

With copy service record, mounted as originally worn.

Cecil McAllister was born in Sidmouth, Devon 28th May 1895 a Storehouse Boy in HM Dockyard (Devonport), he entered the Royal Navy as Writer 3rd Class at Vivid I 22nd December 1913. He subsequently joined Pembroke II 29th December 1913, HMS Blenheim 10th May 1916 where he was advanced to Writer 2nd Class 21st December 1917, Pembroke I 8th July 1919, HMS Mars 8th October 1919, Pembroke 14th November 1919, HMS Gibraltar 18th November 1919 where he was advanced to Writer 1st Class, HMS Duncan 6th February 1921, HMS Vulcan 6th February 1923 where he was advanced to Chief Petty Officer Writer 21st December 1923, Pembroke II 22nd February 1926, Egmont II 22nd June 1926, HMS Dartmouth 1st October 1926, Tamar II 1st November 1926, Pembroke II 21st July 1928, HMS Canterbury 9th February 1932, Pembroke II 3rd September 1932 and discharged shore to pension 15th February 1936. He had qualified in Cyphering and Coding 7th October 1931.

GVF £125 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afgahistan NWF 1919, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 2nd type, Meritorious Service Medal GV (Immediate) to Warrant Officer 1st Class Reginald John Cann Royal Signals late 7th Hussars born 10th December 1890 in Salisbury, Wiltshire he attested for the 7th Hussars 12th January 1910. 

1914/15 Star,British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

5213 SJT R J Cann 7-Hrs

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

5213 SERGT R J Cann 7-Hrs

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 2nd type

532939 WO CL II R J Cann R Signals

Meritorious Service Medal (immediate) GV

5213 SJT R J Cann 7/Hrs

With copy Medal Index Card, MSM Card, London Gazette entry and headers for MID and MSM.

Original MID certificate, a quantity of original letters including a testimonial, certificate of discharge before re-enlistment, First, Second and Third Class Army Education Certificates (3), Warrant for WO2 and WO1 (2), pension letters from the Royal Hospital Chelsea, letters from Royal Signals Association, Will, certificate of Burial (1942), photo of his grave, Signals Association testimonial.

Reginald John Cann was born 10th December 1890 in Salisbury, Wiltshire he attested for the 7th Hussars 12th January 1910, serving in Mesopotamia from 23rd April 1915 and later in the Third Afghan War of 1919. Promoted Warrant Officer 2nd Class 3rd March 1925 and Warrant Officer 1st Class 25th April 1935. Awarded a pension of 51 and a half pence a day for life from 2nd March 1931 having completed 21 years service. Residing in Garston, Liverpool he died in 1942.

Meritorious Service Medal London Gazette 15th October 1918 page 12103 “In recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in Mesopotamia during the present war”.

Mentioned in Despatches (Lt General Sir W R Marshall, KCB, KCSI CinC Mesopotamia) London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7243 

Military Conduct “Exemplary”

“An exceptionally fine type of man. He is honest, sober, reliable and thoroughly trustworthy. He takes a keen interest and can be relied upon to complete with thoroughness and work which he is entrusted. He has on frequent occasions been left in charge of this unit and has proved himself capable of carrying on the work of his officers with complete satisfaction. He has had a long experience with horses and horsemastership and has excellent control over men”

R W Morgan, Captain Commanding No 2 Cavalry Brigade Signal Troop, Siakot, India.

Eighteen India General Service Medals clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919 to the 7th Hussars.

GVF & better £695 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Naval Reserve GV to Seaman Alexander Williamson, Royal Naval Reserve a Fisherman born in Duncan’s Bay, Caithness in 1878. Joining the Royal Naval Reserve 1st April 1904, he was a Fisherman operating from the port of Wick employed on in shore fishing at John O’Groats. Mobilised 6th August 1914, he joined HMS Queen Elizabeth 22nd December 1914 ans served aboard this ship throughout the First World War. Demobilised 15th February 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

C 3557 A Williamson SMN RNR

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal GV Royal Naval Reserve

C 3557 A Williamson Sea RNR

With copy service papers

Alexander Williamson was born in Duncan’s Bay, Caithness 12th March 1878, a Fisherman operating from the post of Wick and mainly employed in in shore fishing off John O’Groates, he joined the RNR 1st April 1904. Mobilised 6th August 1914, he joined Victory and subsequently Excellent 12th November 1914, Victory 21st December 1914 and HMS Queen Elizabeth 22nd December 1914, serving aboard this ship for the entire First World War. Demobilised 15th February 1919.

