1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Captain Douglas Morris Borland, Royal Army Medical Corps, born in Glasgow in 1885, he qualified as a Doctor of Medicine MB, ChB from Glasgow University in 1909.  An influential British Homeopath, he studied with James Tyler Kent in Chicago, USA and brought Kentian homeopathy back to England. Serving in France with a Stationary Hospital from 23rd April 1915, he later served in Salonika attached 27th Division and was Mentioned in Despatches for distinguished services in June 1918. After the war, he established a consultant practice in Harley Street, London and returned to the staff of the London Homeopathic Hospital, the author of several books and articles on the subject, he became Senior Consultant Physician and Chairman of the Staff. Returning to Glasgow in the 1950’s, he died in Wigton, Cumberland 29th November 1960.

1914/15 Star

Lieut D M Borland RAMC

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Capt D M Borland

With research recorded here extracted from on line sources, flattened card boxes of issue.

Douglas Morris Borland born 22nd March 1885 in Glasgow, the son of William Borland a Writer and his wife Marion, in 1901 the family were residing at 260 West George Street, Glasgow.  An influential British Homeopath, he studied with James Tyler Kent in Chicago, USA and brought Kentian Homeopathy back to England.

Douglas M Borland Dr Douglas Morris Borland (1885 – 1960)

Borland qualified MB, ChB at Glasgow in 1909. After various hospital posts including Hon Physician and House Surgeon, Victoria Infirmary, Glasgow, Assistant Obstetrician Salvation Army Hospital, Hon Surgeon North Devon Infirmary, Barnstaple (on 1911 census), he went to Chicago, USA to study Homeopathy, going as an open minded sceptic and returning an astonished and convinced Homeopath. He then took an appointment at the London Homeopathic Hospital  followed by active service during the First World War with the Royal Army Medical Corps, serving in France from 23rd April 1915 with a Stationary Hospital and later attached 27th Division in Salonika, being Mentioned in Despatches for Distinguished Services in Salonika London Gazette 11th June 1918 page 6925.

After the war he established a consultant practice in Harley Street, London and returned to the staff of the London Homeopathic Hospital, the author of several books and articles on the subject, he became Senior Consultant Physician and Chairman of the Staff. Returning to Glasgow in the 1950’s, he died in Wigton, Cumberland 29th November 1960.

Virtually as issued.

First time on the market.

EF £250 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Chief Engineer John Gibbons, Merchant Fleet Auxiliary  who served aboard the Queen Empress. A Paddle Steamer requisitioned by the Admiralty in October 1915, she later became a Minesweeper re-named HMS Queen Empress. Returned to her owners Williamson – Buchanan Steamers of Glasgow in 1920.

1914/15 Star

Engr J Gibbons MFA

British War and Victory Medals

CH ENGR J Gibbons MFA

With copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry recording service aboard Queen Empress.

Queen Empress

The Queen Empress 20th April 1912 launched by Murdock & Murray, Port Glasgow as Yard Nr: 249 named Queen Empress for John Williamson, Glasgow, June 1912 completed as a paddle steamer, carried 1,321 passengers. On 25th October 1915 requisitioned for Admiralty service initially as a Troop Transport, name unchanged, then commissioned as an Auxiliary Minesweeper as HMS Queen Empress. On 30th June 1920 decommissioned, refitted and returned to her owners as Queen Empress. Owners now Williamson-Buchanan Steamers Ltd., Glasgow.

GVF £145 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Engineer Lieutenant Harry Shepherd, Royal Navy a former Engine Smith from Prinsted, Sussex born in 1875. Entering the Royal Navy as acting Engine Room Artificer (ERA) 4th Class 2nd April 1900, he was advanced to ERA 2nd Class aboard HMS Dreadnought in April 1907 and promoted Artificer Engineer (Warrant Officer) 1st April 1911. Serving aboard HMS Iron Duke, HMS P24 and HMS Moresby in the First World War he was promoted Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) in April 1921 and retired as Engineer Lieutenant in June 1925.

