1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV (TFEM) with Silver War Badge and original documentation to Gunner Albert Henry Lee, Hampshire Royal Garrison Artillery TF born in Eastney, Portsmouth in 1893 and enlisted at Portsmouth on 18th October 1911. Serving in France from 26th November 1915, he was discharged no longer fit for Military service 30th July 1919. Re-enlisting for the Royal Artillery Territorial Army in 1921 he rose to Sergeant and was discharged in 1928. Post War he resided in Southsea, Portsmouth and worked as a Waiter. He died in Portsmouth in 1974.

1914/15 Star,

812 Gnr A H Lee RGA

British War and Victory Medals

352146 Gnr A H Lee RA

Territorial Force Efficiency Medal GV (TFEM)

352146 Gnr A H Lee RGA

Silver war Badge complete with catch and pin the reverse numbered

455992

With two original discharge certificates (1919 and 1928), original character certificate, original letter forwarding the 1914/15 Star and Silver war Badge, National Health and Pensions Insurance card addressed “Mr Albert Lee, 9 Durham Street, Southsea, Portsmouth”. The Silver War Badge the correct one for this soldier.

Albert Henry Lee was born in 1893 in Eastney, Portsmouth, he enlisted for the Hampshire Royal Garrison Artillery at Portsmouth 18th October 1911 and served in France from 26th November 1915. A 1st Class Gunner he was discharged 30th July 1919 no longer fit for Military service 30th July 1919. Re-enlisting for the Royal Artillery TA 13th June 1921 he was promoted Sergeant and was discharged 12th June 1928, described as “A steady sober man”. Post War he resided in Southsea, Portsmouth where he worked as a Waiter. He died in Portsmouth in 1974.

New ribbons will be supplied for the 1914/15 Star Trio.

First time on the market.

GVF & better £195 Reserved 


British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp North West Frontier 1935 to Private James McFarlane, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Serving as a Corporal in the First World War, he also served with the Labour Corps. Serving with the 2nd Battalion during the North West Frontier operations of 1935, the Medal roll records “Discharged”.

British War and Victory Medals

2987 Cpl J McFarlane A & S Highrs

India General Service Medal GV clasp North West Frontier 1935

2978080 Pte J McFarlane A & S H

With copy Medal Index Cards, Medal roll entry, IGS Medal roll entry.

James McFarlane was awarded the British War and Victory Medals only for his First World war service, he also served in the Labour Corps. Copy Medal roll entry confirming IGS clasp North West Frontier 1935 for service with the 2nd Battalion, roll states “Discharged”.

GVF & better £175 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1921-24, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 2nd type  to Company Quartermaster Sergeant James Tourle, Royal Signals late Royal Garrison Artillery a former Carter from Newdigate, Dorking, Surrey born in 1890. Enlisting in June 1910, he served in India from November 1911, Aden from September 1913 returning to India in April 1916. Serving in the Third Afghan War of 1919 with 4th Army Corps Signal Company and during the Waziristan 1921-24 operations with No 1 Line Company “B” Corps Signals. Promoted CQM Sergeant in March 1927, he transferred to the Royal Signals 1st July 1927. Awarded the LSGC in October 1928, he was discharged at his own request in May 1930.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

33673 Gnr J Tourle RA (RGA on Star)

India General Service Medal GV clasps Afghanistan NWF 1919, Waziristan 1921-24

1050 Cpl J Tourle 1 Army Cps Sig Coy

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 2nd type

1405788 CQM SJT J Tourle R Signals

With copy Medal Index Cards, Medal roll entries, IGS Medal roll entries and service papers.

James Tourle was born in Newdigate, Dorking, Surrey in 1890 a Carter he attested for the Royal Garrison Artillery at Aldershot on 21st June 1910 and joined the 2nd Depot at Fort Rowner, Gosport. Serving in Aden from 1st September 1913 to 10th April 1916 when he returned to India. Appointed acting Bombardier whilst serving in 61 Company 13th August 1916, he reverted to Gunner (misconduct) posted to the Signal Service Unit Depot at Poona 25th May 1917, he joined 41st Corps Signal Company with the rank of Corporal 19th September 1917. Transferring to the Indian Unattached List 12th February 1919, he was discharged 9th March 1919 and re-enlisted.