A coiple of slight edge knocks to LSGC otherwise

VF £145 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to 2nd Lieutenant Alexander Farquharson, Rifle Brigade late 6th Battalion Cameron Highlanders born in St Machar, Aberdeen 19th October 1894. In 1914 he was employed as a Warehouseman and resided at 166 Butterbiggins Road, Glasgow. Enlisting on 4th December 1914, he joined the 8th Battalion at Inverness the next day and joined the 6th Battalion 20th August 1915 in France. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for the Battalion’s attack on Martinpuich, Somme sector 15th September 1916, in which he showed great gallantry, assisting in the capture of thirty German soldiers, the total number captured in the Battalion’s successful attack being 186 at a cost of 240 casualties. Presented with his DCM by HM The King at Hyde Park 2nd June 1917. Commissioned into the Rifle Brigade 25th September 1917, he was at some time attached 11th Battalion London Regiment. Relinquishing his commission 13th September 1919, he resided in 1922 at Gordon Cottage, Auchinblae, Aberdeenshire

1914/15 Star

S-16045 Pte A Farquharson Cam’n Hdrs

British War & Victory Medals

2 Lieut A Farquharson

 Original Silk Ribbons, with copy Medal Index Card.

Alexander Farquharson was born in St Machar, Aberdeen 19th October 1894. In 1914 he was employed as a Warehouseman and resided at 166 Butterbiggins Road, Glasgow. Enlisting on 4th December 1914, he joined the 8th Battalion at Inverness the next day and joined the 6th Battalion 20th August 1915 in France. Appointed Lance Corporal 21st September 1916, promoted Corporal 24th September 1916. Awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal London Gazette 14th November 1916 page 11090 

“For conspicuous gallantry in action. He assisted in the capture of thirty prisoners, displaying great courage and initiative. He set a fine example throughout”.

Awarded for the Battalion’s attack on Martinpuich, Somme sector 15th September 1916, driving the Germans from the north eastern end of the village and capturing 186 prisoners, the successful attack cost the Camerons a total of 240 killed and wounded. Recommended for a commission, he joined No 8 Officer Cadet Battalion at Lichfield 7th June 1917 and was commissioned into the Rifle Brigade 25th September 1917 and returned to France, at one time attached 1/11th Battalion London Regiment. He relinquished his commission 13th September 1919. Medals sent to his home address “Gordon Cottage, Auchinblae, Aberdeenshire”

The Daily Record 2nd June 1917 page 4

“Decorated by HM The King at Hyde Park London today……including twelve Victoria Crosses Corporal Alexander Farquharson was one of eleven honoured Scots, one receiving the DCM and MM, four received the DCM and six the MM”.

The Daily Record 12th June 1917 page 3

“Among the recipients of honours at the Hyde Park investiture was Corporal Alex Farquharson, Camerons, who received the DCM. Single handed (sic) he took over 30 Germans as prisoners. A native of Cluny, he was prior to the war employed with Messers William McLaren & Sons of 5 South Hanover Street, Glasgow”.

GVF & better £395 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Private Herbert James Clark, 2nd Battalion, The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. Enlisting 28th January 1908, he served with the 2nd Battalion served in France from 4th October 1914. Discharged 1st March 1915 no longer physically fit for Military service, the result of wounds received in action. Almost certainly wounded in the successful attack on enemy positions near Zillebeke on 7th November 1914 in which the Battalion suffered 30 officers and 483 other rank casualties.

1914 Star

L-9255 Pte H J Clark 2/The Queen’s R

British War & Victory Medals

L-9255 Pte H J Clark The Queen’s R

 Original Silk Ribbons, with copy Medal Index Card.