1914/15 Star

Act Engr H Shepherd RN

British War and Victory Medals

Art Eng H Shepherd RN

With copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry, details extracted from his on line Rating’s service record and The Navy List.

Harry Shepherd was born in Prinsted, Sussex 3rd June 1875, an Engine Smith, he entered the Royal Navy as acting ERA 4 (270155) at Duke of Wellington II 2nd April 1900. Rated ARA4 aboard HMS Prince George 24th May 1901, he was advanced to ERA3 2nd April 1903, ERA2 aboard HMS Dreadnought 1st April 1907 and promoted Artificer Engineer (Warrant Officer) 1st April 1911. Appointed to HMS St Vincent 5th May 1911, HMS Iron Duke August 1914, HMS P24 (Coastal Patrol Boat) 25thAugust 1915, HMS Moresby (Destroyer) 7th January 1918, HMS Emperor of India 28th January 1920, HMS Benbow 1st April 1921 and HMS Tyrant (Torpedo Boat Destroyer) 24th August 1922. Promoted Commissioned Engineer (Sub Lieutenant) 1st April 1921, he retired as Engineer Lieutenant 3rd June 1925.

NEF £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Canteen Manager Walter Wilkinson, Royal Navy who served aboard HMS Sentinel.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

W Wilkinson CTN MGR

With copy 1WW Admiralty Medal roll entry recording Canteen Manager Walter Wilkinson served aboard HMS Sentinel.

Original ribbons, the Victory Medal officially re-impressed naming as issued and often found as such to civilians employed by the Admiralty.

NEF £175 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Driver Peter Bachegalup, Royal Field Artillery with original boxes and envelopes of issue, a former Labourer from Manchester born in 1882. Enlisting in April 1915, he served in Egypt and France.

1914/15 Star

13624 Dvr P Bachegalup RFA

 British War & Victory Medals

13624 Dvr P Bachegalup RA

 

 

Peter Bachegalup, born 1882, in Manchester, Lancashire. Son of Frederick & Teresa Bachegalup of 46 Bridgewater Street, Bedford, Leigh. The 1911 Census records Peter Bachegalup aged 30 years working as a General Labourer. He married Annie Blackley of 4 Hayes Row, Sandy Lane, Lowton, Newton-Le-Willows on 21st September 1912 at St Georges Church, Farnworth. Peter Bachegalup enlisted as a Driver into Royal Field Artillery on 13th April 1915 at Leigh, Lancashire. His Medal Index Card records he entered the war on 25th December 1915. His record of service records he embarked from Devonport 20th December 1915 and disembarked Alexandria, Egypt on 1st January 1916 with the 165th Brigade RFA. Driver Bachegalup saw service in France from 6th March 1916 until he was admitted to the 94th Field Ambulance on the 5th May with Influenza and was transferred back to England on 10th May aboard SS Dieppe. In January 1917 he was posted back to France and served there until August 1917. Driver Bachegalup was discharged from service 31st March 1920.

Two sets of service records can be found for this soldier online.

 GVF £75 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Private Ernest George Toogood, 8th and 1/4th Battalions, Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry who served in France from 22nd September 1915. 

1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals

16650 Pte E G Toogood D of CORN LI

With details extracted from his Medal Index Card and British War and Victory Medal rolls.

Ernest George Toogood enlisted into the 8th Battalion Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry and later served with the 1/4th Battalion Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry. His Medal Index Card records he entered the war in France on 22nd September 1915. The 1914/15 Star Medal Roll  records and was demobilized on 17th July 1919.

 GVF £85 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Able Seaman and Stoker 1st Class Albert Nutt, Royal Canadian Navy. Mobilized from the Canadian Naval Reserve on the outbreak of War, he served aboard HMCS Niobe 1914 to 1915. Niobe was a Royal Navy Diadem Class Cruiser which had seen service in the Boer War and was given to Canada in 1911, the second ship to join their newly created Royal Canadian Navy, she saw active service until July 1915 when she returned to Halifax, Nova Scotia where she was employed as a Depot Ship.