Serving in the Third Afghan War with 41 Corps Signal Company, promoted Sergeant 13th November 1919, he served with No 1 Line Company “B” Corps Signals during the Waziristan operations 1921-24. Promoted Company Quartermaster Sergeant 1st May 1927, he transferred to the Royal Signals 1st July 1927. Awarded the LSGC Medal in October 1928, he arrived back in England from India 12th May 1930 and was discharged at his own request 26th May 1930.

Neat official correction to Cpl and CPS on IGS.

GVF & better £325 Available


British War and Victory Medals, General Service Medal GV clasp IRAQ to Private F Agnew, East Yorkshire Regiment. Enlisting under the alias Ernest Cook, he served with the 10th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment and 20th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in France. Transferring back to the East Yorkshire Regiment he served with the 2nd Battalion during the post War IRAQ operations.

British War and Victory Medals

21651 Pte E Cook E York R

General Service Medal GV clasp IRAQ

21651 Pte F Agnew E York R

With copy Medal Index Cards, Medal roll entry and GS Medal roll entry.

Enlisting under the alias Ernest Dixon he served in France with the 10th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment and 20th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Transferring back to the East Yorkshire Regiment at the end of hostilities he admitted to his true identity and served with the 2nd Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment during the IRAQ operations. Still serving with his Regiment when his number changed to 4334548.

VF £125 Available


British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21, Territorial Efficiency Medal GV to Signalman Harry William Broom, Royal Signals late Somerset Light Infantry a former Grocer’s Errand Boy born in Paddington, London in 1898. Serving with the 1/5th Battalion Somerset Light Infantry in France, he transferred to the Royal Engineers and Royal Signals on its formation. Serving with “B” Divisional Signals, 1st Signal Corps during the Waziristan operations 1919-21 he was discharged 4th November 1924.

British War and Victory Medals

240487 Pte H W Broom Som LI

India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21

1857109 SGLN W Broome R Signals

Territorial Efficiency Medal GV

240487 Pte W H Broom 5-Som LI 

With copy Medal Index Card, IGS Medal roll entry, 1911 census entry.

Harry William Broom was born in Paddington, London in 1898, the son of Henry Broom a Farm Labourer and his wife Hannah, the 1911 census records he is a 13 year old Grocer’s Labourer residing with his parents brother and sister at Dyers Cottage, Milverton, Somerset. Attesting for the 1/4th Battalion Somerset Light Infantry, he transferred to the 1/5th Battalion and served in France. Transferring to the Royal Engineers (number 31533) and later the newly formed Royal Signals. Serving in “B” Divisional Signals, 1st Signal Corps during the Waziristan operations 1919-21, awarded the Territorial Efficiency Medal Army Order 378 of November 1927. Discharged 4th November 1924.

Unusual combination.

GVF & better £225 Available


British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21 to Private Thomas Atkin, Machine Gun Corps late Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment a former Farm Horseman born in Spalding, Lincolnshire in 1898. Enlisting 24th May 1917, he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps 14th March 1918 serving with the 8th Battalion. Taken Prisoner of War 24th April 1918, he was repatriated after the end of hostilities arriving home in December 1918. Re-enlisting 22nd February 1919 he served in India and with 6th Company Machine Gun Corps during the Waziristan operations 1919-21. Discharged in June 1922 he resided in Boston, Lincolnshire and died there in 1963.

British War and Victory Medals

97843 Pte T Atkin Notts & Derby R

India General Service Medal GV clasp Waziristan 1919-21

7811464 Pte T Atkin MGC

 

With copy Medal Index Card, IGS Medal roll entry and service papers.

Thomas Atkin was born in Spalding, Lincolnshire an 18 year old Horseman on a Farm he attested at Lincoln for the 12th Training Reserve Battalion 24th May 1917. Posted to 3rd Battalion Notts and Derby Regiment 1st December 1917, he joined the 10th Battalion 29th January 1918 and the 1st Battalion 2nd February 1918 transferring to 8th Battalion Machine Gun Corps 14th March 1918. Posted as missing in action 24th April 1918, it was later confirmed he had been taken prisoner of war on that date.

The Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux (also Actions of Villers-Bretonneux, after the First Battles of the Somme, 1918) took place from 24th to 25th April 1918, during the German Spring offensive, against the Allied lines to the east of Amiens. It is notable for the first major use of tanks by the Germans, who deployed fourteen of their twenty A7Vs and for the first tank-versus-tank battle in history.