Herbert J Clark enlisted 28th January 1908, he served in France from 4th October 1914 and was discharged 1st March 1915 no longer physically fit for Military service the result of wounds received in action. The Birmingham Daily Post 27th January 1915 page 3 records Private Clark as wounded, the list of casualties released from the Base BEF 5th December 1914. Issued a Silver War Badge (73164) on 13th December 1916.

On 4th November 1914 the 2nd Battalion found themselves in billetts at the Hotel de Ville, Ypres and moved to positions north of Dickebusch two days later due to heavy shelling. Moving forward to assist 4th Guards Brigade in action at Zillebeke, they carried out a successful attack on 7th November driving the enemy back and capturing three machine guns. Held positions throughout the day under heavy fire until relieved the next day. Casualties reported as 8 officers killed and 22 wounded with 68 other ranks killed and 415 other ranks wounded.

VF Condition £165 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, 1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals, Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 King George V, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Air Force GV to Flight Sergeant Walter Mace, Royal Air Force late 10th Hussars born in Warminster, Wiltshire 9th June 1881. A Printer he attested for the 10th Hussars 14th December 1900 aged 19 years 188 days and served in South Africa 1901-02, India and in France from 6th October 1914.  Transferred to the Royal Flying Corps 6th March 1917 as a Disciplinarian and Drill Instructor and returned home being posted to Halton camp. Promoted Flight Sergeant 1st September 1917, he transferred to the RAF on its formation 1st April 1918 and appears to have served in various training sections at RAF Halton until discharged to pension 13th December 1921, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 16th July 1921. He married in Hammersmith in 1922 and died on 20th July 1958.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, south Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

4921 Pte W Nance 10th Hussars

1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914British War and Victory Medals

4921 SJT W Nance 10/Hrs

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Air Force GV

65852 FLT SGT W A Nance RAF

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal rolls and RAF service record. The Delhi Durbar Medal confirmed on roll, the award of the Clasp to the 1914 Star also confirmed.

Provenance Spink April 2014 lot 369.

Walter Arthur Nance was born in Warminster, Wiltshire a Printer he attested for the 10th Hussars 14th December 1900 aged 19 years 188 days. Serving in South Africa 1901 to 1902, he later served in India and appears on the Delhi Durbar 1911 Medal roll as Sergeant, 10th Hussars attached Adjutant General in India. Serving in France from 6th October 1914,  he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps 6th March 1917 as a Disciplinarian and Drill Instructor and returned home being posted to Halton camp. Promoted Flight Sergeant 1st September 1917, he transferred to the RAF on its formation 1st April 1918 and appears to have served in various training sections at RAF Halton until discharged to pension 13th December 1921, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 16th July 1921, home address recorded as 19 The Triangle, Middle Street, Yeovil, Somerset, he married in Hammersmith in 1922 and died on 20th July 1958. All Medals and clasp recorded on his RAF service record.

Unusual combination of awards.

GVF & better £650 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Arthur Keen, Royal Fusiliers. Serving in France from  1st June 1915 with the 9th Battalion, he was admitted to No 34 Casualty Clearing Station 8th July 1916, the day following his Battalion’s attack on Ovillers in which they suffered heavy casualties. Joining the 24th Battalion on recovery 3rd August 1916, he was admitted to No 2 Field Ambulance Royal Naval Division 14th November 1916 with shrapnel wounds, probably sustained the previous day during the attack on Beaumont Trench, Somme sector. Remaining in France under treatment until 28th December when he was evacuated to the UK.

1914/15 Star

3906 Pte A Keen R Fus

British War and Victory Medals

3906 Cpl A Keen R Fus

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll and casualty list entries

British War and Victory Medal roll entry records he served as Private and Corporal 9th Battalion in France from 31st May 1915 until 2nd August 1916, transferring to 24th Battalion 3rd August 1916 to 28th December 1916 as Lance Sergeant. No 34 Casualty Clearing Station admission book records he is admitted 8th July 1916 serving with “A” Company 9th Battalion Royal Fusiliers with shell shock TNA Ref MH106/687. No 2 Field Ambulance Royal Naval Division admission book records admitted with shrapnel wounds left hand 14th November 1916 and moved to No 5 Field Ambulance the same day. To Corps Collection Station Acheux, TNA ref MH106/227.