1914/15 Star

A. Nutt, AB. Sto. H.M.C.S. Niobe.

British War and Victory Medals

A. Nutt. Sto 1. 196. RCN

Naming exactly as described, the Star impressed in the correct style with ship in different size capital letters, the British War and Victory Medals correctly impressed in uniform letters and number.

Able Seaman and Stoker 1st Class Alfred Nutt was a Canadian Naval Reservist mobilized on the outbreak of War, his service record available from the National Archives of Canada.

 

HMS Niobe was a ship of the Diadem Class of Protected Cruisers in the Royal Navy. She served in the Boer war and was then given to Canada as the second ship of the newly created Naval Service of Canada becoming HMCS Niobe. The Naval Service of Canada became the  Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) in August 1911. The ship was nearly lost when she went aground off Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia overnight 30th–31st July 1911. Repairs were completed at the end of 1912 and the ship returned to service in late 1914. During the First World War, Niobe patrolled the approaches to the St Lawrence River and then joined the Royal Navy’s 4th Cruiser Squadron to patrol off New York . The cruiser returned to Halifax, Nova Scotia  on 17th July 1915 and never put to sea again. Niobe was Paid Off in September and served as a Depot Ship in Halifax. Damaged in the 1917 Halifax explosion, she was sold for scrap and broken up in the 1920s.

A very rare Trio to one of the Royal Canadian Navy’s first sailors on their second ship received into service.

EF £950 Available


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals, Silver Medal 2nd Army Signalling School France 1918 to Signal Sergeant Joseph Reginald Marsh, 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment a Chemist born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892. Residing in Sheffield in 1913 when he joined the Territorial Army, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion seeing action during the battle of Auber’s Ridge in May 1915, The Somme offensive in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Serving in France until 9th December 1918, he returned home and was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

1914/15 Star

200222 Pte J R Marsh York & Lanc R

British War & Victory Medals

200222 SJT J R Marsh Y & L R

2nd Army Signal School France Sept – Oct 1918 Silver Medal the reverse engraved

“Football Comp Sgt J Marsh” hallmarks for Birmingham 1917

With details of service extracted from his on line service record.

Joseph Reginald Marsh was born in Sculcoates, Hull in 1892, a Chemist residing with his family at 1 Swaledale Road, Sheffield, he attested for the 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment TF on 13th March 1913. Appointed Lance Corporal, he served in France from 13th April 1915, the Battalion taking part in the fighting at Auber’s Ridge in May 1915. Later to see action on the Somme in 1916 and the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917. Promoted Corporal 1st August 1917 and Sergeant 28th May 1918 he was an Army Signaller. Returning home 9th December 1918, he was demobilized 9th February 1919. He died in Selby, Yorkshire in 1959.

GVF & better £145 Available


British War & Victory Medals and two British Red Cross Medals for Nursing and First Aid to Miss Edith Rowe, Voluntary Aid Detachment who served in France from March 1917 to April 1919 attached Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service.

British War & Victory Medals

E Rowe VAD

British Red Cross Medal for Proficiency in Nursing engraved reverse

03747 E Rowe

British Red Cross Society Proficiency in Red Cross First Aid with clasp for 1924 the reverse engraved

05403 E Rowe

The British War and Victory Medals mounted as originally worn.

With copy Medal Index Card and Medal roll entry which records Edith Rowe served with the VAD attached QAIMNS in France from 27th March 1917 to 16th April 1919.

NEF £100 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals to Deck Hand Claude Edward Spall, Royal Naval Reserve a Fisherman born in Barlton, Corville, Suffolk in 1887, he died in Lothingland, Suffolk in 1968 aged 80 years.

1914/15 Star

DA.3472 C E Spall DH RNR

British War & Victory Medals

3472DA. C E Spall DH RNR

Mounted as originally worn.