Repatriated at the end of hostilities he arrived in Hull aboard a troop transport 3rd December 1918 and was posted to the 1st (Reserve) Battalion Machine Gun Corps 8th February 1919. Discharged 22nd February 1919 he re-enlisted the same day and served with No 6 Company Machine Gun Corps during the Waziristan operations 1919-21. Discharged 6th June 1922 he resided in Boston, Lincolnshire where he died in 1963 aged 65 years.

GVF & better £165 SOLD


British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasps North West Frontier 1930-31, Burma 1930-32, 1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, Defence and War Medals to Sergeant Paul McLachlan, Royal Signals late Seaforth Highlanders. Serving with the 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders in France in the First World War he transferred to the Royal Signals post War. Serving with Kohat District Signals during the NWF operations 1930-31 and attached to Wireless Group, Burma Military Police during the Burma operations 1930-32. Awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in 1936, in April 1938 he was serving with the Peking, China detachment Royal Signals, his exact Second World War service unknown.

British War and Victory Medals

S-8977 Pte P McLachlan Seaforth

India General Service Medal GV clasps North West Frontier 1930-31, Burma 1930-32

2314250 Cpl P McLachlan R Signals

1939/45 Star, Pacific Star, Defence and War Medals

Unnamed as issued

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV Third type

2314250 SJT P McLachlan R Signals

With copy Medal Index Card recording the British War and Victory Medals only awarded for his First World War service, copy Medal roll entry recording service with 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, copy Medal roll entries for clasp North West Frontier 1930-31 serving with Kohat District Signals TNA WO100/494 page 81, Burma 1930-32 clasp for service with “A” Corps Signals, India attached Wireless Group, Burma Military Police. LSGC Medal awarded in April 1936, with a group photo “A” Corps Signals Sergeant’s Mess, McLachlan front row sitting second from the right. The Wire Journal of the Royal Signals April 1938 page 183 records he has joined the Peking Detachment Royal Signals, China, China being at war with Japan during this period. His Second World War service un researched.

Scarce combination

GVF £425 Available


British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Thomas Dawson Kenion, Herefordshire Regiment attached Cheshire Regiment  a School Master born in Rochdale, Lancashire in 1883. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Herefordshire Regiment 14th September 1915, promoted Lieutenant Herefordshire Regiment 1st July 1917, he eventually went to France 21st May 1918 attached to the 23rd Battalion Cheshire Regiment. Post War he returned to the North Eastern County School, Barnard Castle, Teesdale, Durham where he was Classics Master and a Lieutenant in the School OTC, he died in Durham in 1946.

British War and Victory Medals

Lieut T D Kenion

Thomas Dawson Kenion was born in Rochdale, Lancashire in 1883, the 1901 census records he is a Pupil at Denstone College, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, the 1911 census records he is an Assistant Master at Barnard Castle School, Teesdale, Durham. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant Herefordshire Regiment 14th September 1915 (London Gazette 14th December 1915 page 12459), promoted Temporary Captain Herefordshire Regiment 20th September 1916 (London Gazette 10th October 1916 page 9754) relinquishing his temporary rank 4th July 1917, he was promoted Lieutenant Herefordshire Regiment 1st July 1917 (London Gazette 9th November 1917 page 11584). Serving in France from 21st May 1918 attached to the 23rd (Territorial) Battalion Cheshire Regiment.

23rd Battalion Cheshire Regiment Territorial Force

1st January 1917 formed at Happisburgh, Norfolk from the 46th Provisional Battalion as part of the 224th Brigade and then moved to Bacton, Norfolk. April 1918 Moved back to Happisburgh and became a Garrison Guard. 21st May 1918 mobilised for war and landed at Calais and join the 178th Brigade of the 59th Division. 19th June 1918 transferred to the 121st Brigade of the 49th Division and the title of ‘Garrison’ was dropped and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including; The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Second Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Battle of the Scherpenberg, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes. 11th November 1918 ended the war near Roubaix, France.

Post War Kenion returned to Barnard Castle School where he was appointed Lieutenant North Eastern County School (Bernard Castle) Contingent Junior Division OTC from the Hereford Regiment 14th June 1919 with seniority from 22nd November 1910 (London Gazette 9th October 1919 page 12533). The Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette dated 8th February 1947 page 5 records –

“Mr Thomas Dawson Kenion of Holmfield, Darlington Road, Barnard Castle late Classics Master at Barnard Castle School who died on 16th October last left £82,077, 7 shillings and 9 pence. Bequests included £1,500 to the Boys Orphanage, Sunderland to provide outfits and assistance to boys on their leaving the Orphanage”.