The 9th Battalion suffered heavy losses during the attack on Ovillers 7th July 1916, the following day Keen was evacuated with shell shock. Admitted No 2 Field Ambulance Royal Naval Division 14th November 1916 with shrapnel wounds, probably sustained the previous day during the attack on Beaumont Trench, Somme sector. Remaining in France under treatment until 28th December when he was evacuated to the UK.

GVF & better £110 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

British War and Victory Medals, Africa General Service Medal GV clasp Somaliland 1920, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Engine Room Artificer 1st Class George Arthur Boden, Royal Navy born in Nottingham 9th August 1891, an Engine Fitter he entered the Royal Navy at Crescent 16th May 1917 as acting Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 4th Class. Joining HMS Wolverine 20th September 1917, Victory II 14th December 1917, HMS Racehorse 22nd February 1918, Victory II 28th February 1919 and HMS Odin 31st July 1919,taking part in the Somaliland operations of 1920 aboard this ship. Joining HMS Dunedin on loan to Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) 15th March 1932, HMS Achilles (RNZN) 26th October 1937, HMS Philomel (RNZN) 26th October 1938. Discharged to pension in New Zealand 15th May 1939, he was employed as an Engine Fitter in the Naval Base at Auckland.

British War and Victory Medals

M.26133 G A Boden Act ERA 4 RN

Africa General Service Medal GV clasp Somaliland 1920

M.26133 G A Boden Act ERA 4  CL HMS Odin

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

M.26133 G A Boden ERA1 HMS Dunedin

With copy Medal roll entries, service records (2)

George Arthur Boden was born in Nottingham 9th August 1891, an Engine Fitter he entered the Royal Navy at Crescent 16th May 1917 as acting Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 4th Class. He subsequently joined HMS Wolverine 20th September 1917, Victory II 14th December 1917, HMS Racehorse 22nd February 1918, Victory II 28th February 1919, HMS Odin 31st July 1919, where he was confirmed in the rate of ERA 4th Class 4th September 1919, HMS Caroline 25th September 1920, Victory II 1st January 1921, HMS Columbine 22nd June 1921 where he was advanced to ERA 3rd Class, Vivid II 28th October 1921, HMS Crozin 15th November 1921, Victory II 2nd December 1922, Fisgard 16th May 1923, HMS Campbell 21st September 1923, HMS Westminster 25th September 1923 where he was advanced to ERA 2nd Class 22nd August 1926, HMS Vampire 20th April 1927, Egmont II 11th June 1929 where he was advanced to ERA 1st Class, 23rd August 1930, Victory II 30th December 1931, HMS Concord 16th February 1932, Victory II 4th March 1932, HMS Dunedin on loan to Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) 15th March 1932, HMS Achilles (RNZN) 26th October 1937, HMS Philomel (RNZN) 26th October 1938. Discharged to pension in New Zealand 15th May 1939, he was employed as an Engine Fitter in the Naval Base at Auckland.

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 26th May 1932.

The Africa General Service Medal clasp Somaliland 1920 rare to the Royal Navy, HMS Odin receiving 156 Medals.

VF & better £525 SOLD


Groups with First World War Medals

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04, 1914 Star and GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII to Private William Herbert Jones, Royal Marine Light Infantry a former Labourer born in Dulverton, Somerset 6th November 1875. Entering the Royal Marines at the Recruit Depot, Walmer 21st November 1893. Serving aboard HMS Hussar from 17th November 1900, he re-joined Plymouth Division 16th January 1904 after taking part in the operations off Somaliland. Joining Victory for service with the Royal Marine Brigade 12th September 1914, he served at Dunkirk and the defence of Antwerp 19th September to 12th October 1914. Joining Plymouth Division 8th March 1916 as part of the Garrison Military Police, HMS Sandhurst 21st November 1917, Plymouth Division 13th February 1919 and demobilised 21st March 1919.