Claude Edward Spall, born Barlton, Corville, Suffolk on 27th December 1887. Son of William and May Georgina Spall of Rosa Terrace, Carlton Colville, Lowestoft. The 1911 Census records Claude E Spall aged 23 years working as a Fisherman on a Drifter. In the same year on the 17th April he married Emily Jane Turrell at the parish Church of Carlton Colville, Suffolk. Claude E Spall enlisted into the Royal Naval Reserve and saw service during the First World War. He died in 1968, Lothingland, Suffolk aged 80 years.

GVF & better £65 SOLD


 1914/15 Star, British War & Victory Medals named to Leading Seaman Harold Victor Lesingham, Royal Navy, a former Shop Boy born in March, Cambridgeshire in 1892. Entering the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class in April 1908, during the First World War he served aboard HM Ships Actaeon, Duncan, Hibernia and Agamemnon. Discharged time expired in February 1922, he died in Hitchen, Hertfordshire in 1958 aged 66 years.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

J.1535 H V Lesingham LS RN

With copy service record.

Harold Victor Lesingham, born March, Cambridgeshire on 1st March 1892. Son of Henry Frederick & Kate Lesingham of Home Villas, Creek Road, March, Cambridgeshire. A former Shopboy, he entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class on 28th April 1908 at Ganges I. Rated Boy 1st Class on 6th December 1908, rated Ordinary Seaman 10th March 1910 and Able Seaman 17th November 1910 aboard HMS Exmouth. The 1911 Census records Able Seaman Harold V Lesingham serving board HMS Exmouth in the Mediterranian, aged 19 years. Joining HMS Actaeon 16th May 192, Pembroke I 12th June 1915, HMS Duncan 20th July 1915. Advanced to Leading Seaman 20th September 1915 aboard HMS Duncan, he joined Pembroke I 11th April 1917, HMS Hibernia 16th June 1917, Pembroke I 16th October 1917, HMS Agamemnon 16th November 1917, Pembroke I 21st March 1919. In 1919 he married Madeline Payne. Discharged shore, time expired 28th February 1922. He died on the 20th March 1958, at Lister Hospital, Hitchen, Hertfordshire aged 66 years.

New ribbons will be supplied.

GVF £65 SOLD


Medals to Father and son – British War Medal & EDVII Volunteer Force Long Service Medal to Private Thomas Holmes, Rifle Brigade & Liverpool Regiment born in Liverpool in 1864. British War & Victory Medals named to Gunner Wilfred Holmes, Royal Field Artillery born in Liverpool in 1894.

British War Medal

366 Pte T Holmes, Rif Brig

EDVII Volunteer Long Service Medal

3739 Pte T Holmes, 1st V.B. Liverpool Regt

British War & Victory Medals

825 Gnr W Holmes, R.A.

Thomas Holmes was born in Liverpool in 1864, the 1911 census records he is a 47 year old Joiner employed by a Printing Works residing at 15 Alfred Street, Abercromby, Liverpool with his wife Elizabeth and son Wilfred. Medal Index Card records he initially enlisted into the Rifle Brigade. He later went on to serve with the Liverpool Regiment, The Labour Corps and the Royal Engineers, the British War Medal being his sole entitlement.

Wilfred Holmes was born in Liverpool in 1894, the 1911 census records he is 17 years old and unemployed, residing with his father Thomas and mother Elizabeth. Medal Index Card records he enlisted as a Gunner with the Royal Field Artillery (3rd (East Lancashire) Brigade), a territorial unit. The British War and Victory Medals his full entitlement.

GVF £165 SOLD


From left to right –

Victory Medal to Captain Charles Hamilton Russell Grant 2/22nd London Regiment a Dental Surgeon from Cricklewood, London born in Singapore in 1882. Serving in France, Salonica and Palestine he was Mentioned in Despatches by General Allenby in 1919. He died in Willesden General Hospital following an operation in 1931.