GVF £195 Reserved 14/02/18


British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third Type to Able Seaman William John Wadley Royal Navy a former Munitions Worker born in Woolwich, London in 1899 he entered the Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class 27th July 1916. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, he remained aboard this ship until the Armistice. Serving aboard HMS Wakeful on the outbreak of war, torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30, 29th May 1940 there were only two survivors from the embarked soldiers and 25 Royal Navy crew survived. Wadley had a fortunate escape having been admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth on 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was discharged medically unfit in June 1940.

British War and Victory Medals

J.55658 W J Wadley AB RN

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Royal Navy GV Third type

J.55658 W J Wadley AB HMS Pembroke

William John Wadley was born 16th December 1899 in Woolwich, London a Munitions Worker he entered the Royal Navy 27th July 1916 as Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Powerful. Joining HMS Hercules 29th March 1917, rated Ordinary Seaman 16th December 1916 and Able Seaman 3rd September 1918. Awarded the LSGC Medal 22nd December 1932, on the outbreak of the Second World War he was serving aboard HMS Wakeful.

Wakeful was selected to support Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of allied troops from Dunkirk on 26 May 1940. On 27 May 1940 Wakeful embarked 631 allied troops. While returning them to Dover Wakeful came under air attack and received minor damage below the waterline. Despite the near miss Wakeful returned to Dunkirk to continue the evacuation, embarking 640 Allied troops on 28 May 1940. While carrying this out Wakeful was torpedoed by the German E-Boat S-30. The Destroyer was struck by two torpedoes, one hitting the forward boiler room. Casualties were heavy, only two of the 640 Allied troops – Mr Stanley Patrick of the Royal Army Service Corps and Mr James ‘Jim’ Kane of the Royal Tank Regiment plus 25 of Wakeful’s crew survived. A number of ships stopped to pick up the survivors, but one of these, the Destroyer Grafton, was then in turn sunk by a German U-Boat.

Wadley had a lucky escape, admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 7th May 1940 with a gastric ulcer, he was medically unfit 15th June 1940.

GVF & better £135 Available


British War and Victory Medals, India General Service Medal GV clasp North West Frontier 1935 to Private James McFarlane, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

British War and Victory Medals

2987 Pte J McFarlane A & S Highrs

India General Service Medal GV clasp North West Frontier 1935

2978080 Pte J McFarlane A & S H

With copy Medal Index Card confirming the British War and Victory Medals only awarded for his First World War service, also served in the Labour Corps. Served with the 2nd Battalion during the North West Frontier operations of 1935, medal roll records “discharged”, roll dated Rawalpindi 11th December 1936.

GVF & better £175 Available


British War and Victory Medals, General Service Medal GV clasps IRAQ, N W Persia to acting Sergeant Thomas McHenry, Royal Irish Fusiliers late Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers a Labourer born in Shankhill, Belfast. Enlisting 15th September 1914 he served in France from 18th February 1916 with the 8th and 2nd Battalions. Demobilized at the end of hostilities he re-enlisted 6th June 1919 and served in IRAQ and NW Persia with 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Discharged to the Special Reserve 5th June 1923, he went to live in Cheriton, Folkestone, Kent.

British War and Victory Medals

13045 A SJT T McHenry R Innis Fus

General Service Medal GV clasps IRAQ, NW Persia

32937 A SJT T McHenry R IR Fus

With copy Medal Index Cards and details of service from The Regimental Records, Royal Irish Regiment. Clasps verified correct on the Medal roll and Medal Index Card.

Thomas McHenry was born in Shankhill, Belfast, Ireland a Labourer he attested for the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Belfast 15th September 1914, his next of kin recorded as his mother Charlotte McHenry 18 Sherwood Street, Belfast. Serving in France from 18th February 1916 to 2nd May 1916 and again from 18th December 1916 to 25th July 1918 with the 8th and 2nd Battalions. Demobilized at the end of hostilities he re-enlisted 6th June 1919 and served with the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers in IRAQ and NW Persia. Discharged to the Special Reserve 5th June 1923, his home address is recorded as 28 Bloomfield Road, Cheriton, Folkestone, Kent.