Africa General Service Medal EVII clasp Somaliland 1902-04

W H Jones Lce Corpl RM HMS Hussar

1914 Star with GENUINE clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

PLY.6817 Pte W H Jones RM Brigade

British War and Victory Medals

PLY.6817 Pte W H Jones RMLI

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy EVII

PLY.6817 William H Jones Private RMLI

With copy service papers.

William Herbert Jones was born in Dulverton, Somerset 6th November 1875, a Labourer he attested for the Royal Marines at Taunton 21st November 1893 and joined the Recruit Depot at Walmer the same day. Posted to “D” Company, Plymouth Division Royal Marines Light Infantry 18th July 1894, he subsequently joined Vivid 16th January 1895, Plymouth Division 29th January 1896, Cambridge 1st October 1898, Thunderer 14th October 1898, Plymouth Division 2nd October 1900, HMS Hussar 17th November 1900, Plymouth Division 16th January 1904, Cambridge 9th March 1904, Plymouth Division 16th December 1904, Vivid 28th January 1905, HMS Britannia 2nd April 1905, Plymouth Division 20th August 1905, Vivid 29th November 1905, HMS Impregnable 1st November 1906, Plymouth Division 11th June 1909, HMS Mars 17th June 1909, Plymouth Division 14th July 1909, HMS Highflyer 19th September 1909, Plymouth Division 28th October 1909, HMS Argyll 8th February 1910, Plymouth Division 5th March 1912, Victory for Royal Marine Brigade 12th September 1914 serving at Dunkirk and the defence of Antwerp 19th September to 12th October 1914, Plymouth Division 8th March 1916 as part of the Garrison Military Police, HMS Sandhurst 21st November 1917, Plymouth Division 13th February 1919 and demobilised 21st March 1919. Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded 29th December 1908, in possession of Five Good Conduct Badges, the fifth being awarded in 1914.

A total of 145 Africa General Service Medal clasp Somaliland 1902-04 to HMS Hussar.

GVF & better £695 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 1st type to Petty Officer Frederick George Cunliffe, Royal Navy a former Labourer born in Charles, Devon in 1879. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Curacoa 23rd April 1897, he was advanced to Leading Seaman aboard HMS Russell 11th December 1907. Joining HMS Exmouth 1st July 1913, he was advanced to Petty Officer 27th April 1914 and was aboard this ship on the outbreak of the First World War. Exmouth was part of the Channel Fleet in 1914 but in May 1915 was sent to the Dardanelles supporting allied offensives at Gallipoli in June and August 1915. In November 1915 Exmouth was deployed top the Aegean Sea. Joining HMS Argus in September 1918 he was awarded the LSGC Medal aboard this ship, a delayed award having previously broken his “Very Good Conduct”. Discharged 28th November 1919, in 1939 he is recorded as a General Labourer residing in St Germans, Cornwall. He died in Plymstock, Plymouth in 1950 aged 70 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

193352 F G Cunliffe PO RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV 1st type

193352 F G Cunliffe PO HMS Argus

With copy service papers, birth marriage and death certificates, census entries.

Frederick George Cunliffe was born at 28 Hampton Street, Charles, Plymouth, Devon 28th September 1879 (birth certificate records date of birth as 26th February 1880) a Labourer he entered the Royal Navy aboard HMS Curacoa as a Boy 2nd Class 23rd April 1897. Rated Ordinary Seaman (Seaman Gunner) aboard HMS Northampton 1st October 1897, and Able Seaman aboard HMS Hermes 8th May 1900. He subsequently joined Vivid II 9th December 1900, Cambridge 11th March 1901, Vivid I 18th November 1901, HMS Rainbow 17th December 1901, HMS Donegal 5th November 1903, Vivid I 28th December 1904, Cambridge 19th February 1905, Vivid I 28th May 1905, HMS Hood 14th June 1905, HMS Russell 21st April 1906 where he was advanced to Leading Seaman 11th December 1907, Vivid I 23rd June 1908, HMS Leander 19th October 1909, HMS Blake 14th February 1911, HMS Exmouth 1st July 1913 where he was advanced to Petty Officer 27th April 1914, Vivid 1st September 1917, HMS Argus 14th September 1918 and Vivid I 23rd September 1919 from where he was discharged to pension 28th November 1919. The 1939 Register records he is a RN pensioner and General Labourer residing with his wife Florence at 2 Lower Wood View, St Germans, Cornwall, he died in Hooe, Plymstock, Plymouth 29th September 1950 aged 70 years his occupation recorded as Pensioned Petty Officer Royal Navy.