Victory Medal

Capt C H R Grant

British War Medal to Captain Wilfred Hardinge Heinig, 54th Sikhs, Indian Army attached 51st Sikhs born in 1887 in India, he was educated at King’s College School. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant from the RMC Sandhurst in August 1907, he joined the 54th Sikhs, Indian Army and was promoted to Captain in September 1915. Killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years when leading his company of the 51st Sikhs in an attack on the Turkish trenches. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial. 

British War Medal

Capt W H Heinig

Victory Medal to 2nd Lieutenant William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge 4th Battalion London Regiment born in Barnet, London in 1896. Educated at Barnet Grammar School, he was a banker before volunteering in September 1914. Serving as a Private soldier in the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli he was commissioned into the 4th Battalion London Regiment in October 1916. Serving in France attached to the 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years. Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Victory Medal

2 Lieut W K E Mansbridge

Charles Hamilton Russell Grant was born in Singapore in 1882, the 1911 census records he is a Dental Surgeon residing with his wife, son and daughter in Cricklewood, London NW2.

Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 2nd Battalion 22nd London Regiment 1st October 1914 (London Gazette 17th October 1914 page 8335). Mentioned in Despatches (General Allenby) for distinguished services in Egypt during the period 19th September 1918 to 31st January 1919 London Gazette 5th June 1919 page 7182. From The Willesden Chronicle 12th June 1931 page 9

“The death occurred at Willesden General Hospital following an operation yesterday (Monday) of Mr Russell Grant LDS, RCS of 92 Walm Lane, Cricklewood. Mr Grant had been Hon Dental Surgeon to Willesden hospital for the last 10 years and at the annual general meeting of the hospital last night, a vote of sympathy was passed to the bereaved family”.

Mr Grant was a student at the National Dental Hospital (now the Dental Department of the University College Hospital) where he obtained the Gold Medal for 1902 and qualified in 1903. With the exception of the War years, he practiced mainly in Willesden Green since that date and his skill and ability brought him a considerable practice. He was for over 10 years a much valued member of the Honorary Staff of the Willesden Hospital, and his loss is keenly felt by his colleagues there. One of the earliest volunteers for the War he took a combatant commission in the 2/22nd London Regiment (The Queen’s) in September 1914 and served throughout, first on the Somme, then in Salonika and finally Palestine where he took part in the capture of Jerusalem. He had by then reached the rank of Captain and been Mentioned in Despatches and appointed to the Staff of General (now Lord) Allenby.

In Jerusalem he contracted Typhoid Fever and was invalided back to Egypt where he apparently recovered, but his death was probably due to a sequel of that disease. Latterly Mr Grant had lived in Eastcote, where he took an active part in local affairs, and also in the neighbouring district of Northwood, where he had been a Churchwarden of Emmanuel Church. In all these circles, as well as among his many friends and relations, he will be very sadly missed”. With copy Medal Index Card (awarded British War and Victory Medals only), copy obituary, newspaper article, London Gazette entry and headers for MID, census entry 1911.

GVF £95 Reserved 

Wilfred Hardinge Heinig was killed in action 6th April 1916 aged 28 years in Mesopotamia. Born in 1887, he entered King’s College School in 1899. He was in the second XV in 1904 and in the first XV in 1905-6, and a School Prefect in 1906. From school he entered Sandhurst from which he passed out in a high position in August 1907. He joined the 54th Sikhs Indian Army and spent his military life in India. He was ordered to Mesopotamia in January last . Letters received from his fellow officers show he always retained his very high sense of duty and at the same time overflowed with high spirits and joy in life generally. His Commanding Officer, Colonel Magrath wrote of him –

“It was with rather a heavy heart that I detailed him to proceed with a draft as, apart from the fact he was my Quartermaster and a very hard working and useful officer at that, he was always so cheery and of such a bright disposition, that he was the life and soul of the Mess during the dull times we spent at Fort Lockhart and Hangu. I have just heard from Captain O’Neill that his same cheery disposition made him most popular with the 51st in the Field, and he did a lot to keep their spirits up in the trenches. But most important to you of all will be the news that he died like a very gallant soldier, at the head of his company in an assault on the Turkish trenches on 6th April. He was killed instantaneously, shot through the head and heart, and thus met with a glorious death. His loss to the Regiment is a heavy one, but we all feel proud of him and he has well upheld the name of the 54th”.