EF £250 SOLD


1914 Star with slide on bar 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914, British War and Victory Medals, Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type to Sergeant John Stone, 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment born in Torquay, Devon in 1888. Enlisting in 1906, he served in France from 22nd August 1914, the HQ BEF casualty list dated 9th November 1914 records him as wounded in action. Returning to France, in 1916 he was serving with “C” Company 1st Battalion and remained in France with the 1st Battalion until the end of hostilities. Stone would have been discharged to pension in 1928, he died in Weymouth in 1945.

1914 Star with old slide on type clasp 5th Aug – 22nd Nov 1914

7801 L Cpl J Stone 1/Devon R

British War and Victory Medals

7801 SJT J Stone Devon R

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal Army GV 1st type

5608683 SJT J Stone Devon R

Mounted as originally worn, with details extracted from on line records.

John Stone was born in Torquay, Devon 20th January 1888, the son of James Stone a Stone Mason and his wife Elizabeth Ann. The 1901 census records John Stone is 13 years old residing with his family at 2 Orchard Cottages, St Mary’s, Torquay. The 1911 census records John Stone is a 24 year old Private soldier serving with the 1st Battalion Devon Regiment at Lucknow Barracks, Tidworth, Andover, Hampshire. Serving in France from 22nd August 1914, the Battalion was to be in action during the battle of the Aisne, La Bassee and Armentieres. Stone is recorded as wounded in action in The Western Times dated 12th November 1914 page 3, the information taken from HQ BEF casualty list dated 9th November 1914.

Sergeant Stone is recorded in 14 Field Ambulance admission and discharge book as being admitted 16th March 1916 with a Pyrexia, aged 30 years and serving with “C” Company, total Army service 10 years, evacuated to 42 Casualty Clearing Station. Recorded again in 14 Field Ambulance admission and discharge book 26th September 1917 as being treated for a sprained ankle, discharged to 59 General Hospital, St Omar. Serving in France until the Armistice, he remained in the Army post War and would have been discharged to pension in 1928. He died in Weymouth, Dorset in 1945.

GVF £350 Available


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf to Captain Harry Noel Dawe, Royal Army Medical Corps and Special List late 18th (1st Public Schools) Battalion Royal Fusiliers born in Chester in 1881. Initially working as a Dental Mechanic (Technician) he studied to be a Dental Surgeon at Glasgow University and graduated LDS, RFPS in 1912. On the outbreak of War he was residing and practicing in Ilfracome, Devon and enlisted as a Private soldier, serving in France from 15th November 1915. Commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps in August 1916, he remained in France and was Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig, published in the London Gazette in July 1919. Residing and practicing in Market Drayton, Shropshire post War he remained there and died in Shrewsbury in 1971 aged 90 years.

1914/15 Star

3758 Pte H N Dawe R Fus

British War and Victory Medals with MID Oakleaf

Capt H N Dawe

With research details extracted from on line sources.

Harry Noel Dawe was born on Christmas day 1881 in Chester, the son of The Reverend William Dawe and his wife Emma. The 1901 census records he is a 19 year old Dental Mechanic (Now Technician) residing as a boarder at 47 Clarendon Road, Leeds. Finally securing a place to train as a Dental Surgeon at Glasgow University he graduated LDS, RFPS in 1912, registering as a Dental Surgeon 8th February 1913. On the outbreak of the First World War he was residing at 1 Bath Place, Ilfracombe, Devon and practicing there. Enlisting as a Private soldier into the 18th (1st Public Schools) Battalion Royal Fusiliers he served in France from 15th November 1915. Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps 23rd August 1916, promoted Captain 22nd August 1917 onto the Special List (Dental Surgeon). He married Mabel Alice Fife at St Matthews Church, Bayswater, London 8th February 1917 whilst on leave. Mentioned in Despatches by FM Sir Douglas Haig for distinguished services in France London Gazette 10th July 1919 page 8755. Residing at 101 The Terrace, Market Drayton, Shropshire, he practiced there for many years and died in Shrewsbury in 1971 aged 90 years.

Unusual instance of a Dental Surgeon enlisting as a Private soldier in an Infantry Regiment.

First time on the market.