Choice condition

EF £165 SOLD


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, 1939/45 Defence Medal to Leading Mechanic Harold Edward Albert Ardiss, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force. Born under the surname Stone (changed to Ardiss) in Paddington in 1887, he was a Chauffeur and Mechanic when he entered the Royal Navy 6th December 1915 and served in France as a Driver from 15th December 1915 to 16th January 1916 and again from 16th March 1917 to 19th November 1917. Promoted to Sergeant Mechanic RAF in August 1918 he was discharged to the Reserve in April 1919. In 1939 he was residing in Clacton, Essex and employed with his wife as a Boarding House Assistant, he was also an Air Raid Precautions Warden. He died in Stamford, Suffolk in 1967.

1914/15 Star

F.10003 H E A Ardiss AM 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

F.10003 H E A Ardiss LM RN

1939/45 Defence Medal

Unnamed as issued

With copy service records RN and RAF a Sweetheart Brooch, the Defence Medal in card box of issue with Home Office award certificate addressed –

“Mr H E Ardiss, “Starpoint”, 14 Roseberry Road, Felixstowe, Suffolk”

The Trio mounted as originally worn.

Harold Edward Albert Ardiss (born Stone) was born in Paddington, London 30th June 1887. A Chauffeur and Mechanic he entered the Royal Navy as a Driver 6th December 1915 and served in France from 15th December 1915 to 16th January 1916. Serving at Dover and Felixstowe, he returned to France serving at Dunkirk from 16th March 1917 to 19th November 1917, when he was posted to Crystal Palace and finally Daedalus (Lee on Solent). Advanced to Leading Mechanic 1st August 1916, he transferred to the Royal Air Force 1st April 1918 as Corporal Mechanic. Promoted Sergeant Mechanic 1st August 1918, he was transferred to the RAF Reserve in April 1919. In 1939 he is employed with his wife Mary as Boarding House Assistants, residing at 11 Russell Road, Clacton, Essex, he is also an ARM Warden. He died in Stamford, Suffolk in 1967, death registered under the surname Ardiss.

NEF £175 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Vivtory Medals to Private Joseph George Parrott, Middlesex Regiment born in Edmonon, Middlesex in 1893. The 1911 census records he is employed as a Clerk. Serving with the 2/7th Battalion in Egypt from 24th August 1915, he later served in France with the 1/7th Battalion, the 2/7th being disbanded 15th June 1916 in France. In 1939 he was employed as a Builder’s Foreman and later with the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA). He died in Syria on 14th February 1945.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

2755 Pte J G Parrott Middx R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries, Commonwealth War Graves details and other research 

Joseph George Parrott was born in Edmonton, Middlesex 16th September 1893, the 1911 census records he is a 17 year old  Clerk residing with his family at 9 Stanhope Road, New South Gate, Middlesex. Serving in Egypt with the 2/7th Battalion 24th August 1915 and later the 1/7th Battalion in France, he was demobilised at the end of hostilities. The 1939 Register records he is a Builder’s Foreman residing at 7 Russell Lane, Frien Barnett, Middlesex with his wife Ethel and children. Serving with the Entertainments National Service Association he died on 14th February 1945 and is buried in Aleppo War Cemetery, Syria. One of seven ENSA personnel listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as having died in the Second World War.

The Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA) was an organisation set up in 1939 by Basil Dean and Leslie Henson to provide entertainment for British armed forces personnel during World War 2. ENSA operated as part of the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes. It was superseded by Combines Services Entertainment (CSE) which now operates as part of the Services Sound and Vision Corporation (SSVC).

Contact wear, a rare Second World War casualty.