The only son of Robert Lawrence and Mary Heinig of “Deanurst”, Barton Road, Montpellier, Torquay, Devon. Commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

With copy Medal Index Card which records the award of the British War and Victory Medals, newspaper articles, copy photo in The Sphere dated 20th May 1916 etc.

GVF £145 Available

Kenneth William Elliott Mansbridge was born in Barnet, London in 1896, he served with the 2nd/4th Battalion London Regiment in Malta, Egypt and Gallipoli. Commissioned 25th October 1916 he served in France attached 13th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action 4th October 1917 aged 20 years.

From The Hendon Times 19th October 1917 page 5

“The death in action on 4th October 1917 is announced of 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth William Elliott Lovell (sic) Mansbridge, the elder son of Mr E Lovell Mansbridge of the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House and of “Elleborn”, Lichfield Grove, Church End Finchley. Lieutenant Lovell Mansbridge was educated at Barnet Grammar School, after which he took up Banking as a career. He enlisted within three weeks of the outbreak of War in the Royal Fusiliers (4th London Regiment). He saw varied service in Malta, Egypt (from 24th August 1915) and Gallipoli where he experienced 4 months of severe campaigning. He was invalided to Malta seven days before the evacuation of the Peninsula. He returned to England and in May 1916 was nominated for a commission. His Cadet training took place at Lichfield and on 25th October 1916, he was Gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the (4th Battalion) London Regiment. In January this year he was attached to the (13th Battalion) King’s Royal Rifle Corps and saw service in France till the great advance of 4th October when he met his death on the field of honour, This gallant young officer was only 20 years old”.

Commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial. With copy census details, Medal Index Card, Newspaper article, London Gazette announcing his commission, casualty details. Not sure where “Lovell Mansbridge” came from all official documents give his name as William Kenneth Elliott Mansbridge.

GVF £95 Available


British War and Victory Medals named to Private Thomas Geoffery Goulty, Coldstream Guards. An Apprentice to Machinery born in Nottingham in 1898. Attesting for the Coldstream Guards in June 1916 aged 18 years, he served in France with the 1st Battalion. Wounded in Action on 23rd October 1918, shrapnel wounds left side he was treated in Hospitals in France. Re-joining the 1st Battalion in January 1919 he embarked for England in March 1919 and was demobilized in October 1919.

British War & Victory Medals

21705 Pte T G Goulty C GDS

Thomas Geoffery Goulty, born in Nottingham in 1898. Son of William Goulty of 18 Grove Road, Fenton, Nottingham. A former Apprentice to Machinery, enlisted with the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards on 2nd June 1916 aged 18 years. Embarked at Southampton for France on 23rd October 1917, disembarking at Le Harve on the 24th October 1917. He was hospitalised with boils in March 1918 and was wounded in Action on 23rd August 1918, shrapnel to left side. Admitted 43 Casualty Clearing Station 24th August, 7th Canadian General Hospital 24th August and 93 General Hospital 26th September, 14 Convalescent Depot 3rd October. Granted leave to the UK 28th November 1918 he re-joined his Battalion in France 2nd January 1919 and embarked for England 5th March 1919 Discharged to Class “Z” Army Reserve 18th October 1919.

GVF £40 Available


A rare British War and Victory Medal, British issue to an Egyptian Soldier in the Egyptian Army Artillery.

British War and Victory Medals

7270 Artillery E A

With copy Medal roll entry and header.

Medals correct impressed naming.

The Medal roll for the British War and Victory Medals to the Egyptian Army TNA WO329/2370, soldier number 7270 is recorded on page 10 of that roll, the Egyptian Army Artillery being commanded by Major Hon T P P Butler, DSO, Royal Artillery. Soldier’s numbers only are recorded as eligible for the medals, no names.

Rare.

GVF & better £195 Available


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £125 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £195 Available