NEF £195 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Lieutenant Commander Nowell Campbell Johnstone, Royal Navy born in Bodmin in 1886. The son of Captain Pearson Campnbell Johnston, Royal Navy and Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was found dead in the sea off Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet in May 1902, he passed out as Midshipman in September 1903 being appointed to HMS Sutlej. Received an Admiralty appreciation of his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury in May 1916, he was tried by Court Martial for wilful disobedience of a lawful command, forfeiting one year’s seniority receiving a severe reprimand and dismissed his ship. Appointed to HMS Inflexible in December 1916, The Sir John Moore in October 1917, Victory in January 1918 and HMS Africa in June 1918, he was tried by Court Martial for a second time in May 1918 for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth. Loosing five years seniority and dismissed from the Barracks he was placed on retired pay in December 1918. His body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour on 30th June 1937, he had been missing from a sailing trip in his boat Bessie since 20th May 1937.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

Lieut N C Johnstone RN

With copy service record

Nowell Campbell Johnstone was born in Windsor Cottage, Bodmin, 3rd December 1886 the son of Captain Pearson Campbell Johnston, Royal Navy and later Governor of Bodmin Naval Prison, he was to be found dead, probable suicide, in the sea at Hole Head, Teignmouth in June 1914. Entering Britannia as Naval Cadet 15th February 1902, he passed out as Midshipman 15th October 1903. Appointed to HMS Sutlej 15th September 1903 and then to HMS Crescent, where he assisted the navigator. Johnstone made a good start to his career in Crescent, when the Admiralty commended his services in helping to rescue the crew of SS Clan Monroe when she wrecked on 2nd July, 1905 off South Africa. Commissioned Sub Lieutenant 15th December 1906, promoted Lieutenant 30th June 1909. When the First World War broke out Johnstone was in Command of HMS Vulture and was again commended by the Admiralty for his actions when HMS Lightning was mined 30th June 1915. Appointed To HMS P25 on 20th April 1916 in Command and to HMS Canterbury 3rd May 1916. In November 1916 he was cautioned by his Commanding Officer over the extent of his wine bill, on 2nd December 1916 he was tried by Court Martial for “Wilful disobedience of a lawful command and ordering a steward to place the cost of a glass of port on another officer’s bill”. Found guilty he was sentenced to loose one years seniority, severely reprimanded and dismissed his ship. On 12 December, Captain Royds, his Commanding Officer summed up Johnstone’s limitations: “Promising career has been spoiled by his becoming unable to keep away from drink. Will drink as much as he is allowed or can get hold of.”

From: The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thursday 27th May 1937 page 8

Appointed to HMS Inflexible 23rd December 1916, to the Sir John Moore 29th October 1917, Victory Barracks additional as PT Officer 22nd January 1918, HMS Africa 10th June 1918 for Physical Training Duties. In May 1918 Johnstone was again tried by Court Martial for being drunk in the RN Barracks, Portsmouth, found guilty he was sentenced to loose five years seniority and to be dismissed from the RN Barracks. Placed on the Retired List 17th December 1918 with a pension of 5 shillings a day, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on the Retired List 30th June 1919. In 1927 Johnstone was suspected of defrauding the Boy Scouts Association and other similar allegations were levelled at him, no charges appear to have been formally brought against him by the Police. On 30th June 1937 his body was found floating in Falmouth Harbour, he had been missing since 20th May.

GVF £195 Available


Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Private Albert Thomas, Labour Corps late Army Service Corps and Volunteer Service Company Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry a printer from Helston, Cornwall. A serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion DCLI he volunteered for service in South Africa in April 1900 and returned home in December 1900. In hospital at Wynberg from September to October 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, discharged in December 1900. In 1911 he was a General Labourer residing in Godolphin Road, Helston and on the outbreak of war volunteered to serve in the Army Service Corps arriving in France 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps, he served with 17th Company and was discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

Queen’s South Africa Medal clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal

6401 Corpl A Thomas 2 D of C Lt Infy

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

SS-14190 Pte A Thomas ASC

With details extracted from his on line Boer War service record, Medal Index Card and Medal rolls.