VF £250 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Vivtory Medals to Private (Lance Corporal) Charles Porter, Highland Light Infantry, born in Liverpool in 1892. Serving in France from 30th November 1914, he was taken prisoner of war at La Bassee 19th December 1914 during the attack and capture of German trenches near Givenchy. Despite their success, the 1st Battalion were unable to hold their gains against repeated counter attacks and were forced to withdraw, their casualties recorded as 9 officers killed, 54 other ranks killed with 63 wounded and 266 missing. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918. 

1914/15 Star

11359 L Cpl C Porter High LI

British War and Victory Medals

11359 Pte C Porter High LI

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries and other research from the International Red Cross.

Original silk ribbons.

Charles Porter born 21st December 1892 in Liverpool, next of kin recorded as Mrs Porter, 56 Oakfield Road, Liverpool, he served in France from 30th November 1914 with 1st Battalion Highland Light Infantry, captured at La Bassee 19th December 1914, he was also wounded in the right arm. On 19th December 1914 “B” and “C” companies took part in the attack on German trenches near Givenchy, the first wave moving forward at 0534 and gaining their objective. The gains were gallantly held throughout the rest of the day, but repeated counter attacks forced a withdrawal. Casualties recorded in the War Diary for the period 19th to 20th December as 9 officers killed, 54 other ranks killed with 63 wounded and 266 missing.

Repatriated at the end of hostilities, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918.

An unusual instance of a 1914/15 Star Trio to a 1914 prisoner of war.

GVF £125 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Natal, Belfast, Orange Free Statel, King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, British War Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919,  Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Private Edward Hunter South Lancashire Regiment late Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers born in Glendermott, Londonderry, Ireland in 1879. Serving in the Boer War with the 5th (Militia) Battalion attached 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, he transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment, the 1911 census records he is serving with the 1st Battalion. Serving in India during the First World War and in the Third Afghan War of 1919, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal awarded in October 1920.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Natal, Belfast, Orange Free State

1624 Pte E Hunter Rl Innis Fus

King’s South Africa Medal clasps South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902

1624 Pte E Hunter Innis Fus

British War Medal

6792 Pte E Hunter S Lan R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Afghanistan NWF 1919

6792 ARMR SGT E Hunter S Lan R

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

6792 Pte E Hunter S Lan R

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entries and other research from on line sources. 

Edward Hunter was born in Glendermott, Londonderry, Ireland in 1879, a member of the 5th (Militia) Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, he served in South Africa attached 1st Battalion. He transferred to the South Lancashire Regiment, the 1911 census records he is a 32 year old Private soldier serving with the 1st Battalion. Serving in India during the First World War and in the Third Afghan War, he was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in October 1920. The Medal roll entries record his Medals were returned an re-issued, the reason for this is unclear as there are no alterations to any of the naming. The QSA was originally issued with 4 clasps in error (not entitled to Cape Colony) and this was returned for amendment, top clasp has unofficial silver bar attaching but verified correct.

A couple of small eK’s to LSGC otherwise

GVF £475 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

British War and Victory Medals, Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV to Corporal Joseph Jackson, 33rd Battalion London Regiment late Denbigh Yeomanry a Railway Signalman born in Macclesfeld, Cheshire in 1874. In 1914 he was residing in Old Colwyn, North Wales when he attested for the Denbighshire Yeomanry 2nd September 1914. Serving at home until transferring to the 33rd Battalion London Regiment, he served in France from 3rd July 1918 until the end of hostilities. Discharged 4th April 1919 suffering from Myalgia attributed to his active service and awarded a 20% disability pension.

British War & Victory Medals

860708 Cpl J Jackson 33-Lond R

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV Coinage Head

Joseph Jackson

With copy Medal Index Card, Medal roll entry and details from what survives of his on line service record.

Original ribbons.