Albert Thomas was born in Helston, Cornwall in 1873, a Printer and serving member of the 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry he volunteered to serve in South Africa at Helston on 21st April 1900 with the Volunteer Service Company, which joined the 2nd Battalion DCLI in South Africa. Admitted to Hospital at Wynberg 24th September 1900 suffering from Enteric Fever, he made a good recovery and was discharged 20th October 1900. Leaving South Africa 9th November 1900 he was discharged at his own request at home 12th December 1900. The 1911 census records he is a 37 year old General Labourer residing with his wife Ada and three children in Godolphin Road, Helston. Attesting for the Army Service Corps on the outbreak of War he served in France from 19th August 1915. Transferring to the Labour Corps he served with 17th Company until discharged to the Reserve 15th February 1919.

GVF £275 Available


Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914, 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Stoker Petty Officer John Foott, Royal Navy a former Agricultural Labourer born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland in June 1885. Entering the Royal Navy in July 1903 as Stoker 2nd Class, his six breaks in “Very Good” conduct prevented him from receiving the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. Serving aboard HMS Suffolk 1914 to 1916 and HMS Blake 1917 to 1919 he was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer in October 1918 and discharged in September 1922.

Naval General Service Medal GV clasp Persian Gulf 1909-1914

304460 J Foott Sto 1 CL HMS Fox

1914/15 Star

304460 J Foott Sto 1 RN

British War and Victory Medals

304460 J Foott SPO RN

With copy service record and Medal roll entries.

John Foott was born in Carringtwohill, County Cork, Ireland 24th June 1885 and entered the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class at Vivid 10th July 1903. His character in 1905 was assessed as “Fair” and the following year as “Indifferent”, with two periods in cells amounting to 21 days, his character remained up and down with four further assessments below “Very Good”. Rated Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Cornwall 1st July 1906, he served aboard HMS Fox from 1st June 1910 to 31st December 1910. Advanced to Leading Stoker 21st May 1914 aboard HMS Indus, he was reduced to Stoker 1st Class aboard HMS Suffolk 19th October 1915. Advanced to Leading Stoker for the second time aboard HMS Suffolk 14th August 1916, he joined HMS Blake 1st March 1917 and was advanced to Stoker Petty Officer 1st October 1918. Discharged Shore 19th September 1922 from Vivid II with reduced pension.

GVF £225 SOLD


1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals to Nursing Sister Frances Florence Tarleton, Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service. Born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire in 1881 the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton, she trained as a Nurse for six years as a at Edinburgh Hospital for Children and St Georges Hospital London. Appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910, she served at the Royal Naval Hospitals Haslar, Plymouth, Chatham, Queensferry, Malta and aboard the Hospital Ships Carrisbroke Castle and Rewa, the latter taking casualties from the Gallipoli invasion beaches and later France. Miss Tarleton left QARNNS in June 1921 unfit for further service having undergone an appendicectomy and suffering from debility.

1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals

N Sister F F Tarleton QARNNS

With folder of research including copy service papers, copies from her pension application folder etc. With A Scottish Territorial Red Cross Brigade Badge complete with pin and catch reverse.

Frances Florence Tarleton was born in Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire, Scotland 29th December 1881, the daughter of Lt Colonel James H Tarleton and his wife Helen, the 1891 census records the family are residing in Edinburgh, Frances one of five daughters. Training as a Nurse at the Edinburgh Hospital for Children for three years and St George’s Hospital, London for three years she was appointed Nursing Sister QARNNS 20th August 1910 and appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar. She was subsequently appointed to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th August 1911, Hospital Ship Carrisbroke Castle 3rd August 1914, Hospital Ship Rewa 28th August 1914, Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth 15th June 1915, Royal Naval Hospital Chatham as Sister in Charge 3rd July 1915 reverting to Nursing Sister 29th February 1916, Royal Naval Hospital Malta 12th August 1916, Queensferry Naval Hospital 15th July 1920 and finally Royal Naval Hospital Plymouth 15th October 1920 from where she was discharged 2nd June 1921. In 1920 Miss Tarleton was admitted to hospital for an appendicectomy, she was also suffering from debility which made her unfit for further service, there is much correspondence concerning this in her pension file.

The Hospital Ship Rawa began her duties on 29th January 1915 and left Gallipoli with her last load of patients on 29th April 1915 bound for England. During this period 7,424 patients were taken on board of whom 3,647 were discharged to the Advanced Base, 3,628 were taken by the ship to Hospitals at Malta, Alexandria and Plymouth, 149 patients died on board.

A rare 1914/15 Star Trio to QARNNS.

GVF £595 Available