Joseph Jackson was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire in 1874, the 1911 census records he is a 37 year old Railway Signalman residing with his wife Jane (whom he married in Bury, Lancashire 23rd May 1903) and 3 sons at Ballin Grove, Butley, Macclesfield. In 1914 he was residing at “Ingledene”, Penmaen Park, Old Colwyn, North Wales when he attested for the 2/1 Denbighshire Yeomanry 2nd September 1914 (Regimental numbers 558 and 215011). Serving in France from 3rd July 1918, on this day the Battalion arrived in France at Boulogne. It was not until 28th August that the Battalion took over a section of the front line at Ypres. Jackson remained with the Battalion until the Armistice and returning to England was disembodied 4th April 1919. He had contracted Myalgia as a result of his active service at home and abroad and was awarded a 20% disability pension.

Rare British War and Victory Medals to the 33rd Battalion London Regiment.

NEF £175 Available


Groups with First World War Medals

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private James Logan, Gordon Highlanders born in 1878 who served with the 2nd and 8th / 10th Battalions in France from 16th February 1915. The 2nd Battalion took part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916 and captured their objectives suffering 461 casualties they were relieved from the front line on 3rd July. Private Logan is recorded as admitted to No 34 Casualty Clearing Station on 2nd July 1916 with a gun shot wound left hand and evacuated by Ambulance Train to hospital 5th July 1916. Almost certainly wounded during his Battalions attack on 1st July. Later serving with the 8th/10th Battalion he was taken prisoner of war at Monchy 28th March 1918 during the German Spring offensive. Repatriated at the end of hostilities, he arrived in Dover 29th November 1918 and was discharged to the Reserve 28th March 1919.

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

S-7784 Pte J Logan Gord Highrs

With details extracted from his on line service record.

WithServed with “C” Company 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders on the Somme, the Battalion was part of 20th Brigade, 7th Division and took part in the attack on Mametz 1st July 1916. Assaulting the western side of the village on the right of the railway, the German first line was reached and the Battalion came under heavy Machine Gun fire from The Shrine, advancing past Mametz Station and on to Shrine Alley, Cemetery Trench and to its final objectives of Bunny Alley and Orchard Alley. Withdrawn from the front line on 3rd July having suffered 461 casualties. Admitted to 34 Casualty Clearing Station on 2nd July 1916 with gun shot wound left hand, he was evacuated further by Ambulance Train (to hospital) 5th July 1916.

Later serving with the 8th/10th Battalion, he was taken prisoner of war during the German Spring offensive (probably at Monchy 28th March 1918) when other members of this Battalion are recorded as captured and repatriated, arriving at Dover 29th November 1918 and sent to POW Reception Camp, Canterbury (Ref: Red Cross Archive). Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 28th March 1919.

GVF & better £150 SOLD


Groups with First World War Medals

British War and Victory Medals toPrivate John Arthur Lange, 1st King Edward’s Horse an Accountant born in Lambeth, Surrey in 1899. Enlisting in London 29th November 1915 aged 16 years 10 months, he served in France after January 1916. On 19th October 1917 he was admitted to hospital in Warrington suffering from debility and pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and following discharge in December 1917 he was posted to Dublin. Demobilised at the end of hostilities, in 1939 he was a Commercial Traveller residing with his wife in Harrow, Middlesex, he died in Poole, Dorset in 1985 aged 86 years.

British War & Victory Medals

1352 Pte J A Lange K Edw H

With details extracted from his on line service record.

John Arthur Lange was born in Lambeth, Surrey 21st February 1899, the 1911 census records he is a scholar residing with his father Arthur a Restaurant Carver, mother Alice and three sisters at 10 Pawsons Road, West Croydon, Surrey. Attesting for the 1st King Edward’s Horse in London 29th November 1915 he stated his occupation as Accountant and age as 16 years 10 months. Serving in France after January 1916, he was admitted to the Lord Derby War Hospital, Warrington 19th October 1917 suffering from debility and pyrexia of unknown origin, the result of service in France. In December 1917 he is recorded as serving Dublin and does not appear to have returned to active service. Demobilised at the end of hostilities, the 1939 Register records he is a Commercial Traveller residing with his wife Winifred at 243 Rayners Lane, Harrow, Middlesex, he died in Poole, Dorset in 1985 aged 86 years.

First time on the market and relatively scarce to the Regiment.

GVF & better £125 Available 


Groups with First World War Medals

British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


© J.Collins Medals 2014